92 results match your criteria School Health [Journal]


Materialising links between air pollution and health: How societal impact was achieved in an interdisciplinary project.

Health (London) 2018 Oct 12:1363459318804590. Epub 2018 Oct 12.

London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), UK.

Societal impact is an increasingly important imperative of academic funding. However, there is little research to date documenting how impact is accomplished in practice. Drawing on insights from Actor-Network Theory, we explore the research-policy interface within an interdisciplinary research project on the relationships between air pollution and human health. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459318804590DOI Listing
October 2018

Exploring young people's emotional well-being and resilience in educational contexts: A resilient space?

Health (London) 2018 Sep 16:1363459318800162. Epub 2018 Sep 16.

University of Brighton, UK.

The term 'resilience' is pervasive in narratives of young people's emotional well-being. However, the meaning it has for those it describes is perhaps less well understood. Resilience was investigated as part of an engagement exercise into health improvement commissioning in educational contexts in the South East of England. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459318800162DOI Listing
September 2018

"It's not my business": Exploring heteronormativity in young people's discourses about lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer issues and their implications for youth health and wellbeing.

Health (London) 2017 Jun 1:1363459317715776. Epub 2017 Jun 1.

Simon Fraser University, Canada.

In Canada, the issue of creating safe and inclusive school environments for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer students has been in the spotlight. Several researchers and advocates have pointed out the positive effects of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer-positive policy frameworks on the health and wellbeing of all young people. In this article, we take a critical approach to analyzing narrative findings from qualitative interviews conducted with youth in three communities in British Columbia, Canada: "the North," Vancouver, and Abbotsford. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459317715776DOI Listing
June 2017
3 Reads

A qualitative investigation of lay perspectives of diagnosis and self-management strategies employed by people with progressive multiple sclerosis.

Health (London) 2017 05 10;21(3):316-336. Epub 2016 Nov 10.

University of Exeter Medical School, UK.

This article explores how people with progressive multiple sclerosis give meaning to their experiences. It builds upon the self-management literature, which has captured the tension between the desire for retaining normalcy and the increasing burden of self-management associated with chronic disease progression. This repeat interview study is empirically grounded in 28 interviews with 14 people with progressive multiple sclerosis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459316674787DOI Listing
May 2017
4 Reads

How do health behaviour interventions take account of social context? A literature trend and co-citation analysis.

Health (London) 2018 07 23;22(4):389-410. Epub 2017 Mar 23.

London School of Economics and Political Science, UK.

In recent years, health behaviour interventions have received a great deal of attention in both research and policy as a means of encouraging people to lead healthier lives. The emphasis of such interventions has varied over time, in terms of level of intervention (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459317695630DOI Listing
July 2018
10 Reads

Practices of partnership: Negotiated safety among couples who inject drugs.

Health (London) 2018 01 3;22(1):3-19. Epub 2016 Aug 3.

Centre for Social Research in Health, UNSW Australia, Australia.

Despite the majority of needle-syringe sharing occurring between sexual partners, the intimate partnerships of people who inject drugs have been largely overlooked as key sites of both hepatitis C virus prevention and transmission, and risk management more generally. Drawing on interviews with 34 couples living in inner-city Australia, this article focuses on participants' accounts of 'sharing'. While health promotion discourses and conventional epidemiology have tended to interpret the practice of sharing (like the absence of condom use) in terms of 'noncompliance', we are interested in participants' socially and relationally situated 'rationalities'. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459316660859DOI Listing
January 2018
8 Reads

Science and scepticism: Drug information, young men and counterpublic health.

Health (London) 2017 11 10;21(6):595-615. Epub 2016 Feb 10.

Curtin University, Australia.

It is perhaps no surprise that young people can be sceptical of the drug-related information they receive in school-based health education, health promotion and the media. Significant societal anxiety surrounds young people's drug consumption, so it is tempting to approach this scepticism as a problem to be solved. In this article, we look closely at a group of young Australian men (n = 25), all of whom hold deeply sceptical views about the drug information they received in schools, social marketing campaigns and public speech generally. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459315628042DOI Listing
November 2017
2 Reads

Knowledge, Attitudes and Perceptions of Secondary School Teenagers towards HIV Transmission and Prevention in Rural and Urban Areas of Central Uganda.

Health (Irvine Calif) 2016 14;8(10). Epub 2016 Jul 14.

Department of Pharmacology & Therapeutics, Makerere University College of Health Sciences, Kampala, Uganda.

HIV/AIDS has remained a challenge in Uganda among adolescent despite the ABC strategy used globally to prevent HIV infection. The study assessed the knowledge, attitudes and perceptions of secondary school teenagers towards HIV transmission and prevention in rural and urban schools of central Uganda. A cross sectional study using self-administered questionnaires and structured interviews was used to collect data from adolescents in secondary schools in Kampala and Buikwe districts. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4236/health.2016.810097DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5927383PMC
July 2016
1 Read

Lay knowledge, social movements and the use of medicines: Personal reflections.

Health (London) 2016 Mar 30;20(2):77-93. Epub 2015 Nov 30.

University of Exeter, UK.

This article consists of two personal reflections about the changing status of lay knowledge over the last 20 years. The first reflection is by Nicky Britten from the perspective of a sociologist working in medical schools whose interest in this topic was motivated by my own personal experience of health care and of teaching general practitioners. Starting with the problematic deficit model of 'ignorant patients', I trace the literature on patient-centredness, shared decision-making, lay knowledge, public involvement in research and social movements. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459315619021DOI Listing
March 2016
2 Reads

Bone Mineral Density Reporting Underestimates Fracture Risk in Ontario.

Health (Irvine Calif) 2015 May;7(5):566-571

Osteoporosis Canada, Toronto, Canada.

Objective: Analysis of clinical documents such as bone mineral density (BMD) reports is an important component of program evaluation because it can provide insights into the accuracy of assessment of fracture risk communicated to patients and practitioners. Our objective was to compare fracture risk calculations from BMD test reports to those based on the 2010 Canadian guidelines.

Methods: We retrieved BMD reports from fragility fracture patients screened through a community hospital fracture clinic participating in Ontario's Fracture Clinic Screening Program. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4236/health.2015.75067DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4623753PMC
May 2015
4 Reads

In the loop: Practices of self-monitoring from accounts by trial participants.

Health (London) 2016 09 13;20(5):523-38. Epub 2015 Oct 13.

London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, UK

Self-monitoring, by which individuals record and appraise ongoing information about the status of their body in order to improve their health, has been a key element in the personal management of conditions such as diabetes, but it is now also increasingly used in relation to health-associated behaviours. The introduction of self-monitoring as an intervention to change behaviour is intended to provide feedback that can be used by individuals to both assess their status and provide ongoing support towards a goal that may be formally set or remains implicit. However, little attention has been paid to how individuals actually engage in the process or act upon the information they receive. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459315611939DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5007662PMC
September 2016
4 Reads

Reconceptualising public acceptability: A study of the ways people respond to policies aimed to reduce alcohol consumption.

Authors:
Simon Cohn

Health (London) 2016 05 13;20(3):203-19. Epub 2015 Mar 13.

London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, UK

The issue of public acceptability of health policies is key if they are to have significant and lasting impact. This study, based on focus groups conducted in England, examines the ways people responded to, and made sense of, policy ideas aimed at reducing alcohol consumption. Although effective policies were supported in the abstract, specific proposals were consistently rejected because they were not thought to map onto the fundamental causes of excessive drinking, which was not attributed to alcohol itself but instead its cultural context. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459315574117DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4853811PMC
May 2016
2 Reads

The Effect of Short Term Vitamin D Supplementation on the Inflammatory and Oxidative Mediators of Arterial Stiffness.

Health (Irvine Calif) 2014 Jun;6(12):1503-1511

University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, USA.

Background: Vitamin D deficiency has been implicated as a potential risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The high rate of vitamin D deficiency (<30 ng/ml) exhibited by African Americans may account for some of the excess prevalence of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in this vulnerable US population. Vitamin D supplementation may reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease by ameliorating the onset and progression of arterial stiffness, a strong predictor of cardiovascular mortality, usually assessed by pulse wave velocity and augmentation index. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4236/health.2014.612185DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4260399PMC
June 2014
18 Reads

Prising open the 'black box': An epistemological critique of discursive constructions of scaling up the provision of mental health care in Africa.

Authors:
Sara Cooper

Health (London) 2015 Sep 17;19(5):523-41. Epub 2014 Nov 17.

London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, UK

Global mental health research is increasingly highlighting the high levels of untreated mental illness in Africa and calling for the scaling-up of services in order to redress this situation. A particular model of care is being strongly advocated for such scale-up, and a recent explosion of research is providing guidelines for its implementation. This article seeks to open up the 'black box' of international research on scaling up the provision of mental health care in Africa, unearthing the hidden assumptions and power dynamics underpinning the knowledge produced. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459314556905DOI Listing
September 2015
1 Read

Resolute efforts to cure hepatitis C: Understanding patients' reasons for completing antiviral treatment.

Health (London) 2015 Sep 5;19(5):473-89. Epub 2014 Nov 5.

Edith Nourse Rogers Memorial Veterans Hospital, Bedford, MA, USA; Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.

Antiviral treatment for hepatitis C is usually difficult, demanding, and debilitating and has long offered modest prospects of successful cure. Most people who may need treatment have faced stigma of an illness associated with drug and alcohol misuse and thus may be deemed poor candidates for treatment, while completing a course of treatment typically calls for resolve and responsibility. Patients' efforts and their reasons for completing treatment have received scant attention in hepatitis C clinical policy discourse that instead focuses on problems of adherence and patients' expected failures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459314555237DOI Listing
September 2015
15 Reads

Between hope and evidence: how community advisors demarcate the boundary between legitimate and illegitimate stem cell treatments.

Health (London) 2015 Mar 2;19(2):188-206. Epub 2014 Nov 2.

Department of Anatomy and Neuroscience, The University of Melbourne, Australia.

Stem cell science provides an exemplary study of the 'management of hope'. On the one hand, raising 'hopes' and expectations is a seen as a necessary aspect of securing investment in promising innovative research. On the other, such hyperbole risks raising hopes to a level that may lead people to undertake undue risks, which may ultimately undermine confidence in medical research. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459314555240DOI Listing
March 2015
3 Reads

A 'new normal': Exploring the disruption of a poor prognostic cancer diagnosis using interviews and participant-produced photographs.

Health (London) 2015 Sep 15;19(5):451-72. Epub 2014 Oct 15.

Warwick Medical School, UK.

Cancer survival is increasing, and many people are living years after cancer treatment. For example, it is predicted that 46 per cent of men and 56 per cent of women diagnosed in 2007 in England and Wales will survive their cancer for 5 years or more. However, 'survivors' may be living with significant physical, psychological and social disruption caused by their illness. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459314554319DOI Listing
September 2015
1 Read

Sleep Quality, Sleep Patterns and Consumption of Energy Drinks and Other Caffeinated Beverages among Peruvian College Students.

Health (Irvine Calif) 2013 Aug;5(8B):26-35

Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Multidisciplinary International Research Training Program, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Objectives: To evaluate sleep quality in relation to lifestyle characteristics including consumption of energy drinks and other caffeinated beverages among Peruvian college students.

Methods: A total of 2,458 college students were invited to complete a self-administered questionnaire that collected information about a variety of behaviors including consumption of energy drinks, caffeinated and alcoholic beverages. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) was used to assess sleep quality. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4236/health.2013.58A2005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4169115PMC
August 2013
1 Read

African Dust Storms Reaching Puerto Rican Coast Stimulate the Secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 and Cause Cytotoxicity to Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells (BEAS-2B).

Health (Irvine Calif) 2013 Oct;5(10B):14-28

Department of Biochemistry, University of Puerto Rico-Medical Sciences Campus, San Juan, Puerto Rico ; Center for Environmental and Toxicological Research, San Juan, Puerto Rico.

African dust storm events (ADE) travel across the Atlantic Ocean (ADEAO) and reach the Puerto Rican coast (ADEPRC), potentially impacting air quality and human health. To what extent seasonal variations in atmospheric particulate matter (PM) size fractions, composition and sources trigger respiratory-adverse effects to Puerto Ricans is still unclear. In the present study, we investigated the pro-inflammatory and cytotoxic effects of PM samples harvested during ADEAO (PM), ADEPRC (PM and PM) and Non-ADE (Preand Post-ADEAO and Non-ADEPRC), using BEAS-2B cells. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4236/health.2013.510A2003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4082624PMC
October 2013
7 Reads

Impact of age at onset for children with renal failure on education and employment transitions.

Health (London) 2015 Jan 30;19(1):67-85. Epub 2014 Jun 30.

University of Surrey, UK.

Previous medical research has shown that children with end-stage renal failure experience delay or underachievement of key markers of transition to adulthood. This article analyses 35 qualitative interviews with end-stage renal failure patients, aged 20-30 years, first diagnosed at 0-19 years of age, to explore how far delayed or underachievement in education and employment is related to their age at onset of end-stage renal failure. This study shows how unpredictable failures of renal replacement therapies, comorbidities and/or side effects of treatment in the early life course often coincided with critical moments for education and employment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459314539773DOI Listing
January 2015
2 Reads

Stress Intervention and Disease in African American Lupus Patients: The Balancing Lupus Experiences with Stress Strategies (BLESS) Study.

Health (Irvine Calif) 2014 Jan;6(1):71-79

Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, 96 Jonathan Lucas Street, Suite 816, Charleston, SC 29425 and Medical Service, Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston, SC.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4236/health.2014.61011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4052946PMC
January 2014
2 Reads

The development of the specialism of emergency medicine: media and cultural influences.

Health (London) 2015 Jan 11;19(1):3-16. Epub 2014 May 11.

School of Health Sciences, University of Nottingham, Royal Derby Hospital, Derby, UK.

In this article we analyse, via a critical review of the literature, the development of a relatively new medical specialism in the United Kingdom, that of emergency medicine. Despite the high media profile of emergency care, it is a low-status specialism within UK medicine. The creation of a specialist College in 2008 means that, symbolically, recognition as a full specialism has now been achieved. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459314530737DOI Listing
January 2015
3 Reads

Performing 'pragmatic holism': Professionalisation and the holistic discourse of non-medically qualified acupuncturists and homeopaths in the United Kingdom.

Authors:
Assaf Givati

Health (London) 2015 Jan 11;19(1):34-50. Epub 2014 May 11.

University of Portsmouth, UK

Complementary and alternative medicine practitioners have often utilised 'holism' as a key identification mark of their practice, distancing themselves from 'the reductionist biomedicine'. However, the past couple of decades have witnessed increased engagement of several complementary and alternative medicines in professionalisation, which includes a degree of biomedical alignment while 'reducing' holistic claims in order to provide practice with a 'credible outlook' and move closer to the mainstream, a development which challenges the role of holism in complementary and alternative medicine practices. This article explores the strategies by which two groups of complementary and alternative medicine practitioners, namely, non-medically qualified acupuncturists and homeopaths in the United Kingdom, pragmatically accommodate holistic notions as a professional resource, a process of negotiation between maintaining their holistic premise, on the one hand, and the drive to professionalise and enhance their societal status, on the other. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459314530739DOI Listing
January 2015
3 Reads

Medical professionalism on television: student perceptions and pedagogical implications.

Health (London) 2014 Nov 27;18(6):597-612. Epub 2014 Mar 27.

University of Western Sydney, Australia.

Previous research has pointed to the role television can play in informing health practices and beliefs. Within the academic setting in particular, some educators have raised concerns about the influence of medical dramas on students. Less research, however, draws on the perspectives of students, and this study therefore explores medical students' perceptions of medical practice and professionalism in popular medical television programmes. Read More

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http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1363459314524804
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459314524804DOI Listing
November 2014
4 Reads

Experiential knowledge of disability, impairment and illness: The reproductive decisions of families genetically at risk.

Health (London) 2014 Sep 6;18(5):476-92. Epub 2013 Nov 6.

Warwick Medical School, UK

As the capacities of Reproductive Genetic Technologies expand, would-be parents face an increasing number of reproductive decisions regarding testing and screening for different conditions. Several studies have acknowledged the role that 'experiential knowledge of disability' plays in arriving at decisions around the use of these technologies; however, there is a lack of clarity within this literature as to what constitutes 'experiential knowledge of disability' and an over-reliance on medical diagnoses as a shorthand to describe different types of experience. Drawing on both social model of disability theory and the literature on chronic illness, this article presents an analysis of data from an in-depth qualitative interview study with 64 people with an inheritable condition in their family, Spinal Muscular Atrophy, and reports their views around reproduction and Reproductive Genetic Technologies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459313507588DOI Listing
September 2014
1 Read

Spatio-Temporal Variations in the Associations between Hourly PM and Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) from MODIS Sensors on Terra and Aqua.

Health (Irvine Calif) 2013 Oct;5(10A2):8-13

Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, USA.

Recent studies have explored the relationship between aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements by satellite sensors and concentrations of particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 μm (PM). However, relatively little is known about spatial and temporal patterns in this relationship across the contiguous United States. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4236/health.2013.510A2002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4554528PMC
October 2013
1 Read

The role of drinking in new and existing friendships across high school settings.

Health (Irvine Calif) 2013 Jun 20;5(6A3):18-25. Epub 2013 Jun 20.

The University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, America.

We use 9 Add Health high schools with longitudinal network data to assess whether adolescent drinkers choose friends who drink, prefer friends whose friends drink, if selection differs between new and existing friendships, and between schools. Utilizing dynamic social network models that control for friend influences on individual alcohol use, the results show that drinkers do not strongly prefer friends who drink. Instead, they favor close friends whose friends' drink, suggesting that alcohol matters for selection on the social groups and environments that friends connect each other to. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4236/health.2013.56A3004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4663454PMC
June 2013
4 Reads

An exploration of violence, mental health and substance abuse in post-conflict Guatemala.

Health (Irvine Calif) 2013 May;5(5):825-833

Department of Family Medicine & Community Health, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA.

Guatemala's 36-year civil war officially ended in December 1996 after some 200,000 deaths and one million refugees. Despite the ceasefire, Guatemala continues to be a violent country with one of the highest homicide rates in the world. We investigated potential associations between violence, mental health, and substance abuse in post-conflict Guatemala using a community-based survey of 86 respondents living in urban and rural Guatemala. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4236/health.2013.55109DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5095616PMC
May 2013
7 Reads

Becoming men: Gender, disability, and transitioning to adulthood.

Health (London) 2014 Jan 1;18(1):95-114. Epub 2013 Mar 1.

University of Toronto, Canada.

Children and youth with progressive conditions are living longer, and there is increased interest in designing programs that will assist them with "transitioning" to adulthood. Almost none of the transitions research to date, however, has attended to the experiences of disabled boys in "becoming men," nor has there been critical conceptual work problematizing notions of "normal" adulthood or theorizing the complex, diverse, and gendered experiences of transitioning. In this Canadian study, we investigated the intersectionality of gender, disability, and emerging adulthood with 15 young men with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459313476967DOI Listing
January 2014
3 Reads

Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder blame game: a study on the positioning of professionals, teachers and parents.

Health (London) 2013 Nov 14;17(6):584-604. Epub 2013 Feb 14.

University of Milano-Bicocca, Italy.

Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder is currently the most debated childhood psychiatric diagnosis. Given the circulation of competing perspectives about the 'real' causes of children's behaviour and the 'best' way to treat them, we aim to analyse the interactions of the central social actors' discourses about attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder children within the Italian context. Adopting a multi-method approach, we focus on the polyphonic chorus of voices surrounding the child, studying the discourses of mental health professionals, teachers and parents. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459312472083DOI Listing
November 2013
6 Reads

Young people and health: towards a new conceptual framework for understanding empowerment.

Authors:
Grace Spencer

Health (London) 2014 Jan 4;18(1):3-22. Epub 2013 Feb 4.

The University of Nottingham, UK.

In recent times, empowerment has become the focus of much work with young people amidst increasing concerns about their health. Empowerment is often offered as a 'solution' to such concerns, with the uncritical assumption being made that empowerment unproblematically results in positive health outcomes. While much of the health promotion literature advocates 'empowerment', it often does so without offering a clear conceptualisation of the word itself or indeed addressing the thorny theoretical tensions surrounding the concept's root word of power. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459312473616DOI Listing
January 2014
4 Reads

Sidestepping questions of legitimacy: how community representatives manoeuvre to effect change in a health service.

Health (London) 2014 Jan 30;18(1):23-40. Epub 2013 Jan 30.

School of Public Health and Community Medicine, UNSW Australia.

Empirical studies of community participation in health services commonly tie effectiveness to the perceived legitimacy of community representatives among health staff. This article examines the underlying assumption that legitimacy is the major pathway to influence for community representatives. It takes a different vantage point from previous research in its examination of data (primarily through 34 in-depth interviews, observation and recording of 26 meetings and other interactions documented in field notes) from a 3-year study of community representatives' action in a large health region in Australia. Read More

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http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1363459312473617
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459312473617DOI Listing
January 2014
3 Reads

Heteronormativity hurts everyone: experiences of young men and clinicians with sexually transmitted infection/HIV testing in British Columbia, Canada.

Health (London) 2013 Sep 1;17(5):441-59. Epub 2012 Nov 1.

School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, 2206 East Mall, LPC, Vancouver, BC Canada .

Heteronormative assumptions can negatively influence the lives of young gay and bisexual men, and recent sociological analyses have identified the negative impacts of heteronormativity on heterosexual men (e.g. 'fag discourse' targeted at heterosexual adolescents). Read More

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http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1363459312464071
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459312464071DOI Listing
September 2013
6 Reads

Understanding context for quality improvement: artefacts, affordances and socio-material infrastructure.

Authors:
Davina Allen

Health (London) 2013 Sep 1;17(5):460-77. Epub 2012 Nov 1.

Cardiff School of Nursing and Midwifery Studies, Cardiff, UK.

Against a backdrop of growing concern for patient safety and service quality, modern health-care systems are witnessing a proliferation of improvement initiatives. The impact is often variable, however, and a key theme to emerge from evaluations of these efforts is a recognition of the effects of local context on the success or otherwise of an intervention. However, the 'context' tends to be understood in terms of higher order issues such as structure, culture and leadership. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459312464072DOI Listing
September 2013
2 Reads

Ills from the womb? A critical examination of clinical guidelines for obesity in pregnancy.

Health (London) 2013 Jul 15;17(4):407-21. Epub 2012 Oct 15.

Department of Kinesiology, School of Public Health, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA.

In this article, we critically examine the clinical guidelines for obesity in pregnancy put forth by the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC) that are underpinned by the rules of Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM), a system of ranking knowledge that promises to provide unbiased evidence about the effectiveness of treatments. While the SOGC guidelines are intended to direct health practitioners on 'best practice' as they address pregnancy weight gain with clients in the clinical context, we question their usefulness, arguing that despite their commitment to objectivity, they remain mired in cultural biases that stigmatize large female bodies and associates them to 'unfit' mothers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459312460702DOI Listing
July 2013
2 Reads

Comparison of nutritional intake in US adolescent swimmers and non-athletes.

Health (Irvine Calif) 2012 Oct;4(10):873-880

Department of Epidemiology & Cancer Control, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, USA.

Swimming is a very popular sport among adolescents in the US. Little is known about the diet of competitive adolescent swimmers in the US but data from other countries indicate several inadequacies, including excessive intake of fat and lower than recommended intake of carbohydrate and several micronutrients that may affect athletic performance and bone accrual. We assessed usual diet, using a food frequency questionnaire and calcium checklist, among 191 adolescent males and females [91 swimmers (mean 13. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5035546PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.4236/health.2012.410133DOI Listing
October 2012
3 Reads

In pursuit of leanness: the management of appearance, affect and masculinities within a men's weight loss forum.

Health (London) 2013 May 18;17(3):284-99. Epub 2012 Jul 18.

Division of Psychology, School of Social Sciences, Nottingham Trent University, Burton Street, Nottingham, NG1 4BU, UK.

In a somatic society which promotes visible, idealized forms of embodiment, men are increasingly being interpellated as image-conscious body-subjects. Some research suggests that men negotiate appearance issues in complex and varied ways, partly because image concerns are conventionally feminized. However, little research has considered how overweight men construct body projects in the context of weight loss, or how men talk to each other about weight management efforts. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459312454149DOI Listing
May 2013
1 Read

Parallel vigilance: parents' dual focus following diagnosis of Type 1 diabetes mellitus in their young child.

Health (London) 2013 May 15;17(3):246-65. Epub 2012 Jul 15.

London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, 15-17 Tavistock Place, London, WC1H 9SH, UK.

There is consensus that enabling patient self-care and expertise leads to better management of chronic illness. Clinicians are being encouraged to manage clinical encounters in ways that promote these outcomes rather than perpetuate hierarchical relationships. This article describes one part of a larger study of 55 outpatient consultations conducted within 14 months of the diagnosis of Type 1 diabetes mellitus in young children. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459312451180DOI Listing
May 2013
7 Reads

Constructing the moral body: self-care among older adults with multiple chronic conditions.

Health (London) 2013 May 5;17(3):211-28. Epub 2012 Jul 5.

School of Kinesiology, The University of British Columbia, 156-1924 West Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z2, Canada.

Older adults are increasingly living with and managing multiple chronic conditions. The self-management of illness occurs in a social and political context in which the responsibility for health has shifted from the State to the individual, who is expected to be an active consumer of health care. Although there has been extensive investigation of the management of single chronic conditions, the realities of living with multiple morbidities have largely been ignored, particularly among older adults. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459312451181DOI Listing
May 2013
6 Reads

Faux masculinities among college men who experience depression.

Health (London) 2013 Jan 6;17(1):75-92. Epub 2012 Jun 6.

School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, 302-6190 Agronomy Road, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 1Z3, Canada.

Depression is a significant problem among college men that can be complicated by masculine ideals of stoicism, reluctance to seek help, and risky self-management strategies. Underpinning these issues are complexities in recognizing what behaviors might be indicative of college men's depressive symptoms. Findings drawn from a qualitative study of 25 Canadian-based college men who self-identified or were diagnosed with depression revealed three predominant masculine identities: the angry man; the solitary man; and the risk-reliant man. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459312447256DOI Listing
January 2013
5 Reads

Tales of healthy men: male reproductive bodies in biomedicine from 'Lebensborn' to sperm banks.

Authors:
Antje Kampf

Health (London) 2013 Jan 6;17(1):20-36. Epub 2012 Jun 6.

School of Medicine, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Am Pulverturm 13, Mainz, 55131, Germany.

Using the example of 'sperm tales', borne out of the biomedical technologies that went hand in hand with the establishment of the 'science of man' (andrology), the article engages with the epistemic evolution of interrelated biomedical theories and concepts of what constitutes a 'healthy' reproductive male body. The article asks: how has the normative ideal male body been either perpetuated or interrogated through these tales of male reproduction at the interface between scientific and medical technologies? And how were changes to the normalization of male bodies central to clinical practices and cultural understandings of health and illness? With many aspects of the medical history of male reproduction in the 20th century still unexplored, this article will focus on the growing intervention of biomedicine to 'treat' male infertility by way of the classification, standardization and normalization of male corporeality, focusing in particular on the representation and construction of men and the male body, as reflected in medical science and practice from the second half of the 20th century onwards in Germany. The article analyses the rise in importance of sperm in biomedical investigation, including a consideration of the construction of infertility as the defining force behind concepts of 'healthy men', and examines the related conceptualization of male reproductive bodies at the crossroad between 'healthy' and 'normal'. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459312447251DOI Listing
January 2013
3 Reads

Young children's meaning making about the causes of illness within the family context.

Health (London) 2013 Jan 4;17(1):3-19. Epub 2012 May 4.

School of Psychology, Massey University, Private Bag 11 222, Palmerston North 4442, New Zealand.

In this article we highlight the ways in which young children draw on their family contexts in their meaning making about the causes of illness. Studies of young children's understanding of illness causality have largely focused on the nature of children's knowledge rather than the ways in which children acquire their knowledge. Seeking to advance a socio-constructivist understanding of young children's conceptualization of illness causality, we interviewed five four-year-old children and their family members. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459312442421DOI Listing
January 2013
3 Reads

Theoretical directions for an emancipatory concept of patient and public involvement.

Health (London) 2012 Sep 25;16(5):531-47. Epub 2012 Apr 25.

Patient and Public Involvement, Peninsula Medical School, Veysey Building, Salmon Pool Lane, Exeter, EX2 4SG, UK.

Patient and public involvement (PPI) is now firmly embedded in the policies of the Department of Health in England. This article commences with a review of the changing structures of PPI in English health and social care, largely in terms of their own explicit rationales, using that as a spring board for the development of a general theoretical framework. Arguing that all democratic states face major dilemmas in seeking to meet conflicting demands and expectations for involvement, we identify the diverse and sometimes conflicting cultural and political features embedded in current models of involvement in England, in a context of rapid delegitimation of the wider political system. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459312438563DOI Listing
September 2012
5 Reads

Neoliberalism, welfare policy and health: a qualitative meta-synthesis of single parents' experience of the transition from welfare to work.

Authors:
Kay Cook

Health (London) 2012 Sep 5;16(5):507-30. Epub 2012 Mar 5.

Centre for Applied Social Research, RMIT University, GPO Box 2476, Melbourne, VIC 3001, Australia.

Following the United States' lead, the emergence of neoliberal welfare policy across the western world has resulted in employment programmes for single parents, who are predominantly single mothers. While some governments claim that employment will improve single parents' incomes and well-being, researchers dispute that single parents can unproblematically move into the workforce, with net positive effects. While researchers have quantified the socio-economic effect of these programmes, in particular on participant health, no study has yet synthesized participants' experiences of welfare-to-work. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459311434650DOI Listing
September 2012
25 Reads

The use of routinely collected patient data for research: a critical review.

Health (London) 2012 Jul 9;16(4):448-63. Epub 2011 Nov 9.

School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Jean McFarlane Building, University Place, Oxford Road, Manchester, UK.

Over recent years in the UK there has been growing interest in the potential for routinely collected NHS (National Health Service) patient data to be used for secondary purposes, facilitated by the potential of increasingly sophisticated electronic databases. This article is based on a critically reflective literature review which analyses the key debates pertaining to this issue. The work arose in the context of a programme of research concerning routine patient data use in neonatal care. Read More

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http://hea.sagepub.com/content/16/4/448.full.pdf
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http://hea.sagepub.com/cgi/doi/10.1177/1363459311425513
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459311425513DOI Listing
July 2012
4 Reads

The social in medicine: social techniques in patient education.

Health (London) 2012 Jul 22;16(4):418-33. Epub 2011 Aug 22.

The Danish School of Education, Aarhus University, Denmark.

The article investigates the role of the social in medicine through an empirical study of social technologies in Diabetes 2 and COPD patient education in Denmark. It demonstrates how the social at the same time is the cause of disease but also functions as a solution to the problem. Furthermore it suggests that the patient groups have an ambiguous role in medicine; they appear to be organized as communities of empowerment, critical of the individualizing effects of medicine, but at the same time these groups are embedded in medical practices, transferring responsibility for illness and health to the level of the citizens. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459311416835DOI Listing
July 2012
1 Read

Practising engagement: Infusing communication with empathy and compassion in medical students' clinical encounters.

Authors:
Sally Warmington

Health (London) 2012 May 12;16(3):327-42. Epub 2011 Aug 12.

Centre for Health and Society, School of Population Health, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Patients commonly experience some physicians' ways of interacting with them as detached and indicating a lack of concern for their welfare. This is likely to add to the distress experienced by a person seeking healing, as well as interfering with the exchange of information required for good medical care. Despite contemporary medical schools' focus on clinical communication, and on training for 'patient-centred' practice, problems with the relations between doctors and patients are still widely acknowledged. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459311416834DOI Listing
May 2012
9 Reads

Expert nurses and the division of labour in hospitals.

Health (London) 2012 May 21;16(3):282-97. Epub 2011 Jun 21.

School of Health and Human Sciences, University of Essex, UK.

This article analyses nursing expertise with a particular focus at the level of clinical and organizational practice. Through an examination of a specialist team of hospital nurses, and drawing on the concept of a community of practice, the article provides a critique of discussions of nursing expertise which can be overly normative, individualistic or divorced from practice. The theoretical background to our analysis is the division of labour in health care; the case study on which this analysis is based is a particular health policy: the introduction of critical care outreach services. Read More

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http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1363459311411166
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459311411166DOI Listing
May 2012
4 Reads

The pursuit of medical knowledge and the potential consequences of the hidden curriculum.

Authors:
Barret Michalec

Health (London) 2012 May 20;16(3):267-81. Epub 2011 May 20.

Department of Sociology, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716, USA.

This study explores how preclinical medical students experience particular elements of their training, specifically their pursuit for medical knowledge and how this may impact their attributes as well as their relations with those outside of the realm of medicine. Ten first-year and 10 second-year students of a US medical school were interviewed regarding their experiences with and perceptions of their medical training. The students reported a cognitive and emotional distance from non-medical students that appears to be accentuated not only by their strenuous academic responsibilities but also elements of the hidden curriculum nested within medical training. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459311403951DOI Listing
May 2012
4 Reads

The rise of cancer in urban India: Cultural understandings, structural inequalities and the emergence of the clinic.

Health (London) 2012 May 20;16(3):250-66. Epub 2011 May 20.

School of Social Science, University of Queensland, Australia.

Cancer services in India have evolved and expanded significantly in recent years, with a surge in the availability of biomedical oncological treatment facilities for certain cohorts of the Indian population in urban areas. Despite significant and sustained economic development in many areas of India, major issues persist in the delivery of cancer care, even in the context of relatively prosperous urban populations. This article explores the dilemmas evident in Indian cancer care as perceived by a group of Indian oncology clinicians. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459311403949DOI Listing
May 2012
3 Reads