2,061 results match your criteria Seminars in Nephrology[Journal]


Emerging In Vitro Systems to Screen and Predict Drug-Induced Kidney Toxicity.

Semin Nephrol 2019 Mar;39(2):215-226

CVRMSafety, Drug Safety and Metabolism, IMED Biotech Unit, AstraZeneca, Gothenburg, Sweden. Electronic address:

Drug attrition related to kidney toxicity remains a challenge in drug discovery and development. In vitro models established over the past 2 decades to supplement in vivo studies have improved the throughput capacity of toxicity evaluation, but usually suffer from low predictive value. To achieve a paradigm shift in the prediction of drug-induced kidney toxicity, two aspects are fundamental: increased physiological relevance of the kidney model, and use of appropriate toxicity end points. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S02709295183018
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.12.009DOI Listing
March 2019
12 Reads

Translational Safety Biomarkers of Kidney Injury.

Semin Nephrol 2019 Mar;39(2):202-214

Merck Research Laboratories, Department of Safety Assessment and Laboratory Animal Resources, Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.

Acute kidney injury continues to be a common problem and there continues to be a medical need for sensitive translational biomarkers for clinical monitoring. The past decade has yielded unprecedented progress in fundamental research into novel kidney biomarker evaluation and the mechanistic understanding of kidney injury; as such, these novel biomarkers increasingly are being used in preclinical drug development and in early clinical trials of drug candidates on a case-by-case basis, as well as in medical and veterinary practice. With the recent successful clinical qualification of a subset of novel accessible biomarker candidates for use in early phase clinical trials, continued clinical evaluation may enable expanded regulatory qualification for more generalized clinical use. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.12.008DOI Listing
March 2019
3 Reads

Kidney Pathology and Investigative Nephrotoxicology Strategies Across Species.

Semin Nephrol 2019 Mar;39(2):190-201

GlaxoSmithKline, King of Prussia, PA.

Drug-induced kidney toxicity is a significant contributor to acute kidney injury. Nephrotoxic drugs need to be identified during nonclinical testing to highlight potential risk translatable to the intended patient population. When nonclinical kidney toxicity signals arise, scientists and physicians affiliated with clinical trials need to be familiar with commonly encountered drug-induced perturbations in the kidney, terminology, and how these changes relate to clinical risk. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.12.007DOI Listing
March 2019
6 Reads

Modeling Exposure to Understand and Predict Kidney Injury.

Semin Nephrol 2019 Mar;39(2):176-189

Medicine Design Modeling and Simulation, Pfizer, Inc, Cambridge, MA.

Exposure is a critically important aspect to consider in the study and management of drug-induced kidney injury. Although blood concentrations of kidney toxicants often may provide a valid surrogate measure of kidney exposure, the kidney has several unique physiological and biochemical properties that lend themselves to accumulation or exclusion of some drugs at sites of toxicity. In such cases, an understanding of these pharmacokinetic mechanisms can be as important as understanding the underlying mechanisms of toxicity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.12.006DOI Listing
March 2019
8 Reads

Xenobiotic Transporters in the Kidney: Function and Role in Toxicity.

Semin Nephrol 2019 Mar;39(2):159-175

Pharmaceutical Candidate Optimization, Bristol-Myers Squibb Research and Development, Princeton, NJ.

The kidney plays a critical role in the elimination of many xenobiotics, and drug-induced kidney injury is a risk factor in drug discovery and development. In addition, accumulation of nephrotoxic compounds, a process often controlled by xenobiotic transporters, is often a prerequisite to kidney injury. Such adverse events are dependent on many transporters, particularly those in the solute carrier and adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette superfamilies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.12.010DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Epigenetic Regulation in Kidney Toxicity: Insights From Cisplatin Nephrotoxicity.

Semin Nephrol 2019 Mar;39(2):152-158

Department of Nephrology, The Second Xiangya Hospital at Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, China; Department of Cellular Biology and Anatomy, Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University, Charlie Norwood VA Medical Center, Augusta, GA. Electronic address:

Nephrotoxicity, as a result of the exposure of kidney to endogenous and exogenous toxins, is an important factor for acute kidney injury and the development of progressive chronic kidney disease. Cisplatin is among the most widely studied kidney toxicants. In the past decade, epigenetic regulation has emerged as a notable pathogenic mechanism in cisplatin nephrotoxicity, including DNA methylation, histone modification, and noncoding RNAs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.12.005DOI Listing
March 2019
5 Reads

Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Kidney Toxicity.

Semin Nephrol 2019 Mar;39(2):141-151

Interdisciplinary Toxicology Program, University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Sciences, University of Georgia, Athens, GA. Electronic address:

Toxicant-induced acute kidney injury is responsible for millions of deaths each year. An underlying cause of toxicant-induced acute kidney injury is renal cell death. As such, understanding the mechanisms by which toxicants cause renal cell death can aid the development of targeted therapies for the prevention and treatment of kidney disease. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.12.004DOI Listing
March 2019
5 Reads

Environmental and Genetic Factors Influencing Kidney Toxicity.

Authors:
Lawrence H Lash

Semin Nephrol 2019 Mar;39(2):132-140

Department of Pharmacology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI. Electronic address:

The kidneys are a frequent target organ for toxicity from exposures to various environmental chemicals and agents. To understand the risk to human health from such exposures, it is important to consider both the underlying chemical and pathologic mechanisms and factors that may modify susceptibility to injury. Choices of exemplary environmental agents to review are based on those with selective effects on the kidneys and for which significant amounts of mechanistic and human data are available. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.12.003DOI Listing
March 2019
6 Reads

Kidney Safety Assessment: Current Practices in Drug Development.

Semin Nephrol 2019 Mar;39(2):120-131

Merck Research Laboratories, Department of Safety Assessment and Laboratory Animal Resources, West Point, PA.

The kidney's role as a major route of metabolism and clearance of xenobiotics and its ability to concentrate the glomerular filtrate make it particularly vulnerable to drug-induced toxicity. Improving kidney safety is an active area of research and there is a need in early stages of drug development for strategies and model systems to reliably identify nephrotoxic compounds and sufficiently characterize mechanisms to support drug pipeline decision making. In later stages of drug development the value of sensitive translational biomarkers to monitor kidney toxicity across species in nonclinical and clinical settings is gaining realization. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.12.002DOI Listing
March 2019
4 Reads

Introduction: Kidney Safety Science.

Authors:
Vishal S Vaidya

Semin Nephrol 2019 Mar;39(2):117-119

Drug Safety Research and Development, Pfizer, Inc, Cambridge, MA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.12.001DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Kidney-Immune System Crosstalk in AKI.

Semin Nephrol 2019 01;39(1):96-106

Center for Critical Care Nephrology, Department of Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.

Acute kidney injury (AKI) now is recognized as a systemic disease. It occurs frequently in critically ill patients and has profound effects on morbidity and mortality. Recent research efforts have shown a bidirectional interplay between AKI and the immune system. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.10.007DOI Listing
January 2019
7 Reads

AKI and the Neuroimmune Axis.

Semin Nephrol 2019 01;39(1):85-95

Division of Nephrology and Center for Immunity, Inflammation, and Regenerative Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA. Electronic address:

Neuroimmune interaction is an emerging concept, wherein the nervous system modulates the immune system and vice versa. This concept is gaining attention as a novel therapeutic target in various inflammatory diseases including acute kidney injury (AKI). Vagus nerve stimulation or treatment with pulsed ultrasound activates the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway to prevent AKI in mice. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S02709295183015
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.10.008DOI Listing
January 2019
16 Reads

Iron Homeostasis in Healthy Kidney and its Role in Acute Kidney Injury.

Semin Nephrol 2019 01;39(1):76-84

Center for Immunity, Inflammation and Regeneration Medicine, Division of Nephrology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA. Electronic address:

Iron is required for key aspects of cellular physiology including mitochondrial function and DNA synthesis and repair. However, free iron is an aberration because of its ability to donate electrons, reduce oxygen, and generate reactive oxygen species. Iron-mediated cell injury or ferroptosis is a central player in the pathogenesis of acute kidney injury. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.10.006DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 and Klotho in AKI.

Semin Nephrol 2019 01;39(1):57-75

Division of Renal Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA.

Acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with many of the same mineral metabolite abnormalities that are observed in chronic kidney disease. These include increased circulating levels of the osteocyte-derived, vitamin D-regulating hormone, fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), and decreased renal expression of klotho, the co-receptor for FGF23. Recent data have indicated that increased FGF23 and decreased klotho levels in the blood and urine could serve as novel predictive biomarkers of incident AKI, or as novel prognostic biomarkers of adverse outcomes in patients with established AKI. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.10.005DOI Listing
January 2019
4 Reads

Dysregulated Mineral Metabolism in AKI.

Semin Nephrol 2019 01;39(1):41-56

Division of Nephrology, Department of Medcine, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY.

Dysregulated mineral metabolism is a nearly universal sequalae of acute kidney injury (AKI). Abnormalities in circulating mineral metabolites observed in patients with AKI include hypocalcemia, hyperparathyroidism, hyperphosphatemia, decreased vitamin D metabolite levels, and increased fibroblast growth factor 23 levels. We review the pathophysiology of dysregulated mineral metabolism in AKI with a focus on calcium, phosphate, parathyroid hormone, and vitamin D metabolites. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.10.004DOI Listing
January 2019
7 Reads

Cardiorenal Syndrome in Acute Kidney Injury.

Semin Nephrol 2019 01;39(1):31-40

International Renal Research Institute, S. Bortolo Hospital, Vicenza, Italy.

Varying degrees of cardiac and kidney dysfunction commonly are observed in hospitalized patients. As a demonstration of the significant interplay between the heart and kidneys, dysfunction or injury of one organ often contributes to dysfunction or injury of the other. The term cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) was proposed to describe this complex organ cross-talk. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S02709295183015
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.10.003DOI Listing
January 2019
34 Reads

Pulmonary Consequences of Acute Kidney Injury.

Semin Nephrol 2019 01;39(1):3-16

Division of Renal Diseases and Hypertension, Department of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado. Electronic address:

Mortality rates among critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) requiring renal replacement therapy typically exceed 50%, rates that have not improved significantly despite ongoing advancements in renal replacement therapy. A growing body of animal and human data have accumulated over the past 2 decades that have shown that AKI is associated with a series of distant organ effects that may contribute to the persistently high mortality of AKI. In this review, we describe the pulmonary sequelae of AKI, focusing on mechanisms of pulmonary edema in the context of traditional complications of AKI (eg, volume overload, acidosis) and nontraditional complications of AKI (eg, systemic inflammation). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.10.001DOI Listing
January 2019
4 Reads

Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, and Management of Hepatorenal Syndrome.

Semin Nephrol 2019 01;39(1):17-30

University College London Centre for Nephrology, Division of Medicine, University College London Medical School, Royal Free Hospital, London, UK. Electronic address:

Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common presentation in patients with advanced cirrhosis hospitalized with acute decompensation. A new revised classification now divides AKI in cirrhotic patients into two broad subgroups: hepatorenal syndrome AKI (HRS AKI) and non-hepatorenal syndrome AKI (non-HRS AKI). HRS AKI represents the end-stage complication of decompensated cirrhosis with severe portal hypertension and is characterized by worsening of renal function in the absence of prerenal azotemia, nephrotoxicity, and intrinsic renal disease. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.10.002DOI Listing
January 2019
10 Reads

Gut Microbiota-Kidney Cross-Talk in Acute Kidney Injury.

Semin Nephrol 2019 01;39(1):107-116

Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. Electronic address:

The recent surge in research on the intestinal microbiota has greatly changed our understanding of human biology. Significant technical advances in DNA sequencing analysis and its application to metagenomics and metatranscriptomics has profoundly enhanced our ability to quantify and track complex microbial communities and to begin understanding their impact on human health and disease. This has led to a better understanding of the relationships between the intestinal microbiome and renal physiology/pathophysiology. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S02709295183016
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.10.009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6322425PMC
January 2019
5 Reads
3.483 Impact Factor

Introduction: Cross-Talk Between the Kidneys and Remote Organ Systems in AKI.

Authors:
David E Leaf

Semin Nephrol 2019 01;39(1):1-2

Division of Renal Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.10.010DOI Listing
January 2019
4 Reads

Causal Connections From Chronic Kidney Disease to Cardiac Fibrosis.

Semin Nephrol 2018 11;38(6):629-636

Department of Cardiology and Pneumology, University Medical Center Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany; German Center for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK), Partner Site, Goettingen, Germany. Electronic address:

Cardiovascular disease and heart failure are the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease. Because impairment of kidney function correlates with heart failure and cardiac fibrosis, a kidney-heart axis is suspected. Although our understanding of the underlying mechanisms still is evolving, the possibility that kidney-heart messengers could be intercepted offers ample reason to focus on this clinically highly relevant problem. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S02709295183013
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.08.007DOI Listing
November 2018
14 Reads

Oral Anticoagulation in Patients With End-Stage Kidney Disease on Dialysis and Atrial Fibrillation.

Semin Nephrol 2018 11;38(6):618-628

Section of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX. Electronic address:

Patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) have an elevated incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF) and are at increased risk for thromboembolic events. However, these patients are also at increased risk for bleeding and it is unclear whether they benefit from an oral anticoagulant. Point prevalent on July 1, 2015, only ~28% of dialysis patients with AF were on oral anticoagulation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.08.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6233322PMC
November 2018
3 Reads

Heart Failure in End-Stage Kidney Disease: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Therapeutic Strategies.

Semin Nephrol 2018 11;38(6):600-617

Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, TX; Baylor Heart and Vascular Institute, Dallas, TX; Baylor Jack and Jane Hamilton Heart and Vascular Hospital, Dallas, TX.

Heart failure (HF) is a major comorbidity in patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). The pathogenesis of HF in patients on renal replacement therapy represents the confluence of several traditional and nontraditional vascular risk factors, unique to the milieu of chronic kidney disease and the dialysis modality. The diagnosis of HF with ESKD is complicated by the background of frequent inevitable fluid shifts superimposed on underlying myocardial pump abnormalities and dialysis-induced myocardial stunning. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S02709295183013
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.08.005DOI Listing
November 2018
18 Reads

Risk Stratification and Treatment of Coronary Disease in Chronic Kidney Disease and End-Stage Kidney Disease.

Semin Nephrol 2018 11;38(6):582-599

Division of Nephrology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California.

Patients with advanced chronic kidney disease have an enormous burden of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, but, paradoxically, their representation in randomized trials for the evaluation and management of coronary artery disease has been limited. Clinicians therefore are faced with the conundrum of synergizing evidence from observational studies, expert opinion, and extrapolation from the general population to provide care to this complex and clinically distinct patient population. In this review, we address clinical risk stratification of patients with chronic kidney disease and end-stage kidney disease using traditional cardiovascular risk factors, noninvasive functional and structural cardiac imaging, invasive coronary angiography, and cardiovascular biomarkers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.08.004DOI Listing
November 2018
4 Reads

Dialysis Prescription and Sudden Death.

Semin Nephrol 2018 11;38(6):570-581

Harold Simmons Center for Kidney Disease Research and Epidemiology, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, University of California Irvine School of Medicine, Orange, CA; Section of Nephrology, Tibor Rubin Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Long Beach, CA.

In the United States, end-stage renal disease patients receiving hemodialysis have an exceedingly high risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD), accounting for 29% of death events, likely relating to their uremic milieu, recurring exposure to fluid and electrolyte fluxes, and underlying cardiovascular pathology. Furthermore, epidemiologic studies have shown that SCD events, as well as mortality and hospitalizations, occur most frequently on the first dialysis day after the long interdialytic gap, suggesting that abrupt fluctuations in the accumulation and removal of electrolytes, fluid, and uremic toxins over the dialysis cycle may be contributory. Some population-based observational studies have suggested that lower dialysate potassium concentrations appear to be associated with a heightened risk of postdialysis cardiac arrest in hemodialysis patients, although the optimal serum-to-dialysate potassium gradient remains unclear. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S02709295183012
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.08.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6392037PMC
November 2018
13 Reads
3.483 Impact Factor

Cardiovascular Disease in Children and Adolescents With Chronic Kidney Disease.

Semin Nephrol 2018 11;38(6):559-569

Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH. Electronic address:

The lifespan of children with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD), although improved over the past 2 decades, remains low compared with the general pediatric population. Similar to adults with CKD, cardiovascular disease accounts for a majority of deaths in children with CKD because these patients have a high prevalence of traditional and uremia-related risk factors for cardiovascular disease. The cardiovascular alterations that cause these terminal events begin early in pediatric CKD. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.08.002DOI Listing
November 2018
5 Reads

Update on Chronic Kidney Disease Mineral and Bone Disorder in Cardiovascular Disease.

Semin Nephrol 2018 11;38(6):542-558

Department of Medicine, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC; Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC; Department of Medicine, Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, NC. Electronic address:

Chronic kidney disease mineral and bone disorder (MBD) encompasses changes in mineral ion and vitamin D metabolism that are widespread in the setting of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. MBD components associate with cardiovascular disease in many epidemiologic studies. Through impacts on hypertension, activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, vascular calcification, endothelial function, and cardiac remodeling and conduction, MBD may be a direct and targetable cause of cardiovascular disease. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S02709295183012
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.08.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6372293PMC
November 2018
14 Reads

Introduction: Cardiovascular Disease in Chronic Kidney Disease.

Authors:
David M Charytan

Semin Nephrol 2018 11;38(6):541

Division of Nephrology New York University School of MedicineNew York, NY.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.08.008DOI Listing
November 2018
3 Reads

Treatment of IgA Nephropathy: Evolution Over Half a Century.

Semin Nephrol 2018 09;38(5):531-540

Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.

Fifty years into the original description of IgA nephropathy, there is still no specific therapy for this condition and general measures including blood pressure control with blockers of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and salt restriction remain the cornerstone to slow disease progression. Although the paucity in treatment advances could be related to the disease's complex pathogenesis, which requires multiple hits, heterogeneity as reflected by diverse ethnic differences, and genetic predisposition and histopathologic variations, many nonspecific and immunomodulatory agents have been tested with variable degrees of success and tribulations. Here, we review the evolution of these different therapeutic approaches over time that culminated in the 2012 Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes Clinical Practice Guideline for Glomerulonephritis that presently is being updated, and provide an appraisal of recent data on various forms of immunosuppressive agents. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.05.023DOI Listing
September 2018
24 Reads

Biomarkers and Precision Medicine in IgA Nephropathy.

Semin Nephrol 2018 09;38(5):521-530

Policlinic, University of Bari, Bari, Italy; Laboratory Research, Schena Foundation, Valenzano, Bari, Italy.

The field of biomarker research in IgA nephropathy has experienced a major boost in recent years with the publication of a large number of scientific reports. Candidate biomarkers from blood, urine, and renal tissue obtained through the use of clinical chemistry, molecular biology, and omics have been proposed for translation in clinical practice. Nevertheless, individual biomarkers often lack sensitivity and specificity with the consequent impairment of disease specificity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.05.022DOI Listing
September 2018
5 Reads

Murine Models of Human IgA Nephropathy.

Semin Nephrol 2018 09;38(5):513-520

Department of Nephrology, Juntendo University Faculty of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common form of primary glomerulonephritis in the world. IgAN is characterized by mesangial deposits of IgA1-containing immune complexes. IgA1 usually co-deposits with complement C3 and variable IgG and/or IgM. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.05.021DOI Listing
September 2018
5 Reads

The Gut-Renal Connection in IgA Nephropathy.

Authors:
Rosanna Coppo

Semin Nephrol 2018 09;38(5):504-512

Fondazione Ricerca Molinette, Turin, Italy. Electronic address:

The connection between a dysregulated gut-associated lymphoid tissue and IgA nephropathy (IgAN) was supposed decades ago after the observation of increased association of IgAN with celiac disease. Pivotal studies have shown a role for alimentary antigens, particularly gliadin in developing IgAN in BALB/c mice, and a reduction in IgA antigliadin antibodies and proteinuria was reported after gluten free-diet in patients with IgAN. Recently a genome-wide association study showed that most loci associated with IgAN also are associated with immune-mediated inflammatory bowel diseases, maintenance of the intestinal barrier, and response to gut pathogens. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S02709295183008
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.05.020DOI Listing
September 2018
8 Reads

Role of the Spleen Tyrosine Kinase Pathway in Driving Inflammation in IgA Nephropathy.

Semin Nephrol 2018 09;38(5):496-503

Renal and Vascular Inflammation Section, Department of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital Campus, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.. Electronic address:

IgA nephropathy is the most common type of primary glomerulonephritis worldwide. At least 25% of patients may progress to kidney failure requiring dialysis or transplantation. Treatment of IgA nephropathy using generalized immunosuppression is controversial, with concerns regarding the balance of safety and efficacy in a nonspecific approach. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S02709295183008
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.05.019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6135887PMC
September 2018
13 Reads

Role of Mesangial-Podocytic-Tubular Cross-Talk in IgA Nephropathy.

Semin Nephrol 2018 09;38(5):485-495

Department of Medicine, Queen Mary Hospital, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong.

IgA nephropathy (IgAN), a common primary glomerulonephritis worldwide, is associated with a substantial risk of progression to end-stage renal failure. The disease runs a highly variable clinical course with frequent involvement of tubulointerstitial damage. A subgroup of IgAN with proximal tubular epithelial cells (PTECs) and tubulointerstitial damage often is associated with rapid progression to end-stage renal failure. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S02709295183008
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.05.018DOI Listing
September 2018
11 Reads

Histologic Classification of IgA Nephropathy: Past, Present, and Future.

Semin Nephrol 2018 09;38(5):477-484

Department of Cellular Pathology, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, United Kingdom.. Electronic address:

IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common glomerulonephritis worldwide. Since its description in 1968, a number of histologic descriptions and classification systems have emerged, the most recent of which is the Oxford Classification of IgAN. We present a historical panorama of histologic classifications of IgAN and discuss the most recent developments, updates, and future challenges of the Oxford Classification of IgAN. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.05.017DOI Listing
September 2018
16 Reads

Aberrant Glycosylation of the IgA1 Molecule in IgA Nephropathy.

Semin Nephrol 2018 09;38(5):461-476

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL.

IgA nephropathy, the most common primary glomerulonephritis in the world and a frequent cause of end-stage renal disease, is characterized by typical mesangial deposits of IgA1, as described by Berger and Hinglaise in 1968. Since then, it has been discovered that aberrant IgA1 O-glycosylation is involved in disease pathogenesis. Progress in glycomic, genomic, clinical, analytical, and biochemical studies has shown autoimmune features of IgA nephropathy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.05.016DOI Listing
September 2018
5 Reads

Genetic Determinants of IgA Nephropathy: Eastern Perspective.

Authors:
Ming Li Xue-Qing Yu

Semin Nephrol 2018 09;38(5):455-460

Department of Nephrology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China.; Key Laboratory of Nephrology, National Health Commission (NHC) and Guangdong Province, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China.; Guangdong Medical University, Zhanjiang, Guangdong, China.. Electronic address:

IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is one of the most common primary glomerulonephritides throughout the world and a major cause of end-stage renal disease among the East Asian population. It is widely considered that genetic factors play an important role in the pathogenesis of IgAN. This article summarizes the recent achievements in the genetic studies of IgAN, focusing mainly on studies performed in East Asia, from the early association studies of candidate genes and family based designs, to the recent genome-wide association studies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.05.015DOI Listing
September 2018
6 Reads

Genetic Determinants of IgA Nephropathy: Western Perspective.

Semin Nephrol 2018 09;38(5):443-454

Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY. Electronic address:

IgA nephropathy (IgAN) represents a genetically complex multifactorial trait. Its prevalence and clinical features vary geographically, and the disease has a range of clinical presentations that suggest multiple subtypes. Although familial aggregation of IgAN has been reported and prior linkage studies have highlighted significant locus heterogeneity, specific genetic variants underlying familial IgAN have not yet been defined. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.05.014DOI Listing
September 2018
6 Reads

Epidemiology of IgA Nephropathy: A Global Perspective.

Semin Nephrol 2018 09;38(5):435-442

Department of Nephrology, Grigore T. Popa University of Medicine and Pharmacology, Iasi, Romania.

IgA nephropathy (IgAN), or Berger's disease, is the most common primary glomerular disease worldwide, but varies largely in its geographic distribution. A systematic review of 1,619 publications from the five continental regions of the world was performed to assess the prevalence of IgAN in different worldwide regions and analyze factors responsible for geographic differences. All observational studies that described the prevalence and incidence data on glomerulonephritis were considered. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.05.013DOI Listing
September 2018
14 Reads

An Overview of IgA Nephropathy: 50 Years On.

Authors:
Sydney C W Tang

Semin Nephrol 2018 09;38(5):433-434

Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong, China.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.05.024DOI Listing
September 2018
5 Reads

Dialysis Patient-Centeredness and Precision Medicine: Focus on Incremental Home Hemodialysis and Preserving Residual Kidney Function.

Semin Nephrol 2018 07;38(4):426-432

Harold Simmons Center for Kidney Disease Research and Epidemiology, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, University of California Irvine Medical Center, Orange, CA.; Tibor Rubin Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach, CA.; Department of Epidemiology, University of California Los Angeles Fielding School of Public Health, Los Angeles, CA.; Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute, Harbor-University of California Los Angeles, Torrance, CA.. Electronic address:

An exponential interest in incremental transition to dialysis recently has emerged in lieu of outright three times/wk hemodialysis initiation as the standard of care. Incremental dialysis is consistent with precision medicine, given individualized dialysis dose adjustment based on patient's dynamic needs, leading to reduced patient suffering from longer or more frequent dialysis treatments and improved health-related quality of life. It includes twice-weekly or less frequent hemodialysis treatments with or without a low-protein diet on nondialysis days, or a shorter (<3 h) hemodialysis treatment three times per week or more frequent treatments, a useful approach for home hemodialysis initiation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.05.012DOI Listing
July 2018
7 Reads
3.483 Impact Factor

Using Technology to Inform and Deliver Precise Personalized Care to Patients With End-Stage Kidney Disease.

Semin Nephrol 2018 07;38(4):418-425

Medical Office, Fresenius Medical Care North America, Waltham, MA.

Consistent with the increase of precision medicine, the care of patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) requiring maintenance dialysis therapy should evolve to become more personalized. Precise and personalized care is nuanced and informed by a number of factors including an individual's needs and preferences, disease progression, and response to and tolerance of treatments. Technology can support the delivery of more precise and personalized care through multiple mechanisms, including more accurate and real-time assessments of key care elements, enhanced treatment monitoring, and remote monitoring of home dialysis therapies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.05.011DOI Listing
July 2018
3 Reads

Personalized Anemia Management and Precision Medicine in ESA and Iron Pharmacology in End-Stage Kidney Disease.

Semin Nephrol 2018 07;38(4):410-417

Clinical Affairs, DaVita Kidney Care, Denver, CO.

Substantial progress has been made in the application of computer-driven methods to provide erythropoietic dosing information for patients with anemia resulting from chronic kidney disease. Initial solutions were simply computerized versions of traditional paper-based anemia management protocols. True personalization was achieved through the use of advanced modeling techniques such as artificial neural networks, physiologic models, and feedback control systems. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.05.010DOI Listing
July 2018
20 Reads

Personalized Management of Bone and Mineral Disorders and Precision Medicine in End-Stage Kidney Disease.

Semin Nephrol 2018 07;38(4):397-409

Division of Renal Diseases and Hypertension, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO.. Electronic address:

Chronic kidney disease mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is common in end-stage renal disease and is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Mainstays of treatment include decreasing serum phosphorus level toward the normal range with dietary interventions and phosphate binders and treating increased parathyroid hormone levels with activated vitamin D and/or calcimimetics. There is significant variation in serum levels of mineral metabolism markers, intestinal absorption of phosphorus, and therapeutic response among individual patients and subgroups of patients with end-stage renal disease. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S02709295183007
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.05.009DOI Listing
July 2018
28 Reads

Precision Medicine for Nutritional Management in End-Stage Kidney Disease and Transition to Dialysis.

Semin Nephrol 2018 07;38(4):383-396

Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, Los Angeles, CA.

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a global public health burden. Dialysis is not only costly but may not be readily available in developing countries. Even in highly developed nations, many patients may prefer to defer or avoid dialysis. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S02709295183007
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.05.008DOI Listing
July 2018
7 Reads
3.483 Impact Factor

Precision Medicine and Personalized Management of Lipoprotein and Lipid Disorders in Chronic and End-Stage Kidney Disease.

Semin Nephrol 2018 07;38(4):369-382

Harold Simmons Center for Kidney Disease Research and Epidemiology, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, University of California Irvine Medical Center, Orange, CA.; Nephrology Section, Tibor Rubin Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Long Beach, CA.

Precision medicine is an emerging field that calls for individualization of treatment strategies based on characteristics unique to each patient. In lipid management, current guidelines are driven mainly by clinical trial results that presently indicate that patients with non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (CKD) should be treated with a β-hydroxy β-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitor, also known as statin therapy. For patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) being treated with hemodialysis, statin therapy has not been shown to successfully reduce poor outcomes in trials and therefore is not recommended. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.05.007DOI Listing
July 2018
6 Reads

Patient-Centered Approach for Hypertension Management in End-Stage Kidney Disease: Art or Science?

Semin Nephrol 2018 07;38(4):355-368

Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, University of TennesseeHealth Science Center, Memphis, TN.; Nephrology Section, Memphis VA Medical Center, Memphis, TN.. Electronic address:

Hypertension is present in most patients with end-stage kidney disease initiating dialysis and management of hypertension is a routine but challenging task in everyday dialysis care. End-stage kidney disease patients are uniquely heterogeneous individuals with significant variations in demographic characteristics, functional capacity, and presence of concomitant comorbid conditions and their severity. Therefore, these patients require personalized approaches in addressing not only hypertension but related illnesses, while also accounting for overall prognosis and projected longevity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.05.006DOI Listing
July 2018
4 Reads

Precision Medicine and Personalized Approach to Renal Transplantation.

Semin Nephrol 2018 07;38(4):346-354

Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Department of Medicine, University of California-Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, CA.

Successful renal transplantation is a highly effective endeavor that improves and prolongs the lives of patients with chronic kidney disease. Transplant surgery and immunosuppression carries risk and the demand for donor kidneys outstrips supply by far. These realities mandate thoughtful allocation and utilization of this limited resource to select candidates. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.05.005DOI Listing
July 2018
4 Reads
3.483 Impact Factor

Personalized Approach and Precision Medicine in Supportive and End-of-Life Care for Patients With Advanced and End-Stage Kidney Disease.

Authors:
Sara N Davison

Semin Nephrol 2018 07;38(4):336-345

Division of Nephrology and Immunology, Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.. Electronic address:

Kidney supportive care requires a highly personalized approach to care. Precision medicine holds promise for a deeper understanding of the pathophysiology of symptoms and related syndromes and more precise individualization of prognosis and treatment estimates, therefore providing valuable opportunities for greater personalization of supportive care. However, the major drivers of quality of life are psychosocial, economic, lifestyle, and preference-based, and consideration of these factors and skilled communication are integral to the provision of excellent and personalized kidney supportive care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.05.004DOI Listing
July 2018
21 Reads

Precision Medicine in the Transition to Dialysis and Personalized Renal Replacement Therapy.

Semin Nephrol 2018 07;38(4):325-335

Harold Simmons Center for Kidney Disease Research and Epidemiology, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, University of California Irvine, School of Medicine, Orange, CA.; Tibor Rubin Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Long Beach, CA.; Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute, Harbor-University of California Los Angeles, Torrance, CA.

Launched in 2016, the overarching goal of the Precision Medicine Initiative is to promote a personalized approach to disease management that takes into account an individual's unique underlying biology and genetics, lifestyle, and environment, in lieu of a one-size-fits-all model. The concept of precision medicine is pervasive across many areas of nephrology and has been particularly relevant to the care of advanced chronic kidney disease patients transitioning to end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). Given many uncertainties surrounding the optimal transition of incident ESKD patients to dialysis and transplantation, as well as the high mortality rates observed during this delicate transition period, there is a pressing urgency for implementing precision medicine in the management of this population. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2018.05.003DOI Listing
July 2018
2 Reads
3.483 Impact Factor