713 results match your criteria Seizures Psychogenic Nonepileptic


Quality of life and psychological dysfunction in traumatized and nontraumatized patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES).

Epilepsy Behav 2019 Feb 12;92:341-344. Epub 2019 Feb 12.

CAPHRI School for Public Health and Primary Care, Department of Health Services Research, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands; Centre for Economic Evaluation, Trimbos Institute, Netherlands Institute of Mental Health and Addiction, Utrecht, the Netherlands.

Objectives: Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) have the appearance of epileptic seizures, yet show no epileptiform discharges in the brain. The quality of life (QOL) in patients with PNES is reportedly low and trauma eems to be a relevant risk factor. The objective of this study was to examine the difference between measures of (epilepsy-specific) QOL (Quality of Life in Epilepsy Inventory; QOLIE-31p) and psychological dysfunction (trauma symptom inventory; TSI) between patients with diagnosed PNES with self-reported trauma and those without self-reported trauma. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S15255050183095
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2019.01.024DOI Listing
February 2019
4 Reads

Pins and PNES: Systematic content analysis of Pinterest for information on psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES).

Epilepsy Behav 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Department of Psychiatry, Cleveland Clinic, United States of America.

Pinterest is a visual search based, the fourth largest social networking site in the U.S. with 81% of its users being women. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2019.01.020DOI Listing
February 2019

Dramatic presentations in psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

Seizure 2019 Jan 24;65:144-147. Epub 2019 Jan 24.

Neuroscience Research Center, Shiraz Medical School, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. Electronic address:

Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of dramatic presentations of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) (i.e., urine incontinence and ictal injury) and to characterize the patients' historical risk factors that may be associated with such dramatic manifestations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.seizure.2019.01.019DOI Listing
January 2019

Preictal autonomic dynamics in psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

Epilepsy Behav 2019 Jan 23;92:206-212. Epub 2019 Jan 23.

The University of Melbourne, Department of Psychiatry, Austin Health, Heidelberg, VIC 3084, Australia; The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Heidelberg, VIC 3084, Australia; King's College London, Department of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, Weston Education Centre, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RJ, UK. Electronic address:

Objectives: Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) resemble seizures but are psychological in origin. The etiology of PNES remains poorly understood, yet several theories argue for the importance of autonomic dysregulation in its pathophysiology. We therefore conducted a retrospective study to investigate autonomic dynamics leading up to a seizure to inform their mechanistic relevance. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2018.12.026DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Psychological trauma, somatization, dissociation, and psychiatric comorbidities in patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures compared with those in patients with intractable partial epilepsy.

Epilepsy Behav 2019 Jan 14;92:108-113. Epub 2019 Jan 14.

Northeast Regional Epilepsy Group, United States of America.

Objective: The objective of this study was to compare patients with intractable epilepsy with patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) on the presence of psychological traumas, clinical factors, and psychological measures of somatization and dissociation.

Background: Several studies have reported a high prevalence of psychological trauma in patients with PNES, while less have examined the prevalence of psychological trauma in patients with epilepsy and compared both groups. Reports have been somewhat divergent with some describing significantly higher prevalence in physical abuse, others, in emotional abuse/neglect, and others, in sexual abuse in patients with PNES compared with those in patients with epilepsy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2018.12.027DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read
2.257 Impact Factor

Adherence with psychotherapy and treatment outcomes for psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

Neurology 2019 Feb 4;92(7):e675-e679. Epub 2019 Jan 4.

From the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center, Department of Neurology (B.T., H.B., L.J.H.), and Department of Psychiatry (S.M.), Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT; Epilepsy Center of Excellence, Neurology Service (B.T.), and Psychology Service (S.M.), VA Connecticut Healthcare System, Newington; and Departments of Neurology (B.T., B.A.D.) and Psychiatry (G.B.), Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.

Objective: We conducted a prospective cohort study of patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) to examine the association between adherence with psychotherapy and outcomes, including significant (≥50%) reduction in PNES frequency, PNES freedom, improvement in quality of life, and reduction in emergency department (ED) utilization.

Methods: A total of 105 participants were referred to receive psychotherapy either at Brigham and Women's Hospital or with a local therapist. We called participants at 12-24 months follow-up and obtained detailed follow-up data from 93 participants (89%). Read More

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http://www.neurology.org/lookup/doi/10.1212/WNL.000000000000
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000006848DOI Listing
February 2019
9 Reads

Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures, conversion, and somatic symptom disorders.

Authors:
Selim R Benbadis

Neurology 2019 Feb 4;92(7):311-312. Epub 2019 Jan 4.

From the University of South Florida, Tampa.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000006838DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Affect-induced reflex seizures (AIRS): A case series based on a systematic literature review.

Epilepsy Behav 2018 Dec 29;92:18-25. Epub 2018 Dec 29.

Vancouver General Hospital Epilepsy Program, Gordon and Leslie Diamond Health Care Centre, 8257 - 2775 Laurel Street, Vancouver, British Columbia, V5Z 1M9, Canada; University of British Columbia Neuropsychiatry Program, Detwiller Pavilion, UBC Hospital, 2255 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A1, Canada. Electronic address:

Seizures are commonly thought to occur in a spontaneous, unpredictable manner. However, it is well-established that a subset of patients with epilepsy can experience reflex seizures that are consistently elicited by a specific stimulus. While various forms of reflex epilepsy have been documented in the literature, acute affective states have not been commonly described as a potential reflex seizure trigger. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2018.10.036DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

A systematic study of stereotypy in epileptic seizures versus psychogenic seizure-like events.

Epilepsy Behav 2019 Jan 20;90:172-177. Epub 2018 Dec 20.

Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA. Electronic address:

Objective: The objective of this study was to quantify the features of stereotypy in epileptic seizures and compare it with that of stereotypy in psychogenic nonepileptic seizure-like events (PNES) confirmed by video-electroencephalography (VEEG) monitoring.

Methods: Video-electroencephalography monitoring records of 20 patients with temporal lobe seizures (TLS) and 20 with PNES were retrospectively reviewed (n = 138 seizures, 48 TLS and 90 PNES). We analyzed the semiology of 59 behaviors of interest for their presence, duration, sequence, and continuity using quantified measures that were entered into statistical analysis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2018.11.030DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Education in patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

Seizure 2019 Jan 14;64:74-76. Epub 2018 Dec 14.

Neuroscience Research Center, Shiraz Medical School, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. Electronic address:

Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate any possible association between education and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) and any potential effects education might have on clinical characteristics of patients with PNES.

Methods: In this retrospective study, all patients with PNES, who were studied at Shiraz Comprehensive Epilepsy Center at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, from 2008 until 2018, were recruited. We categorized the patients as 1. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.seizure.2018.12.008DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Self-reporting versus clinical scrutiny: the value of adding questionnaires to the routine evaluation of seizure disorders. An exploratory study on the differential diagnosis between epilepsy and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

Epilepsy Behav 2019 Jan 19;90:191-196. Epub 2018 Dec 19.

Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri IRCCS, Department of Neuroscience, Laboratory of Neurological Disorders, Milano, Italy.

Questionnaires or symptom lists have proved effective for differentiating epileptic seizures (ES) from psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES). However, monitoring the events, corroborated by medical history gathered by experts, remains the gold standard. We directly compared symptoms and characteristic of the events self-reported by patients/eyewitnesses (Questionnaire A/B) with the information contained in the clinical charts of 50 patients with undefined diagnosis undergoing long-term monitoring. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S15255050183091
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2018.11.040DOI Listing
January 2019
10 Reads

Medical health care utilization cost of patients presenting with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

Epilepsia 2019 Feb 21;60(2):349-357. Epub 2018 Dec 21.

Department of Neurology, Monash Medical Centre, Clayton, Victoria, Australia.

Objective: To investigate the health care utilization cost of patients presenting with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) to a tertiary hospital in Australia.

Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of adult patients with PNES based on video-electroencephalographic confirmation over a 5-year period. We used an itemized list to collect detailed health care utilization data. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/epi.14625DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Sleep-disordered breathing among patients admitted for inpatient video-EEG monitoring.

Neurology 2019 Jan 14;92(3):e194-e204. Epub 2018 Dec 14.

From the Departments of Medicine (S.S., Z.C., A.P., C.J.R., N.C.J., C.F., P.P., P.K., T.J.O.), Neurology (S.S., E.J.W., A.P., C.H., J.C., C.J.R., R.Y., C.F., P.P., P.K., T.J.O.), and Respiratory and Sleep Disorders Medicine (T.M., J.G.), The Royal Melbourne Hospital, The University of Melbourne, Parkville; Department of Neuroscience (S.S., Z.C., A.P., N.C.J., C.F., P.P., P.K., T.J.O.), Central Clinical School, Monash University; Department of Neurology (S.S., A.P., P.P., P.K., T.J.O.), The Alfred Hospital; and Neuropsychiatry Unit (S.F., D.V.), The Royal Melbourne Hospital and Melbourne Neuropsychiatry Centre, Australia.

Objective: To examine the prevalence and risk factors of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in individuals with epilepsy and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES).

Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study of consecutive patients admitted for inpatient video-EEG monitoring at The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Australia, between December 1, 2011, and July 31, 2017. Participants underwent routine clinical investigations during their monitoring period including polysomnography, neurocognitive testing, and screening instruments of daytime somnolence, sleep quality, and quality of life. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000006776DOI Listing
January 2019

Novel features for capturing temporal variations of rhythmic limb movement to distinguish convulsive epileptic and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

Epilepsia 2019 Jan 9;60(1):165-174. Epub 2018 Dec 9.

Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Objective: To investigate the characteristics of motor manifestation during convulsive epileptic and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES), captured using a wrist-worn accelerometer (ACM) device. The main goal was to find quantitative ACM features that can differentiate between convulsive epileptic and convulsive PNES.

Methods: In this study, motor data were recorded using wrist-worn ACM-based devices. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/epi.14619DOI Listing
January 2019
7 Reads
4.571 Impact Factor

Risk factors for the use of antiepileptic drugs in patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

Epilepsy Behav 2019 Jan 22;90:119-121. Epub 2019 Jan 22.

Neuroscience Research Center, Shiraz Medical School, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of antiepileptic drug (AED) use in patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) and to characterize the patients' historical risk factors that may be associated with such a practice.

Methods: In this retrospective database study, all patients with PNES, who were investigated at Shiraz Comprehensive Epilepsy Center at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, from 2008 to 2018, were studied. Patients with concomitant epilepsy or abnormal Electroencephalogram (EEG) were not included. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2018.11.009DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures in children and adolescents: An international cross-cultural study.

Epilepsy Behav 2019 Jan 2;90:90-92. Epub 2018 Dec 2.

Children's Comprehensive Epilepsy Center, Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary, Canada; Alberta Children's Hospital Research Institute, Calgary, Canada; Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Electronic address:

Purpose: We compared various clinical characteristics of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) between young patients from Iran, Saudi Arabia, and Canada, three nations with significantly different socioeconomic and demographic characteristics. This international cross-cultural comparative study may advance our knowledge and understanding of PNES in children and adolescents across the cultures and borders.

Methods: In this retrospective study, we investigated all patients 16 years of age or younger, with PNES admitted to the epilepsy monitoring units at one center in Iran, one center in Saudi Arabia, and one center in Canada. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2018.11.005DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Temporally linked occurrences of epileptic and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures - Coincidental or pathogenically related?

Seizure 2019 Jan 28;64:20-22. Epub 2018 Nov 28.

Peter Kellaway Section of Neurophysiology, Department of Neurology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA; Neurology Care Line, Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Houston, Texas, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.seizure.2018.11.014DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

Semiological characteristics of patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures: Gender-related differences.

Epilepsy Behav 2018 Dec 8;89:130-134. Epub 2018 Nov 8.

Department of Neurology, Karadeniz Technical University Medical Faculty, 61080 Trabzon, Turkey.

Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) are more prevalent among women, and diagnosis may sometimes be delayed by as much as seven years. Understanding the effect of gender on the presentation of a PNES may assist with diagnosis based on semiological details in the clinical setting. Although video-EEG monitoring (VEM) is the gold standard for diagnosing PNES, determining gender-related seizure semiology through careful history may prevent diagnostic delay while waiting for VEM. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2018.10.032DOI Listing
December 2018
9 Reads

Dual diagnosis of epilepsy and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures: Systematic review and meta-analysis of frequency, correlates, and outcomes.

Epilepsy Behav 2018 Dec 29;89:70-78. Epub 2018 Oct 29.

Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.

Comorbid epilepsy and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) represent a serious challenge for the clinicians. However, the frequency, associations, and outcomes of dual diagnosis of epilepsy and PNES are unclear. The aim of the review was to determine the frequency, correlates, and outcomes of a dual diagnosis. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S15255050183070
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2018.10.010DOI Listing
December 2018
3 Reads

Fearful Attachment Linked to Childhood Abuse, Alexithymia, and Depression in Motor Functional Neurological Disorders.

J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci 2019 31;31(1):65-69. Epub 2018 Oct 31.

From the Department of Neurology, Functional Neurology Research Group, Cognitive Behavioral Neurology Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston (BW, JPO, RJ, DLP); the Department of Psychiatry, Benson-Henry Institute for Mind Body Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston (GLF); and the Department of Psychiatry, Neuropsychiatry Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston (DLP).

Insecure attachment is a predisposing risk factor for the development of functional neurological disorder (FND). There is limited research investigating connections between attachment styles, other predisposing vulnerabilities, and symptom severity in patients with motor FND. By using a within-group design with prospective data collection, the authors performed univariate tests followed by multivariate linear regressions to investigate neuropsychiatric factors associated with four attachment styles (secure, fearful, preoccupied, and dismissing) among 56 patients with motor FND (mean age=40. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.neuropsych.18040095DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6349486PMC
October 2018
15 Reads

The effectiveness and acceptability of a guided self-help Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) intervention for psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

Epilepsy Behav 2018 Nov 17;88:332-340. Epub 2018 Oct 17.

Trent Doctorate in Clinical Psychology, University of Lincoln, Brayford Wharf East, Lincoln LN5 7AY, UK.

This study utilized a nonconcurrent case-series design to examine the effectiveness and acceptability of a guided self-help Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) intervention for people with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures. A key aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between psychological flexibility (a key process within ACT), psychological health, quality of life, and seizure frequency. Six participants completed the study, with reliable and clinically significant changes in psychological flexibility, quality of life, and psychological health observed in the majority of participants. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S15255050183018
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2018.09.039DOI Listing
November 2018
4 Reads

Secure Attachment and Depression Predict 6-Month Outcome in Motor Functional Neurological Disorders: A Prospective Pilot Study.

Psychosomatics 2018 Aug 29. Epub 2018 Aug 29.

Department of Neurology, Functional Neurology Research Group, Cognitive Behavioral Neurology Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; Department of Psychiatry, Neuropsychiatry Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. Electronic address:

Background: The relationships between baseline neuropsychiatric factors and clinical outcome in patients with functional neurological disorder (FND)/conversion disorder remain poorly understood.

Objective: This prospective, naturalistic pilot study investigated links between predisposing vulnerabilities (risk factors) and clinical outcome in patients with motor FND engaged in usual care within a subspecialty FND clinic.

Methods: Thirty-four patients with motor FND were enrolled and completed baseline and 6-month follow-up psychometric questionnaires. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psym.2018.08.004DOI Listing
August 2018
3 Reads

Can home videos made on smartphones complement video-EEG in diagnosing psychogenic nonepileptic seizures?

Seizure 2018 Nov 3;62:95-98. Epub 2018 Oct 3.

All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. Electronic address:

Purpose: To assess the contribution home-videos made on mobile phones can make to the diagnosis of Psychogenic Nonepileptic Seizures (PNES).

Methods: Consecutive patients 10-50 years old, with episodes of altered behavior or abnormal movements, unresponsiveness, or falls, were recruited after they had obtained 'good' or 'fair' quality (quality of video scale (QOV)) home-videos of their episodes on personal mobile phones; these subjects underwent video-electroencephalography (VEEG). Diagnoses of PNES, other physiological events or epileptic seizure (ES) on home-videos (by the epilepsy fellow, step 1) and on VEEGs (by a fully trained epileptologist unaware of the home-video recording, step 2) were compared. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S10591311183030
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.seizure.2018.10.003DOI Listing
November 2018
3 Reads

Narrative analysis of written accounts about living with epileptic or psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

Seizure 2018 Nov 28;62:59-65. Epub 2018 Sep 28.

Academic Neurology Unit, University of Sheffield, UK. Electronic address:

Purpose: This study is based on a narrative analysis of individuals' written accounts of living with epilepsy (n = 29) or psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (n = 20, PNES). Narrative analysis looks at both the content and structure of the personal account. We used a form of narrative analysis that allowed us to identify common story lines, otherwise known as narrative typologies, potentially characteristic of these patient groups. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S10591311183047
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.seizure.2018.09.022DOI Listing
November 2018
11 Reads

Provocative induction of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures: Noninferiority of an induction technique without versus with placebo.

Epilepsia 2018 Nov 1;59(11):e161-e165. Epub 2018 Oct 1.

Neurology Care Line, Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Houston, Texas.

We aim to demonstrate, in a sufficiently powered and standardized study, that the success rate of inducing psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) without placebo (saline infusion) is noninferior to induction with placebo. The clinical data of 170 consecutive patients with suspected PNES who underwent induction with placebo from January 21, 2009 to March 31, 2013 were pair-matched with 170 consecutive patients with suspected PNES who underwent the same induction technique but without addition of placebo from April 1, 2013 to February 7, 2018 at the same center. The success rates of induction were 79. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/epi.14570
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/epi.14570DOI Listing
November 2018
5 Reads

The application of artificial intelligence to understand the pathophysiological basis of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

Epilepsy Behav 2018 Oct 28;87:167-172. Epub 2018 Sep 28.

Italy Institutes of Neurology, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Magna Græcia University of Catanzaro, Catanzaro, Italy. Electronic address:

Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) are episodes of paroxysmal impairment associated with a range of motor, sensory, and mental manifestations, which perfectly mimic epileptic seizures. Several patterns of neural abnormalities have been described without identifying a definite neurobiological substrate. In this multicenter cross-sectional study, we applied a multivariate classification algorithm on morphological brain imaging metrics to extract reliable biomarkers useful to distinguish patients from controls at an individual level. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2018.09.008DOI Listing
October 2018
15 Reads

Comparison of postictal semiology and behavior in psychogenic nonepileptic and epileptic seizures.

Epilepsy Behav 2018 Nov 27;88:123-129. Epub 2018 Sep 27.

College of Medicine, SUNY Upstate Medical University, 766 Irving Ave., Syracuse, NY 13210, United States of America.

Background: The available information on postictal semiology and behavior in patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizure (PNES) is limited. In this study, we explore the differences in postictal semiology and behavior between patients with epileptic seizure (ES) and PNES and focus on clinical features that may be helpful in differentiating these two conditions.

Methods: In this retrospective study, video-electroencephalograph (video-EEG) of 144 seizures from 64 patients with PNES and 66 seizures from 42 patients with ES were reviewed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2018.08.020DOI Listing
November 2018
1 Read

Diagnostic utility of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form in the epilepsy monitoring unit: Considering sex differences.

Epilepsy Behav 2018 Nov 25;88:117-122. Epub 2018 Sep 25.

Division of Psychology, Mayo Clinic Arizona, 13400 E. Shea Blvd., Scottsdale, AZ 85259, USA. Electronic address:

Psychological assessment measures are frequently used to evaluate patients in epilepsy monitoring units. One goal of that assessment is to contribute information that may help with differential diagnosis between epilepsy and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES). The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) is one such measure. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2018.08.033DOI Listing
November 2018

Psychogenic Nonepileptic Seizures (PNES) as a Network Disorder - Evidence From Neuroimaging of Functional (Psychogenic) Neurological Disorders.

Epilepsy Curr 2018 Jul-Aug;18(4):211-216

2Departments of Psychiatry and Neurology, Alpert Medical School, Brown University Director of Neuropsychiatry and Behavioral Neurology, Rhode Island Hospital.

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http://epilepsycurrents.org/doi/10.5698/1535-7597.18.4.211
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5698/1535-7597.18.4.211DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6145391PMC
September 2018
8 Reads

Psychiatric disorders and trauma history in patients with pure PNES and patients with PNES and coexisting epilepsy.

Epilepsy Behav 2018 Nov 18;88:41-48. Epub 2018 Sep 18.

Epilepsy Center Bethel, Krankenhaus Mara, Bielefeld, Germany.

Several studies found high prevalence rates of psychiatric disorders in patients with pure psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES). Traumatic experiences were also reported to be elevated in patients with PNES and were discussed as a crucial risk factor for the development of PNES. Much less is known about psychiatric comorbidities and specifically, about trauma history in patients with PNES and coexisting epilepsy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2018.08.027DOI Listing
November 2018
6 Reads

Experience of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures in the Canadian league against epilepsy: A survey describing current practices by neurologists and epileptologists.

Seizure 2018 Oct 2;61:227-233. Epub 2018 Sep 2.

Saskatchewan Epilepsy Program, College of Medicine, Division of Neurology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. Electronic address:

Purpose: Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) are one of the most common differential diagnoses of epilepsy. Our objective is to describe current medical care in Canada and identify patterns of practice and service gaps.

Methods: In 2015, a 36-question survey was sent via email to the 131 members of the Canadian League Against Epilepsy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.seizure.2018.08.025DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

Integrating the systematic assessment of psychological states in the epilepsy monitoring unit: Concept and compliance.

Epilepsy Behav 2018 Nov 10;88:5-14. Epub 2018 Sep 10.

Institute of Synergetics and Psychotherapy Research, Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg, Austria; Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg, Austria.

Background: Admission to the epilepsy monitoring unit (EMU) for long-term video-electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring (VEEG) constitutes the gold standard for seizure diagnosis and presurgical evaluation. This study applied the concept of a high-frequency systematic monitoring of psychological states and tested patients' compliance in order to evaluate if its integration in the EMU is feasible and if patients benefit from the graphically underpinned discussion of their EMU stay-related cognitions and emotions.

Methods: The process-monitoring is technically realized by an internet-based device for data collection and data analysis, the Synergetic Navigation System (SNS). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2018.08.029DOI Listing
November 2018
4 Reads

Differentiating epilepsy from psychogenic nonepileptic seizures using neuropsychological test data.

Epilepsy Behav 2018 Oct 29;87:39-45. Epub 2018 Aug 29.

Department of Psychology, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON, Canada.

Objective: Differentiating epileptic seizures (ES) from psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) represents a challenging differential diagnosis with important treatment implications. This study was designed to explore the utility of neuropsychological test scores in differentiating ES from PNES.

Method: Psychometric data from 72 patients with ES and 33 patients with PNES were compared on various tests of cognitive ability and performance validity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2018.08.010DOI Listing
October 2018
6 Reads

Psychiatric comorbidity and traumatic brain injury attribution in patients with psychogenic nonepileptic or epileptic seizures: A multicenter study of US veterans.

Epilepsia 2018 Oct 24;59(10):1945-1953. Epub 2018 Aug 24.

VA Portland Health Care System, Portland, Oregon.

Objective: To determine the frequency and severity of psychiatric disorders and attribution of seizures to traumatic brain injury (TBI) in veterans with verified psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) versus epileptic seizures (ES).

Methods: We studied 333 consecutive admissions to the monitoring units of three Veterans Administration epilepsy centers. All patients underwent continuous video-electroencephalographic recording to define definite PNES or ES. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/epi.14542DOI Listing
October 2018
4 Reads

Emotion dysregulation in patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures: A systematic review based on the extended process model.

Epilepsy Behav 2018 09 31;86:37-48. Epub 2018 Jul 31.

Academic Neurology Unit, The University of Sheffield, The Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Glossop Road, Sheffield S10 2JF, United Kingdom. Electronic address:

Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) are characterized by paroxysmal alterations in motor and sensory functions resembling epileptic seizures, but are not caused by epileptiform activity. In recent years, there has been increasing scientific interest in emotion dysregulation in patients with PNES (pwPNES), but the literature has not yet been interpreted within a broader model of emotion dysregulation. The aim of this review was therefore to synthesize the existing literature on emotion dysregulation in pwPNES within the extended process model (EPM) of emotion regulation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2018.06.049DOI Listing
September 2018
4 Reads

Preliminary Evidence for Limbic-Frontal Hyperexcitability in Psychogenic Nonepileptic Seizure Patients.

Clin EEG Neurosci 2018 Aug 3:1550059418792454. Epub 2018 Aug 3.

5 Hoglund Brain Imaging Center, Department of Neurology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA.

Objectives: The goal of the current pilot project was to probe the resting-state magnetoencephalography (MEG) in individuals with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) and ascertain if there is evidence for frontal temporal cortical hyperexcitability, as evidenced by increased focal coherence in these regions.

Methods: Six patients with PNES and without any evidence of epilepsy were included. Nine healthy control (HC) subjects (age matched as a group) were also included. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1550059418792454DOI Listing
August 2018
10 Reads

Sleep in psychogenic nonepileptic seizures: Time to raise a red flag.

Epilepsy Behav 2018 09 19;86:6-8. Epub 2018 Jul 19.

Department of Neurology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, United States of America. Electronic address:

Poor sleep is a frequent complaint in patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES). However, few studies have examined sleep problems in this population. We aimed to compare sleep complaints in patients with PNES with those with epilepsy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2018.07.001DOI Listing
September 2018
4 Reads

Sibling-Controlled Study of Parental Bonding, Coping, and Urgent Health-Care Use in Families With Children With Nonepileptic Seizures.

J Pediatr Psychol 2018 Nov;43(10):1128-1137

Northwestern University.

Objectives: Pediatric psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) is a functional somatic symptom condition with significant health-care service burden. While both family and individual factors play an important role in the development and maintenance of PNES, little is known about what predicts urgent health-care use in families with children who have PNES. The aim of the current study was to explore whether child coping and parental bonding styles influence the decision to seek urgent medical care in these families. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jpepsy/jsy050DOI Listing
November 2018
6 Reads

Utilization of brain imaging in evaluating patients with psychogenic nonepileptic spells.

Epilepsy Behav 2018 08 5;85:177-182. Epub 2018 Jul 5.

Department of Neurological Sciences, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, United States of America. Electronic address:

Background: Psychogenic nonepileptic spells (PNES) are paroxysmal movements or sensory events that resemble epileptic seizures but lack corresponding ictal electrographic changes. A confirmed diagnosis of PNES is only accomplished via video electroencephalogram (vEEG) monitoring. Prior to diagnosis, patients are often assessed with neurodiagnostic imaging and their conditions treated with anticonvulsant medications, both of which are of limited clinical value and contribute to the higher cost of care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2018.06.015DOI Listing
August 2018
15 Reads

Characteristics of patients with confirmed epilepsy and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures in Qatar.

Epilepsy Behav 2018 08 4;85:218-221. Epub 2018 Jul 4.

Neurosciences Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran; Department of Neurology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

Objective: The Middle Eastern country of Qatar opened its first epilepsy monitoring unit (EMU) in late 2015. This study compared demographic and clinical characteristics of patients with confirmed epilepsy to those of patients with confirmed psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES).

Methods: Data were collected via retrospective chart review on 113 patients admitted for evaluation to the Qatar national health system EMU between November 2015 and May 2017. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2018.06.014DOI Listing
August 2018
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Neuropsychiatric features of the coexistence of epilepsy and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

J Psychosom Res 2018 Aug 26;111:83-88. Epub 2018 May 26.

Post-Graduate Program in Medicine and Health Sciences, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Brazil; Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, PUCRS, Brazil; Service of Neurology, Hospital São Lucas, PUCRS, Brazil; Service of Neurosurgery, Hospital São Lucas, PUCRS, Brazil.

Objective: To investigate demographic, epidemiologic and psychiatric features suggestive of the coexistence epilepsy (ES) and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) that may contribute to precocious suspicion of the association.

Methods: In this exploratory study, all patients older than 16 years admitted to prolonged video-electroencephalogram monitoring were evaluated about demographic, epileptological and psychiatric features. Detailed psychiatric assessment using M. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychores.2018.05.014DOI Listing
August 2018
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The Identification of Torsades de Pointes via CEEG: A Case Report on a Patient with Physiologically Provoked Nonepileptic Events.

Neurodiagn J 2018 ;58(2):91-106

a Department of Clinical Neurophysiology , Medical University of South Carolina , Charleston , South Carolina.

Continuous electroencephalography (CEEG) is chiefly performed at The Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) for identifying seizures, including its refined use within the epilepsy monitoring unit (EMU) as a differentiator between epileptic and psychogenic etiologies. CEEG also provides critical data that carry implications outside the bounds of both epilepsy and psychogenic events, such as the characterization of unorthodox clinical phenomena that are of physiological (though nonepileptic) origins. Although nonepileptic events (NEEs) are primarily linked with psychogenic phenomena (conversion disorder, malingering) that can mimic epileptic activity, they, like seizures, have diverse semiologies and etiologies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/21646821.2018.1456292DOI Listing
January 2018
30 Reads

A pilot randomised controlled trial of a home-based writing intervention for individuals with seizures.

Psychol Health 2018 Sep 29;33(9):1151-1171. Epub 2018 May 29.

a Academic Neurology Unit , University of Sheffield , Sheffield , UK.

Objective: We investigated the feasibility, acceptability and preliminary effectiveness of a writing intervention for individuals with epilepsy or psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

Methods: Individuals were randomised to write about potentially 'therapeutic' topics (n = 43) or about their daily events (n = 25). Participants were asked to write on four separate occasions for at least 20 min. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08870446.2018.1478974DOI Listing
September 2018
1 Read

You've made the diagnosis of functional neurological disorder: now what?

Pract Neurol 2018 Aug 15;18(4):323-330. Epub 2018 May 15.

Functional Neurology Research Group, Department of Neurology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Patients with functional neurological disorders (FND)/conversion disorder commonly present to outpatient clinics. FND is now a 'rule in' diagnosis based on neurological examination findings and semiological features. While neurologists may be more comfortable diagnosing patients with FND, there is only limited guidance as to how to conduct follow-up outpatient visits. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/practneurol-2017-001835DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6372294PMC
August 2018
5 Reads

[Psychogenic non epileptic seizures : Differential diagnostic features].

Herzschrittmacherther Elektrophysiol 2018 May 14. Epub 2018 May 14.

Epilepsiezentrum Frankfurt Rhein-Main, Zentrum der Neurologie und Neurochirurgie, Universitätsklinikum Frankfurt, Schleusenweg 2-16, 60528, Frankfurt am Main, Deutschland.

Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) are to be considered in the differential diagnosis of a transient loss of consciousness. Their discrimination from syncope, epileptic seizures or vascular events can be difficult and requires profound knowledge about the semiology and clinical presentation of PNES and their differential diagnoses. Erroneous diagnoses and the resulting therapies lead to elevated morbidity, elevated costs and a poorer outcome. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00399-018-0557-zDOI Listing
May 2018
3 Reads

Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures in adults with epilepsy and intellectual disability: A neglected area.

Seizure 2018 Jul 4;59:67-71. Epub 2018 May 4.

Department of Behavioural Sciences, Epilepsy Centre Kempenhaeghe, P.O. Box 61, 5590 AB Heeze, The Netherlands. Electronic address:

Purpose: To describe the main characteristics of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) in adults with epilepsy and intellectual disability (ID), and to analyse the differences regarding psychosocial functioning, epilepsy severity and ID between patients with PNES and a control group without PNES.

Methods: Medical records of adults with ID and epilepsy living at an epilepsy care facility (N = 240) were screened for PNES and evaluated by a neurologist. A control group consisting of patients with epilepsy and ID, without PNES, was matched according to age, sex and level of ID. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.seizure.2018.05.002DOI Listing
July 2018
6 Reads

Clinical spectrum of psychogenic non epileptic seizures in children; an observational study.

Seizure 2018 Jul 27;59:60-66. Epub 2018 Apr 27.

Department of Neurology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi 110029, India.

Purpose: The current study was designed to analyze the clinical spectrum of Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) in children.

Methods: Children aged 6-16years with clinically suspected PNES, confirmed by short-term VEEG (STVEEG{video electroencephalogram}) and induction were classified as per Seneviratne classification. Stressors, associated co morbidities, Verbal IQ (Intelligence Quotient) and behavioral abnormalities were assessed using HTP(House tree person) test, DSM IV (Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders) TR criteria, MISIC (Malin intelligence scale for Indian children) and CBCL (Child behaviour checklist). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.seizure.2018.04.024DOI Listing
July 2018
4 Reads

Health care practitioners' perceptions of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures: A systematic review of qualitative and quantitative studies.

Epilepsia 2018 06 11;59(6):1109-1123. Epub 2018 May 11.

Academic Neurology Unit, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK.

A recent systematic synthesis of qualitative research demonstrated that patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) often experience unsatisfactory encounters with health care practitioners (HCPs). It is important to understand such interactions from the perspective of those responsible for delivering care. This systematic review aimed to examine the attitudes and perceptions of HCPs toward PNES. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/epi.14189DOI Listing
June 2018
5 Reads

Characteristics of Children Hospitalized for Psychogenic Nonepileptic Seizures Due to Conversion Disorder Versus Epilepsy.

Hosp Pediatr 2018 Jun 8;8(6):321-329. Epub 2018 May 8.

Department of Pediatrics, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York.

Objectives: Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) are a manifestation of conversion disorder among children but can be difficult to distinguish from epilepsy. We sought to identify characteristics that differentiate children with PNES from those with epilepsy.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of children admitted with epilepsy or PNES to 45 children's hospitals from 2004 to 2014. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/hpeds.2017-0103DOI Listing
June 2018
6 Reads