659 results match your criteria Seminars in Immunopathology [Journal]


Subclinical inflammation and depressive symptoms in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

Semin Immunopathol 2019 Feb 18. Epub 2019 Feb 18.

German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), München-Neuherberg, Germany.

Depression is a frequent comorbidity of type 1 diabetes (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Depression and diabetes are linked by a bidirectional relationship, but the underlying mechanisms are still incompletely understood. Experimental, observational and intervention studies showed that inflammatory processes contribute to the development of depression in animal models and humans. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-019-00730-xDOI Listing
February 2019

Sex differences in immunity.

Semin Immunopathol 2019 Mar 11;41(2):133-135. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Institute for Immunology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-00728-xDOI Listing

Correction to: Potential importance of B cells in aging and aging-associated neurodegenerative diseases.

Semin Immunopathol 2019 Mar;41(2):277

Brudnick Neuropsychiatric Research Institute, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA.

The original version of this article unfortunately contained mistakes. Two references were given incorrectly (under number 40 and 41). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-00729-wDOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Sex differences in vaccine-induced humoral immunity.

Semin Immunopathol 2019 Mar 13;41(2):239-249. Epub 2018 Dec 13.

Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT, and Harvard, 400 Technology Square, Cambridge, MA, 02139, USA.

Vaccines are among the most impactful public health interventions, preventing millions of new infections and deaths annually worldwide. However, emerging data suggest that vaccines may not protect all populations equally. Specifically, studies analyzing variation in vaccine-induced immunity have pointed to the critical impact of genetics, the environment, nutrition, the microbiome, and sex in influencing vaccine responsiveness. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0726-5DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Sexual dimorphism in hepatitis B and C and hepatocellular carcinoma.

Semin Immunopathol 2019 Mar 29;41(2):203-211. Epub 2018 Nov 29.

Department of Medicine II (Gastroenterology, Hepatology, Endocrinology and Infectious Diseases), Medical Center University of Freiburg, Faculty of Medicine, University of Freiburg, Hugstetter Str. 55, 79106, Freiburg, Germany.

The incidence of viral hepatitis B or C (HBV/HCV) infection and hepatocellular carcinoma is higher in male compared to female populations, showing a faster disease progression and results in a worse overall survival. Indeed, women are in general better protected from viral infections and show a lower risk of death from malignant cancer in comparison to men. Females mount stronger innate and adaptive immune responses than males, and therefore, most of the autoimmune diseases occur predominantly in females. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0727-4DOI Listing
March 2019
15 Reads

Homage to Mechnikov - the phagocytic system: past and present.

Authors:
Toru Miyazaki

Semin Immunopathol 2018 11 31;40(6):519-521. Epub 2018 Oct 31.

Laboratory of Molecular Biomedicine for Pathogenesis, Center for Disease Biology and Integrative Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0033, Japan.

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00281-018-0719-4
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0719-4DOI Listing
November 2018
6 Reads

Developing combination strategies using PD-1 checkpoint inhibitors to treat cancer.

Authors:
Emmett V Schmidt

Semin Immunopathol 2019 01 29;41(1):21-30. Epub 2018 Oct 29.

Merck & Co., Inc., Kenilworth, NJ, USA.

More than 3000 clinical trials are evaluating the clinical activity of the PD-1 checkpoint inhibitors as monotherapies and in combinations with other cancer therapies [1]. The PD-1 checkpoint inhibitors are remarkable for their clinical activities in shrinking tumors across a wide range of tumor types, in causing durable responses, and in their tolerability. These attributes position them as favorable agents in clinical combinations. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00281-018-0714-9
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0714-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6323091PMC
January 2019
13 Reads

Sex differences in tuberculosis.

Semin Immunopathol 2019 Mar 25;41(2):225-237. Epub 2018 Oct 25.

Coinfection Unit, Priority Research Area Infections, Research Center Borstel, Parkallee 1-40, 23847, Borstel, Germany.

Tuberculosis is the most prevalent bacterial infectious disease in humans and the leading cause of death from a single infectious agent, ranking above HIV/AIDS. The causative agent, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is carried by an estimated two billion people globally and claims more than 1.5 million lives each year. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00281-018-0725-6
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0725-6DOI Listing
March 2019
9 Reads

Sexual dimorphism in solid and hematological malignancies.

Semin Immunopathol 2019 Mar 25;41(2):251-263. Epub 2018 Oct 25.

Department of Oncology, Hematology and Bone Marrow Transplantation with Section Pneumology, Hubertus Wald Tumorzentrum, Hubertus Wald Comprehensive Cancer Center Hamburg, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20246, Hamburg, Germany.

Cancer represents a leading cause of death with continuously increasing incidence worldwide. Many solid cancer types in non-reproductive organs are significantly more frequent and deadly in males compared to females. This sex-biased difference is also present in hematologic malignancies. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00281-018-0724-7
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0724-7DOI Listing
March 2019
9 Reads

Off-the-shelf cell therapy with induced pluripotent stem cell-derived natural killer cells.

Semin Immunopathol 2019 01 25;41(1):59-68. Epub 2018 Oct 25.

The KG Jebsen Center for Cancer Immunotherapy, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.

Cell therapy is emerging as a very promising therapeutic modality against cancer, spearheaded by the clinical success of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) modified T cells for B cell malignancies. Currently, FDA-approved CAR-T cell products are based on engineering of autologous T cells harvested from the patient, typically using a central manufacturing facility for gene editing before the product can be delivered to the clinic and infused to the patients. For a broader implementation of advanced cell therapy and to reduce costs, it would be advantageous to use allogeneic "universal" cell therapy products that can be stored in cell banks and provided upon request, in a manner analogous to biopharmaceutical drug products. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00281-018-0721-x
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0721-xDOI Listing
January 2019
11 Reads

Sex differences in autoimmune disorders of the central nervous system.

Semin Immunopathol 2019 Mar 25;41(2):177-188. Epub 2018 Oct 25.

Institute of Neuroimmunology and Multiple Sclerosis (INIMS), Center for Molecular Neurobiology Hamburg (ZMNH), University Medical Center Hamburg Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.

Stronger adaptive immune responses in females can be observed in different mammals, resulting in better control of infections compared to males. However, this presumably evolutionary difference likely also drives higher incidence of autoimmune diseases observed in humans. Here, we summarize sex differences in the most common autoimmune diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) and discuss recent advances in the understanding of possible underlying immunological and CNS intrinsic mechanisms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0723-8DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Putting EV into context: contextual factors influencing immune-related functions of extracellular vesicles (EV).

Semin Immunopathol 2018 09 23;40(5):421-424. Epub 2018 Oct 23.

Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0720-yDOI Listing
September 2018
1 Read

Androgen-dependent immune modulation in parasitic infection.

Semin Immunopathol 2019 Mar 23;41(2):213-224. Epub 2018 Oct 23.

Department of Molecular Biology and Immunology, Molecular Infection Immunology, Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine, Bernhard-Nocht-Straße 74, 20359, Hamburg, Germany.

Parasitic infections modulate the immune system of the host, resulting in either immune tolerance or the induction of pro-inflammatory defense mechanisms against the pathogen. In both cases, sex hormones are involved in the regulation of the immune response, as they are present in the systemic circulation and can act on a wide variety of cell types, including immune cells. Men and women have a different milieu of sex hormones, and these hormones play a role in determining immune responses to parasitic infections. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0722-9DOI Listing
March 2019
3 Reads

A scavenging system against internal pathogens promoted by the circulating protein apoptosis inhibitor of macrophage (AIM).

Semin Immunopathol 2018 11 11;40(6):567-575. Epub 2018 Oct 11.

Laboratory of Molecular Biomedicine for Pathogenesis, Center for Disease Biology and Integrative Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0033, Japan.

An internal system designed to ward off and remove unnecessary or hazardous materials is intrinsic to animals. In addition to exogenous pathogens, a number of self-molecules, such as apoptotic or necrotic dead cells, their debris, and the oxides or peroxides of their cellular components, are recognized as extraneous substances. It is essential to eliminate these internal pathogens as quickly as possible because their accumulation can cause chronic inflammation as well as autoimmune responses, possibly leading to onset or progression of certain diseases. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00281-018-0717-6
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0717-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6223838PMC
November 2018
8 Reads

Macrophage-microbe interaction: lessons learned from the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

Semin Immunopathol 2018 11 10;40(6):577-591. Epub 2018 Oct 10.

Department of Biochemistry, Biozentrum, University of Basel, 50-70 Klingelbergstrasse, 4056, Basel, Switzerland.

Macrophages, being the cornerstone of the immune system, have adapted the ancient nutrient acquisition mechanism of phagocytosis to engulf various infectious organisms thereby helping to orchestrate an appropriate host response. Phagocytosis refers to the process of internalization and degradation of particulate material, damaged and senescent cells and microorganisms by specialized cells, after which the vesicle containing the ingested particle, the phagosome, matures into acidic phagolysosomes upon fusion with hydrolytic enzyme-containing lysosomes. The destructive power of the macrophage is further exacerbated through the induction of macrophage activation upon a variety of inflammatory stimuli. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0710-0DOI Listing
November 2018
3 Reads

The microgenderome revealed: sex differences in bidirectional interactions between the microbiota, hormones, immunity and disease susceptibility.

Semin Immunopathol 2019 Mar 8;41(2):265-275. Epub 2018 Oct 8.

School of Health Sciences, College of Health and Medicine, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia.

Sex differences in immunity are well described in the literature and thought to be mainly driven by sex hormones and sex-linked immune response genes. The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is one of the largest immune organs in the body and contains multiple immune cells in the GIT-associated lymphoid tissue, Peyer's patches and elsewhere, which together have profound effects on local and systemic inflammation. The GIT is colonised with microbial communities composed of bacteria, fungi and viruses, collectively known as the GIT microbiota. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00281-018-0716-7
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0716-7DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Developmental origin and sex-specific risk for infections and immune diseases later in life.

Semin Immunopathol 2019 Mar 8;41(2):137-151. Epub 2018 Oct 8.

Department of Obstetrics and Fetal Medicine, Laboratory for Experimental Feto-Maternal Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.

The intrauterine environment is an important determinant of immunity later in life of the offspring. An altered prenatal immune development can result in a high postnatal risk for infections, chronic immune diseases, and autoimmunity. Many of these immune diseases show a strong sex bias, such as a high incidence of autoimmune diseases and allergies in adult females or a high risk for infections in males. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0713-xDOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Sex and sex steroids impact influenza pathogenesis across the life course.

Semin Immunopathol 2019 Mar 8;41(2):189-194. Epub 2018 Oct 8.

Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA.

Males and females differ in the outcome of influenza A virus (IAV) infections, which depends significantly on age. During a typical seasonal influenza epidemic, young children (< 10 years of age) and aged adults (65+ years of age) are at greatest risk for severe disease, and among these age groups, males tend to suffer a worse outcome from IAV infection than females. Following infection with either pandemic or outbreak strains of IAVs, females of reproductive ages (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0718-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6370518PMC
March 2019
1 Read

Sex-related factors in autoimmune liver diseases.

Semin Immunopathol 2019 Mar 1;41(2):165-175. Epub 2018 Oct 1.

I. Department of Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistr. 52, 20246, Hamburg, Germany.

Autoimmune diseases are a broad range of diseases in which the immune system produces an inappropriate response to self-antigens. This results in inflammation, damage, or dysfunction of tissues and/or organs. Many autoimmune diseases are more common in women and differences between female and male immune and autoimmune responses have been well documented. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0715-8DOI Listing
March 2019
3 Reads

Sexual dimorphism in HIV-1 infection.

Semin Immunopathol 2019 Mar 1;41(2):195-202. Epub 2018 Oct 1.

German Center for Infection Research, partner site Hamburg-Lübeck-Borstel, Hamburg, Germany.

Sex-specific differences affecting various aspects of HIV-1 infection have been reported, including differences in susceptibility to infection, course of HIV-1 disease, and establishment of viral reservoirs. Once infected, initial plasma levels of HIV-1 viremia in women are lower compared to men while the rates of progression to AIDS are similar. Factors contributing to these sex differences are poorly understood, and range from anatomical differences and differential expression of sex hormones to differences in immune responses, the microbiome and socio-economic discrepancies, all of which may impact HIV-1 acquisition and disease progression. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0704-yDOI Listing
March 2019
12 Reads

Female predisposition to TLR7-driven autoimmunity: gene dosage and the escape from X chromosome inactivation.

Semin Immunopathol 2019 Mar 1;41(2):153-164. Epub 2018 Oct 1.

Centre de Physiopathologie de Toulouse Purpan (CPTP), Université de Toulouse, INSERM, CNRS, Université Paul Sabatier, 31300, Toulouse, France.

Women develop stronger immune responses than men, with positive effects on the resistance to viral or bacterial infections but magnifying also the susceptibility to autoimmune diseases like systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In SLE, the dosage of the endosomal Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) is crucial. Murine models have shown that TLR7 overexpression suffices to induce spontaneous lupus-like disease. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00281-018-0712-y
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0712-yDOI Listing
March 2019
8 Reads

Anti-cancer immunotherapy: breakthroughs and future strategies.

Semin Immunopathol 2019 01 21;41(1):1-3. Epub 2018 Sep 21.

Center for Cancer Immune Therapy (CCIT), Department of Hematology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev, DK-2730, Herlev, Denmark.

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00281-018-0711-z
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0711-zDOI Listing
January 2019
6 Reads

Correction to: Complement in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

Authors:
B Paul Morgan

Semin Immunopathol 2018 09;40(5):517

Systems Immunity Research Institute and Dementia Research Institute Cardiff, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, CF14 4XN, UK.

The presentation of Fig. 2 was incorrect. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0709-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6208653PMC
September 2018
1 Read

IgA nephropathy: clearance kinetics of IgA-containing immune complexes.

Semin Immunopathol 2018 Sep 14. Epub 2018 Sep 14.

Graduate Institute of Aerospace and Undersea Medicine, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan.

IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is associated predominantly IgA deposition in the affected glomeruli and has been shown to be the most common glomerular disorder among young people in the world. Although the exact pathogenic mechanism underlying IgAN remains largely unknown, circulating IgA-containing immune complexes (IgA ICs) is considered to play a major role in initiating the development and evolution of the renal disorder. In this review article, we discuss the fundamental mechanisms of clearance kinetics of IgA ICs and related issues, covering the following: (1) role of circulating IgA ICs in the pathogenesis of IgAN and (2) elimination of IgA ICs from the body, with emphasis of the role of the liver and Fc receptors in immune cells. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00281-018-0708-7
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0708-7DOI Listing
September 2018
17 Reads

Extracellular vesicles in cancer immune responses: roles of purinergic receptors.

Authors:
Michael W Graner

Semin Immunopathol 2018 Sep 12. Epub 2018 Sep 12.

Department of Neurosurgery, University of Colorado Denver, Anschutz Medical Campus, RC2, 12700 E 19th Ave, Room 5125, Aurora, CO, 80045, USA.

Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are nano- to micro-scale membrane-enclosed vesicles that are released from presumably all cell types. Tumor cells and immune cells are prodigious generators of EVs often with competing phenotypes in terms of immune suppression versus immune stimulation. Purinergic receptors, proteins that bind diverse purine nucleotides and nucleosides (ATP, ADP, AMP, adenosine), are widely expressed across tissues and cell types, and are prominent players in immune and tumor cell nucleotide metabolism. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00281-018-0706-9
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0706-9DOI Listing
September 2018
15 Reads

Picket-fences in the plasma membrane: functions in immune cells and phagocytosis.

Semin Immunopathol 2018 Sep 12. Epub 2018 Sep 12.

Program in Cell Biology, Peter Gilgan Centre for Research and Learning, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada.

Recent studies of molecular mobility in the plasma membrane have revealed that diffusion is restricted by cytoskeletal networks or fences. Transmembrane protein "pickets" that reversibly associate with the membrane-associated skeleton and with the pericellular coat impede the movement of unattached bystander molecules. While membrane picket-fences were originally described as barriers to free diffusion in more passive cell types such as fibroblasts, they have particularly important functions in the more dynamic immune cells. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0705-xDOI Listing
September 2018
2 Reads

Pivotal role of innate myeloid cells in cerebral post-ischemic sterile inflammation.

Semin Immunopathol 2018 Sep 11. Epub 2018 Sep 11.

Stroke Renaissance Project, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, 2-1-6 Kamikitazawa, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo, 156-8506, Japan.

Inflammatory responses play a multifaceted role in regulating both disability and recovery after ischemic brain injury. In the acute phase of ischemic stroke, resident microglia elicit rapid inflammatory responses by the ischemic milieu. After disruption of the blood-brain barrier, peripheral-derived neutrophils and mononuclear phagocytes infiltrate into the ischemic brain. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00281-018-0707-8
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0707-8DOI Listing
September 2018
21 Reads

Inhibiting IDO pathways to treat cancer: lessons from the ECHO-301 trial and beyond.

Semin Immunopathol 2019 01 10;41(1):41-48. Epub 2018 Sep 10.

Lankenau Institute for Medical Research (LIMR), 100 East Lancaster Avenue, Wynnewood, PA, 19096, USA.

With immunotherapy enjoying a rapid resurgence based on the achievement of durable remissions in some patients with agents that derepress immune function, commonly referred to as "checkpoint inhibitors," enormous attention developed around the IDO1 enzyme as a metabolic mediator of immune escape in cancer. In particular, outcomes of multiple phase 1/2 trials encouraged the idea that small molecule inhibitors of IDO1 may improve patient responses to anti-PD1 immune checkpoint therapy. However, recent results from ECHO-301, the first large phase 3 trial to evaluate an IDO1-selective enzyme inhibitor (epacadostat) in combination with an anti-PD1 antibody (pembrolizumab) in advanced melanoma, showed no indication that epacadostat provided an increased benefit. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0702-0DOI Listing
January 2019
24 Reads

Perspectives on interferon-alpha in the treatment of polycythemia vera and related myeloproliferative neoplasms: minimal residual disease and cure?

Semin Immunopathol 2019 01 10;41(1):5-19. Epub 2018 Sep 10.

Department of Hematology, Zealand University Hospital, Sygehusvej 10, 4000, Roskilde, Denmark.

The first clinical trials of the safety and efficacy of interferon-alpha2 (IFN-alpha2) were performed about 30 years ago. Since then, several single-arm studies have convincingly demonstrated that IFN-alpha2 is a highly potent anti-cancer agent in several cancer types but unfortunately not being explored sufficiently due to a high toxicity profile when using non-pegylated IFN-alpha2 or high dosages or due to competitive drugs, that for clinicians at first glance might look more attractive. Within the hematological malignancies, IFN-alpha2 has only recently been revived in patients with the Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms-essential thrombocytosis, polycythemia vera, and myelofibrosis (MPNs)-and in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in combination with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00281-018-0700-2
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0700-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6323070PMC
January 2019
9 Reads

Principles of adoptive T cell therapy in cancer.

Semin Immunopathol 2019 01 5;41(1):49-58. Epub 2018 Sep 5.

Center for Cancer Immune Therapy, Department of Hematology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Entrance 81, Floor 05, 2730, Herlev, Denmark.

Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) utilizing either tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL)-derived T cells or T cells genetically engineered to express tumor recognizing receptors has emerged as a powerful and potentially curative therapy for several cancers. Many ACT-based therapies have recently entered late-phase clinical testing, with several T cell therapies already achieving regulatory approval for the treatment of patients with B cell malignancies. In this review, we briefly outline the principles of adoptively transferred T cells for the treatment of cancer. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0703-zDOI Listing
January 2019
13 Reads

Efferocytosis in the tumor microenvironment.

Semin Immunopathol 2018 11 5;40(6):545-554. Epub 2018 Sep 5.

Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, 759 Preston Research Building, 2220 Pierce Ave, Nashville, TN, 37232, USA.

Within the course of a single minute, millions of cells in the human body will undergo programmed cell death in response to physiological or pathological cues. The diminished energetic capacity of an apoptotic cell renders the cell incapable of sustaining plasma membrane integrity. Under these circumstances, intracellular contents that might leak into the surrounding tissue microenvironment, a process referred to as secondary necrosis, could induce inflammation and tissue damage. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0698-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6223858PMC
November 2018
18 Reads

The first line of defence: insights into mechanisms and relevance of phagocytosis in epithelial cells.

Semin Immunopathol 2018 11 4;40(6):555-565. Epub 2018 Sep 4.

Institute for Genome Biology, Leibniz Institute for Farm Animal Biology, 18196, Dummerstorf, Germany.

Epithelial tissues cover most of the external and internal surfaces of the body and its organs. Inevitably, these tissues serve as first line of defence against inorganic, organic, and microbial intruders. Epithelial cells are the main cell type of these tissues. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0701-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6223882PMC
November 2018
2 Reads

Acute and chronic phagocyte determinants of cardiac allograft vasculopathy.

Semin Immunopathol 2018 11 23;40(6):593-603. Epub 2018 Aug 23.

Department of Pathology, The Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, 300 East Superior St, Chicago, IL, 60611, USA.

Post-transplant immunosuppression has reduced the incidence of T cell-mediated acute rejection, yet long-term cardiac graft survival rates remain a challenge. An important determinant of chronic solid organ allograft complication is accelerated vascular disease of the transplanted graft. In the case of cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV), the precise cellular etiology remains inadequately understood; however, histologic evidence hints at the accumulation and activation of innate phagocytes as a causal contributing factor. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0699-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6247110PMC
November 2018
12 Reads

Cancer immune therapy for lymphoid malignancies: recent advances.

Semin Immunopathol 2019 01 13;41(1):111-124. Epub 2018 Jul 13.

Center for Cancer Immunotherapy, Department of hematology, Herlev Hospital, Herlev, Denmark.

Immunotherapy has played an important part in improving the life of patients with lymphoproliferative diseases especially since the addition of rituximab to chemotherapy in the CD20-positive neoplasms in the 1990s. While this field of passive immunotherapy is continuously evolving, several breakthroughs will expand the treatment modalities to include more active immunotherapy. With the approval of immune checkpoint-blocking antibodies for Hodgkin lymphoma and bispecific antibodies for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), activation of endogenous T cells already plays a role in several lymphoid malignancies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0696-7DOI Listing
January 2019
20 Reads

Does patient age influence anti-cancer immunity?

Authors:
Graham Pawelec

Semin Immunopathol 2019 01 13;41(1):125-131. Epub 2018 Jul 13.

Second Department of Internal Medicine, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.

Geriatric oncology, important for the ever-increasing numbers of elderly cancer patients, has thus far focused primarily on tolerance to chemotherapy. With the advent of breakthrough immunomodulatory antibody treatments relying on the patient's own immune system to control the tumor, the issue of immunosenescence becomes extremely important. There is increasingly a valid concern that anti-cancer immunity may be compromised in the elderly due to (i) their low amounts of naïve T cells (potentially leading to holes in the repertoire for neoantigens), (ii) "exhaustion" of potentially tumor-specific memory T cells, and (iii) higher amounts of suppressive cells. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0697-6DOI Listing
January 2019
4 Reads

Cancer immune therapy for myeloid malignancies: present and future.

Semin Immunopathol 2019 01 9;41(1):97-109. Epub 2018 Jul 9.

Department of Hematology, Zealand University Hospital, Sygehusvej 10, 4000, Roskilde, Denmark.

The myelodysplastic syndromes, the chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms, and the acute myeloid leukemia are malignancies of the myeloid hematopoietic stem cells of the bone marrow. The diseases are characterized by a dysregulation of the immune system as both the cytokine milieu, immune phenotype, immune regulation, and expression of genes related to immune cell functions are deregulated. Several treatment strategies try to circumvent this deregulation, and several clinical and preclinical trials have shown promising results, albeit not in the same scale as chimeric antigen receptor T cells have had in the treatment of refractory lymphoid malignancies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0693-xDOI Listing
January 2019
22 Reads

Therapeutic cancer vaccine: building the future from lessons of the past.

Semin Immunopathol 2019 01 5;41(1):69-85. Epub 2018 Jul 5.

INSERM U970, Paris Cardiovascular Research Center (PARCC), Paris, France.

Anti-cancer vaccines have raised many hopes from the start of immunotherapy but have not yet been clinically successful. The few positive results of anti-cancer vaccines have been observed in clinical situations of low tumor burden or preneoplastic lesions. Several new concepts and new results reposition this therapeutic approach in the field of immunotherapy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0691-zDOI Listing
January 2019
9 Reads

The T-win® technology: immune-modulating vaccines.

Semin Immunopathol 2019 01 2;41(1):87-95. Epub 2018 Jul 2.

Center for Cancer Immune Therapy (CCIT), Department of Hematology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev, DK-2730, Herlev, Denmark.

The T-win® technology is an innovative investigational approach designed to activate the body's endogenous anti-regulatory T cells (anti-Tregs) to target regulatory as well as malignant cells. Anti-Tregs are naturally occurring T cells that can directly react against regulatory immune cells because they recognize proteins that these targets express, including indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), tryptophan 2,6-dioxygenase, arginase, and programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1). The T-win® technology is characterized by therapeutic vaccination with long peptide epitopes derived from these antigens and therefore offers a novel way to target genetically stable cells with regular human leukocyte antigen expression in the tumor microenvironment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0695-8DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Acquired resistance to cancer immunotherapy.

Semin Immunopathol 2019 01 2;41(1):31-40. Epub 2018 Jul 2.

Center for Cancer Immune Therapy (CCIT), Department of Hematology, Herlev Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Herlev Ringvej 75, 2730, Herlev, Denmark.

In recent times, advances in cancer immunotherapy have yielded impressive, durable clinical responses in patients with varied subtypes of cancer. However, a significant proportion of patients who initially demonstrate encouraging tumor regression develop resistance and progress over time. The identification of novel therapeutic approaches to overcome resistance may result in significantly improved clinical outcomes and remains an area of high scientific priority. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0692-yDOI Listing
January 2019
4 Reads

AHR signaling in the development and function of intestinal immune cells and beyond.

Semin Immunopathol 2018 07 27;40(4):371-377. Epub 2018 Jun 27.

Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 S. Euclid, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA.

The intestinal immune system is challenged daily with the task of recognizing and eliminating pathogens while simultaneously tolerating dietary and commensal antigens. All components must effectively coordinate to differentiate a continual barrage of environmental cues and mount appropriate responses dependent on the nature of the stimuli encountered. Playing a pivotal role, the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a chemical sensor that detects both dietary and microbial cues and is important for development, maintenance, and function of several types of intestinal immune cells, particularly innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) and T cells. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0694-9DOI Listing
July 2018
11 Reads

Innate lymphoid cells: key players in tissue-specific immunity.

Semin Immunopathol 2018 07 27;40(4):315-317. Epub 2018 Jun 27.

Würzburg Institute of Systems Immunology, Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Versbacher Straße 9, 97078, Würzburg, Germany.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0690-0DOI Listing
July 2018
2 Reads

The roles for innate lymphoid cells in the human immune system.

Semin Immunopathol 2018 07 12;40(4):407-419. Epub 2018 Jun 12.

Center for Infectious Medicine, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

From constituting a novel and obscure cell population, innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are now accepted as a self-evident part of the immune system, contributing with unique and complementary functions to immunity by production of effector cytokines and interaction with other cell types. In this review, we discuss the redundant and complementary roles of the highly plastic human ILCs and their interaction with other immune cells with the ultimate aim of placing ILCs in a wider context within the human immune system. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0688-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6060849PMC
July 2018
2 Reads

Innate lymphoid cells-key immune integrators of overall body homeostasis.

Semin Immunopathol 2018 07 4;40(4):319-330. Epub 2018 Jun 4.

Unit for Immunopathology, Institute of Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Pharmacology, University Hospital Bonn, University of Bonn, 53127, Bonn, Germany.

The maintenance of the tissue barrier is essential to protect the host from external pathogens, thus ensuring the survival of the organism. This process requires the integration of various physiological signals originating from the digestive, immune, endocrine, and the nervous system as indicators of overall body fitness. Innate lymphoid cells (ILC) are a group of immune cells equipped for the guarding and maintenance of the tissue barrier against invading pathogens. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0684-yDOI Listing
July 2018
4 Reads

Tumor-derived exosomes, microRNAs, and cancer immune suppression.

Semin Immunopathol 2018 09 4;40(5):505-515. Epub 2018 Jun 4.

Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, MMC 806, 420 Delaware St SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA.

Originally considered to be part of a cellular waste pathway, expansive research into exosomes has shown that these vesicles possess a vast array of functional utilities. As vital transporters of materials for communications between cells, particular interest has been generated in the ability of cancer cells to use exosomes to induce immune suppression, and to establish a thriving microenvironment, ideal for disease progression. Exosomes carry and transfer many types of cargo, including microRNAs (miRNAs; miRs), which are important modulators of messenger RNA (mRNA) expression. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0689-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6202205PMC
September 2018
2 Reads

Memory responses of innate lymphocytes and parallels with T cells.

Semin Immunopathol 2018 07 28;40(4):343-355. Epub 2018 May 28.

Immunology Program, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 408 East 69th Street, ZRC-1462, New York, NY, 10065, USA.

Natural killer (NK) cells are classified as innate immune cells, given their ability to rapidly respond and kill transformed or virally infected cells without prior sensitization. Recently, accumulating evidence suggests that NK cells also exhibit many characteristics similar to cells of the adaptive immune system. Analogous to T cells, NK cells acquire self-tolerance during development, express antigen-specific receptors, undergo clonal-like expansion, and can become long-lived, self-renewing memory cells with potent effector function providing potent protection against reappearing pathogens. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0686-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6054893PMC
July 2018
3 Reads

Intricate relationships between naked viruses and extracellular vesicles in the crosstalk between pathogen and host.

Semin Immunopathol 2018 09 22;40(5):491-504. Epub 2018 May 22.

Department of Biochemistry & Cell Biology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

It is a long-standing paradigm in the field of virology that naked viruses cause lysis of infected cells to release progeny virus. However, recent data indicate that naked virus types of the Picornaviridae and Hepeviridae families can also leave cells via an alternative route involving enclosure in fully host-derived lipid bilayers. The resulting particles resemble extracellular vesicles (EV), which are 50 nm-1 μm vesicles released by all cells. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00281-018-0678-9
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0678-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6208671PMC
September 2018
11 Reads

Activating and inhibitory receptors expressed on innate lymphoid cells.

Semin Immunopathol 2018 07 22;40(4):331-341. Epub 2018 May 22.

Aix Marseille Univ, CNRS, INSERM, Centre d'Immunologie de Marseille-Luminy, Marseille, France.

Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are innate immune cells located in lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues. They are particularly abundant at mucosal and barrier surfaces. Three major ILC subsets are present in humans and mice: group 1 ILCs (comprising natural killer (NK) cells and ILC1s), ILC2s, and ILC3s. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0685-xDOI Listing
July 2018
2 Reads

Complexity of systems and actions underlying neurogenic inflammation.

Semin Immunopathol 2018 05;40(3):225-228

Department of Dermatology, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive #0869 , La Jolla, CA, 92093, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0683-zDOI Listing
May 2018
1 Read

Orchestration of intestinal homeostasis and tolerance by group 3 innate lymphoid cells.

Semin Immunopathol 2018 07 8;40(4):357-370. Epub 2018 May 8.

Manchester Collaborative Centre for Inflammation Research (MCCIR), Division of Infection, Immunity and Respiratory Medicine, School of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL, UK.

The gastrointestinal tract is the primary site of exposure to a multitude of microbial, environmental, and dietary challenges. As a result, immune responses in the intestine need to be tightly regulated in order to prevent inappropriate inflammatory responses to exogenous stimuli. Intestinal homeostasis and tolerance are mediated through a multitude of immune mechanisms that act to reinforce barrier integrity, maintain the segregation and balance of commensal microbes, and ensure tissue health and regeneration. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0687-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6060788PMC
July 2018
1 Read

Skin neurogenic inflammation.

Semin Immunopathol 2018 May 30;40(3):249-259. Epub 2018 Apr 30.

Department of Dermatology, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive #0869, La Jolla, CA, 92093, USA.

The epidermis closely interacts with nerve endings, and both epidermis and nerves produce substances for mutual sustenance. Neuropeptides, like substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related protein (CGRP), are produced by sensory nerves in the dermis; they induce mast cells to release vasoactive amines that facilitate infiltration of neutrophils and T cells. Some receptors are more important than others in the generation of itch. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-018-0675-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6047518PMC
May 2018
2 Reads