840 results match your criteria Seizures Psychogenic Nonepileptic


Neuropsychiatric Aspects of Epilepsy.

Psychiatr Clin North Am 2020 Jun 8;43(2):275-290. Epub 2020 Apr 8.

Brown University, Rhode Island Hospital, Potter 3, 593 Eddy Street, Providence, RI 02903, USA.

This article reviews common and clinically important neuropsychiatric aspects of epilepsy. Comorbidities are common, underdiagnosed, and powerfully impact clinical outcomes. Biological, psychological, and social factors contribute to the associations between epilepsy and neuropsychiatric disorders. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psc.2020.02.002DOI Listing

Driving rate and road traffic accidents in drivers with functional (psychogenic nonepileptic) seizures.

Seizure 2020 May 6;79:27-29. Epub 2020 May 6.

Epilepsy Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. Electronic address:

Purpose: We investigated the driving rate and the rate of road traffic accidents in patients with functional seizures. We hypothesized that road traffic accidents are common in these patients.

Methods: In this long-term study, all patients with functional seizures, who were diagnosed at Shiraz Comprehensive Epilepsy Center, Iran, from 2008 until 2018, were investigated. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.seizure.2020.04.005DOI Listing

Incidence rates and characteristics of pediatric onset psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

Pediatr Res 2020 May 11. Epub 2020 May 11.

Unit for Psychiatric Research, Psychiatry, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark.

Background: Pediatric onset psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) is a highly disabling disorder and potentially misdiagnosed as epilepsy. Still, knowledge regarding PNES in children and adolescents is limited and data on both incidence and characteristics are scarce. This study investigated the incidence rate (IR) and clinical characteristics of pediatric onset PNES, including possible differences when having comorbid epilepsy. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41390-020-0945-zDOI Listing

Differentiating psychogenic nonepileptic from epileptic seizures: A mixed-methods, content analysis study.

Epilepsy Behav 2020 May 7;109:107121. Epub 2020 May 7.

Private Practice, Cleveland, OH, United States of America.

Background: Identification of clinical features that might distinguish psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) from epileptic seizures (ES) is of value for diagnosis, management, and understanding of both conditions. Previous studies have shown that patients' descriptions of their seizures reflect differences in content and delivery. We aimed to compare verbal descriptions of PNES and ES using a mixed-methods approach. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2020.107121DOI Listing

Quantitative EEG Findings in Patients With Psychogenic Nonepileptic Seizures.

Clin EEG Neurosci 2020 May 4:1550059420918756. Epub 2020 May 4.

Department of Psychology, Uskudar University, Istanbul, Turkey.

. Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES), is one of the clinical manifestations of conversion disorder that epileptiform discharges do not accompany. Factors capable of increasing susceptibility to these seizures have not been adequately investigated yet. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1550059420918756DOI Listing

A survey of physicians' opinions about functional seizures (psychogenic nonepileptic seizures).

Epilepsy Behav 2020 Apr 19;108:107090. Epub 2020 Apr 19.

Epilepsy Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran; Jefferson Comprehensive Epilepsy Center, Department of Neurology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, PA, USA. Electronic address:

Objectives: Opinions of healthcare professionals may shape their attitudes towards any given condition and patient population. The aim of the current study was to gather the views of healthcare providers on some of the issues on symptomatology and terminology of functional seizures (FS).

Methods: This was a questionnaire study that was sent to all neurologists and psychiatrists practicing in Fars province, Iran. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2020.107090DOI Listing

Sensory Processing Difficulties in Functional Neurological Disorder: A Possible Predisposing Vulnerability?

Psychosomatics 2020 Feb 22. Epub 2020 Feb 22.

Functional Neurology Research Group, Cognitive Behavioral Neurology Unit, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; Neuropsychiatry Unit, Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. Electronic address:

Background: Functional neurological disorder (FND) is a prevalent neuropsychiatric condition characterized by sensorimotor difficulties. Patients with FND at times report that sensory experiences trigger and/or exacerbate their symptoms. Sensory processing difficulties are also commonly reported in other psychiatric disorders frequently comorbid in FND, suggesting that contextualizing sensory profiles in FND within a biopsychosocial model may be clinically relevant. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psym.2020.02.003DOI Listing
February 2020

A Novel Integrative Psychotherapy for Psychogenic Nonepileptic Seizures Based on the Biopsychosocial Model: A Retrospective Pilot Outcome Study.

Psychosomatics 2020 Feb 24. Epub 2020 Feb 24.

Neuropsychiatry Clinic, Hadassah Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel; Department of Medical Neurobiology, Faculty of Medicine, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel; Jerusalem Mental Health Center, Hebrew University Medical School, Jerusalem, Israel; Department of Psychiatry, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.

Background: Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) represent one of the most sizable treatment challenges in neuropsychiatry. Although the underlying mechanism is far from being understood, several interventions have been suggested. However, patients with comorbid psychiatric diagnoses and epilepsy are excluded from most intervention studies. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psym.2020.02.006DOI Listing
February 2020

Terminology for psychogenic nonepileptic seizures: The contribution of neuroimaging.

Epilepsy Behav 2020 Apr 2:107063. Epub 2020 Apr 2.

Institute of Neurology, University "Magna Graecia", Germaneto, CZ, Italy; Neuroscience Research Center, University Magna Graecia, Catanzaro, Italy. Electronic address:

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2020.107063DOI Listing

Outcome of CBT-based multimodal psychotherapy in patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures: A prospective naturalistic study.

Epilepsy Behav 2020 May 23;106:107029. Epub 2020 Mar 23.

Epilepsy Center Bethel, Krankenhaus Mara, Bielefeld, Germany.

Purpose: Psychotherapy is recommended in patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES). To date, however, a limited number of studies have attempted to assess the long-term effectiveness of psychotherapy in patients with PNES. Here, we report the short and six-month follow-up seizure and psychopathological outcomes in patients with PNES who have undergone a combination of cognitive-behavioral individual and group therapy. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2020.107029DOI Listing

Management of functional neurological disorder.

J Neurol 2020 Mar 19. Epub 2020 Mar 19.

Neuroscience Research Centre, Institute of Molecular and Clinical Sciences, St. George's University of London, Cranmer Terrace, London, SW17 0RE, UK.

Functional neurological disorder (FND) is a common cause of persistent and disabling neurological symptoms. These symptoms are varied and include abnormal control of movement, episodes of altered awareness resembling epileptic seizures and abnormal sensation and are often comorbid with chronic pain, fatigue and cognitive symptoms. There is increasing evidence for the role of neurologists in both the assessment and management of FND. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00415-020-09772-wDOI Listing

Driving in patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

Epilepsy Behav 2020 Apr 8;105:106991. Epub 2020 Mar 8.

Epilepsy Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

Purpose: We investigated the rate of driving in patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) from a large cohort in Iran. We hypothesized that these patients commonly do not drive. We also investigated the potential factors that may be associated with driving in these patients. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2020.106991DOI Listing

Peri-ictal responsiveness to the social environment is greater in psychogenic nonepileptic than epileptic seizures.

Epilepsia 2020 Apr 10;61(4):758-765. Epub 2020 Mar 10.

Sheffield Teaching Hospitals National Health Service Foundation Trust, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield, UK.

Objective: To look for evidence of peri-ictal social interaction in psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) and epileptic seizures exploring the notion of PNES as a form of nonverbal communication.

Methods: Video recordings of typical seizures experienced by patients with epilepsy and PNES were obtained in a naturalistic social setting (residential epilepsy monitoring unit). Video analysis by three nonexpert clinicians identified 18 predefined semiological and interactional features indicative of apparent impairment of consciousness or of peri-ictal responsiveness to the social environment with assessment of interrater reliability using Fleiss κ. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/epi.16471DOI Listing
April 2020
4.571 Impact Factor

Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures in children-Prospective validation of a clinical care pathway & risk factors for treatment outcome.

Epilepsy Behav 2020 Apr 29;105:106971. Epub 2020 Feb 29.

University of Nicosia, School of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Cyprus.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to prospectively validate a care pathway for psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) in a pediatric setting. The pathway was developed based on a previous study of patients at our center, which demonstrated positive treatment outcomes of 80% full or partial remission. Sequentially referred patients with PNES in the validation cohort received care prospectively according to the pathway algorithm. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2020.106971DOI Listing

A Comprehensive Machine-Learning-Based Software Pipeline to Classify EEG Signals: A Case Study on PNES vs. Control Subjects.

Sensors (Basel) 2020 Feb 24;20(4). Epub 2020 Feb 24.

Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Magna Graecia University of Catanzaro, 88100 Catanzaro, Italy.

The diagnosis of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) by means of electroencephalography (EEG) is not a trivial task during clinical practice for neurologists. No clear PNES electrophysiological biomarker has yet been found, and the only tool available for diagnosis is video EEG monitoring with recording of a typical episode and clinical history of the subject. In this paper, a data-driven machine learning (ML) pipeline for classifying EEG segments (i. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/s20041235DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7071461PMC
February 2020

Use of Combined Electroencephalography and Tilt Table Testing to Determine Etiology of Loss of Consciousness.

Neurodiagn J 2020 Mar;60(1):36-40

Epilepsy Division, Mayo Clinic Florida, Jacksonville, Florida.

Tilt table testing is a common noninvasive diagnostic test performed to reproduce and evaluate syncope in a vulnerable patient and subsequently guide therapy. Electroencephalography (EEG) is typically useful for identifying interictal and ictal abnormalities within the context of epilepsy or suspected epilepsy. We report a series of patients who underwent simultaneous tilt table testing with EEG. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/21646821.2020.1716605DOI Listing

The coexistence of psychogenic nonepileptic and epileptic seizures in the same patient is more frequent than expected: Is there any clinical feature for defining these patients?

Epilepsy Behav 2020 Apr 21;105:106940. Epub 2020 Feb 21.

Hacettepe University, School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Ankara, Turkey.

Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) and PNES-epilepsy coexistence within all video-electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring unit (VEMU) referrals and to identify semiological and electrophysiological features to differentiate patients with PNES-epilepsy coexistence from PNES-only.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed medical files, VEMU reports, and videos of 1983 adult patients. Demographical, historical, clinical, neuroimaging, and electrophysiological parameters of all patients were recorded. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2020.106940DOI Listing

Examination of Potential Differences in Reporting of Sensitive Psychosocial Measures via Diagnostic Evaluation Using Computer Video Telehealth.

J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci 2020 Feb 14:appineuropsych19080177. Epub 2020 Feb 14.

The Department of Psychiatry, Providence Veterans Affairs Medical Center (PVAMC), and Departments of Neurology and Psychiatry, Brown University, Providence, R.I. (LaFrance, Ho, Bhatla); the Division of Neuropsychiatry (LaFrance) and Division of Biostatistics (Baird), Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, R.I.; the Department of Neurology, Yale University, New Haven, Conn., and Department of Neurology, West Haven Veterans Affairs Medical Center, West Haven, Conn. (Altalib); and the Department of Psychiatry, Yale University, New Haven, Conn., and Department of Psychiatry, West Haven Veterans Affairs Medical Center, West Haven, Conn. (Godleski).

Objective: The authors compared baseline characteristics and reporting of psychosocial measures among veterans with seizures who were evaluated in-clinic or remotely via computer video telehealth (CVT). It was hypothesized that the CVT group would report less trauma history, drug use, and comorbid symptoms compared with veterans seen in-clinic.

Methods: A cross-sectional design was used to compare 72 veterans diagnosed with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) or concurrent mixed epilepsy and PNES who were consecutively evaluated by a single clinician at the Providence Veterans Affairs Medical Center (PVAMC) Neuropsychiatric Clinic. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.neuropsych.19080177DOI Listing
February 2020
2.817 Impact Factor

Antiepileptic drugs are not independently associated with cognitive dysfunction.

Neurology 2020 Mar 3;94(10):e1051-e1061. Epub 2020 Feb 3.

From the Departments of Neurology (E.F., C.B.M., K.Y., B.J., T.J.O., P.K.) and Neuropsychiatry (D.V.), The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville; Department of Neurology (E.F., C.B.M., T.J.O., P.K.), Alfred Health; Department of Neurosciences, Central Clinical School (E.F., T.J.O., P.K.), Monash University, Melbourne; Clinical Outcomes Research (CORe) Unit, Department of Medicine (RMH) (C.B.M.), The University of Melbourne, Parkville; Department of Medicine (P.W.C.), Monash University and Eastern Health; and Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health (P.W.C.), Melbourne, Australia.

Objective: To test the hypothesis that individual antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are not associated with cognitive impairment beyond other clinically relevant factors, we performed a cross-sectional study of patients admitted to an inpatient video-EEG monitoring unit.

Methods: We prospectively enrolled patients admitted to an inpatient specialist epilepsy program between 2009 and 2016. Assessments included objective cognitive function, quality of life subscales for subjective cognitive function, and questionnaires for anxiety and depressive symptoms. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000009061DOI Listing

International multicenter studies on psychogenic nonepileptic seizures: A systematic review.

Psychiatry Res 2020 Jan 25;285:112812. Epub 2020 Jan 25.

Neuroscience Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran; Jefferson Comprehensive Epilepsy Center, Department of Neurology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, PA, USA. Electronic address:

The aim of the current paper is to systematically review the literature on the existing international multicenter studies on various aspects of PNES and to highlight their findings and significance. I searched the electronic database PubMed for articles that included any of these search terms: Non-epileptic seizures, Nonepileptic seizures, Pseudoseizures, Non-epileptic events, Nonepileptic events, Dissociative seizures, Psychogenic, PNES, AND "international" or "multicenter" or "cross cultural", in their abstracts and titles and published before August 6, 2019. I searched PsycINFO database (keywords in the abstracts) and also included some of the references of the selected articles if they were relevant. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2020.112812DOI Listing
January 2020

Terminology for psychogenic nonepileptic seizures: Making the case for "functional seizures".

Epilepsy Behav 2020 Mar 24;104(Pt A):106895. Epub 2020 Jan 24.

Section of Cognitive Neuropsychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK. Electronic address:

Purpose: The purpose of the study was to review the literature on the terminologies for psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) and make a proposal on the terminology of this condition. This proposal reflects the authors' own opinions.

Methods: We systematically searched MEDLINE (accessed from PubMed) and EMBASE from inception to October 10, 2019 for articles written in English with a main focus on PNES (with or without discussion of other functional neurological disorders) and which either proposed or discussed the accuracy or appropriateness of PNES terminologies. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2019.106895DOI Listing

Emergency room diagnoses of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures with psychogenic status and functional (psychogenic) symptoms: Whopping.

Epilepsy Behav 2020 Mar 24;104(Pt A):106882. Epub 2020 Jan 24.

Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Inserm, U1216, CHU Grenoble Alpes, Grenoble Institut Neurosciences, GIN, 38000 Grenoble, France. Electronic address:

Collecting 130 electronic medical records and diagnoses from emergency room stays of eleven patients with confirmed psychogenic nonepileptic seizure (PNES) over a 17-year period (2001-2018), 48 different diagnostic terms were retrieved. This emphasized the need for a consensual terminology encompassing not only PNES but also all functional transient (paroxysmal) events, including episodes of motor or sensory deficits, and cognitive symptoms. Rather than defining what it is not (PNES, stroke mimicks…), it would be more accurate to define what it is: a paroxysmal functional event. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2019.106882DOI Listing

Epilepsy Benchmarks Area IV: Limit or Prevent Adverse Consequence of Seizures and Their Treatment Across the Life Span.

Epilepsy Curr 2020 Jan-Feb;20(1_suppl):31S-39S. Epub 2020 Jan 23.

Epilepsy Genetics Program, Department of Neurology, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Epilepsy represents a complex spectrum disorder, with patients sharing seizures as a common symptom and manifesting a broad array of additional clinical phenotypes. To understand this disorder and treat individuals who live with epilepsy, it is important not only to identify pathogenic mechanisms underlying epilepsy but also to understand their relationships with other health-related factors. Benchmarks Area IV focuses on the impact of seizures and their treatment on quality of life, development, cognitive function, and other aspects and comorbidities that often affect individuals with epilepsy. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1535759719895277DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7031803PMC
January 2020

Assessment of the Predictive Value of Outpatient Smartphone Videos for Diagnosis of Epileptic Seizures.

JAMA Neurol 2020 May;77(5):593-600

Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.

Importance: Misdiagnosis of epilepsy is common. Video electroencephalogram provides a definitive diagnosis but is impractical for many patients referred for evaluation of epilepsy.

Objective: To evaluate the accuracy of outpatient smartphone videos in epilepsy. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamaneurol.2019.4785DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6990754PMC

Ictal autonomic activity recorded via wearable-sensors plus machine learning can discriminate epileptic and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc 2019 07;2019:3502-3506

Differentiating epileptic seizures (ES) and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) is commonly based on electroencephalogram and concurrent video recordings (vEEG). Here, we demonstrate that these two types of seizures can be discriminated based on signals related to autonomic nervous system activity recorded via wearable sensors. We used Empatica E4 Wristband sensors worn on both arms in vEEG confirmed seizures, and machine learning methods to train classifiers, specifically, extreme gradient boosting (XGBoost). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/EMBC.2019.8857552DOI Listing

Disability benefits in patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures: a survey of physicians' opinions.

Epilepsy Behav 2020 Feb 11;103(Pt A):106877. Epub 2020 Jan 11.

Clinical Neurology Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

Objectives: The aim of the current study was to gather the views of healthcare providers practicing in the field of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) on the issue of "disability benefits eligibility and PNES".

Methods: This was a questionnaire study that was sent to all neurologists and psychiatrists practicing in Fars province, Iran. The survey included seven questions: one question about professional qualifications, one question on the participants' personal experience with the topic of interest (i. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2019.106877DOI Listing
February 2020

Children with Psychogenic Nonepileptic Seizures.

Pediatr Neurol Briefs 2019 Dec 31;33. Epub 2019 Dec 31.

Texas Child Neurology, Plano, TX.

A large multicenter retrospective cohort study was conducted by researchers from the Pediatric Health Information System hospital network to determine differences in demographics, clinical characteristics, testing, treatment, and healthcare use between children aged 8-20 years with epilepsy ( = 13,241) and those with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) secondary to conversion disorder ( = 399). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.15844/pedneurbriefs-33-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6942551PMC
December 2019

Job consultation in patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures: Systematic review and survey of physicians' opinion.

Epilepsy Behav 2020 Feb 31;103(Pt A):106863. Epub 2019 Dec 31.

Neuroscience Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran; Jefferson Comprehensive Epilepsy Center, Department of Neurology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA. Electronic address:

Objectives: The objectives of this study were 1) to review the literature about "job/employment and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES)" and 2) to gather the views of neurologists and psychiatrists on the issue of job consultation in patients with PNES.

Methods: Phase one involved a systematic literature review; phase two involved the collection of the views of neurologists and psychiatrists, practicing in Fars province, Iran, on the issue of job consultation in patients with PNES. A questionnaire was designed for the purpose of this study. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2019.106863DOI Listing
February 2020

Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures: The sex ratio trajectory across the lifespan.

Seizure 2020 Feb 19;75:63-65. Epub 2019 Dec 19.

Neuroscience Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. Electronic address:

Purpose: We investigated the sex ratio trajectory across the lifespan in patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES). We hypothesized that there are significant changes in the trajectory of the sex ratio in these patients across the lifespan with respect to the age at onset.

Methods: In this retrospective study, all patients with PNES, who were diagnosed at Shiraz Comprehensive Epilepsy Center, Iran, from 2008 until 2019, were investigated. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.seizure.2019.12.017DOI Listing
February 2020

Reduced left amygdala volume in patients with dissociative seizures (psychogenic nonepileptic seizures).

Seizure 2020 Feb 19;75:43-48. Epub 2019 Dec 19.

Department of Radiology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, 10833 Le Conte Ave., Los Angeles, CA, 90095, USA.

Purpose: This study specifically investigated differences of amygdalar and hippocampal volumes between patients with dissociative seizures (DS), mesial temporal lobe sclerosis (MTS), and normal controls (NC).

Methods: Between 2003 and 2018, 127 patients diagnosed with DS and 278 with MTS were recruited. An additional 52 NC subjects were recruited between 2015 and 2018. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.seizure.2019.12.014DOI Listing
February 2020

Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures that remit when the diagnosis is given: Just good luck?

Epilepsy Behav 2020 Jan 14;102:106667. Epub 2019 Dec 14.

Ayrshire Central Hospital, Irvine KA12 8SS, UK.

Objective: Some patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) remit when given the diagnosis. It is not realistically possible to test this potential therapeutic effect in an Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT) so we aim to statistically demonstrate it using the temporal relationship between the communication of the diagnosis and the timing of remission.

Method: Re-analysis of data from a study of PNES, where diagnosis was communicated, and outcomes recorded in 54 patients. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2019.106667DOI Listing
January 2020

Spectrum of Nonepileptic Paroxysmal Events in Children from Southern India.

J Neurosci Rural Pract 2019 Oct 11;10(4):608-612. Epub 2019 Dec 11.

Department of Pediatric Neurology, Indira Gandhi Institute of Child HealthBengaluru, KarnatakaIndia.

Nonepileptic paroxysmal events (NEPEs) present with episodes similar to epileptic seizures but without abnormal electrical discharge on electroencephalogram (EEG). NEPEs are commonly misdiagnosed as epilepsy. Epilepsy is diagnosed on the basis of a detailed history and examination. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0039-3399472DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6906108PMC
October 2019

Optimizing therapies for neurobehavioral comorbidities of epilepsy using chronic ambulatory electrocorticography.

Epilepsy Behav 2020 Jan 2;102:106814. Epub 2019 Dec 2.

Department of Neurology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL, United States of America. Electronic address:

There is an unmet need to improve therapy for neuropsychiatric comorbidities that are highly prevalent in persons with epilepsy (PWE). However, diagnosing and monitoring the neurobehavioral symptoms is challenging as their presentation can overlap with seizures. In this retrospective study, we report the advantage of chronic ambulatory electrocorticography (ECoG) from implanted Responsive Neurostimulator System (RNS®) in characterizing these psychosomatic paroxysms as a possible ictal, postictal, or interictal phenomenon and how the diagnosis guided the therapy choices. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2019.106814DOI Listing
January 2020

Outcome of prolonged video-EEG monitoring in a new VA monitoring unit.

Epilepsy Behav 2020 Jan 3;102:106696. Epub 2019 Dec 3.

James A. Haley Veterans' Hospital, University of South Florida, United States of America. Electronic address:

Background And Objective: For patients with refractory seizures or seizure-like activity, prolonged inpatient video-electroencephalography (EEG) (v-EEG) is standard of care to guide diagnosis and management. The purpose of this study was to describe the outcome of v-EEG in a new Veterans' Administration (VA) hospital epilepsy monitoring unit (EMU).

Methods: We reviewed all prolonged (>24 h) inpatient v-EEGs performed in our EMU (2 beds) at the James A Haley VA in Tampa, FL over a five-and-a-half-year period (11/2013-07/2019). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2019.106696DOI Listing
January 2020

A Qualitative Analysis of School Nurses' Experience Caring for Students With Psychogenic Nonepileptic Events.

J Sch Nurs 2019 Dec 1:1059840519889395. Epub 2019 Dec 1.

Department of Psychology, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH, USA.

Psychogenic nonepileptic events (PNEE) are paroxysmal changes in behavior resembling epileptic seizures but with no electrographic correlate and are instead caused by psychological factors. In this qualitative study, semistructured interviews were conducted with 10 school nurses to identify how they perceive the experience of caring for a student with PNEE as well as supportive factors and barriers to optimal management of PNEE in schools. Several themes were identified: lack of diagnosis awareness by school staff leading to impressions that the student was "faking" the events, inadequate information provided by a health-care provider regarding the diagnosis in general and specifically about the individual student leading to a reliance on information from the student's family, feelings of doubt and insecurity about the diagnosis and management of the events, and reliance on the school nurse to develop a response plan and to manage the events which can be very time-consuming. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1059840519889395DOI Listing
December 2019

Clinical characteristics of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures across the lifespan: An international retrospective study.

Epilepsy Behav 2020 Jan 28;102:106705. Epub 2019 Nov 28.

Children's Comprehensive Epilepsy Center, Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary, Canada; University of Nicosia, School of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Cyprus; University of Calgary, Cumming School of Medicine, Departments of Pediatrics, Canada.

Purpose: Previous studies from a few countries have reported semiological differences in younger children compared with adolescents or adults with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNESs). This study tested the hypothesis that semiological, demographic, and historical risk factors vary with different ages of PNES onset in a large cohort from different countries.

Methods: In this retrospective study, we investigated patients consecutively referred for PNES, who were admitted to epilepsy monitoring units in Iran, Brazil, Venezuela, Canada, Argentina, and USA. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2019.106705DOI Listing
January 2020
2.257 Impact Factor

Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures in adults with epilepsy: a tertiary hospital-based study.

Int J Neurosci 2020 May 6;130(5):522-532. Epub 2019 Dec 6.

Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Assiut University Hospital, Assiut, Egypt.

Many studies describe and characterize psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) in high-income but few come from low/middle and low income countries. We aimed to determine the prevalence of PNES coexisted in adults with epilepsy and to characterize their semiology, comorbidities and predictors whether presented with epilepsy ( = 563) or alone ( = 73). Patients were recruited from a tertiary referral epilepsy clinic. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00207454.2019.1698566DOI Listing

Reduced limbic microstructural integrity in functional neurological disorder.

Psychol Med 2019 11 26:1-9. Epub 2019 Nov 26.

Department of Neurology, Functional Neurology Research Group, Behavioral Neurology Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Background: Functional neurological disorder (FND) is a condition at the intersection of neurology and psychiatry. Individuals with FND exhibit corticolimbic abnormalities, yet little is known about the role of white matter tracts in the pathophysiology of FND. This study characterized between-group differences in microstructural integrity, and correlated fiber bundle integrity with symptom severity, physical disability, and illness duration. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0033291719003386DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7247956PMC
November 2019

Moral injury in Veterans with nonepileptic seizures.

Epilepsy Behav 2020 Jan 22;102:106681. Epub 2019 Nov 22.

Providence VA Medical Center, Providence, RI, United States of America; Brown University, Providence, RI, United States of America.

Objective: Over 40% of combat Veterans report exposure to at least one type of morally injurious experience (MIE). While moral injury (MI) is described among Veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), MI has not been studied in Veterans with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES). We sought to identify MI in a clinical sample of Veterans with PNES and describe differences between those with MI and those without. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2019.106681DOI Listing
January 2020

Depression, anxiety, and clinical history in Spanish-speaking American patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) compared with Spanish-speaking American patients with epilepsy.

Epilepsy Behav 2020 Jan 21;102:106694. Epub 2019 Nov 21.

Northeast Regional Epilepsy Group, United States of America.

Objective: The objective of this study was to compare Spanish-speaking American patients with epilepsy to Spanish-speaking American patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) on depression, anxiety, and other clinical variables.

Background: Research on Spanish-speaking American patients with epilepsy or PNES is relatively infrequent, with only a few studies on psychopathology in these two patient groups. Studies of English-speaking patients indicate that those with PNES present with greater depression and anxiety and report poorer quality of life (QOL) when compared with persons with epilepsy (PWEs). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2019.106694DOI Listing
January 2020
2.257 Impact Factor

First do no harm: Preventing harm and optimizing care in psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

Epilepsy Behav 2020 Jan 20;102:106642. Epub 2019 Nov 20.

Weill Cornell Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, 1300 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065, United States; New York-Presbyterian Hospital Westchester Division, 21 Bloomingdale Road, White Plains, NY 10605, United States.

Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) are challenging clinical occurrences consisting of any combination of altered movement, sensation, or awareness that resemble epileptic seizures (ES) but do not coincide with electrographic ictal discharges and are presumed to be neuropsychiatric-neurobehavioral in origin. Securing the PNES diagnosis is a crucial first step and is best confirmed by recording events on video-electroencephalogram (v-EEG) and finding an absence of ictal EEG changes and the presence of normal awake EEG rhythms before, during, and after the event. However, obstacles to timely diagnosis and referral to psychiatric treatment frequently occur, placing these patients at risk for harm from unnecessary medications and procedure as well as placing high burden on medical systems. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2019.106642DOI Listing
January 2020

The role of the anterior and midcingulate cortex in the neurobiology of functional neurologic disorder.

Handb Clin Neurol 2019 ;166:267-279

Departments of Neurology and Psychiatry, Cognitive Behavioral Neurology and Neuropsychiatry Units, Functional Neurology Research Group, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States. Electronic address:

Functional neurologic disorder (FND)/conversion disorder is a prevalent and disabling condition at the intersection of neurology and psychiatry. Clinicians often report feeling ill-equipped treating patients with FND, perpetuated by a historically limited understanding of neurobiologic disease mechanisms. In this review, we summarize the neuroimaging literature across the spectrum of sensorimotor FND, including functional imaging studies during rest, sensorimotor performance, and emotional-processing tasks as well as structural magnetic resonance imaging findings. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-444-64196-0.00014-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7012371PMC

Cognitive-emotion processing in psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

Epilepsy Behav 2020 Jan 12;102:106639. Epub 2019 Nov 12.

Department of Psychiatry, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 60 Fenwood Road, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address:

Background: Previous literature suggests that cognitive-emotion processing contributes to the pathogenesis of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES). Characterization of alterations in cognitive-emotion processing in PNES could inform treatment.

Methods: In this descriptive, cross-sectional study, 143 patients with video electroencephalogram (EEG) confirmed PNES were prospectively recruited. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2019.106639DOI Listing
January 2020

Structural brain abnormalities in patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

Neurol Sci 2020 Mar 12;41(3):555-559. Epub 2019 Nov 12.

Neuroscience Research Center, Shiraz Medical School, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

Objectives: We assessed the relationship between the clinical features of patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) and referrals for brain imaging tests. We also hypothesized that some clinical factors might be associated with structural brain imaging abnormalities in these patients.

Methods: In this retrospective study, patients with PNES, who were investigated at Shiraz Comprehensive Epilepsy Center, Iran, from 2008 until 2019, were studied. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10072-019-04108-7DOI Listing

High Yield of Screening for ADHD in the Epilepsy Monitoring Unit.

J Atten Disord 2019 Nov 9:1087054719886359. Epub 2019 Nov 9.

Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA.

ADHD is common in patients with epilepsy, but adult patients with possible epilepsy are not routinely screened for ADHD. We aimed to characterize the results of two validated screening tools in the setting of an Epilepsy Monitoring Unit (EMU). This study utilized the validated Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale version 1. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1087054719886359DOI Listing
November 2019

Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures: Comparing what South African healthcare providers communicate to patients at the point of diagnosis against international guidelines.

Epilepsy Behav 2019 12 4;101(Pt A):106399. Epub 2019 Nov 4.

Department of Psychology, University of Stellenbosch, RW Wilcocks Building, 2nd Floor, Ryneveld Street, Stellenbosch 7600, South Africa. Electronic address:

The process of communicating a diagnosis of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) has been widely studied internationally and found to be an important factor in the reduction of symptoms as well as promoting the uptake of treatment. To date, no research has focused on diagnosis communication in the South African context. This study used applied thematic analysis to explore the content addressed by a sample of 11 South African healthcare providers (HCPs) when presenting a diagnosis of PNES to a patient. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2019.06.042DOI Listing
December 2019