720 results match your criteria Simulation in Healthcare[Journal]


Breast Cancer Detection: The Development and Pilot Study of a "Tactile Landscape" as a Standardized Testing Tool.

Simul Healthc 2019 Apr 8. Epub 2019 Apr 8.

From the Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering (D.E.V.), Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), Delft, the Netherlands; Breast Endocrine and Surgical Oncology Unit (M.B.), Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, SA, Australia; Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering (J.F.M.M., R.H.M.G.), Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), Delft, the Netherlands; and College of Medicine and Public Health (H.O.), Flinders University, Adelaide, SA, Australia.

Introduction: There is still a need for competent breast lump detection palpation skills, especially in developing countries. Our goal is to design, develop, and establish a test to determine whether students can, by touch alone, identify and discriminate between a range of different simulated lesions at different adiposity levels.

Methods: Common lesions, breast cancers, and cysts were physically simulated and hidden in a test object referred to as the "tactile landscape" (TL). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000365DOI Listing

A Porcine Model for Learning Ultrasound Anatomy of the Larynx and Ultrasound-Guided Cricothyrotomy.

Simul Healthc 2019 Apr 8. Epub 2019 Apr 8.

From the Department of Anesthesiology (D.M., S.L.O.), University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA.

Background: Difficulty with tracheal intubation is the most common cause of serious adverse respiratory events during anesthesia. Cricothyrotomy is a life-saving procedure that is seldom performed by anesthesiologists. Anesthesiology residents are traditionally trained to perform cricothyrotomy with artificial mannequins and exposed larynx models from animals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000364DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Association of the Number of a Simulation Faculty With the Implementation of Simulation-Based Education.

Simul Healthc 2019 Apr 8. Epub 2019 Apr 8.

From the Department of Emergency and Critical Care Medicine (J.T., T.S., H.F., Y.H., M.M., Y.I.), Tokyo Bay Urayasu Ichikawa Medical Center; SAMURAI JADECOM Simulation Center (J.T., T.S., M.M.), Urayasu, Chiba; Department of Emergency Medicine (T.S.), International University of Health and Welfare, Minato, Tokyo; and Department of Emergency and Critical Care Medicine (H.H.), Yokosuka General Hospital Uwamachi, Kanagawa, Japan.

Introduction: Although the implementation of simulation-based education (SBE) is essential for emergency medicine residency programs (EMRPs), little is known about the factors associated with its degree of SBE implementation in EMRPs. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate factors associated with SBE implementation in EMRPs. We hypothesized that the number of the simulation faculty was associated with the degree of SBE implementation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000360DOI Listing

An Observational Study of a Simulation-Based Cross-Discipline Learning Activity Between Theater Arts and Physical Therapy Students.

Simul Healthc 2019 Apr 8. Epub 2019 Apr 8.

From the School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science (D.M.D., S.P., A.F.), and School of Theatre Arts (P.M., L.M.), Curtin University; and Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital (D.M.D.), Perth, Western Australia, Australia.

Introduction: Professional actors are often used to portray simulated patients during healthcare professional training. This study aimed to create an activity where physical therapy (PT) and theater arts (TA) students could address discrete learning outcomes in a common setting with mutual benefit.

Methods: Mixed methods observational study of 246 university students (201 PT, 45 TA) undertaking a scenario involving the provision of a clinical history. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000359DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Development and Review of the Chest tube High-feedback Educational Simulation Trainer (CHEST).

Simul Healthc 2019 Apr 8. Epub 2019 Apr 8.

From the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso, El Paso, TX.

Introduction: Emergency medicine physicians must receive training in chest tube placement. This life-saving skill must be completed quickly and competently to prevent morbidity and mortality. Training on live patients is no longer an appropriate or acceptable practice. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000361DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

Learning Curves for Two Fiberscopes in Simulated Difficult Airway Scenario With Cumulative Sum Method.

Simul Healthc 2019 Mar 22. Epub 2019 Mar 22.

From the Department of Anesthesiology, Istanbul University, Istanbul Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul, Turkey.

Introduction: The aims of this randomized prospective mannequin study were to determine the amount of attempts required for successful intubation using different fiberscopes (Bonfils and SensaScope) by inexperienced anesthesiologists in a difficult airway scenario and to build the associated learning curves.

Methods: Difficult airway simulation was achieved with tongue edema in mannequin. After approval of volunteers, we asked 15 anesthesiology residents without any experience with fiberscopes to intubate with each device in a random order. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000368DOI Listing

A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Learners' Decision-making, Anxiety, and Task Load During a Simulated Airway Crisis Using Two Difficult Airway Aids.

Simul Healthc 2019 Apr;14(2):96-103

From the Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Management (A.P.A., E.B.R., R.B., J.G., D.W.M.), University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas; US Anesthesia Partners-Texas Central (B.A.R.), Austin; Department of Clinical Sciences (A.T.M.), University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center; Department of Surgery Center for Minimally Invasive Surgery (M.S.K.), University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX; and Department of Anesthesiology (O.T.G.), Thomas Jefferson University Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA.

Introduction: The American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) difficult airway algorithm and the Vortex approach are difficult airway aids. Our objective was to demonstrate that a simpler cognitive model would facilitate improved decision-making during a process such as difficult airway management. We hypothesized the simpler Vortex approach would be associated with less anxiety and task load. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000362DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

A Simulation-Based Pilot Study of a Mobile Application (NRP Prompt) as a Cognitive Aid for Neonatal Resuscitation Training.

Simul Healthc 2019 Feb 25. Epub 2019 Feb 25.

From the Allan Waters Family Simulation Centre, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute (D.M.C.), St. Michael's Hospital; Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Toronto (N.H.C., D.M.C.); Department of Pediatrics, St. Michael's Hospital (N.M., D.M.C.); and Division of Paediatric Medicine (N.M.), The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada.

Introduction: Despite standardized neonatal resuscitation program (NRP) training, retention and adherence to the NRP algorithm remain a challenge. Cognitive aids can potentially improve acquisition and application of NRP knowledge and skills. The objective of this study was to determine whether an interactive mobile application providing audiovisual prompts, NRP Prompt, can help novice NRP providers learn the NRP algorithm more effectively and therefore improve their NRP performance. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000353DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Comparisons of Stress Physiology of Providers in Real-Life Resuscitations and Virtual Reality-Simulated Resuscitations.

Simul Healthc 2019 Apr;14(2):104-112

From the Keck School of Medicine (T.P.C.), University of Southern California; Division of Emergency Medicine (T.P.C.) and Emergency and Transport Medicine (Y.B., T.H.), Children's Hospital Los Angeles; and PM Pediatrics (J.M.S.), Los Angeles, CA.

Background: Virtual reality (VR) is a promising simulation medium for high-stakes, low-frequency events such as pediatric resuscitation. The psychological fidelity of VR compared with a real resuscitation in an emergency department (ED) is relatively unknown. The objective was to determine whether stress physiology changes were equivalent between ED and VR resuscitations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000356DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

"Nightmares-Family Medicine" Course Is an Effective Acute Care Teaching Tool for Family Medicine Residents.

Simul Healthc 2019 Feb 5. Epub 2019 Feb 5.

From the Family Medicine (F.G., K.S., I.S.), and Centre for Studies in Primary Care (K.S.), Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada.

Introduction: Simulation is an effective method for teaching acute care skills but has not been comprehensively evaluated with family medicine (FM) residents. We developed a comprehensive simulation-based approach for teaching acute care skills to FM residents and assessed it for effectiveness.

Method: We compared the effectiveness of our standard acute care simulation training [Acute Care Rounds (ACR)] to a more comprehensive simulation-based acute care program, Nightmares-Family Medicine (NM). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000355DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

A Simple Low-Cost Method to Integrate Telehealth Interprofessional Team Members During In Situ Simulation.

Simul Healthc 2019 Apr;14(2):129-136

From Jump Simulation (W.F.B., L.T.B., K.L.C., J.D.S., J.A.V.), an OSF HealthCare and University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria Collaboration; Department of Emergency Medicine (W.F.B., L.T.B., A.L.V., J.A.V.), Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine (W.P.T), and OSF ConstantCare (W.P.T.), OSF HealthCare; Departments of Emergency Medicine (W.F.B., L.T.B., A.L.V., J.A.V.), and Internal Medicine (W.P.T.), University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria; and Department of Emergency Medicine (E.S.P.), Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL.

Introduction: With the growth of telehealth, simulation personnel will be called upon to support training that integrates these new technologies and processes. We sought to integrate remote telehealth electronic intensive care unit (eICU) personnel into in situ simulations with rural emergency department (ED) care teams. We describe how we overcame technical challenges of creating shared awareness of the patient's condition and the care team's progress among those executing the simulation, the care team, and the eICU. Read More

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Exploring the Influence of Language on Assessment Given a Mismatch Between Language of Instruction and Language of Practice.

Simul Healthc 2019 Feb 5. Epub 2019 Feb 5.

From the College of Pharmacy, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar.

Statement: A phenomenon is occurring in international settings where the language of program delivery and assessment does not match the primary language of practice. It is unknown whether determining competence in English disadvantages students for practice in non-English settings. As such, we conducted a pilot study to determine student performance and perceptions after completion of two Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) examinations, one conducted in English and one conducted in Arabic within an Arabic-speaking Middle Eastern setting. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000358DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Using Mirror Patients to Enhance Patient Safety.

Simul Healthc 2019 Feb 5. Epub 2019 Feb 5.

From the Stony Brook Children's Hospital (I.H.G, K.C., S.C., R.P.), Stony Brook, New York.

Statement: Unannounced, in situ simulations offer opportunities for interprofessional teams to train for pediatric emergencies and uncover latent safety threats (LST). Simulation fidelity is an important component of in situ simulations. Threats to fidelity include creating a fictional patient vignette, which limits realism and the opportunity for patient handoffs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000348DOI Listing
February 2019

A Systematic Review of the Educational Effectiveness of Simulation Used in Open Surgery.

Simul Healthc 2019 Feb;14(1):51-58

From the Department of Surgical Affairs (L.H., O.T.), Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland; Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering (C.S.), Trinity College Dublin; Department of Anatomy (J.H.), Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin; and School of Allied Health, Faculty of Education and Health Sciences, Health Research Institute (R.G.), University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland.

Statement: The role of simulation to teach and access open surgical skills has become more prevalent in recent years. This systematic review synthesizes the totality of evidence with respect to the educational effectiveness of simulators used in open surgical training. A systematic literature search was conducted in PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, Scopus, and Web of Science. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000349DOI Listing
February 2019

Feasibility of Simulation-Based Medical Education in a Low-Income Country: Challenges and Solutions From a 3-year Pilot Program in Uganda.

Simul Healthc 2019 Apr;14(2):113-120

From the Department of Anesthesia (F.B., A.H.S., F.M.), Faculty of Health Sciences, Busitema University, Tororo; Department of Anesthesia and intensive care (C.S.), Uganda Heart Institute; Department of Anesthesia (A.K., E.T.A.), College of Health Sciences, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda; Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care (M.L., M.S.L., T.L., G.D.), University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, California; and Department of Surgery (O.K.), College of Health Sciences, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda.

Statement: Simulation is relatively new in many low-income countries. We describe the challenges encountered, solutions deployed, and the costs incurred while establishing two simulation centers in Uganda. The challenges we experienced included equipment costs, difficulty in procurement, lack of context-appropriate curricula, unreliable power, limited local teaching capacity, and lack of coordination among user groups. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000345DOI Listing
April 2019
5 Reads

The Impact of Phone Interruptions on the Quality of Simulated Medication Order Validation Using Eye Tracking: A Pilot Study.

Simul Healthc 2019 Apr;14(2):90-95

From the Unité de Recherche en Pratique Pharmaceutique and Department of Pharmacy (M.T., D.L.), CHU Sainte-Justine; Faculté de pharmacie (C.P.), Université de Limoges, France and Unité de Recherche en Pratique Pharmaceutique, CHU Sainte-Justine; Faculté de pharmacie (S.G.), Université de Lille, France and Unité de Recherche en Pratique Pharmaceutique, CHU Sainte-Justine; Department of Pediatrics (A.L.), Division of Emergency Medicine, CHU Sainte-Justine, Faculty of Medicine, Université de Montréal; and Faculty of Pharmacy (J.F.B.), Université de Montréal and Unité de Recherche en Pratique Pharmaceutique, CHU Sainte-Justine, Montréal, QC, Canada.

Introduction: Order validation is an important component of pharmacy services, where pharmacists review orders with a focus on error prevention. Interruptions are frequent and may contribute to a reduction in error detection, thus potential medication errors. However, studying such errors in practice is difficult. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000350DOI Listing
April 2019
5 Reads

Can Haptic Simulators Distinguish Expert Performance? A Case Study in Central Venous Catheterization in Surgical Education.

Simul Healthc 2019 Feb;14(1):35-42

From the Departments of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering (H.E.C., M.A.Y.) and Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering (D.F.P., J.Z.M.), The Pennsylvania State University, University Park; Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center (C.C.S., K.A.M., D.C.H.), Hershey; and School of Engineering Design, Technology, and Professional Programs (SEDTAPP) and Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering (S.R.M.), The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA.

Introduction: High-tech simulators are gaining popularity in surgical training programs because of their potential for improving clinical outcomes. However, most simulators are static in nature and only represent a single anatomical patient configuration. The Dynamic Haptic Robotic Training (DHRT) system was developed to simulate these diverse patient anatomies during Central Venous Catheterization (CVC) training. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000352DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6358479PMC
February 2019
1 Read

Self-Reported Emotions in Simulation-Based Learning: Active Participants vs. Observers.

Simul Healthc 2018 Dec 29. Epub 2018 Dec 29.

From the Department of Pediatrics (T.R.), Kaiser Permanente Oakland Medical Center, Oakland; Kanbar Center for Simulation and Clinical Skills (C.A.), and Departments of Medicine (B.O.) and Pediatrics (S.V.S.), Division of Pediatric Critical Care, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA.

Introduction: Experiential learning through active participation is thought to be a key benefit of simulation-based education. Recent research has challenged this assumption, suggesting that active participants learn just as well as observers. Studies report that active participants experience stress and anxiety during simulation, which may hamper learning by active participants. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000354DOI Listing
December 2018
15 Reads

Virtual Reality Simulation in Nontechnical Skills Training for Healthcare Professionals: A Systematic Review.

Simul Healthc 2018 Dec 29. Epub 2018 Dec 29.

From the Univ Rennes (M.S.B., E.M.), LP3C (Laboratoire de Psychologie: Cognition, Comportement, Communication); and Univ Rennes (P.J.), Inserm, LTSI (Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et de l'Image), Rennes, France.

Statement: This systematic review, conducted in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines, is aimed to review current research in virtual reality (VR) for healthcare training, specifically pertaining to nontechnical skills. PsycInfo and Medline databases were queried for relevant articles published through December 2017. Of the 1377 publications identified, 80 were assessed for eligibility and 26 were finally included in the qualitative synthesis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000347DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Using Simulation to Teach Echocardiography: A Systematic Review.

Simul Healthc 2018 Dec;13(6):413-419

From the Department of Medicine, University of Florida, College of Medicine (C.A.R., J.M.M.), University of Florida Health Science Center Libraries (H.F.N.); Division of Medical Education, Department of Pediatrics (E.B.), Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine (D.E.W.), University of Florida, College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL.

Statement: We identified 24 studies of high-fidelity simulation being used to teach echocardiography. A variety of study designs were used with outcomes ranging from reports of learner self-confidence up to improvement in organizational practice. Most studies were carried out in graduate medical populations, specifically in anesthesia trainees. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000351DOI Listing
December 2018
14 Reads

Simulation Safety First: An Imperative.

Simul Healthc 2018 12;13(6):373-375

From the Foundation for Healthcare Simulation Safety (D.R., A.H., A.M.), Newton Wellesley Hospital (A.H., A.M.), Ariadne Labs (A.H.), Center for Medical Simulation (D.R.), and Harvard Medical School (D.R.), Boston, MA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000341DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6303129PMC
December 2018

Simulation-Based Education to Train Learners to "Speak Up" in the Clinical Environment: Results of a Randomized Trial.

Simul Healthc 2018 Dec;13(6):404-412

From the Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology (C.O., N.F., F.A., M.A.S., H.M.), Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn; Medicine (P.H.), Albert Einstein College of Medicine, SUNY Downstate, New York; and Family Medicine (K.M.), Bronx-Lebanon Hospital Center, Bronx, NY.

Introduction: Assertiveness is essential for communication and/or speaking up. We performed a randomized trial to assess the effectiveness of assertiveness/advocacy/CUS/two-challenge rule (AACT) simulation-based education for labor and delivery, as well as postpartum nurses. We aimed to determine whether this training would improve labor and delivery and postpartum nurses speaking up in the clinical setting. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000335DOI Listing
December 2018
19 Reads

The Use of Statistical Process Control Charts to Evaluate Interprofessional Education Sessions Embedded Into a Pediatric Emergency In situ Resuscitation Program.

Simul Healthc 2019 Apr;14(2):121-128

From the University of Toronto (J.P.); Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine (J.P.), Population Health Sciences, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada; Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine (S.C.), Tecnologico de Monterrey, Escuela de Medicina, Monterrey, Nuevo León, Mexico; Pediatric Emergency Medicine (W.S.), Hamad Medical Corporation, Hamad, Qatar; College of Family Physicians of Canada (D.K.), Mississauga; and Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine (S.S., C.G., T.P.), The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada.

Statement: The rigorous evaluation of simulation in healthcare to improve resuscitations and team functioning can be challenging. Statistical process control (SPC) charts present a unique methodology to enable statistical rigor when evaluating simulation. This article presents a brief overview of SPC charts and its advantages over traditional before and after methodologies, followed by an exemplar using SPC to evaluate an in situ team training program with embedded interprofessional education sessions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000336DOI Listing
April 2019
16 Reads

Using an Immersive Virtual Reality System to Assess Lay Provider Response to an Unannounced Simulated Sudden Cardiac Arrest in the Out-of-Hospital Setting.

Simul Healthc 2019 Apr;14(2):82-89

From the Center for Resuscitation Science (M.L., A.A., D.G.B., A.B., A.L.B., B.S.A.), Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine; and School of Nursing (M.L.), University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

Background: A sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) occurs when the heart abruptly stops beating; because of the nature of SCA, capturing data in the out-of-hospital setting from actual bystander response is difficult. Current technologies such as virtual reality (VR) allow the creation of scenarios programmed for heightened realism. No studies have used an immersive VR system to observe lay bystander response. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000338DOI Listing
April 2019
6 Reads

Comparative Analysis of Emergency Medical Service Provider Workload During Simulated Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Resuscitation Using Standard Versus Experimental Protocols and Equipment.

Simul Healthc 2018 Dec;13(6):376-386

From the Department of Emergency Medicine (N.A., B.C., L.H.M., S.S., K.A.W., J.B., L.K., G.D.J.), Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI; Emergency Department (C.C.P.), Tobey Hospital, Wareham, MA; Lifespan Medical Simulation Center (M.D.); Biostatistics Core (J.T.M.), Rhode Island Hospital; Departments of Diagnostic Imaging (D.L.M., L.H.M.) and Neurosurgery (L.H.M.), Alpert Medical School of Brown University; and School of Engineering (G.D.J.), Brown University, Providence, RI.

Introduction: Protocolized automation of critical, labor-intensive tasks for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) resuscitation may decrease Emergency Medical Services (EMS) provider workload. A simulation-based assessment method incorporating objective and self-reported metrics was developed and used to quantify workloads associated with standard and experimental approaches to OHCA resuscitation.

Methods: Emergency Medical Services-Basic (EMT-B) and advanced life support (ALS) providers were randomized into two-provider mixed-level teams and fitted with heart rate (HR) monitors for continuous HR and energy expenditure (EE) monitoring. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000339DOI Listing
December 2018
11 Reads

Multiple Patient Casualty Scenarios: A Measurement Tool for Teamwork.

Simul Healthc 2018 Dec;13(6):394-403

From the University of Texas at San Antonio (S.L.M.), San Antonio, TX; the Rice University (S.Z., D.L.R., E.S.), Houston, TX; PACE Consulting Solutions (W.L.B.), LLC & Kogod School of Business, American University, Washington, DC; Department of Surgery (S.Z.), the Houston Methodist Institute for Technology, Innovation & Education (MITIE), Houston, TX; Educational Testing Services (M.L.), Princeton, NY; American College Testing (S.K.), Iowa City, IA; and Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (J.L.), Bethesda, MD.

Introduction: Teamwork is a critical aspect of patient care and is especially salient in response to multiple patient casualties. Effective training and measurement improve team performance. However, the literature currently lacks a scientifically developed measure of team performance within multiple causality scenarios, making training and feedback efforts difficult. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000342DOI Listing
December 2018
23 Reads

Social Network Analysis of a Simulation Community.

Simul Healthc 2019 Apr;14(2):71-76

From the University of Western Australia (R.H.R); Department of Health (R.H.R., A.C.C., S.N., B.L.S.), Government of Western Australia, East Perth, WA; and Optimice Pty Ltd (C.K.), Sydney, NSW, Australia.

Introduction: Graphical analysis of networking maps can be used to measure the health, connectivity, and vulnerabilities of a professional community. We aimed to capture and map the connections and relationships between individuals and organizations in the healthcare simulation community of the state of Western Australia. It was also intended that this analysis would encourage new opportunities for collaboration to advance simulation-based education. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000344DOI Listing
April 2019
29 Reads

Interprofessional Healthcare Student Training in the Care of Sexual Assault Patients Utilizing Standardized Patient Methodology.

Simul Healthc 2019 Feb;14(1):10-17

From the University of Texas Health San Antonio (W.J.L.), San Antonio, TX; Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (K.W., L.A.T., A.R.P.), Bethesda, MD; and Texas Christian University & University of North Texas Health Sciences Center School of Medicine (L.C.), Fort Worth, TX.

Background: The medical assessment of sexual assault (SA) is challenging because SA patients are often hesitant to disclose their medical needs, which puts them at further physical and psychological risk, and because of provider unease in conducting SA examinations. This challenge is compounded by a lack of provider training.

Objectives: The study goals were to develop an interprofessional simulation event that would foster SA interview skills, foster effective communication with SA patients, and increase learner confidence in assessing SA patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000331DOI Listing
February 2019
14 Reads

Preparing the Next Generation of Code Blue Leaders Through Simulation: What's Missing?

Simul Healthc 2019 Apr;14(2):77-81

From the Department of Medicine, London Health Sciences Centre (A.K.S., K.S., D.M., S.B.), Western University, Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, London, ON; Division of Cardiology (S.B.), Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, QC; and Department of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences (A.R.), University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada.

Introduction: Despite the increasing reliance on simulation to train residents as code blue leaders, the perceived role and effectiveness of code blue simulations from the learners' perspective have not been explored. A code blue Simulation Program (CBSP), developed based on evidence-based simulation principles, was implemented at our institution. We explored the role of simulation in code blue training and the differences between real and simulated code blues from the learner perspective. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000343DOI Listing
April 2019
13 Reads

Augmented Reality Future Step Visualization for Robust Surgical Telementoring.

Simul Healthc 2019 Feb;14(1):59-66

From the Departments of Computer Science (D.S.A., V.S.P.) and Industrial Engineering (M.E.C., E.J.R.M., G.T.G., J.P.W.), Purdue University, West Lafayette; and Indiana University, School of Medicine (B.M., S.M., B.L.Z.), Bloomington, IN.

Introduction: Surgical telementoring connects expert mentors with trainees performing urgent care in austere environments. However, such environments impose unreliable network quality, with significant latency and low bandwidth. We have developed an augmented reality telementoring system that includes future step visualization of the medical procedure. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000334DOI Listing
February 2019
13 Reads

Emergent Themes for Instructional Design: Alpha and Beta Testing During a Faculty Development Course.

Simul Healthc 2019 Feb;14(1):43-50

From the University of Hawaii (J.J.L., B.W.B., A.S., K.M.H); and SimTiki Simulation Center (J.J.L., B.W.B., K.M.H.), Telehealth Research Institute, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI.

Introduction: Instructional design is an established discipline for designing educational activities for learners and is applied during the development of simulation-based healthcare educational activities. Although the iterative process is already being used with alpha/beta testing during development of the simulation, the process has not been described in detail. We sought to describe this process of design changes made during a novice faculty development course for simulation-based healthcare education where participants routinely design scenarios and conduct alpha/beta testing. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=01266021-900000000-9956
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000329DOI Listing
February 2019
16 Reads

Evaluation of a Low-Cost, High-Fidelity Animal Model to Train Graduate Advanced Practice Nursing Students in the Performance of Ultrasound-Guided Central Line Catheter Insertion.

Simul Healthc 2018 Oct;13(5):341-347

From the Clinical University of Miami School of Nursing & Health Studies (S.D.H., N.A.C., G.M.-V.); and University of Miami School of Nursing & Health Studies (K.G.), Coral Gables, FL.

Introduction: Ultrasound-guided central venous catheter insertion (UGCVC) is a commonly performed procedure taught through simulation. The aims of the study were to examine the utilization of an animal model and compare it with two currently used Blue Phantom central line models to determine whether an animal model provides good or better simulated conditions for the performance of UGCVC insertion.

Methods: Using a randomized cross-over study, 46 advanced practice nursing students were assessed using a task-specific performance tool in their performance of UGCVC insertion on both the animal model and the Blue Phantom models. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000337DOI Listing
October 2018
31 Reads

Some Exciting News and Changes for the Journal.

Authors:
Mark W Scerbo

Simul Healthc 2018 10;13(5):303-305

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000346DOI Listing
October 2018
15 Reads

Learners' Experiences During Rapid Cycle Deliberate Practice Simulations: A Qualitative Analysis.

Simul Healthc 2019 Feb;14(1):18-28

From the Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX.

Introduction: Rapid Cycle Deliberate Practice (RCDP) is a team-based simulation method, emphasizing repetitive practice over reflective debriefing, with progressively more challenging rounds, frequent starts and stops, and direct coaching. Although some studies have shown improved performance, no study has evaluated learners' perceptions. We aimed to explore learners' experiences during RCDP. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000324DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Simulation Faculty Development: Continuing the Dialogue.

Simul Healthc 2018 10;13(5):371

Department of Medical Education School of Medicine Department of Health Services Administration, School of Health Professions Office of Interprofessional Simulation for Innovative Clinical Practice University of Alabama at Birmingham Birmingham, AL University of Alabama at Birmingham, School of Nursing Birmingham, AL Center for Healthcare Improvement and Patient Simulation The University of Tennessee Health Science Center Memphis, TN Departments of Pediatrics and Medical Education, School of Medicine Department of Health Services Administration, School of Health Professions Office of Interprofessional Simulation for Innovative Clinical Practice, University of Alabama at Birmingham Birmingham, AL.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000326DOI Listing
October 2018
16 Reads

In Situ Simulation to Mitigate Threats to Participation in a Multicenter Clinical Trial in High-Acuity, Low-Frequency Setting.

Simul Healthc 2019 Feb;14(1):1-9

From the Division of Emergency Medicine, University of Cincinnati, College of Medicine (S.C., L.B., G.G., M.F., B.K.), Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati; and Quality Improvement Services (V.R.), Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH.

Introduction: Multicenter clinical trials of high-acuity, low-frequency emergencies are expensive and resource intensive. Current standards for trial preparation have significant limitations. Our objective is to describe our use of in situ simulation (ISS) to identify and mitigate threats to enrollment, protocol adherence, and patient safety in preparation for a multicenter clinical trial of antiepileptics for status epilepticus in the emergency department. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000328DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6358461PMC
February 2019
1 Read

Validation of the FAST Workstation as an Objective Evaluator of Hand-Tied Surgical Knots.

Simul Healthc 2019 Feb;14(1):29-34

From the Loyola University Medical Center (A.S., D.E.), Maywood, IL; and University of California Los Angeles (R.P.), Encinitas, CA.

Introduction: Hand-tying surgical knots is an important skill that is applicable across all surgical disciplines. Knot quality is traditionally assessed in the operating room by visual inspection, which is inherently subjective. With the increasing prevalence of simulation training, surgical trainees having access to objective feedback of their knot-tying skills are paramount for skill evaluation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000333DOI Listing
February 2019
6 Reads

The Influence of Culture on Teamwork and Communication in a Simulation-Based Resuscitation Training at a Community Hospital in Honduras.

Simul Healthc 2018 Oct;13(5):363-370

From the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine (M.F.P.); Perinatal Institute (T.L.S., A.R.L.R., B.D.K.R.), Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH; Hospital Enrique Aguilar Cerrato (J.C.V.), La Esperanza, Honduras; College of Medicine (S.J.), The Ohio State University, Columbus; Global Health Center (A.R.L.R., B.D.K.R.), Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center; Department of Pediatrics (A.R.L.R.), University of Cincinnati; University of Cincinnati College of Allied Health Sciences (D.W.R.); and Department of Pediatrics (B.D.K.R.), University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH.

Statement: Communication and teamwork are important aspects of medicine and have been a recent focus of resuscitation. Culture can influence communication and teamwork, and these effects have not been studied in low-resource settings. Using a case study and the TEAM scale, we evaluated how culture influences teamwork and communication during resuscitation simulations, in addition to examining other challenges of simulation research in low-resource settings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000323DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

Simulation and Integration Into Patient Safety Systems.

Authors:
Paul E Phrampus

Simul Healthc 2018 08;13(4):225-226

From the Departments of Anesthesiology and Emergency Medicine, Winter Institute for Simulation, Education and Research (WISER), University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000332DOI Listing
August 2018
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Priorities Related to Improving Healthcare Safety Through Simulation.

Simul Healthc 2018 Jun;13(3S Suppl 1):S41-S50

From the Department of Surgery (J.T.P.), LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA; Department of Emergency Medicine (R.J.F.), Georgetown University School of Medicine and MedStar Health, Washington, DC; and Department of Anesthesiology (D.M.G.), Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA.

Statement: Improving healthcare safety is a worthwhile and important endeavor. Simulation-based activities can help with such a goal through research and training. In this manner, it can focus on education and training, assessment and metrics, process improvement, and culture change to help move forward both patient safety and quality of care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000295DOI Listing
June 2018
3 Reads

The Second Society for Simulation in Healthcare Research Summit: Beyond our Boundaries.

Simul Healthc 2018 Jun;13(3S Suppl 1):S1-S6

From the Department of Psychology (M.W.S.), Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA; Department of Pediatrics (A.W.C.), University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY; Department of Surgery (J.T.P.), LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA; School of Nursing and Health Studies (J.Sa.), University of Miami, Miami, FL; and Virginia Modeling, Analysis, and Simulation Center (J.So.), Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA.

Statement: In this article, we report on the Second Society for Simulation in Healthcare Research Summit held in 2017. This meeting succeeded the First Research Summit from 2011 with the goal of advancing the scope of healthcare simulation research. During the one and a half day summit, some of the world's leading experts in simulation, healthcare, and simulation in healthcare convened to discuss ideas about what research goals would be most beneficial to the healthcare simulation community, and what could be done to achieve them. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000330DOI Listing
June 2018
2 Reads

Pretest Scores Uniquely Predict 1-Year-Delayed Performance in a Simulation-Based Mastery Course for Central Line Insertion.

Simul Healthc 2018 Jun;13(3):163-167

From the Zamierowski Institute for Experiential Learning (E.D., M.L.), University of Kansas Medical Center and Health System; and Division of Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine (L.T.), and Department of Biostatistics (J.M.), University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS.

Introduction: Within simulation-based mastery learning (SBML) courses, there is inconsistent inclusion of learner pretesting, which requires considerable resources and is contrary to popular instructional frameworks. However, it may have several benefits, including its direct benefit as a form of deliberate practice and its facilitation of more learner-specific subsequent deliberate practice. We consider an unexplored potential benefit of pretesting: its ability to predict variable long-term learner performance. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000327DOI Listing
June 2018
1 Read

FIRES: Bridging the Publication Gap for Upcoming Investigators.

Simul Healthc 2018 06;13(3):147-148

From the Departments of Pediatrics and Medical Education (M.A.), Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL; and Department of Pediatrics (A.W.C.), University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000325DOI Listing
June 2018
2 Reads

High-Value, Cost-Conscious Communication Skills in Undergraduate Medical Education: Validity Evidence for Scores Derived from Two Standardized Patient Scenarios.

Simul Healthc 2018 Oct;13(5):316-323

From the Mayo Clinic School of Medicine (N.N., S.R.S., D.A.R., L.N.D., A.N.L-H.), Rochester, MN and College of Medicine (Y-S.P.), University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL.

Introduction: Training in high-value, cost-conscious care (HVCCC) is increasingly being incorporated into medical school curricula, but students may have limited opportunities to engage patients in HVCCC conversations. The aim of this study was to develop two standardized patient scenarios with associated checklists, hypothesizing that resulting scores would allow for valid formative assessments of HVCCC communication skills.

Methods: Scenarios were designed to generate a less-is-more conversation (in response to a patient requesting an unnecessary test) and a shared decision-making conversation (in response to a patient choosing between multiple effective treatment options). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000316DOI Listing
October 2018
4 Reads

Imitating Incidents: How Simulation Can Improve Safety Investigation and Learning From Adverse Events.

Authors:
Carl Macrae

Simul Healthc 2018 Aug;13(4):227-232

From the Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.

Statement: One of the most fundamental principles of patient safety is to investigate and learn from the past in order to improve the future. However, healthcare organizations can find it challenging to develop the robust organizational processes and work practices that are needed to rigorously investigate and learn from safety incidents. Key challenges include difficulties developing specialist knowledge and expertise, understanding complex incidents, coordinating collaborative action, and positively changing practice. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000315DOI Listing
August 2018
2 Reads

The Many Faces of Patient-Centered Simulation: Implications for Researchers.

Simul Healthc 2018 Jun;13(3S Suppl 1):S51-S55

From the Simulation Center (J.L.A.), Johns Hopkins All Children's Hospital, St. Petersburg, FL; Modeling, Simulation, & Visualization Engineering Department (F.D.M.), Joint Appointment, Electrical & Computer Engineering Department, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA; AHC Simulation Center and Interprofessional Education & Resource Center (J.L.M.), Department of Family Medicine & Community Health, Graduate Faculty, College of Education and Human Development, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; and College of Nursing and Health Innovation (M.E.M.), The University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX.

Introduction: Patient-centered simulation for nonhealthcare providers is an emerging and innovative application for healthcare simulation. Currently, no consensus exists on what patient-centered simulation encompasses and outcomes research in this area is limited. Conceptually, patient-centered simulation aligns with the principles of patient- and family-centered care bringing this educational tool directly to patients and caregivers with the potential to improve patient care and outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000312DOI Listing
June 2018
2 Reads

Using Technology to Enhance Teaching of Patient-Centered Interviewing for Early Medical Students.

Simul Healthc 2018 Jun;13(3):188-194

From the Department of Psychiatry (S.K., N.T.), and Center for New Designs in Learning and Scholarship (S.P., E.S., P.A., Y.V.), Georgetown University, Washington, DC.

Introduction: Effective strategies for teaching communication skills to health professions students are needed. This article describes the design and evaluation of immersive and interactive video simulations for medical students to practice basic communication skills.

Methods: Three simulations were developed, focusing on patient-centered interviewing techniques such as using open-ended questions, reflections, and empathic responses while assessing a patient's history of present illness. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000304DOI Listing
June 2018
2 Reads

Exploring Validation and Verification: How they Different and What They Mean to Healthcare Simulation.

Simul Healthc 2018 Oct;13(5):356-362

From the Department of Anesthesiology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN.

Statement: The healthcare simulation (HCS) community recognizes the importance of quality management because many novel simulation devices and techniques include some sort of description of how they tested and assured their simulation's quality. Verification and validation play a key role in quality management; however, literature published on HCS has many different interpretations of what these terms mean and how to accomplish them. The varied use of these terms leads to varied interpretations of how verification process is different from validation process. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000298DOI Listing
October 2018
1 Read

A Method for Functional Task Alignment Analysis of an Arthrocentesis Simulator.

Simul Healthc 2018 Aug;13(4):289-294

From the St. Joseph Mercy Oakland Simulation Center (R.A.A.), Ross University School of Medicine, Pontiac, MI, and the Center for Research and Innovation in Veterinary and Medical Education, Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine, Iselin, NJ; Learning Sciences (G.E.G.), Adtalem Global Education, Downers Grove, IL, and the Center for Teaching and Learning, Ross University School of Medicine, Iselin, NJ; SJEH Simulation Center (L.A.B.), Ross University School of Medicine; Department of Biomedical Sciences (R.N.F.), Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine, Iselin, NJ; College of Veterinary Medicine (I.C.F.), Long Island University, Brooklyn, NY; and Department of Clinical Sciences (E.L.L.), Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine, Iselin, NJ.

Introduction: During simulation-based education, simulators are subjected to procedures composed of a variety of tasks and processes. Simulators should functionally represent a patient in response to the physical action of these tasks. The aim of this work was to describe a method for determining whether a simulator does or does not have sufficient functional task alignment (FTA) to be used in a simulation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SIH.0000000000000313DOI Listing
August 2018
2 Reads