13 results match your criteria Skull Base Petrous Apex Infection

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[Apical petrositis, osteomyelitis of the base of the skull bones and of the first cervical vertebra in a 5 year-old children following chicken pox].

Vestn Otorinolaringol 2016 ;81(1):61-63

Pirogov Russian National Research Medical University, Moscow, Russia, 117997.

This publication was designed to describe a rare case of development of apicalpetrositis in a child presenting with acute otitis mediafollowing chicken pox experienced in the preceding period. We carried out the study with the use of computed tomography (CT) that demonstrated destruction of the temporal bone, bones of the base of the skull and of the first cervical vertebra. The treatment strategy chosen for the management of this condition that included antibiotic therapy and expectant observation proved justified and can be recommended as an algorithm of choice taking into consideration the difficulty of surgical approach to the apex of the petrous pyramid. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.17116/otorino201681161-63DOI Listing
June 2016
7 Reads

Gruber, Gradenigo, Dorello, and Vail: key personalities in the historical evolution and modern-day understanding of Dorello's canal.

J Neurosurg 2016 Jan 26;124(1):224-33. Epub 2015 Jun 26.

Departments of 1 Neurological Surgery and.

A century ago an ambitious young anatomist in Rome, Primo Dorello, who sought to understand the cause of abducent nerve palsy that often occurred in patients with severe middle ear infections, conducted intricate studies on the intracranial course of the nerve. In his findings, he identified that the abducent nerve passes through a narrow sinus near the apex of the petrous bone, which formed an osteofibrous canal. Dorello suggested that in this enclosed region the abducent nerve may be particularly vulnerable to compression due to the vascular edema accompanying the infection. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3171/2014.12.JNS14835DOI Listing
January 2016
10 Reads

Gradenigo's syndrome as first presentation of solitary osseous plasmacytoma of the petrous apex.

Arch Iran Med 2014 Jul;17(7):526-8

Department of Neurosurgery, Arad Hospital, Tehran, Iran.

Plasma cell tumors of the skull base are rare in neurosurgical practice. True solitary osseous plasmacytoma of the skull base without development of multiple myeloma is extremely rare. We report a case of typical Gradenigo's syndrome, including left abducens nerve palsy, left facial pain and paresthesia in V1 and V2 distribution of trigeminal nerve caused by solitary osseous plasmacytoma of the left petrous apex. Read More

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http://search.proquest.com/openview/bc98c18e69808c61e827e42b
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http://dx.doi.org/0141707/AIM.0016DOI Listing
July 2014
3 Reads

Aspergillus petrous apicitis associated with cerebral and peritubular abscesses in an immunocompetent man.

J Laryngol Otol 2013 Apr 28;127(4):404-7. Epub 2013 Feb 28.

Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Royal Preston Hospital, UK.

Background: Petrous apex aspergillosis is an uncommon and dangerous condition, with only four previously reported cases. As with other forms of petrous apicitis, the clinical symptoms are often non-specific and this contributes to diagnostic delay. This paper presents the first reported case of Aspergillus petrous apicitis associated with an intracranial or nasopharyngeal abscess. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0022215113000315DOI Listing
April 2013
4 Reads

Dural angioleiomyoma of the middle cranial fossa: a case report and review of the literature.

Brain Tumor Pathol 2013 Apr 17;30(2):117-21. Epub 2012 Aug 17.

Department of Pathology, Wuxi People's Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University, 299 Qingyang Road, Wuxi, 214023, Jiangsu, People's Republic of China.

We describe a case of dural angioleiomyoma (ALM) of the middle cranial fossa. A 62-year-old man was referred to our center for fracture of the left clavicle because of a fall, and he had a sudden seizure during admission. The mass was completely resected. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007/s10014-012-0115
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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10014-012-0115-z
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10014-012-0115-zDOI Listing
April 2013
2 Reads

Repair of cerebrospinal fluid leak via petrous bone using multilayer technique with hydroxyapatite paste.

World Neurosurg 2010 Dec;74(6):650-3

Department of Neurosurgery, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.

Objective: Repairing bone defects after drilling in skull base surgery is difficult in deeper locations, the posterior wall of the internal auditory canal, and the petrous apex. These defects traditionally have been repaired by soft tissue, such as fascia, muscle, or adipose tissue, coupled with lumbar drainage for several days postoperatively.

Methods: To repair cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage through air cells in the petrous bone, we applied a multilayer technique using hydroxyapatite cement (HAC) in three patients with postoperative CSF leakage. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wneu.2010.05.035DOI Listing
December 2010
7 Reads

Circumferential petrosectomy for petrous apicitis and cranial base osteomyelitis.

Otol Neurotol 2006 Oct;27(7):1003-13

The Bobby R. Alford Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA.

Objective: Petrous apicitis and cranial base osteomyelitis are life-threatening conditions. A surgical management may be necessary in cases that progress, in conditions that fail to improve with medical treatment, or in cases with impending complications. In this study, we describe a technique to remove the maximum amount of infected temporal bone while preserving the integrity of the peripheral auditory pathway and facial nerve. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.mao.0000233811.41177.48DOI Listing
October 2006
4 Reads

Primary tuberculous petrositis.

Acta Otolaryngol 2005 Nov;125(11):1236-9

Department of ENT and Head and Neck Surgery, Maulana Azad Medical College and LN Hospital, New Delhi, India.

Tuberculous osteomyelitis of the temporal bone is a rare and dangerous entity that should be included in the differential diagnosis of infectious processes of the base of the skull. We present the case of an 11-year-old child who presented with diplopia, ear discharge and hearing loss. The radiological and histopathological findings revealed tuberculous otitis with osteomyelitis and an abscess in the petrous apex. Read More

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November 2005
5 Reads

Incidental petrous apex findings on magnetic resonance imaging.

Ear Nose Throat J 2001 Apr;80(4):200-2, 205-6

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Loyola Center for Cranial Base Surgery, Loyola University Medical Center, 2160 South First Ave., Maywood, IL 60153, USA.

We performed a retrospective chart review to categorize a group of petrous apex findings that were noted incidentally on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 88 patients. These patients were among those who had been seen at a tertiary care center between July 1988 and July 1998. These incidental findings, which were unrelated to the presenting clinical manifestations, included asymmetric fatty bone marrow (n = 41), inflammation (19), cholesterol granulomas (14), cholesteatomas (9), and neoplasms (5). Read More

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April 2001
3 Reads

Venous channels of the petrous apex: their presence and clinical importance.

Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 1997 Feb;116(2):168-74

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of California, Davis, USA.

A methyl methacrylate casting technique was used to make detailed casts of the intracerebral venous system of four human cadaver specimens. Seven of the eight petrous apices studied were diploeic (n = 5), or pneumatic (n = 2) and had venules coursing in the anterior petrous apex. These venules form conduits connecting the cavernous to the inferior petrosal sinus or the jugular bulb and have not been previously described. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0194-59989770320-6DOI Listing
February 1997
2 Reads

Treatment of invasive external otitis with cefsulodin.

Rev Infect Dis 1984 Sep-Oct;6 Suppl 3:S698-704

Thirteen patients with invasive infections of the external ear were treated with cefsulodin sodium. Eleven were elderly diabetic patients with malignant external otitis, and two were nondiabetic adults with cellulitis or chondritis of the external ear. Four of 11 patients with malignant external otitis had extensive disease, with progression of infection to the petrous apex, medial base of the skull, or parapharyngeal soft tissue. Read More

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January 1987
3 Reads

Malignant external otitis: CT evaluation.

Radiology 1982 Nov;145(2):383-8

Malignant external otitis is an aggressive infection caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa that most often occurs in elderly diabetics. Malignant external otitis often spreads inferiorly from the external canal to involve the subtemporal area and progresses medically towards the petrous apex leading to multiple cranial nerve palsies. The computed tomographic (CT) findings in malignant external otitis include obliteration of the normal fat planes in the subtemporal area as well as patchy destruction of the bony cortex of the mastoid. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1148/radiology.145.2.7134442DOI Listing
November 1982
3 Reads

Histopathology of Pseudomonas osteomyelitis of the temporal bone starting as malignant external otitis.

Authors:
J B Nadol

Am J Otolaryngol 1980 Nov;1(5):359-71

Although the natural history and treatment of "malignant external otitis" have been well described, available histopathologic data are limited to three case reports. The histopathology in two additional cases, in which the disease process was advanced and uncontrolled, is presented to illustrate the unique progression of temporal bone osteomyelitis due to the Pseudomonas organism. In both cases the bony labyrinthine capsule demonstrated remarkable resistance to the osteomyelitic process even though the infection seemed to pass around the inner ear from all sides. Read More

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November 1980
2 Reads
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