241 results match your criteria Reviews in Neurological Diseases[Journal]


Narcolepsy: clinical approach to etiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

Rev Neurol Dis 2011 ;8(3-4):e97-106

Comprehensive Epilepsy Center, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY, USA.

Narcolepsy is a neurologic disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and manifestations of disrupted rapid eye movement sleep stage. The pathologic hallmark is loss of hypocretin neurons in the hypothalamus likely triggered by environmental factors in a susceptible individual. Patients with narcolepsy, in addition to excessive daytime sleepiness, can present with cataplexy, sleep paralysis, sleep fragmentation, and hypnagogic/hypnopompic hallucinations. Read More

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October 2012
7 Reads

Orofacial pain following an invasive dental procedure.

Rev Neurol Dis 2011 ;8(3-4):e88-96

Craniofacial Pain Center, Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, Boston, MA, USA.

Like headache, the etiology of orofacial pain is often an enigma. Orofacial pain resulting from invasive dental procedure may cause a patient to present to a neurologist for diagnosis and treatment. The cases presented here were personally seen by the first author, a consulting neurologist; they illustrate the diversity in clinical presentation and the differences between a musculoskeletal and neuropathic origin of pain. Read More

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October 2012
6 Reads

An update on the diagnosis and management of dementing conditions.

Rev Neurol Dis 2011 ;8(3-4):e68-87

Department of Neurology, Barrow Neurological Institute, St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ, USA.

Worsening memory is a common complaint in the elderly and predictably causes affected individuals and their families to wonder whether the underlying cause is Alzheimer disease, the most common form of dementia. Alzheimer disease is a devastating illness that unavoidably leads to a complete loss of independence and, as a result, substantial emotional, physical, and financial distress for patients and their families. The causes and severity of memory impairment in the elderly are diverse, however, so any given case might not necessarily be secondary to a neurodegenerative disorder such as Alzheimer disease. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4096631PMC
October 2012
18 Reads

The neurology of decreased activity: abulia.

Rev Neurol Dis 2011 ;8(3-4):e55-67

Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Delirium is sometimes defined as acute onset of either overactivity or underactivity. This article reviews the nature and clinico-anatomical locations of lesions in patients with reduced activity. The term abulia is used to describe global underactivity. Read More

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October 2012
7 Reads

Progressive personality and language changes in a 62-year-old woman.

Rev Neurol Dis 2011 ;8(3-4):e121-2, discussion e135-7

Department of Neurological Sciences, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, USA.

A 62-year-old woman with no known psychiatric illness had a 1.5-year history of progressive personality and language changes, leading to a loss of functional independence. Laboratory results revealed elevated autoimmune antibodies. Read More

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October 2012
17 Reads

A rare cause of headache.

Rev Neurol Dis 2011 ;8(3-4):e120, discussion e131-4

Department of Neurosurgery, Oncology Training and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.

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October 2012
4 Reads

Neurology of sleep.

Authors:
Antonio Culebras

Rev Neurol Dis 2011 ;8(3-4):e114-9

Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY, USA.

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October 2012
5 Reads

Illusion of stroke: intravascular lymphomatosis.

Rev Neurol Dis 2011 ;8(3-4):e107-13

Department of Neurology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

We describe an unusual case of cerebral intravascular lymphomatosis wherein the patient presented with multiple embolic strokes predominantly in the posterior circulation. Using this case as an illustration, we review the literature of this malignancy, which consists of extranodal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. For patients with recurrent stroke-like events without cardiac risk factors, the accurate diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion by the neurologist and a brain biopsy specimen demonstrating lymphoma cells within the lumen of cerebral blood vessels. Read More

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October 2012
4 Reads

Management of diabetic small-fiber neuropathy with combination L-methylfolate, methylcobalamin, and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate.

Rev Neurol Dis 2011 ;8(1-2):39-47

Allen M. Jacobs & Associates, Ltd., St. Louis, MO, USA.

Agents used to treat symptoms of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) are only palliative, not disease modifying. Although studies of monotherapy with L-methylfolate, methylcobalamin, or pyridoxal 5'-phosphate suggest that each of these bioavailable B vitamins may reverse the pathophysiology and symptoms of DPN, data on the efficacy of this combination therapy are limited. Therefore, we assessed the efficacy of an oral combination of L-methylfolate, methylcobalamin, and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate for improving epidermal nerve fiber density (ENFD) in the lower extremity of patients with DPN. Read More

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March 2012
4 Reads

Penetrating artery territory pontine infarction.

Rev Neurol Dis 2011 ;8(1-2):30-8

Division of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

Pontine infarcts account for 25% of lacunar strokes. The primary morphologies are wedge-shaped tegmental, basal, and tegmentobasal infarcts, caused by disease of the paramedian basilar branches, and smaller, circumscribed lacunar infarcts attributed to lipohyalinosis. Roughly 60% of infarcts are paramedian. Read More

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March 2012
3 Reads

Prognosis in intracerebral hemorrhage.

Rev Neurol Dis 2011 ;8(1-2):23-9

Department of Neurosurgery, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.

Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is the most devastating type of stroke with the greatest mortality rate. Unfortunately there are no clinically proven therapies, and treatment is typically supportive. Given the poor prognosis, many families are faced with the decision to limit or withdraw care from those who have had an ICH. Read More

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March 2012
3 Reads

The effect of pregnancy on seizure control and antiepileptic drugs in women with epilepsy.

Rev Neurol Dis 2011 ;8(1-2):16-22

Department of Neurology, UMDNJ-Cooper University Medical Center, Camden, NJ, USA.

Epilepsy is one of the most common neurologic conditions seen by obstetricians, primary care physicians, and neurologists. It is present in three to five per 1000 births, and most women with epilepsy (WWE) can expect to have a normal pregnancy and delivery. The clinician's goal is to establish the best seizure control with the fewest possible number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) prior to pregnancy. Read More

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March 2012
7 Reads

A practical review and approach to poststroke seizures.

Rev Neurol Dis 2011 ;8(1-2):10-5

Neuroscience Institute, JFK Medical Center, Edison, NJ, USA.

Much confusion still exists about when to treat seizures related to stroke and what agents to use. Seizures may occur in the setting of ischemic stroke, intracranial hemorrhage, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and other cerebrovascular lesions. The epidemiology of poststroke seizures and patients at higher risk for developing poststroke epilepsy are identified. Read More

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March 2012
6 Reads

Hypertension-related eye abnormalities and the risk of stroke.

Rev Neurol Dis 2011 ;8(1-2):1-9

Department of Ophthalmology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA.

Many studies have shown that hypertensive ocular funduscopic abnormalities are clearly related to stroke, even after controlling for blood pressure and other vascular risk factors. Retinal abnormalities indicative of a breakdown of the blood-retina barrier confer a greater increase in risk for stroke than sclerotic retinal changes. Similar retinal changes also have a positive relationship to stroke mortality. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3448945PMC
March 2012
11 Reads

Headache and the neck: cervical headache.

Rev Neurol Dis 2010 ;7(4):154-6

Department of Neurology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

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September 2011
4 Reads

A patient with progressive headache and partial optic chiasm involvement.

Rev Neurol Dis 2010 ;7(4):152-3; discussion 160-4

Department of Neurology, Fatih University, Ankara, Turkey.

A 69-year-old woman presented with a 2-month history of bilateral throbbing daily headaches and a 2-week history of progressive visual loss. Radiologic imaging, visual field test, and cerebrospinal fluid analysis findings are discussed. After treatment, the symptoms were resolved without deficit. Read More

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September 2011
13 Reads

A late complication of γ knife radiosurgery.

Authors:
Ted L Rothstein

Rev Neurol Dis 2010 ;7(4):150-1; discussion 157-9

Department of Neurology, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA.

An 85-year-old man was hospitalized after developing sudden weakness on his right side and mild expressive aphasia. He had undergone γ knife stereotactic radiosurgery to the left thalamus 7.5 years earlier for a disabling essential tremor; the surgery had led to remarkable improvement in his ability to write and use utensils. Read More

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September 2011
13 Reads

Selected contributions to neurology by Philadelphia neurologists since 1980.

Rev Neurol Dis 2010 ;7(4):140-9

Department of Neurology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, USA.

On the occasion of the 125th anniversary of the Philadelphia Neurologic Society, 3 short talks were given that highlighted accomplishments by Philadelphia's neurologists over the past 30 years. The theme for the celebration was "Contributions to Neurology by Philadelphia Neurologists, 1980-2008." Each of the 3 speakers was chosen because of his contributions and the sequential time frames in which they occurred. Read More

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September 2011
10 Reads

Improvement of cutaneous sensitivity in diabetic peripheral neuropathy with combination L-methylfolate, methylcobalamin, and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate.

Rev Neurol Dis 2010 ;7(4):132-9

Carolina Musculoskeletal Institute, Aiken, SC, USA.

Studies of monotherapy with L-methylfolate, methylcobalamin, or pyridoxal 5'-phosphate suggest that these B vitamins may reverse both the symptoms and the pathophysiology of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). The efficacy of oral-combination L-methylfolate, 3 mg; methylcobalamin, 2 mg; and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, 35 mg (LMF-MC-PP) in restoring cutaneous sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes with DPN was evaluated in 20 type 2 diabetic patients who were given LMF-MC-PP twice daily for 4 weeks and then once daily for an additional 48 weeks. Statistically significant improvement in 1-point (tactile) and 2-point (discriminatory) static testing at the right and left great toe and heel in the patients was observed in all 3 follow-up periods: 1) baseline to 6 months, 2) baseline to 1 year, and 3) 6 months to 1 year. Read More

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September 2011
6 Reads

Headache in men: forgotten in practice and ignored in research.

Rev Neurol Dis 2010 ;7(4):125-31

Department of Neurology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

In general practice, the sex-specific consultation rate for headache is only slightly lower for men than it is for women. Headache is 2 to 3 times more common in women than it is in men, and women outnumber men in general practice by 2-fold. However, in headache practice they seem to outnumber men by 4- to 5-fold, suggesting a specific barrier to seeking specialty care. Read More

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September 2011
12 Reads

Neurologic complications of bariatric surgery.

Rev Neurol Dis 2010 ;7(4):119-24

University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada.

With the rapid rise in the number of bariatric surgeries performed for morbid obesity, several short- and long-term neurologic complications of this procedure have been identified. These complications affect various levels of the neuraxis, and most are likely secondary to deficiency of essential minerals and vitamins. We report on 3 patients who developed unusual and severe neurologic deficits after undergoing bariatric surgery, including Wernicke encephalopathy, acute and rapidly progressive polyneuropathy, myelopathy, and visual deficits. Read More

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September 2011
7 Reads

Delirium: a neurologist's view--the neurology of agitation and overactivity.

Authors:
Louis R Caplan

Rev Neurol Dis 2010 ;7(4):111-8

Department of Neurology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Delirium is a term used variously to characterize a change in behavior. Neurologists most often use the term to describe a patient who has acutely developed a hyperactive agitated state. In many patients, agitation and overactivity are explained by toxic and metabolic factors and infections. Read More

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September 2011
28 Reads

Course of frequent/daily headache in the general population and in medical practice.

Rev Neurol Dis 2010 ;7(4):103-10

Department of Neurology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Frequent headache is defined as headaches ≥ 15 days/month and daily headache operationally as headaches ≥ 5 days/week. In this article, we review the outcome of frequent/ daily headache in the general population and in medical practice. In the general population, within 1 year fewer than half of those with frequent/daily headache will still have frequent/daily headache, with a gradual further decrease over subsequent years. Read More

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September 2011
2 Reads

Headache: occipital nerve involvement in headache.

Rev Neurol Dis 2010 Spring-Summer;7(2-3):e91-3

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August 2011
4 Reads

A patient with acute visual loss and transient neurologic symptoms. Diagnosis: an acute central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) in the left eye with severe retinal ischemia.

Rev Neurol Dis 2010 Spring-Summer;7(2-3):e89-90; discussion e98-101

Department of Ophthalmology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA.

A 73-year-old man presented with acute visual loss in his left eye associated with transient left upper extremity numbness. Diagnosis was made in the emergency room, where treatment strategies were discussed. Read More

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August 2011
3 Reads

A patient with progressive weakness and cramping of right arm and both legs. Diagnosis: persistent, multifocal, partial conduction blocks (CB) of motor axons outside the common sites of nerve entrapment.

Rev Neurol Dis 2010 Spring-Summer;7(2-3):e85-8; discussion e94-7

Department of Neurology, George Washington University Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA.

A 44-year-old man presented with a 1-year history of progressive muscle weakness and cramping. Neurophysiology study, along with clinical presentation, was diagnostic. The differential diagnosis, diagnostic testing, treatment, and prognosis of this rare disease are discussed. Read More

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August 2011
28 Reads

Gait dysfunction and cognition.

Authors:
William J Weiner

Rev Neurol Dis 2010 Spring-Summer;7(2-3):e82-4

University of Maryland School of Medicine, Maryland Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Center, Baltimore, MD, USA.

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August 2011
3 Reads

Interface of sleep and neurologic disease.

Authors:
Antonio Culebras

Rev Neurol Dis 2010 Spring-Summer;7(2-3):e76-81

Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY, USA.

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August 2011
4 Reads

Essential tremor.

Rev Neurol Dis 2010 Spring-Summer;7(2-3):e69-75

Department of Neurology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.

Essential tremor (ET) is one of the most common movement disorders. Although often considered a monosymptomatic disorder (postural and kinetic tremor), ET has more recently been considered a more heterogeneous syndrome, with motor and nonmotor features. The diagnosis is clinical and pharmacologic and surgical therapies exist. Read More

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August 2011
3 Reads

An update on idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

Rev Neurol Dis 2010 Spring-Summer;7(2-3):e56-68

Department of Ophthalmology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA.

Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition of unknown etiology often encountered in neurologic practice. It produces nonlocalizing symptoms and signs of raised intracranial pressure and, when left untreated, can result in severe irreversible visual loss. It most commonly occurs in obese women of childbearing age, but it can also occur in children, men, nonobese adults, and older adults. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3674489PMC
August 2011
3 Reads

Multiple system atrophy.

Rev Neurol Dis 2010 Spring-Summer;7(2-3):e45-55

Department of Neurology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.

Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is an adult-onset, progressive, neurodegenerative condition that has several different initial presentations. Ultimately affected patients develop parkinsonian features, autonomic dysfunction, cerebellar ataxia, and corticospinal deficits. Patients with MSA are often misdiagnosed as having Parkinson disease. Read More

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August 2011
4 Reads

Repurposing an old drug to improve the use and safety of tissue plasminogen activator for acute ischemic stroke: minocycline.

Rev Neurol Dis 2010 ;7 Suppl 1:S7-13

Department of Neurology, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA, USA.

There is only 1 US Food and Drug Administration-approved drug for acute ischemic stroke: tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Due to a short time window and fear of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), tPA remains underutilized. There is great interest in developing combination drugs to use with tPA to improve the odds of a favorable recovery and to reduce the risk of ICH. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4730954PMC
November 2010
3 Reads

Drug repurposing for drug development in stroke.

Authors:
Susan C Fagan

Rev Neurol Dis 2010 ;7 Suppl 1:S3-6

Program in Clinical and Experimental Therapeutics, University of Georgia College of Pharmacy, Augusta, GA, USA.

The development of new treatments for acute stroke has been fraught with costly and spectacularly disappointing failures. Repurposing of safe, older drugs provides a lower risk alternative. Vascular protection with candesartan is one such approach. Read More

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November 2010
3 Reads

Target brain: neuroprotection and neurorestoration in ischemic stroke.

Authors:
Jeffrey L Saver

Rev Neurol Dis 2010 ;7 Suppl 1:S14-21

UCLA Stroke Center and Department of Neurology, The David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

Many treatments for acute ischemic stroke are vessel and blood based, but brain-based therapies also hold great promise. Acute neuroprotective therapies block the molecular elaboration of injury in hypoxic environments. Prehospital trials of magnesium sulfate are demonstrating the feasibility of delivering potentially brain-protective agents in the first minutes after stroke onset. Read More

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November 2010
3 Reads

Old drugs, new tricks: update on stroke therapeutics.

Authors:
Susan C Fagan

Rev Neurol Dis 2010 ;7 Suppl 1:S1-2; quiz S23

Program in Clinical and Experimental Therapeutics, University of Georgia College of Pharmacy, Augusta, GA, USA.

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November 2010
4 Reads

Migraine: preventive treatment of episodic migraine.

Rev Neurol Dis 2010 ;7(1):37-8

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July 2010
4 Reads

A case of progressive ataxia followed by cognitive and behavioral changes.

Rev Neurol Dis 2010 ;7(1):34-6; discussion 43-4

Department of Neurological Sciences, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, USA.

The patient is a 60-year-old man who initially presented to his local hospital with complaints of gait difficulties that started suddenly after waking. Results of brain magnetic resonance imaging performed 1 week later were normal. Three weeks after that he developed blurred vision and he complained of a severe headache in the posterior head and neck regions at the onset of symptoms, which necessitated several visits to his local emergency room. Read More

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July 2010
18 Reads

A child with progressive dystonia, dysarthria, and spasticity.

Rev Neurol Dis 2010 ;7(1):32-3; discussion 39-42

Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco; Department of Veterans Affairs Parkinson's Disease Research, Education, and Clinical Center (PADRECC), San Francisco, CA, USA.

Children presenting with progressive neurologic symptoms including dystonia, dysarthria, and spasticity can represent a diagnostic challenge. Here we describe the case of a 14-year-old boy who presented to our center with an 11-year history of gradual worsening neurologic symptoms. Diagnostic strategies focus on the use of neuroimaging and genetic testing to help establish the underlying diagnosis. Read More

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July 2010
2 Reads

New findings in the study of neuromuscular disorders.

Authors:
John J Kelly

Rev Neurol Dis 2010 ;7(1):28-31

The George Washington University Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA.

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July 2010
2 Reads

Swallowing and dysphagia in neurological disorders.

Authors:
Sandeep Kumar

Rev Neurol Dis 2010 ;7(1):19-27

Department of Neurology, Stroke Division, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Neurologists are often confronted with swallowing disorders in routine practice. Swallowing impairments carry serious health consequences if they are overlooked or inappropriately managed. Swallowing problems usually develop in patients with established neurological conditions, although on occasion they may be a presenting symptom of a neurological disorder. Read More

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July 2010
3 Reads

A review of frontiers in clinical sleep medicine.

Authors:
Antonio Culebras

Rev Neurol Dis 2010 ;7(1):9-18

Department of Neurology, Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY, USA.

The field of sleep medicine has grown exponentially worldwide. Sleep apnea is linked to the obesity epidemic, which, in some regions of the United States, affects more than one-third of the population. Sleep alterations increase the risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular pathology through a diversity of direct and indirect mechanisms. Read More

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July 2010
3 Reads

New oral anticoagulants in development: potential for improved safety profiles.

Authors:
Kenneth A Bauer

Rev Neurol Dis 2010 ;7(1):1-8

Hematology-Oncology Division, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA, USA.

Venous thromboembolism is the most frequent preventable cause of death in hospitalized patients. Currently available anticoagulants have limitations that restrict their widespread use, particularly in long-term indications. Vitamin K antagonists require frequent monitoring and dose adjustment, and have a narrow therapeutic window with the risk of bleeding. Read More

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July 2010
2 Reads

Headache - chronic cluster headache: preventive treatment.

Rev Neurol Dis 2009 ;6(4):E135-6

Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

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March 2010
2 Reads

Headaches, rapidly progressive visual loss, and bilateral disc edema.

Rev Neurol Dis 2009 ;6(4):E133-4; discussion E141-5

Department of Neurological Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA.

The diagnosis and management of a 28-year-old obese woman who presented with neck pain, headache, and rapidly progressive visual loss is discussed here. Results of her initial general examination were normal. Thorough medical follow-up resulted in a rare diagnosis. Read More

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March 2010
6 Reads

Bilateral vision, hearing impairment, and decreased level of consciousness in a patient hospitalized for new-onset seizure.

Rev Neurol Dis 2009 ;6(4):E131-2, discussion E137-40

Department of Neurology, George Washington University Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA.

Middle-aged patients who present with new-onset visual loss, hearing impairment, or decreased level of consciousness usually represent a broad differential diagnosis. We present a 57-year-old man who developed all these symptoms a few days after hospitalization for new-onset seizures. Read More

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March 2010
4 Reads

Management of daily headache unresponsive to preventive treatment: daily triptans versus daily opioids.

Rev Neurol Dis 2009 ;6(4):E121-30

Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and Craniofacial Pain Center, Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, Boston, MA, USA.

Daily headache affects an estimated 3% to 6% of the general population and affects women 2 to 3 times more frequently than men. The vast majority of daily headache is nonparoxysmal, or chronic daily headache. In the general population, the distribution of chronic tension-type headache and chronic migraine is fairly equal, but in medical practice chronic migraine accounts for the vast majority of nonparoxysmal daily headache. Read More

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March 2010
5 Reads

The use of optical coherence tomography in neurology.

Rev Neurol Dis 2009 ;6(4):E105-20

Department of Ophthalmology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA.

Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive imaging technique routinely used in ophthalmology to visualize and quantify the layers of the retina. OCT allows direct visualization and measurement of the topography of the optic nerve head and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in the peripapillary and macular regions with micron-scale resolution. These measurements are of particular interest in optic neuropathies and in numerous neurologic disorders in which there is axonal loss, such as multiple sclerosis. Read More

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March 2010
4 Reads

A man in the barrel with neck pain.

Rev Neurol Dis 2009 ;6(3):E97

Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.

A 38-year-old man presented with an abrupt onset of occipital and neck pain, radiating to both shoulders. The pain was accompanied by inability to lift his arms against gravity (the "man-in-the-barrel" syndrome). These symptoms were associated with bilateral hand paresthesias, right-sided throbbing headache, vertigo, nausea, and vomiting. Read More

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March 2010
13 Reads

Best of the 2009 annual meeting of the american academy of neurology.

Authors:
John J Kelly

Rev Neurol Dis 2009 ;6(3):E94-6

George Washington University Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA.

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March 2010
5 Reads