78 results match your criteria Silo Filler's Disease


Ultraviolet Photoactivated Room Temperature NO Gas Sensor of ZnO Hemitubes and Nanotubes Covered with TiO Nanoparticles.

Nanomaterials (Basel) 2020 Mar 4;10(3). Epub 2020 Mar 4.

Department of Advanced Convergence Technology, and Research Institute of Advanced Convergence Technology, Korea Polytechnic University, 237 Sangidaehak-ro, Siheung-si 15073, Korea.

Prolonged exposure to NO can cause lung tissue inflammation, bronchiolitis fibrosa obliterans, and silo filler's disease. In recent years, nanostructured semiconducting metal oxides have been widely used to fabricate gas sensors because of their unique structure and surface-to-volume ratio compared to layered materials. In particular, the different morphologies of ZnO-based nanostructures significantly affect the detection property of NO gas sensors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nano10030462DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7153620PMC

Dose-Dependent Pulmonary Injury Following Nitrogen Dioxide Inhalation From Kinepak Detonation.

J Emerg Med 2019 Aug 3;57(2):177-180. Epub 2019 May 3.

Department of Emergency Medicine, Hennepin Healthcare, Minneapolis, Minnesota; Minnesota Poison Control, Hennepin Healthcare, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Background: Nitrogen dioxide (NO) is a pulmonary irritant produced as a byproduct of bacterial anaerobic metabolism of organic materials, and is also produced as a byproduct of explosive detonations. Significant NO exposure results in free-radical-induced pulmonary injury that may be delayed up to 3-30 h after exposure and can progress to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and death. Here we present a case series of 3 patients with dose-dependent pulmonary injury consistent with NO inhalation following exposure to fumes from detonation of an ammonium nitrate/nitromethane (ANNM) explosive device. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jemermed.2019.03.028DOI Listing
August 2019
7 Reads

Silo-Filler's Disease: One Health System's Experience and an Update of the Literature.

J Agromedicine 2020 Jan 17;25(1):8-13. Epub 2019 Apr 17.

Pulmonary Medicine, Marshfield Clinic, Marshfield, Wisconsin, USA.

Silo-filler's disease, a life-threatening condition from exposure to silage gas in recently filled silos, has been known for over 5 decades now. However, farm workers remain exposed to this preventable condition. We describe the index presentations and subsequent changes among 19 patients managed within our health system over a 61-year period and highlight the need for ongoing education on minimizing exposure to silo gas. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1059924X.2019.1592045DOI Listing
January 2020
9 Reads

Upper and lower airways obstruction following an inhalation injury.

Authors:
Stuart M Brooks

J Occup Environ Med 2013 May;55(5):594-6

College of Public Health, University of South Florida, Health Sciences Center, Tampa, FL, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JOM.0b013e318229a68fDOI Listing
May 2013
14 Reads

[What is your diagnosis? Toxic pulmonary edema in silo filler disease (ICD-10 code J68.8)].

Authors:
F Cuculi S Elsasser

Praxis (Bern 1994) 2008 Apr;97(8):419-20

Innere Medizin, Kantonsspital Luzern.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1024/1661-8157.97.8.419DOI Listing
April 2008
14 Reads

Nitrogen dioxide (silo gas) poisoning in dairy cattle.

Tijdschr Diergeneeskd 2007 Oct;132(20):780-2

Animal Health Service, Ruminant Health Department, P.O. Box 9, 7400AA Deventer, The Netherlands.

Toxic silo gases are a potential danger to livestock housed in close proximity to roughage silos. These gases, such as nitrogen dioxide (NO2), may be produced during the early stages of (maize and grass) silage making. In humans, inhalation of these gases causes a condition known as 'Silo Filler's Disease' (SFD), which is a recognized occupational hazard for workers in upright forage silos in many countries. Read More

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October 2007
17 Reads

An assessment of gases in oxygen-deficient hay silos and the effects of forced ventilation.

J Agric Saf Health 2007 Jan;13(1):83-95

Kedan and Associates, Seattle, Washington, USA.

Many modern tower silos used in the agricultural industry for hay and grain storage are oxygen-limiting by design. Forced-air ventilation using a forage blower is a method commonly used to decrease concentrations of toxic and asphyxiant gases and to increase the O2 content within a silo headspace prior to worker entry. This article describes the methods used to measure gas concentrations and the results obtained from a pilot study by the Washington Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation (FACE) program of two oxygen-limiting forage tower silos in eastern Washington State. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.13031/2013.22314DOI Listing
January 2007
14 Reads

Grain silo cleanup operation leads to two occupational deaths.

Authors:
Leigh Jackson

Appl Occup Environ Hyg 2002 Jul;17(7):464-6

US Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Mobile Area Office, Alabama 36693-4309, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10473220290035589DOI Listing
July 2002
12 Reads

[Respiratory pathology in the agricultural environment].

Authors:
J C Dalphin

Rev Prat 1998 Jun;48(12):1313-8

Service de pneumologie Centre hospitalier universitaire, Besançon.

Farmers are usually exposed to a wide variety of noxious organic or chemical substances. This explains why agriculture is probably one of the occupations where prevalences of respiratory diseases are the highest. Some diseases such as extrinsic allergic alveolitis, allergic asthma, silo filler's disease or pesticides-related fibrosis are classic and well described. Read More

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June 1998
14 Reads

Case in point. Silo fillers lung.

Hosp Pract (1995) 1998 Jan;33(1):70

Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn., USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/21548331.1998.11443620DOI Listing
January 1998
9 Reads

[Accidental poisoning with silo gas].

Pol Arch Med Wewn 1997 Jan;97(1):52-5

Ze Stołecznego Ośrodka Ostrych Zatruć.

Eight cases of poisoning in workers cleaning silo are presented. Silo gas, produced during fermentation of vegetable material, contains very toxic nitrogen oxides. In this group three workers died within silo, four patients were hospitalized (one of them with acute toxic pulmonary oedema, two with sings of pneumonia, one had only transient decrease of consciousness) and recovered without detectable sequelae. Read More

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January 1997
11 Reads

60-year-old man with respiratory distress and confusion.

Mayo Clin Proc 1996 Aug;71(8):813-6

Mayo Graduate School of Medicine, Mayo Clinic Rochester, Minnesota, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0025-6196(11)64848-9DOI Listing
August 1996
14 Reads

Lung (agricultural/rural).

Authors:
G A do Pico

Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 1996 Feb;114(2):212-6

Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, 53792, USA.

Industrialization of farming, animal raising, and forestry has added chemical and mechanical hazards that need to be recognized and prevented. Lung disease among farmworkers can result from a wide variety of hazardous exposures, which include organic dusts, allergens, chemicals, toxic gases, and infectious agents. In addition to nonspecific symptoms of mucous membrane irritation, farmworkers can experience occupational asthma or bronchitis, organic dust toxic syndrome, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, silo filler's disease (toxic hemorrhagic pulmonary edema), and neuromuscular respiratory failure. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0194-5998(96)70168-7DOI Listing
February 1996
15 Reads

[Pulmonary diseases due to toxic gases, irritant gases and fumes].

Ryoikibetsu Shokogun Shirizu 1994 (3):569-72

Department of Hygiene and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tokyo.

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May 1994
20 Reads

Case of the season. Silo filler's disease in a patient with prior Swyer-James syndrome.

Authors:
J Hirsch R M Fencel

Semin Roentgenol 1993 Oct;28(4):294-6

Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 19104.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0037-198x(05)80090-2DOI Listing
October 1993
21 Reads

Silo filler's disease in New York State.

Am Rev Respir Dis 1992 Sep;146(3):650-3

New York Center for Agricultural Medicine and Health, Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital, Cooperstown 13326.

Twenty new cases of Silo filler's disease (SFD) have been collected, documenting the incidence and clinical features of exposure to nitrogen oxides present in freshly filled silos. Cases of SFD were identified using a statewide computerized discharge diagnosis system. Fifteen of these were identified in the index period, allowing us to calculate an approximate annual incidence of 5. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/ajrccm/146.3.650DOI Listing
September 1992
20 Reads

Hazardous exposure and lung disease among farm workers.

Authors:
G A do Pico

Clin Chest Med 1992 Jun;13(2):311-28

Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison.

Industrialization of farming, animal raising, and forestry has added new chemical and mechanical hazards that need to be recognized and prevented. Lung disease among farm workers can result from a wide variety of hazardous exposures that include organic dusts, chemicals, and toxic gases. In addition to nonspecific symptoms of mucous membrane irritation, farm workers can develop occupational asthma or bronchitis, organic dust toxic syndrome, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, silo filler's disease (toxic hemorrhagic pulmonary edema), and neuromuscular respiratory failure. Read More

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June 1992
45 Reads

[Silo filler's syndrome].

Schweiz Med Wochenschr 1991 Oct;121(41):1482-7

Schweizerische Unfallversicherungsanstalt (SUVA), Abteilung Arbeitsmedizin.

In 1975 an acute febrile bronchopulmonary illness after massive inhalation of fungal spores in silos was described as "pulmonary mycotoxicosis". Subsequently the disorder was referred to as "silo unloader's syndrome" or as a special form of "organic dust toxic syndrome" (ODTS). In this article the three cases of silo unloader's syndrome recognized by the Swiss National Accident Insurance Company (SUVA) between 1978 and 1989 as being an occupational disease are described. Read More

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October 1991
17 Reads

Agricultural disorders of the lung.

Radiographics 1991 Jul;11(4):625-34

Department of Radiology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha 68198.

Agricultural workers are at risk for developing many respiratory tract disorders. Crop production disorders include chronic bronchitis, asthma, organic dust toxicity syndrome, chemical poisoning, farmer lung, and silo-filler disease. Livestock production disorders include toxic manure poisoning (dung lung) and several zoonoses. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1148/radiographics.11.4.1887117DOI Listing
July 1991
14 Reads

[Acute dyspnea, cough, headache].

Authors:
M Misteli A Ragaz

Schweiz Rundsch Med Prax 1991 Mar;80(10):235-7

Medizinische Klinik, Kantonsspital Aarau.

Six hours after work in an empty, non-ventilated silo a 27-year-old Yugoslav worker suffered acutely from cough, dyspnea and general weakness. He was admitted to the hospital with severe partial respiratory insufficiency, and after emergency intubation artificial respiration had to be installed. X-ray showed a severe symmetrical alveolo-interstitial opacity. Read More

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March 1991
7 Reads

[Storage mite allergy. Routine tests].

Authors:
R Haye

Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen 1991 Feb;111(5):591-2

Ore-nese-halsavdelingen Rikshospitalet, Oslo.

Storage mites are sources of allergy among farmers and silo workers. Among 114 patients with allergic rhinitis we found four with a positive prick test to storage mites. This is not sufficient reason to include storage mites in a standard allergy prick test series. Read More

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February 1991
13 Reads

Bronchoalveolar lavage findings in a patient with the organic dust toxic syndrome.

Thorax 1990 Sep;45(9):713-4

Division of Pneumonology, University Hospital Pellenberg, Leuven, Belgium.

A previously healthy student developed the organic dust toxic syndrome after unloading a grain silo for one day. Bronchoalveolar lavage seven days later showed a total cell count six times normal with 70% lymphocytes. This suggests that the previously described acute neutrophil influx into the alveolar spaces in this syndrome is rapidly replaced by a lymphocyte dominated infiltration. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC462708PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/thx.45.9.713DOI Listing
September 1990
10 Reads

The Bassett Farm Safety and Health Project.

Authors:
D S Pratt

Am J Ind Med 1990 ;18(4):391-3

Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital, Cooperstown, NY 13326.

The Bassett Farm Safety and Health Project was started in 1980 when Drs. May and Pratt made clinical observations on respiratory illnesses in farmers. The initial work involved the investigation of clinical syndromes associated with dust exposures and, from there, environmental dust studies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.4700180407DOI Listing
January 1991
12 Reads

[A case of silo-fillers' disease].

Nihon Kyobu Shikkan Gakkai Zasshi 1989 May;27(5):616-9

A 52 year-old male farmer was admitted to our hospital because of cough, sputum and dyspnea on exertion. Chest X-ray showed pulmonary edema and arterial blood gas analysis showed hypoxemia. Silo-fillers' disease was diagnosed because he had allegedly inhaled yellowish gas in the silo. Read More

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May 1989
15 Reads

Silo-filler's disease: a new perspective.

Authors:
G R Epler

Mayo Clin Proc 1989 Mar;64(3):368-70

Department of Medicine, New England Baptist Hospital, Boston, MA 02120.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0025-6196(12)65260-4DOI Listing
March 1989
13 Reads

Silo-filler's disease.

Mayo Clin Proc 1989 Mar;64(3):291-304

Division of Thoracic Diseases and Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905.

Between 1955 and 1987, 17 patients were examined at the Mayo Clinic shortly after exposure to silo gas. All exposures had occurred in conventional top-unloading silos. Acute lung injury occurred in 11 patients, 1 of whom died; early diffuse alveolar damage with hyaline membranes and hemorrhagic pulmonary edema and acute edema of the airways were found at autopsy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0025-6196(12)65249-5DOI Listing
March 1989
23 Reads

Gases in forage tower silos.

Ann Occup Hyg 1989 ;33(4):519-35

Measurements of hazardous gas concentrations in forage tower silos are described. The problems associated with sampling in silos, the identity and distribution of gases and their rate of evolution, and the effects of forced and natural ventilation are considered. Particular attention is given to conditions at times when entry to the silo by farm personnel is likely and the possibility of farmers carrying out gas measurements is discussed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/annhyg/33.4.519DOI Listing
February 1990
11 Reads

Slow urinary elimination of formic acid in occupationally exposed farmers.

Authors:
J Liesivuori

Ann Occup Hyg 1986 ;30(3):329-33

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/annhyg/30.3.329DOI Listing
December 1986
12 Reads

Silo-filler's disease. A historical perspective and report of a case.

Authors:
W J Maurer

Wis Med J 1985 Aug;84(8):13-6

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August 1985
14 Reads

Respiratory failure in a 32-year-old farmer due to nitrous dioxide exposure.

Authors:
N Schwenk

Minn Med 1984 Dec;67(12):693

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December 1984
15 Reads

Silo filler's disease.

Authors:
D O Jonas

Mil Med 1984 Aug;149(8):481, 485

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August 1984
11 Reads

The breathless farm worker.

Authors:
A Seaton

Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 1984 Jun;288(6435):1940-1

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1442207PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.288.6435.1940DOI Listing
June 1984
11 Reads

Silo emptiers' diseases.

Authors:
T R Pladson

Minn Med 1984 May;67(5):265-9

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May 1984
10 Reads

[Penicillium growing on wood-chips--mildew causing allergic alveolitis].

Duodecim 1984 ;100(3):158-60

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June 1984
13 Reads

Feed-associated respiratory illness in farmers.

Authors:
D S Pratt J J May

Arch Environ Health 1984 Jan-Feb;39(1):43-8

A variety of respiratory hazards are present in the farm environment. Disorders such as Silo Filler's Disease and Farmer's Lung Disease have been detailed in the literature. A retrospective study of hospital visits for farm-associated lung injury in rural Otsego County, New York during an 11-yr period is reported herein. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00039896.1984.10545832DOI Listing
May 1984
10 Reads

Silo-Filler's disease in rural New York.

Authors:

MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 1982 Jul;31(28):389-91

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July 1982
12 Reads

Silo-filler's disease.

Can Med Assoc J 1978 Sep;119(5):482-4

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1818483PMC
September 1978
15 Reads

Grain dust and the lungs.

Can Med Assoc J 1978 May;118(10):1271-4

Grain dust is composed of a large number of materials, including various types of grain and their disintegration products, silica, fungi, insects and mites. The clinical syndromes described in relation to exposure to grain dust are chronic bronchitis, grain dust asthma, extrinsic allergic alveolitis, grain fever and silo-filler's lung. Rhinitis and conjunctivitis are also common in grain workers. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1818652PMC
May 1978
22 Reads

Methemoglobinemia and the oxides of nitrogen.

N Engl J Med 1978 May;298(20):1150

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/NEJM197805182982021DOI Listing
May 1978
13 Reads

Nitrogen dioxide-induced pulmonary disease: five new cases and a review of the leterature.

J Occup Med 1978 Feb;20(2):103-10

Twenty-three patients exposed to nitrogen dioxide in agriculture or industry were referred to the University of Wisconsin Medical Center. Eighteen experienced a transient upper respiratory tract syndrome; five developed pulmonary edema or bronchiolitis obliterans. This latter group responded to steroid therapy but all demonstrated evidence of persistent pulmonary dysfunction on follow-up studies. Read More

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February 1978
17 Reads

Lung disease in farmers.

Authors:
C P Warren

Can Med Assoc J 1977 Feb;116(4):391-4

Lung diseases in farmers attributable to their occupation include (a) farmer's lung, caused by exposure to mouldy hay, (b) the asthma caused by exposure to grain dust and (c) silo-filler's disease. Their prevalence in Canada is unknown. Farmer's lung results from inhalation of mould spores in hay; the mechanism is immunologic. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1879238PMC
February 1977
16 Reads

The health of farmers.

Authors:
L Lawhorne

J Iowa Med Soc 1976 Oct;66(10):409-18

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October 1976
17 Reads

Incidence and significance of precipitating antibodies in occupational and non-occupational extrinsic non-atopic (type III) asthma (bronchial asthma with precipitins).

Med Interne 1976 Apr-Jun;14(2):133-8

Precipitating antibodies against different organic enviromental dusts were studied in 37 patients with suggestive symptoms of nonatopic bronchial asthma, comparatively with a group of 4 patients with atopic asthma and with a group of asymptomatic subjects, exposed to the same organic dusts as the majority of patients. Precipitins were found present in over 75% of the sera from patients with infectious type non-atopic asthma and were associated with positive semidelayed type skin tests as well as with positive bronchial provocation tests a few hours after antigen inhalation. No precipitins were found in the sera from patients with atopic asthma. Read More

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May 1977
18 Reads

Denitrification.

Annu Rev Microbiol 1976 ;30:241-62

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http://www.annualreviews.org/doi/10.1146/annurev.mi.30.10017
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev.mi.30.100176.001325DOI Listing
January 1977
15 Reads

Silo-Filler's disease.

Respiration 1975 ;32(1):81-92

The effects of oxides of nitrogen inhalation are reported in a 21-year-old gardener exposed to silage gas. Initial nausea, cough and fever remitted, but respiratory failure developed 3 weeks later. Roentgenograms and lung function studies revealed pulmonary edema, volume restriction, and severely impaired gas exchange. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000193638DOI Listing
June 1975
14 Reads

Study of atmospheric fungi in a big cereal silo over a period of one year.

Med Interne 1975 ;13(3):221-6

A quantitative and qualitative study of the atmospheric fungi in a big silo was carried out over a period of one year (April 1973--April 1974). About 6 to 12 Petri dishes with Czapek medium were exposed for 5 minutes every month at different floors of the silo. The study showed:--a very high number of fungi colonies, reaching as many as 903 in March 1974 (a total of 60 min exposure); the dominant fungus was penicillium which was, however, overpassed in certain months by aspergillus (flavus and fumigatus) which in May 1973 reached about twice the incidence of penicillium. Read More

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January 1976
12 Reads

Nitrates as an environmental, animal, and human hazard.

Clin Toxicol 1974 Apr;7(2):145-59

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15563657408987991DOI Listing
April 1974
11 Reads

Silo filler's disease.

Authors:
E G Scott W B Hunt

Chest 1973 May;63(5):701-6

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1378/chest.63.5.701DOI Listing
May 1973
12 Reads