5 results match your criteria Rhinoplasty Basic Closed Technique

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Suture techniques for the nasal tip.

Aesthet Surg J 2008 Jan-Feb;28(1):92-100

Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA, USA.

The authors use 5 basic suture techniques in tip plasty: transdomal, interdomal, lateral crural mattress, columella-septal, and intercrural, incorporating these techniques into a simple algorithm to control tip cartilage shape. They then introduce the universal horizontal mattress suture, designed to control all undesirable nasal cartilage convexities/concavities, and provide a new suturing technique that can be applied in all patients in whom a change of cartilage shape, including tip cartilages, is desired. They also apply these suture techniques in patients undergoing closed and secondary rhinoplasty. Read More

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http://asj.oxfordjournals.org/content/asj/28/1/92.full.pdf
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http://asj.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/doi/10.1016/j.asj.2007.10.
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.asj.2007.10.004DOI Listing
February 2009
6 Reads

Open and closed rhinoplasty (minus the "versus"): analyzing processes.

Authors:
John B Tebbetts

Aesthet Surg J 2006 Jul-Aug;26(4):456-9

Both open and closed rhinoplasties involve common processes that are impacted by the choice of approach. Careful analysis is necessary to understand how each approach affects the surgeon's assessment of intrinsic anatomy, limits or expands surgical options, and influences the degree of surgical control. According to the author, any surgeon who performs all rhinoplasties using either an open or closed technique exclusively is likely compromising optimal results in some patients. Read More

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http://asj.oxfordjournals.org/content/asj/26/4/456.full.pdf
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http://asj.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/doi/10.1016/j.asj.2006.06.
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.asj.2006.06.003DOI Listing
June 2009
6 Reads

The midfacial degloving procedure for nasal, sinus, and nasopharyngeal tumors.

Authors:
J D Browne

Otolaryngol Clin North Am 2001 Dec;34(6):1095-104, viii

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27157, USA.

The midfacial degloving approach is more technically involved than a lateral rhinotomy and requires a basic level of proficiency and understanding of closed rhinoplasty incisions and anatomy of the nose, paranasal sinuses, and skull base structures. Current applications of the midfacial degloving procedure have allowed expansion of indications for this technique through the use of complementary endoscopic and subcranial approaches, permitting the exposure and removal of extensive skull base lesions without disfiguring facial incisions. Fundamental in these approaches is the basic midfacial degloving exposure, which is discussed in this article, along with the applications for treatment of skull base lesions. Read More

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December 2001
10 Reads

Suture techniques in rhinoplasty by use of the endonasal (closed) approach.

Authors:
R P Gruber

Aesthet Surg J 1998 Mar-Apr;18(2):99-103

The benefits of both the open and closed approaches were combined by use of an extended closed rhinoplasty. It is theorized that circulation would be improved, while providing greater visualization of the tip cartilages for suture techniques in those patients considered at risk for the open approach (e.g. Read More

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June 2009
8 Reads

[The actual problems in functional and aesthetic nasal surgery].

Authors:
R La Rosa C Miani

Acta Otorhinolaryngol Ital 1996 Jun;16(3):238-44

Divisone ORL, Ospedale Maggiore C.A. Pizzardi, Bologna.

Functional and aesthetic nasal surgery has been undergoing a process of fine-tuning. The surgical approaches lean toward greater conservation-particularly aesthetic- and functional selectivity. This has been made possible by improved diagnostic methods and pre-operative programming techniques such as computerized morphometry, computerized axial tomography, rhinosinus endoscopy, rhinomanometry, acoustic rhinometry and electromyography. Read More

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June 1996
7 Reads
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