8,104 results match your criteria Schizophrenia research[Journal]


The Early Psychosis Screener for Internet (EPSI)-SR: Predicting 12 month psychotic conversion using machine learning.

Schizophr Res 2019 Feb 14. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093-0810, USA. Electronic address:

Introduction: A faster and more accurate self-report screener for early psychosis is needed to promote early identification and intervention.

Methods: Self-report Likert-scale survey items were administered to individuals being screened with the Structured Interview for Psychosis-risk Syndromes (SIPS) and followed at eight early psychosis clinics. An a priori analytic plan included Spectral Clustering Analysis to reduce the item pool, followed by development of Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2019.01.015DOI Listing
February 2019
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Assessment of 3-dimensional wisdom in schizophrenia: Associations with neuropsychological functions and physical and mental health.

Schizophr Res 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, United States; Sam and Rose Stein Institute for Research on Aging, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, United States; Department of Neurosciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, United States. Electronic address:

Recent decades have seen growing empirical research in wisdom as a complex, trait-based psychological characteristic. Wisdom has been shown to possess individual and societal benefits through associations with health and well-being, but it has not yet been evaluated in people with schizophrenia (PwS). In the current study, we administered a widely used, validated 3-dimensional wisdom scale that includes three interrelated dimensions: cognitive, reflective, and affective. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2019.01.022DOI Listing
February 2019
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Altered dynamic global signal topography in antipsychotic-naive adolescents with early-onset schizophrenia.

Schizophr Res 2019 Feb 14. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

The Clinical Hospital of Chengdu Brain Science Institute, MOE Key Laboratory for Neuroinformation, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054, China; School of Life Science and Technology, Center for Information in BioMedicine, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054, China. Electronic address:

Schizophrenia (SCZ) is a severe neuropsychiatric disease associated with dysfunction of brain regions and networks. Recent, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have determined that the global signal (GS) is an important source of the local neuronal activity. However, the dynamics of this effect in SCZ remains unknown. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2019.01.035DOI Listing
February 2019

Patterns of recovery course in early intervention for FIRST episode non-affective psychosis patients: The role of timing.

Schizophr Res 2019 Feb 14. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Department of Psychiatry, Marqués de Valdecilla University Hospital, IDIVAL, School of Medicine, University of Cantabria, Santander, Spain; CIBERSAM, Centro Investigación Biomédica en Red Salud Mental, Spain.

Background: Prevention of symptom relapse and promotion of functional recovery are the two main goals of early intervention following a first episode of non-affective psychosis (FEP). The identification of patterns of recovery is important in developing and implementing recovery focused interventions at set time interval.

Method: Patterns of recovery course, in terms of symptomatic and functional remission, were explored at 1 and 3-year follow-up in a sample of 373 consecutive FEP patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2019.01.032DOI Listing
February 2019

Childhood trauma and psychosis: Moving the field forward.

Schizophr Res 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Mental Health Biomedical Research Centre at South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and King's College London, London, UK; Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2019.02.001DOI Listing
February 2019

Evaluation of the role of fatty acid-binding protein 7 in controlling schizophrenia-relevant phenotypes using newly established knockout mice.

Schizophr Res 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Laboratory for Molecular Psychiatry, RIKEN Center for Brain Science, Wakoshi, Saitama, Japan. Electronic address:

Dampened prepulse inhibition (PPI) is a consistent observation in psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia and qualifies as a robust endophenotype for genetic evaluation. Using high PPI C57BL/6NCrlCrlj (B6Nj) and low PPI C3H/HeNCrlCrlj (C3HNj) inbred mouse strains, we have previously reported a quantitative trait locus (QTL) for PPI at chromosome 10 and identified Fabp7 as a candidate gene for regulating PPI and schizophrenia pathogenesis using Fabp7-deficient mice (B6.Cg-Fabp7 KO). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2019.02.002DOI Listing
February 2019

Brain insulin resistance and altered brain glucose are related to memory impairments in schizophrenia.

Schizophr Res 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Maryland Psychiatric Research Center, Department of Psychiatry, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.

Memory is robustly impaired in schizophrenia (SZ) and related to functional outcome. Memory dysfunction has been shown to be related to altered brain glucose metabolism and brain insulin resistance in animal models and human studies of Alzheimer's disease. In this study, differences in brain glucose using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and blood Extracellular Vesicle (EV) biomarkers of neuronal insulin resistance (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2019.01.031DOI Listing
February 2019

Impact of childhood adversity on corticolimbic volumes in youth at clinical high-risk for psychosis.

Schizophr Res 2019 Feb 7. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Emory School of Medicine, 12 Executive Park, Atlanta, GA 30329, United States; Department of Psychology, Emory University, 36 Eagle Row, Atlanta, GA 30322, United States.

Childhood adversity is among the strongest risk factors for psychosis-spectrum disorders, though the nature and specificity of the biological mechanisms underlying this association remains unclear. Previous research reveals overlaps in the volumetric alterations observed in both adversity-exposed individuals and in psychosis-spectrum populations, highlighting the possibility that deviations in corticolimbic gray matter development may be one mechanism linking adversity and psychosis. Given that childhood adversity encompasses a wide range of adverse experiences, there is also a critical need to examine whether these different types of experiences have unique effects on corticolimbic regions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2019.01.048DOI Listing
February 2019

Switching patients with schizophrenia from paliperidone palmitate to aripiprazole lauroxil: A 6-month, prospective, open-label study.

Schizophr Res 2019 Feb 7. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697, United States. Electronic address:

We assessed the effectiveness of switching from paliperidone palmitate (PP) or risperidone long-acting injection (RLAI) to aripiprazole lauroxil (AL). Prospective, 6-month study in patients with schizophrenia with residual symptoms or intolerance with PP/RLAI. Effectiveness assessed via all-cause and medication-related discontinuation; CGI-S/BPRS and adverse event monitoring assessed efficacy/tolerability, respectively. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2019.01.038DOI Listing
February 2019
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Adding a neuroanatomical biomarker to an individualized risk calculator for psychosis: A proof-of-concept study.

Schizophr Res 2019 Feb 7. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

Department of Psychology, Yale University, 2 Hillhouse Ave., New Haven, CT 06520-8205, United States; Department of Psychiatry, Yale University, 300 George St., New Haven, CT 06511, United States. Electronic address:

In a recent study, a neuroanatomical-based age prediction model observed neuromaturational deviance among clinical high-risk individuals who developed psychosis. Here we aimed to investigate whether incorporating "brain age gap" (discrepancy between neuroanatomical-based predicted age and chronological age) to the North American Prodromal Longitudinal Study risk calculator would enhance prediction of psychosis conversion. The effect of brain age gap was significant (HR = 1. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2019.01.026DOI Listing
February 2019

Frontal slow wave resting EEG power is higher in individuals at Ultra High Risk for psychosis than in healthy controls but is not associated with negative symptoms or functioning.

Schizophr Res 2019 Feb 6. Epub 2019 Feb 6.

Orygen, the National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health, Parkville, Australia; Centre for Youth Mental Health, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia. Electronic address:

Decreased brain activity in the frontal region, as indicated by increased slow wave EEG power measured by electrodes place on the skull over this area, in association with negative symptoms has previously been shown to distinguish ultra-high risk (UHR) individuals who later transitioned to psychosis (UHR-P) from those who did not transition (UHR-NP). The aims of the current study were to: 1) replicate these results and 2) investigate whether similar association between increased frontal slow wave activity and functioning shows any value in the prediction of transition to psychosis in UHR individuals. The brain activity, recorded using EEG, of 44 UHR individuals and 38 healthy controls was included in the analyses. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2019.01.039DOI Listing
February 2019

Verbal learning deficits associated with increased anticholinergic burden are attenuated with targeted cognitive training in treatment refractory schizophrenia patients.

Schizophr Res 2019 Feb 6. Epub 2019 Feb 6.

Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, United States; VISN-22 Mental Illness, Research, Education and Clinical Center (MIRECC), La Jolla, CA, United States. Electronic address:

Targeted cognitive training (TCT) has been reported to improve verbal learning deficits in patients with schizophrenia (SZ). Despite positive findings, it is not clear whether demographic factors and clinical characteristics contribute to the success of TCT on an individual basis. Medication-associated anticholinergic burden has been shown to impact TCT-associated verbal learning gains in SZ outpatients, but the role of anticholinergic medication burden on TCT gains in treatment refractory SZ patients has not been described. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2019.01.016DOI Listing
February 2019
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Family networks during migration and risk of non-affective psychosis: A population-based cohort study.

Schizophr Res 2019 Feb 7. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

Division of Psychiatry, UCL, London, United Kingdom.

Objective: The determinants of increased psychosis risk among immigrants remain unclear. Given ethnic density may be protective, we investigated whether the presence of immediate family, or "family networks", at time of immigration was associated with risk of non-affective psychosis.

Methods: We followed a cohort of migrants (n = 838,717) to Sweden, born 1968-1997, from their 14 birthday, or earliest immigration thereafter, until diagnosis of non-affective psychosis (ICD-9/ICD-10), emigration, death, or 2011. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2019.01.044DOI Listing
February 2019
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Differential emotional abnormalities among schizotypy clusters.

Schizophr Res 2019 Feb 4. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Department of Psychological Science, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA. Electronic address:

Schizotypy, a multidimensional personality organization that reflects liability to develop schizophrenia-spectrum disorders, has been associated with a number of emotional abnormalities. Yet, the exact nature of any emotional abnormalities in schizotypy is relatively unclear. Using an ethnically diverse nonclinical sample (N = 2637), the present study identified homogenous clusters of individuals based on positive and negative schizotypy dimensions and explored three interrelated domains of emotion traits closely tied to functional outcomes and quality of life: affective experience, emotional awareness, and meta-level emotions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2019.01.042DOI Listing
February 2019
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The network structure of schizotypal personality traits in a population-based sample.

Schizophr Res 2019 Feb 4. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Institute for Technology in Psychiatry, McLean Hospital, 115 Mill Street, Belmont, MA 02478, United States of America; Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, 25 Shattuck Street, Boston, MA 02115, United States of America.

Outcomes for people with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders (SSDs) are generally poor, making it important to understand risk states and illness transition. The network approach, which conceptualizes psychopathology as a network of causally interacting symptoms, may hold promise in this regard. Here, we present a network analysis of schizotypal personality traits (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2019.01.046DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

An integrated neurocognitive and social-cognitive treatment for youth at clinical high risk for psychosis: Cognition for Learning and for Understanding Everyday Social Situations (CLUES).

Schizophr Res 2019 Feb 4. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Public Psychiatry Division of Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, 75 Fenwood Road, Boston, MA 02115, United States of America.

Background: Cognitive deficits, a core feature contributing to disability in schizophrenia, are present in milder form in individuals at clinical high risk (CHR) for psychosis. This study investigated the feasibility of Cognition for Learning and Understanding Everyday Social Situations (CLUES), an integrated neurocognitive and social cognitive treatment for youth at CHR.

Method: This was an open, pilot feasibility trial. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2019.01.029DOI Listing
February 2019

Development and testing of a web-based battery to remotely assess cognitive health in individuals with schizophrenia.

Schizophr Res 2019 Feb 4. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Department of Psychiatry, University of Minnesota, United States of America.

Cognitive impairment in schizophrenia is often severe, enduring, and contributes significantly to chronic disability. A standardized platform for identifying cognitive impairments and measuring treatment effects in cognition is a critical aspect of comprehensive evaluation and treatment for individuals with schizophrenia. In this project, we developed and tested a suite of ten web-based, neuroscience-informed cognitive assessments that are designed to enable the interpretation of specific deficits that could signal that an individual is experiencing cognitive difficulties. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2019.01.047DOI Listing
February 2019
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Involuntary hospitalization among young people with early psychosis: A population-based study using health administrative data.

Schizophr Res 2019 Feb 4. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, Western University, London, ON, Canada; Department of Psychiatry, Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, Western University, London, ON, Canada; Institute for Clinical Evaluate Sciences, Toronto, ON, Canada. Electronic address:

Objective: Early psychosis is an important window for establishing long-term trajectories. Involuntary hospitalization during this period may impact subsequent service engagement in people with newly diagnosed psychotic disorder. However, population-based studies of involuntary hospitalization in early psychosis are lacking. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2019.01.043DOI Listing
February 2019
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Prevalence rate of social anxiety disorder in individuals with a psychotic disorder: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Schizophr Res 2019 Feb 2. Epub 2019 Feb 2.

Centre for Youth Mental Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia; Orygen, The National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health, Parkville, Australia.

Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is characterised as an excessive fear of negative judgment from others and is considered one of the most disabling of the mental ill health conditions. Research findings indicate that it is also a significant issue for individuals diagnosed with a psychotic disorder, with prevalence rates of social anxiety ranging from 8% to 36%. This study was conducted to address the variance of the reported prevalence rates of comorbid SAD amongst individuals with a psychotic disorder diagnosis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2019.01.045DOI Listing
February 2019
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Progressive post-onset reorganisation of MRI-derived cortical thickness in adolescents with schizophrenia.

Schizophr Res 2019 Feb 2. Epub 2019 Feb 2.

Highfield Unit, Warneford Hospital, Oxford, UK; Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2019.01.041DOI Listing
February 2019
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What is the optimal neuropsychological test battery for schizophrenia in China?

Schizophr Res 2019 Feb 1. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

Peking University Sixth Hospital, Beijing, China; Peking University Institute of Mental Health, Beijing, China; NHC Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Ministry of Health (Peking University), Beijing, China; The National Clinical Research Center for Mental Health Disorders (Peking University Sixth Hospital), Beijing, China. Electronic address:

Background: The MATRICS consensus cognitive battery (MCCB) has been widely used to evaluate cognitive deficits in schizophrenia (SCZ), however, no study has formally examined the validity of the MCCB in Chinese SCZ. This study compared Chinese SCZ patients with healthy Chinese controls on the MCCB and some additional neurocognitive tests to determine if the Chinese MCCB is an optimal battery to assess the cognitive deficits in Chinese SCZ patients.

Method: The study enrolled and examined 230 patients met DSM-IV criteria for SCZ and 656 healthy controls matched for gender, age and education. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2019.01.034DOI Listing
February 2019
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Oxytocin does not improve working memory in schizophrenia.

Schizophr Res 2019 Jan 31. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

University of California, San Francisco, CA, United States of America; San Francisco Veteran's Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, CA, United States of America.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2019.01.020DOI Listing
January 2019
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A symptom-based continuum of psychosis explains cognitive and real-world functional deficits better than traditional diagnoses.

Schizophr Res 2019 Jan 30. Epub 2019 Jan 30.

The Mind Research Network/Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Institute, 1101 Yale Blvd. NE, Albuquerque, NM 87106, USA; Department of Psychology, University of New Mexico, 2001 Redondo S Dr., Albuquerque, NM 87106, USA; Department of Psychiatry, University of New Mexico School of Medicine, MSC09 5030, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA; Department of Neurology, University of New Mexico School of Medicine, MSC10 5620, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA. Electronic address:

Background: Patients with psychotic spectrum disorders share overlapping clinical/biological features, making it often difficult to separate them into a discrete nosology (i.e., Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders [DSM]). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2019.01.024DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Intrinsic mesocorticolimbic connectivity is negatively associated with social amotivation in people with schizophrenia.

Schizophr Res 2019 Jan 31. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Affective and Social Neuroscience, Center for Brain Disorders and Cognitive Sciences, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, China; Cognitive Neuroscience Center, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands; Department of Psychology, University of Groningen, the Netherlands.

Background: Social amotivation is a core element of the negative symptoms of schizophrenia. However, it is still largely unknown which neural substrates underpin social amotivation in people with schizophrenia, though deficiencies in the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system have been proposed.

Methods: We examined the association between social amotivation and substantia nigra/ventral tegmental area-seeded intrinsic connectivity in 84 people with schizophrenia using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2019.01.023DOI Listing
January 2019
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Stress during critical periods of development and risk for schizophrenia.

Schizophr Res 2019 Jan 30. Epub 2019 Jan 30.

Departments of Neuroscience, Psychiatry and Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, PA, USA. Electronic address:

Schizophrenia is a neurodevelopmental disorder with genetic predisposition, and stress has long been linked to its etiology. While stress affects all stages of the illness, increasing evidence suggests that stress during critical periods of development may be particularly detrimental, increasing individual's vulnerability to psychosis. To thoroughly understand the potential causative role of stress, our group has been focusing on the prenatal methylazoxymethanol acetate (MAM) rodent model, and discovered that MAM offspring display abnormal stress reactivity and heightened anxiety prepubertally, prior to the manifestation of a hyperdopaminergic state. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2019.01.030DOI Listing
January 2019

Citalopram in first episode schizophrenia: The DECIFER trial.

Schizophr Res 2019 Jan 29. Epub 2019 Jan 29.

National Clinical Research Center for Mental Disorders, Mental Health Institute, The Second Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, 139 Renmin Middle Road, Changsha, Hunan, China.

Antidepressants are frequently prescribed in first episode schizophrenia (FES) patients for negative symptoms or for subsyndromal depressive symptoms, but therapeutic benefit has not been established, despite evidence of efficacy in later-stage schizophrenia. We conducted a 52 week, placebo-controlled add-on trial of citalopram in patients with FES who did not meet criteria for major depression to determine whether maintenance therapy with citalopram would improve outcomes by preventing or improving negative and depressive symptoms. Primary outcomes were negative symptoms measured by the Scale for Assessment of Negative Symptoms and depressive symptoms measured by the Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia; both were analyzed by an intent-to-treat, mixed effects, area-under-the-curve analysis to assess the cumulative effects of symptom improvement and symptom prevention over a one-year period. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2019.01.028DOI Listing
January 2019
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Limited changes in activities of daily life performance ability among people with schizophrenia at clinical settings and the factors moderating the changes.

Schizophr Res Cogn 2019 Jun 15;16:29-35. Epub 2019 Jan 15.

Royal Perth Bentley Group, Bentley, Western Australia, Australia.

Background: Impaired community functioning and functional ability are common among people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSD). However, changes occurring in activities of daily life (ADL) ability through interventions provided at clinical settings have not been systematically examined in this population.

Methods: We retrospectively collated and analysed changes in ADL ability between admissions and discharges, measured utilising the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS), among 72 people with SSD at a public inpatient treatment and rehabilitation facility in Western Australia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scog.2018.12.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6348733PMC

Progressive reconfiguration of resting-state brain networks as psychosis develops: Preliminary results from the North American Prodrome Longitudinal Study (NAPLS) consortium.

Schizophr Res 2019 Jan 28. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Department of Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA; Department of Psychiatry, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA. Electronic address:

Mounting evidence has shown disrupted brain network architecture across the psychosis spectrum. However, whether these changes relate to the development of psychosis is unclear. Here, we used graph theoretical analysis to investigate longitudinal changes in resting-state brain networks in samples of 72 subjects at clinical high risk (including 8 cases who converted to full psychosis) and 48 healthy controls drawn from the North American Prodrome Longitudinal Study (NAPLS) consortium. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2019.01.017DOI Listing
January 2019

Cross-diagnostic analysis of cognitive control in mental illness: Insights from the CNTRACS consortium.

Schizophr Res 2019 Jan 28. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of California, Davis, Davis, USA.

Background: In recent years, psychiatry research has increasingly focused on understanding mental illnesses from a cross-diagnostic, dimensional perspective in order to better align their neurocognitive features with underlying neurobiological mechanisms. In this multi-site study, we examined two measures of cognitive control (d-prime context and lapsing rate) during the Dot Probe Expectancy (DPX) version of the AX-Continuous Performance Task in patients with either schizophrenia (SZ), schizoaffective disorder (SZ-A), or Type I bipolar disorder (BD) as well as healthy control (HC) subjects. We hypothesized significantly lower d-prime context and higher lapsing rate in SZ and SZ-A patients and intermediate levels in BD patients relative to HC. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S09209964193001
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2019.01.018DOI Listing
January 2019
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Efficacy of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in schizophrenia patients with treatment-resistant negative symptoms treated with clozapine.

Schizophr Res 2019 Jan 28. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Klinikum der Universität München, University Hospital, LMU Munich, Germany.

Background: Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a promising augmentation treatment for schizophrenia, however there are few controlled studies of rTMS augmentation of clozapine.

Methods: Using data from the 'rTMS for the Treatment of Negative Symptoms in Schizophrenia' (RESIS) trial we examined the impact of rTMS on PANSS total, general, positive and negative symptoms among participants on clozapine. rTMS was applied to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) for five treatment sessions/week for 3-weeks as augmentation for patients with a predominant negative syndrome of schizophrenia, as rated on PANSS. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2019.01.021DOI Listing
January 2019

Altered topological characteristics of morphological brain network relate to language impairment in high genetic risk subjects and schizophrenia patients.

Schizophr Res 2019 Jan 28. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

VA Boston Healthcare System, Harvard Medical School, Brockton, MA, USA.

Objective: Evidence suggests relationships between abnormalities in various cortical and subcortical brain structures and language dysfunction in individuals with schizophrenia, and to some extent in those with increased genetic risk for this diagnosis. The topological features of the structural brain network at the systems-level and their impact on language function in schizophrenia and in those at high genetic risk has been less well studied.

Method: Single-subject morphological brain network was constructed in a total of 71 subjects (20 patients with schizophrenia, 19 individuals at high genetic risk for schizophrenia, and 32 controls). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2019.01.025DOI Listing
January 2019

The interfering effects of frequent auditory verbal hallucinations on shadowing performance in schizophrenia.

Schizophr Res 2019 Jan 27. Epub 2019 Jan 27.

Fundació per a la Investigació i la Docència Maria Angustias Giménez, Barcelona, Spain; CIBERSAM (Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Salud Mental), Spain.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2019.01.019DOI Listing
January 2019

Self-stigma related feelings of shame and facial fear recognition in individuals at clinical high risk for psychosis: A brief report.

Schizophr Res 2019 Jan 28. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Department of Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, 1 Gustave L Levy Place, New York, NY, 10029, USA; Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Center (MIRECC VISN 2), James J. Peter Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 130 West Kingsbridge Rd, Bronx, NY 10468, USA; New York State Psychiatric Institute, 1051 Riverside Drive, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2019.01.027DOI Listing
January 2019

Spatial localization of retinal anomalies in regular cannabis users: The relevance of the multifocal electroretinogram.

Schizophr Res 2019 Jan 26. Epub 2019 Jan 26.

Pôle Hospitalo-Universitaire de Psychiatrie d'Adultes du Grand Nancy, Centre Psychothérapique de Nancy, Laxou, France; INSERM U1114, Fédération de Médecine Translationnelle de Strasbourg, Département de Psychiatrie, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France.

Widely used in industrialized countries, cannabis is a neuromodulator substance. The cannabinoid system is present at critical stages of retinal processing. We have recently shown a delay in bipolar and ganglion cell responses in regular cannabis users, as observed using flash (fERG) and pattern (PERG) electroretinogram. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2019.01.013DOI Listing
January 2019

Alterations in body mass index and waist-to-hip ratio in never and minimally treated patients with psychosis: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Schizophr Res 2019 Jan 23. Epub 2019 Jan 23.

Multimodal Imaging Group, Research Imaging Centre, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH), Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Geriatric Mental Health Division, CAMH, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute, CAMH, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address:

Background: Obesity is up to 4 times higher in patients with schizophrenia than in the general population. However, the link between obesity and schizophrenia in the absence of antipsychotic use is unclear. Therefore, we aimed to examine differences in obesity measures (body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR)) in antipsychotic-naive and minimally treated (up to 2 weeks of lifetime antipsychotic exposure) patients with psychosis compared to healthy controls (HCs). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2019.01.005DOI Listing
January 2019
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Altered functional connectivity and low-frequency signal fluctuations in early psychosis and genetic high risk.

Schizophr Res 2019 Jan 23. Epub 2019 Jan 23.

Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06511, USA; Veterans Affairs Connecticut Health System, West Haven, CT 06516, USA.

Studying individuals at increased genetic risk for schizophrenia may generate important theories regarding the emergence of the illness. In this investigation, genetic high-risk individuals (GHR, n = 37) were assessed with functional magnetic resonance imaging and compared to individuals in the first episode of schizophrenia (FESZ, n = 42) and healthy comparison subjects (HCS, n = 59). Measures of functional connectivity and the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) were obtained in a global, data-driven analysis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2018.12.041DOI Listing
January 2019
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Gut permeability and mimicry of the Glutamate Ionotropic Receptor NMDA type Subunit Associated with protein 1 (GRINA) as potential mechanisms related to a subgroup of people with schizophrenia with elevated antigliadin antibodies (AGA IgG).

Schizophr Res 2019 Jan 23. Epub 2019 Jan 23.

Maryland Psychiatric Research Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21228, United States of America. Electronic address:

About one third of people with schizophrenia have elevated IgG antibodies to gliadin (AGA IgG) and increased inflammation. Understanding the mechanism by which this immune response occurs is critical to the development of personalized treatments. We examined gut permeability and mimicry to the glutamate receptor as possible mechanisms related to high gliadin antibodies (AGA IgG) seen in some people with schizophrenia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2019.01.007DOI Listing
January 2019
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P300 amplitude attenuation in high risk and early onset psychosis youth.

Schizophr Res 2019 Jan 23. Epub 2019 Jan 23.

Department of Psychiatry, Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address:

Little research has investigated the use of electrophysiological biomarkers in childhood and adolescence to distinguish early onset psychosis and the clinical high risk state. The P300 evoked potential is a robust neurophysiological marker of schizophrenia that is dampened in patients with schizophrenia and, less consistently, in those with affective psychoses and those at clinical high risk for psychosis (CHR). How it may differ between patients with psychotic disorders (PS) and CHR is less studied, especially in youth. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2018.12.029DOI Listing
January 2019
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Relationships between cognitive event-related brain potential measures in patients at clinical high risk for psychosis.

Schizophr Res 2019 Jan 22. Epub 2019 Jan 22.

Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address:

Neurophysiological measures of cognitive functioning that are abnormal in patients with schizophrenia are promising candidate biomarkers for predicting development of psychosis in individuals at clinical high risk (CHR). We examined the relationships among event-related brain potential (ERP) measures of early sensory, pre-attentional, and attention-dependent cognition, in antipsychotic-naïve help-seeking CHR patients (n = 36) and healthy control participants (n = 22). These measures included the gamma auditory steady-state response (ASSR; early sensory); mismatch negativity (MMN) and P3a (pre-attentional); and N400 semantic priming effects - a measure of using meaningful context to predict related items - over a shorter and a longer time interval (attention-dependent). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2019.01.014DOI Listing
January 2019
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The interrelationship between schizotypy, clinical high risk for psychosis and related symptoms: Cognitive disturbances matter.

Schizophr Res 2019 Jan 22. Epub 2019 Jan 22.

University Hospital of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Bern, Bolligenstrasse 111, 3000 Bern 60, Switzerland; Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical Faculty, Heinrich-Heine University, Bergische Landstraße 2, 40629 Dusseldorf, Germany. Electronic address:

Schizotypy and clinical high risk (CHR) criteria can identify individuals who are at increased risk for developing psychosis in community and patient samples. However, both approaches have rarely been combined, and very little is known about their associations. Therefore, we examined the factorial structure of CHR and related symptoms and schizotypy features as well as their interrelationship for the first time in a comprehensive approach. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2018.12.039DOI Listing
January 2019
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Modified Work Behavior Inventory assessment: Evaluation of psychometric properties.

Schizophr Res Cogn 2019 Jun 9;16:25-28. Epub 2019 Jan 9.

Office of Mental Health and Suicide Prevention, Veterans Health Administration, Washington, DC, USA.

The Work Behavior Inventory (WBI) is a widely used and validated assessment of work functioning in people with schizophrenia. WBI ratings are based on workplace observation and interview with work supervisors. Workplace observation may not be acceptable in all employment settings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scog.2018.12.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6327903PMC
June 2019
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Neurological soft signs (NSS) and cognitive impairment in chronic schizophrenia.

Schizophr Res Cogn 2019 Jun 21;16:17-24. Epub 2018 Dec 21.

Section of Geriatric Psychiatry, Department of General Psychiatry, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.

Recent studies indicate that neurological soft signs (NSS) in schizophrenia are associated with generalized cognitive impairments rather than changes in specific neuropsychological domains. However, the majority of studies solely included first-episode patients or patients with a remitting course and did not consider age, course, education or severity of global cognitive deficits as potential confounding variables. Therefore, we examined NSS with respect to cognitive deficits in chronic schizophrenia, i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scog.2018.12.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6305804PMC
June 2019
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Impact of baseline early auditory processing on response to cognitive remediation for schizophrenia.

Schizophr Res 2019 Jan 18. Epub 2019 Jan 18.

New York State Psychiatric Institute, Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address:

Background: Early auditory processing (EAP) has increasingly become a focus of efforts to identify biomarkers of treatment response in schizophrenia. EAP deficits lead to poor functional outcome via impaired cognition, and treatments that target EAP may drive downstream cognitive improvements. Assessment of baseline need provides an opportunity for cognitive remediation (CR) programs that give EAP training to personalize treatment and optimize its impact. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2019.01.012DOI Listing
January 2019
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Eye movement abnormalities and their association with cognitive impairments in schizophrenia.

Schizophr Res 2019 Jan 17. Epub 2019 Jan 17.

Department of Pathology of Mental Diseases, National Institute of Mental Health, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, 4-1-1, Ogawahigashi, Kodaira, Tokyo 1878553, Japan; Osaka University, D3, 2-2, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 5650871, Japan. Electronic address:

Background: Eye movement abnormalities have been identified in schizophrenia; however, their relevance to cognition is still unknown. In this study, we explored the general relationship between eye movements and cognitive function.

Methods: The three eye movement measures (scanpath length, horizontal position gain, and duration of fixations) that were previously reported to be useful in distinguishing subjects with schizophrenia from healthy subjects, as well as Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III (WAIS-III) scores, were collected and tested for association in 113 subjects with schizophrenia and 404 healthy subjects. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2018.12.051DOI Listing
January 2019
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Elevated hair cortisol is associated with childhood maltreatment and cognitive impairment in schizophrenia and in bipolar disorders.

Schizophr Res 2019 Jan 16. Epub 2019 Jan 16.

NORMENT K.G. Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo University Hospital, Norway.

Background: The neural diathesis-stress model is useful to understand schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar (BD) disorders. Childhood maltreatment could affect the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA)-axis and lead to chronic changes in stress-sensitivity, which can be measured with hair cortisol concentrations (HCC), representing long-term, cumulative cortisol levels. Here we investigated if childhood trauma experiences are associated with chronic changes in the HPA axis in severe mental disorders. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S09209964193001
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2019.01.011DOI Listing
January 2019
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Divergence of subjective and performance-based cognitive gains following cognitive training in schizophrenia.

Schizophr Res 2019 Jan 16. Epub 2019 Jan 16.

VA Desert Pacific Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Center (MIRECC), VA San Diego Healthcare System, San Diego, CA, United States; Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, United States. Electronic address:

Background: Cognitive training is effective for improving cognitive performance among people with schizophrenia. An individual's perception of their own cognition is dissociable from performance on objective cognitive tests. Since subjective cognitive benefit may impact engagement, motivation, and satisfaction with time-intensive cognitive interventions, this study aimed to determine whether subjective cognitive difficulties improve in conjunction with cognitive gains following 30 h of cognitive training. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S09209964183073
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2018.12.034DOI Listing
January 2019
7 Reads

Do Complement factors "connect the dots" in schizophrenia?

Schizophr Res 2019 Jan 15. Epub 2019 Jan 15.

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Ave KS253, Boston, MA 02215, United States of America.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2018.12.042DOI Listing
January 2019
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The role of substance use and adult sexual assault severity in the course of schizophrenia: An epidemiological catchment study of sexual assault victims.

Schizophr Res 2019 Jan 14. Epub 2019 Jan 14.

Department of Community Mental Health, Faculty of Social Welfare and Health Sciences, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel.

Background: Childhood trauma increases the risk of schizophrenia, yet the role of adult sexual assault in the course of schizophrenia is unknown. This study aims to examine the associations between substance use and sexual assault severity characteristics with the course of schizophrenia among adult sexual assault victims using an epidemiologic study design.

Methods: Sexual assault data on all individuals received from 2000 to 2010 (N = 2147) at the Center for Care of Sexual Assault Victims at Wolfson Medical Center, the largest medical center for sexual assault victims in the country, were merged with the Israel National Psychiatric Case Registry, that consisted of lifetime psychiatric hospitalizations of schizophrenia (birth to 6 years post-assault). Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S09209964193000
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2019.01.008DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads