1,062 results match your criteria Sleep Medicine Reviews [Journal]


Reply to Jenkins' commentary on "The mechanisms of action underlying the efficacy of psychological nightmare treatments".

Sleep Med Rev 2019 Apr 3. Epub 2019 Apr 3.

École de Psychologie, Université Laval, Pavillon Félix-Antoine-Savard, Quebec, QC, G1V 0A6, Canada.

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Narrative review: Do spontaneous eye blink parameters provide a useful assessment of state drowsiness?

Sleep Med Rev 2019 Mar 20;45:95-104. Epub 2019 Mar 20.

Institute for Breathing and Sleep, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia; School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia; Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.

Most objective drowsiness measures have limited ability to provide continuous, accurate assessment of drowsiness state in operational settings. Spontaneous eye blink parameters are ideal for drowsiness assessment as they are objective, non-invasive, and can be recorded continuously during regular activities. Studies that have assessed the spontaneous eye blink as a drowsiness measure are diverse, varying greatly in respect to study design, eye blink acquisition technology and eye blink parameters assessed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.smrv.2019.03.004DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Systematic review of the different aspects of primary snoring.

Sleep Med Rev 2019 Mar 13;45:88-94. Epub 2019 Mar 13.

Special Needs in Oral Health, Sleep Breathing Disorders, Oral Health Sciences, Ghent University Hospital, Gent, Belgium.

Primary snoring, also known as simple or non-apnoeic snoring, is regarded as the first stage of sleep disordered breathing without severe medical consequences for the snorer and co-sleeper. Although it is a highly prevalent phenomenon in the general population, our knowledge is limited because of the lack of a consensus on terminology. This systematic review of the aspects used in the definitions of simple/primary snoring was conducted to obtain an inventory of current practices and compare these definitions with the conceptual definition of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.smrv.2019.03.001DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Neurochemical features of idiopathic restless legs syndrome.

Sleep Med Rev 2019 Mar 21;45:70-87. Epub 2019 Mar 21.

University Institute of Molecular Pathology Biomarkers, UNEx, ARADyAL Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Cáceres, Spain.

The most important traditional hypotheses of the pathogenesis of idiopathic restless legs syndrome (iRLS) involve dopaminergic dysfunction and iron deficiency. However, a possible role of other neurotransmitter or neuromodulators, mainly glutamate, gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GABA), and adenosine have been suggested in recent reports. Moreover, iron deficiency in experimental models (which causes sensorimotor symptoms resembling those of RLS) is able to induce changes in dopaminergic, glutamatergic and adenosinergic neurotransmission, thus suggesting its crucial role in the pathogenesis of this disease. Read More

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March 2019
3 Reads

The bidirectional impact of sleep and circadian rhythm dysfunction in human ischaemic stroke: A systematic review.

Sleep Med Rev 2019 Mar 20;45:54-69. Epub 2019 Mar 20.

The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Melbourne, Australia; University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.

Sleep and circadian rhythm disruption are potentially modifiable risk factors and consequences of ischaemic stroke. Pre-clinical evidence suggests a direct effect of sleep and endogenous circadian rhythm dysfunction on lesion volumes and post-stroke recovery. In humans, sleep and stroke literature has focused primarily on obstructive sleep apnoea. Read More

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March 2019
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Does obstructive sleep apnea affect exercise capacity and the hemodynamic response to exercise? An individual patient data and aggregate meta-analysis.

Sleep Med Rev 2019 Mar 14;45:42-53. Epub 2019 Mar 14.

SNA-EPIS Laboratory, University of Lyon, University Jean Monnet Saint-Etienne, EA 4607, France; Department of Clinical and Exercise Physiology, University Hospital of Saint-Etienne, France.

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been linked to altered cardiovascular response to exercise. A systematic review and individual patient data (IPD) meta-analysis were conducted to assess whether OSA patients present reduced exercise capacity. PubMed, Embase and Web of Science were searched until September 2018. Read More

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March 2019
5 Reads

Epilepsy as a derailment of sleep plastic functions may cause chronic cognitive impairment - A theoretical review.

Sleep Med Rev 2019 Feb 10;45:31-41. Epub 2019 Feb 10.

National Institute of Clinical Neurosciences, Amerikai út 57, Budapest, H-1145, Hungary; Semmelweis University, Institute of Behavioral Sciences, Nagyvárad tér 4, Budapest, H-1089, Hungary.

We report on a peculiar way of chronic cognitive impairment associated with interictal epileptic activity during NREM sleep. We review three major groups of epilepsy: mesiotemporal epilepsy (MTLE) involving the epileptic derailment of the hippocampal declarative memory system; childhood developmental epileptic encephalopathies; and the spectrum disorders of the perisylvian communication network with the centrotemporal spike phenomenon, overarching child- and adulthood epilepsies, totaling up the majority of epilepsies in childhood. We outline high impact research-lines on the cognitive harm of epilepsy; causing specific or global cognitive decline through its interference with sleep plastic functions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.smrv.2019.01.003DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read
8.513 Impact Factor

Effects of sleep restriction on metabolism-related parameters in healthy adults: A comprehensive review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Sleep Med Rev 2019 Feb 10;45:18-30. Epub 2019 Feb 10.

Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.

This review aimed to provide a comprehensive examination of the effect of sleep restriction on metabolism-related parameters by synthesizing the emerging, best evidence. A systematic search was conducted in six electronic databases from inception to January 2018. We identified 41 randomized controlled trials using sleep restriction intervention. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.smrv.2019.02.002DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads
8.513 Impact Factor

Comment on Horne et al. sleep and sleep disordered breathing in children with Down syndrome: Effects on behaviour, neurocognition and the cardiovascular system Sleep Med Rev 44 (2018) 1-11.

Authors:
Mandeep Rana

Sleep Med Rev 2019 Feb 10. Epub 2019 Feb 10.

Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Neurology and Sleep Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA, 02118, USA. Electronic address:

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February 2019

Reply to Rana's comment on sleep and sleep disordered breathing in children with Down syndrome.

Sleep Med Rev 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

The Ritchie Centre, Hudson Institute of Medical Research and Department of Paediatrics, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.

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February 2019

Worldwide and regional prevalence rates of co-occurrence of insomnia and insomnia symptoms with obstructive sleep apnea: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Sleep Med Rev 2019 Feb 10;45:1-17. Epub 2019 Feb 10.

Sleep Medicine Center, Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Mental Health Center, Translational Neuroscience Center, and State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China. Electronic address:

Recent investigations have established that patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and insomnia have greater daytime impairments and reduced quality of life compared to those with either disorder alone. The present study reviewed current data on the co-occurrence prevalence of insomnia and insomnia symptoms with OSA and assessed its worldwide and regional prevalence based on World Health Organization (WHO) regions. A total of 37 studies were included in the analysis. Read More

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February 2019
4 Reads

The paradox of paradoxical insomnia: A theoretical review towards a unifying evidence-based definition.

Sleep Med Rev 2019 04 25;44:70-82. Epub 2018 Dec 25.

Sleep and Epilepsy Center, Neurocenter of Southern Switzerland, Civic Hospital (EOC) of Lugano, Lugano, Switzerland; Sleep Disorders Center, Department of Neurology, Scientific Institute Ospedale San Raffaele, Vita-Salute University, Milan, Italy. Electronic address:

Paradoxical insomnia is one of the most intriguing yet challenging subtypes of insomnia. Despite being recognized for a long time by the international community, it is still unclear whether this entity really exists, which are its features and boundaries. Much of the debate is fuelled by the lack of a consensus on its precise definition. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.smrv.2018.12.007DOI Listing
April 2019
3 Reads

The power of pooled analyses to inform about the effects of CBTI on outcomes beyond sleep.

Authors:
Rachel Manber

Sleep Med Rev 2019 02;43:131-132

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, USA.

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February 2019
1 Read

Circulating biomarkers to identify cardiometabolic complications in patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A systematic review.

Sleep Med Rev 2019 04 27;44:48-57. Epub 2018 Dec 27.

Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Electronic address:

Untreated Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with an increased risk of cardiometabolic diseases such as diabetes and myocardial infarction. However, it is difficult to predict which patients are at particularly high risk. This systematic review aimed to identify potentially useful circulating biomarkers that could predict cardiometabolic complications in OSA. Read More

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April 2019
7 Reads

A systematic review of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia implemented in primary care and community settings.

Sleep Med Rev 2019 04 23;44:23-36. Epub 2018 Nov 23.

École de psychologie, Université Laval, Québec, QC, Canada; Centre d'étude des troubles du sommeil, Institut universitaire en santé mentale de Québec, Québec, QC, Canada.

The advent of stepped-care and the need to disseminate cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) has led to novel interventions, which capitalize on non-specialist venues and/or health personnel. However, the translatability of these CBT-I programs into practice is unknown. This review evaluates the current state of CBT-I programs that are directly implemented in primary care and/or community settings. Read More

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April 2019
16 Reads

Reply to Micarelli et al. Commentary on The Balance of Sleep: Role of the Vestibular Sensory System.

Sleep Med Rev 2019 04 6;44:87-88. Epub 2018 Dec 6.

Department Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.

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April 2019
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New trends in otoneurological dysfunctions in OSA patients concerning "The balance of sleep: Role of the vestibular sensory system".

Sleep Med Rev 2019 04 6;44:85-86. Epub 2018 Dec 6.

University of Rome Tor Vergata, Department of Clinical Sciences and Translational Medicine, Italy; ITER Center for Balance and Rehabilitation Research (ICBRR), Rome, Italy. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.smrv.2018.12.002DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

Sleep talking: A viable access to mental processes during sleep.

Sleep Med Rev 2019 04 6;44:12-22. Epub 2018 Dec 6.

Department of Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy. Electronic address:

Sleep talking is one of the most common altered nocturnal behaviours in the whole population. It does not represent a pathological condition and consists in the unaware production of vocalisations during sleep. Although in the last few decades we have experienced a remarkable increase in knowledge about cognitive processes and behavioural manifestations during sleep, the literature regarding sleep talking remains dated and fragmentary. Read More

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April 2019
16 Reads

The effect of non-pharmacological sleep interventions on depression symptoms: A meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

Sleep Med Rev 2019 02 5;43:118-128. Epub 2018 Nov 5.

School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences, University of Reading, UK.

Poor sleep is a significant risk factor for depression across the lifespan and sleep problems have been hypothesised to contribute to the onset and maintenance of depression symptoms. However, sleep problems are usually not a direct target of interventions for depression. A range of non-pharmacological treatments can reduce sleep problems but it is unclear whether these interventions also reduce other depression symptoms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.smrv.2018.09.004DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Sleep and sleep disordered breathing in children with down syndrome: Effects on behaviour, neurocognition and the cardiovascular system.

Sleep Med Rev 2019 04 22;44:1-11. Epub 2018 Nov 22.

The Ritchie Centre, Hudson Institute of Medical Research and Department of Paediatrics, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.

Down syndrome (DS), the most common human chromosomal malformation, has an estimated annual incidence of one in 1000 live births worldwide. Sleep problems are common in children with DS, reported by parents in up to 65% of school-aged children, significantly higher rates than in typically developing (TD) children. Problems include difficulty in sleep initiation and maintenance together with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) which affects up to over 90%, of DS children compared with 1-5% in the general paediatric population. Read More

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April 2019
3 Reads

Another year of change, growing impact and widening readership.

Sleep Med Rev 2019 02 30;43:129-130. Epub 2018 Nov 30.

Psychiatry and Behavioural Sciences, University of Washington, P.O. Box 356560, Seattle, WA, 98195-6560, USA. Electronic address:

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February 2019
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The influence of bed-sharing on infant physiology, breastfeeding and behaviour: A systematic review.

Sleep Med Rev 2019 02 16;43:106-117. Epub 2018 Nov 16.

Department of Women's and Children's Health, Dunedin School of Medicine, University of Otago, New Zealand. Electronic address:

This review aimed to better understand the underlying physiology of the risks and benefits of bed-sharing. Eight databases were searched using terms relating to adult-infant/baby, bed-sharing/co-sleeping combined with outcome terms for physiology, sleep, cardiovascular, respiratory, temperature and behaviour. Of 836 papers identified, 59 papers representing 48 cohorts met inclusion criteria. Read More

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February 2019
19 Reads

Insomnia as a predictor of mental disorders: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Sleep Med Rev 2019 02 16;43:96-105. Epub 2018 Nov 16.

Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical Center - University of Freiburg, Faculty of Medicine University of Freiburg, Germany.

Previous research has identified insomnia as a predictor for the onset of depression. The aim of this meta-analysis is to investigate whether insomnia also predicts the onset of other mental disorders. Longitudinal studies were eligible for inclusion if they investigated insomnia at baseline (including nighttime- and daytime-symptoms) as a predictor of the later onset of psychopathology within a follow-up time-frame of at least 12 mo. Read More

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February 2019
28 Reads

The neurophysiological and neurochemical effects of alcohol on the brain are inconsistent with current evidence based models of sleepwalking.

Authors:
Mark R Pressman

Sleep Med Rev 2019 02 10;43:92-95. Epub 2018 Nov 10.

Sleep Medicine Services, Lankenau Medical Center, Wynnewood, PA, USA; Lankenau Institute for Medical Research, Wynnewood, PA, USA; Department of Medicine, Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA; Charles Widger School of Law, Villanova University, Villanova, PA, USA. Electronic address:

The DSM-5 and ICSD-3 have removed alcohol from the list of potential triggers for sleepwalking due to the lack of empirical evidence. Recent imaging and EEG based studies of sleepwalking and confusional arousals have provided a more data-based method of examining if alcohol is compatible with what is known about the neurophysiology and neurochemistry of sleepwalking. These studies have demonstrated a deactivation of the frontal areas of the brain, while the cingulate or motor cortex remains active and characterized activation in the form of beta EEG. Read More

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February 2019
21 Reads

White dreams are made of colours: What studying contentless dreams can teach about the neural basis of dreaming and conscious experiences.

Sleep Med Rev 2019 02 14;43:84-91. Epub 2018 Nov 14.

Cognitive Neuroscience Research Unit, CFIN, Aarhus University, Denmark.

Reports of white dreams, the feeling of having had a dream experience without being able to specify this experience any further, make up almost one third of all dream reports, yet this phenomenon-until very recently-had not yet been in the focus of targeted investigations. White dreams are typically interpreted as forgotten dreams, and are sidelined as not being particularly informative with regard to the nature of dreaming. In this review article, we propose a paradigm shift with respect to the status of white dreams arguing that focusing on this phenomenon can reveal fundamental insights about the neural processes that occur in the dreaming brain. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.smrv.2018.10.005DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Insomnia and mortality: A meta-analysis.

Sleep Med Rev 2019 02 11;43:71-83. Epub 2018 Nov 11.

Adelaide Institute for Sleep Health, A Flinders Centre of Research Excellence, Flinders University of South Australia, Australia; School of Psychology, Flinders University of South Australia, Australia.

The purpose of this review was to evaluate the strength of evidence for a relationship between risk of mortality and frequent and ongoing insomnia using a meta-analytic strategy. Seventeen studies, including a total of 36,938,981 individuals followed up for a mean of 11.6 y, reporting the investigation of the association between mortality and frequent (≥3 nights/wk), ongoing (≥1 mo) insomnia were identified. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.smrv.2018.10.004DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

What are the determinants of children's sleep behavior? A systematic review of longitudinal studies.

Sleep Med Rev 2019 02 12;43:60-70. Epub 2018 Nov 12.

Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Department of Public and Occupational Health, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Van der Boechorststraat 7, NL-1081 BT, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

To develop evidence-based healthy sleep interventions for children, this review provides insight into the behavioral determinants of sleep behavior. Hence, the objective of this review is to systematically review the longitudinal evidence on determinants of children's sleep behavior. Studies were identified from searches in PubMed, PsycINFO, and Web of Science, until January 2017. Read More

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February 2019
2 Reads

What works for jetlag? A systematic review of non-pharmacological interventions.

Sleep Med Rev 2019 02 7;43:47-59. Epub 2018 Nov 7.

Sleep Research Group, Charles Perkins Centre, University of Sydney, Australia; Northern Clinical School, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Australia; Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, Australia.

Jetlag is a combination of travel fatigue and circadian misalignment resulting from air travel across time zones. Routinely recommended interventions based on circadian science include timely exposure to light and darkness (scheduled sleep), but the real-world effectiveness of these and other non-circadian strategies is unknown. We systematically reviewed the evidence for non-pharmacological interventions for jetlag. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.smrv.2018.09.005DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

The importance of sleep for governmental sectors, general population and industry - Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Sleep Technology Agenda.

Sleep Med Rev 2019 02 9;43:135-136. Epub 2018 Nov 9.

Office of International Cooperation, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Taipei, Taiwan.

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February 2019
15 Reads
8.513 Impact Factor

The risk of neurodegeneration in REM sleep behavior disorder: A systematic review and meta-analysis of longitudinal studies.

Sleep Med Rev 2019 02 8;43:37-46. Epub 2018 Nov 8.

"Vita-Salute" San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy; IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Neurology - Sleep Disorders Centre, Milan, Italy. Electronic address:

Several studies report an association between REM Sleep Behavior Disorder (RBD) and neurodegenerative diseases, in particular synucleinopathies. Interestingly, the onset of RBD precedes the development of neurodegeneration by several years. This review and meta-analysis aims to establish the rate of conversion of RBD into neurodegenerative diseases. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.smrv.2018.09.008DOI Listing
February 2019
18 Reads

Neurobiological and immunogenetic aspects of narcolepsy: Implications for pharmacotherapy.

Sleep Med Rev 2019 02 8;43:23-36. Epub 2018 Nov 8.

Center for Neuroscience, Biosciences Division, SRI International, Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA. Electronic address:

Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and cataplexy are common symptoms of narcolepsy, a sleep disorder associated with the loss of hypocretin/orexin (Hcrt) neurons. Although only a few drugs have received regulatory approval for narcolepsy to date, treatment involves diverse medications that affect multiple biochemical targets and neural circuits. Clinical trials have demonstrated efficacy for the following classes of drugs as narcolepsy treatments: alerting medications (amphetamine, methylphenidate, modafinil/armodafinil, solriamfetol [JZP-110]), antidepressants (tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors), sodium oxybate, and the H-receptor inverse agonist/antagonist pitolisant. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6351197PMC
February 2019
18 Reads

Comments on: "Sleep disturbances increase the risk of dementia: A systematic review and meta-analysis".

Sleep Med Rev 2019 02 5;43:22. Epub 2018 Nov 5.

Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.smrv.2018.08.010DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Local sleep.

Sleep Med Rev 2019 02 12;43:14-21. Epub 2018 Nov 12.

Department of Integrative Physiology and Neurobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Spokane, WA, USA.

The historic sleep regulatory paradigm invokes "top-down" imposition of sleep on the brain by sleep regulatory circuits. While remaining conceptually useful, many sleep phenomena are difficult to explain using that paradigm, including, unilateral sleep, sleep-walking, and poor performance after sleep deprivation. Further, all animals sleep after non-lethal brain lesions, regardless of whether the lesion includes sleep regulatory circuits, suggesting that sleep is a fundamental property of small viable neuronal/glial networks. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6351167PMC
February 2019
2 Reads

Reply to Sanguankeo and Upala on "Sleep disturbances increase the risk of dementia: A systematic review and meta-analysis".

Sleep Med Rev 2019 02 3;43:133-134. Epub 2018 Nov 3.

Institute of Mental Health, National Clinical Research Center for Mental Disorders, Key Laboratory of Mental Health and Peking University Sixth Hospital, Peking University, Beijing 100191, China; National Institute on Drug Dependence, Peking University, Beijing 100191, China. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.smrv.2018.08.011DOI Listing
February 2019
8 Reads

The psychological wellbeing outcomes of nonpharmacological interventions for older persons with insomnia symptoms: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Sleep Med Rev 2019 02 28;43:1-13. Epub 2018 Sep 28.

Department of Psychology, Goldsmiths, University of London, United Kingdom. Electronic address:

Nonpharmacological treatment of insomnia in older persons has been associated with reduced insomnia symptoms and increased psychological wellbeing. This systematic review and meta-analysis examined whether nonpharmacological interventions can promote wellbeing indicators in older persons who experience insomnia symptoms and investigated the components of these interventions. Twenty studies met inclusion criteria. Read More

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February 2019
8 Reads

Reciprocal relationships between daily sleep and mood: A systematic review of naturalistic prospective studies.

Sleep Med Rev 2018 Dec 1;42:47-58. Epub 2018 Jun 1.

School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia. Electronic address:

An intimate relationship exists between sleep and affective states. Disturbances in sleep are common across a spectrum of psychopathologies, and are recognised as precipitating or prodromal factors for mood disorders. Conversely, affective states can impact sleep quality and ability to fall asleep. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.smrv.2018.05.005DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Sleep and the human impacts of climate change.

Sleep Med Rev 2018 12 24;42:1-2. Epub 2018 Sep 24.

Edith Nourse Rogers Memorial Veterans Hospital, Psychology Department, Springs Rd. Bedford, MA, USA.

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December 2018
19 Reads

Linking sleep disturbance to idiopathic male infertility.

Sleep Med Rev 2018 12 3;42:149-159. Epub 2018 Aug 3.

CIRUS, Centre for Sleep and Chronobiology, Woolcock Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Discipline of Sleep Medicine, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Recently published data suggests that male fertility has declined over the past four decades. The reasons for the decline are unclear with up to 50% of cases of male infertility remaining unexplained (idiopathic male infertility). Whilst environmental factors and rising rates of obesity have been implicated, there is now growing evidence that sleep disturbance may be an independent causative factor. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.smrv.2018.07.006DOI Listing
December 2018
4 Reads

The balance of sleep: Role of the vestibular sensory system.

Sleep Med Rev 2018 12 8;42:220-228. Epub 2018 Sep 8.

Dept. Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.

The vestibular system encodes linear and angular head motion supporting numerous functions from gaze stabilization and postural control, to high-level cortical functions involving spatial cognition, including self-body perception, verticality perception, orientation, navigation and spatial memory. At the brainstem and mesencephalic levels, the vestibular organs also influence postural blood pressure regulation, bone density and muscle composition via specific vestibulo-sympathetic efferences and have been shown to act as a powerful synchronizer of circadian rhythms. Here, we review the evidence that sleep deprivation and sleep apnea syndrome alter vestibular-related oculo-motor and postural control, and that, in turn, vestibular pathologies induce sleep disturbances. Read More

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December 2018
32 Reads

Obstructive sleep apnea and the metabolic syndrome: The road to clinically-meaningful phenotyping, improved prognosis, and personalized treatment.

Sleep Med Rev 2018 12 3;42:211-219. Epub 2018 Sep 3.

Sleep Research and Treatment Center, Department of Psychiatry, Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, PA, USA.

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an increasingly prevalent sleep disorder characterized by upper airway obstruction during sleep, resulting in breathing pauses, intermittent hypoxia, and fragmented sleep. In parallel, the constellation of adverse health outcomes associated with prolonged obesity, such as insulin resistance, elevated blood pressure, triglycerides, and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol - termed metabolic syndrome -raises the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, type 2 diabetes, and all-cause mortality. Affecting 35-40% of U. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.smrv.2018.08.009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6221996PMC
December 2018
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Optical coherence tomography (OCT) findings in obstructive sleep apnea.

Sleep Med Rev 2018 12 29;42:231. Epub 2018 Aug 29.

Department of Ophthalmology, University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland; Institute for Research in Ophthalmology, Foundation for Ophthalmology Development, Poznan, Poland.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.smrv.2018.08.008DOI Listing
December 2018
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Response to letter to editor "Optical coherence tomography (OCT) findings in obstructive sleep apnea" by Piotr Kanclerz.

Sleep Med Rev 2018 12 31;42:232-233. Epub 2018 Aug 31.

Grenoble Alpes University, HP2 Laboratory, INSERM U1042, Grenoble, France; Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital of Grenoble, Grenoble, France. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.smrv.2018.08.007DOI Listing
December 2018
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Determining the likelihood that fatigue was present in a road accident: A theoretical review and suggested accident taxonomy.

Sleep Med Rev 2018 12 29;42:202-210. Epub 2018 Aug 29.

Appleton Institute, Central Queensland University, Adelaide Campus, 44 Greenhill Rd., South Australia 5034, Australia.

Estimates in developed countries of the extent to which fatigue contributes to road accidents range from as low as 5% to as high as 50% of all accidents. Compared with other causes of road accidents (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.smrv.2018.08.006DOI Listing
December 2018
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Reply to Hua Liu, HaiCun Shi and PingLei Pan: Coordinate based meta-analyses in a medium sized literature: Considerations, limitations and road ahead.

Sleep Med Rev 2018 12 26;42:236-238. Epub 2018 Aug 26.

Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-1; INM-7), Research Center Jülich, Jülich, Germany; Institute of Clinical Neuroscience and Medical Psychology, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.smrv.2018.08.004DOI Listing
December 2018
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Biomarkers of dementia in obstructive sleep apnea.

Sleep Med Rev 2018 12 13;42:139-148. Epub 2018 Aug 13.

Center for Advanced Research in Sleep Medicine, Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal, Montreal, Canada; Department of Psychology, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Canada. Electronic address:

Epidemiologic and mechanistic evidence is increasingly supporting the notion that obstructive sleep apnea is a risk factor for dementia. Hence, the identification of patients at risk of cognitive decline due to obstructive sleep apnea may significantly improve preventive strategies and treatment decision-making. Cerebrospinal fluid and blood biomarkers obtained through genomic, proteomic and metabolomic approaches are improving the ability to predict incident dementia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.smrv.2018.08.001DOI Listing
December 2018
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Low-grade inflammation in the relationship between sleep disruption, dysfunctional adiposity, and cognitive decline in aging.

Sleep Med Rev 2018 12 16;42:171-183. Epub 2018 Aug 16.

Laboratory of Functional Neuroscience, Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, Spain; Network Center for Biomedical Research in Neurodegenerative Diseases (CIBERNED), Spain.

Aging is characterized by a progressive increase in proinflammatory status. This state, known as inflammaging, has been associated with cognitive decline in normal and pathological aging. However, this relationship has been inconsistently reported, likely because it is conditioned by other factors also affected by the aging process. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.smrv.2018.08.002DOI Listing
December 2018
3 Reads