74 results match your criteria Reproduction Fertility and Development[Journal]


Soma-germ line interactions and a role for muscle in the regulation of sperm motility.

Development 2018 12 18;145(24). Epub 2018 Dec 18.

Department of Human Genetics, University of Utah, 15 North 2030 East, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA

The development of highly differentiated sperm cells that are specialized for navigating to and fusing with an oocyte is essential for sexual reproduction. As a major part of differentiation, sperm undergo extensive post-meiotic maturation en route to the oocyte. This is regulated largely by soma-derived cues. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dev.biologists.org/lookup/doi/10.1242/dev.167734
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.167734DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6307892PMC
December 2018
14 Reads

GILZ-dependent modulation of mTORC1 regulates spermatogonial maintenance.

Development 2018 09 18;145(18). Epub 2018 Sep 18.

Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria 3800, Australia

Male fertility is dependent on spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) that self-renew and produce differentiating germ cells. Growth factors produced within the testis are essential for SSC maintenance but intrinsic factors that dictate the SSC response to these stimuli are poorly characterised. Here, we have studied the role of GILZ, a TSC22D family protein and spermatogenesis regulator, in spermatogonial function and signalling. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dev.biologists.org/lookup/doi/10.1242/dev.165324
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.165324DOI Listing
September 2018
23 Reads

Retinoic acid receptor signaling is necessary in steroidogenic cells for normal spermatogenesis and epididymal function.

Development 2018 07 9;145(13). Epub 2018 Jul 9.

School of Molecular Biosciences and the Center for Reproductive Biology, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164, Washington, USA

Spermatogenesis in mammals is a very complex, highly organized process, regulated in part by testosterone and retinoic acid (RA). Much is known about how RA and testosterone signaling pathways independently regulate this process, but there is almost no information regarding whether these two signaling pathways directly interact and whether RA is crucial for steroidogenic cell function. This study uses a transgenic mouse line that expresses a dominant-negative form of RA receptor α (RAR-DN) and the steroidogenic cell-specific Cre mouse line, iCre, to generate male mice with steroidogenic cells unable to perform RA signaling. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.160465DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6053667PMC
July 2018
19 Reads

three-dimensional tracking of sperm behaviors in the mouse oviduct.

Development 2018 03 19;145(6). Epub 2018 Mar 19.

Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, TX 77030, USA

Mammalian sperm evolutionarily acquired complex mechanisms to regulate their behaviors, which are thought to be crucial in navigating through the female reproductive tract toward fertilization. However, all current knowledge of this process is largely extrapolated from and studies, because analysis of sperm in their native fertilization environment has not been possible. Here, we report a functional optical coherence tomography approach that allows, for the first time, three-dimensional tracking of sperm behaviors in the mouse oviduct. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.157685DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5897595PMC
March 2018
1 Read

Regulation of mitosis-meiosis transition by the ubiquitin ligase β-TrCP in male germ cells.

Development 2017 11 5;144(22):4137-4147. Epub 2017 Oct 5.

Division of Cell Proliferation, ART, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8575, Japan

The mitosis-meiosis transition is essential for spermatogenesis. Specific and timely downregulation of the transcription factor DMRT1, and consequent induction of expression, is required for this process in mammals, but the molecular mechanism has remained unclear. Here, we show that β-TrCP, the substrate recognition component of an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, targets DMRT1 for degradation and thereby controls the mitosis-meiosis transition in mouse male germ cells. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.158485DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5719248PMC
November 2017
24 Reads

Maternal expression of the histone demethylase Kdm4a is crucial for pre-implantation development.

Development 2017 09 21;144(18):3264-3277. Epub 2017 Aug 21.

Biotech Research and Innovation Centre, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen 2200, Denmark

Regulation of chromatin composition through post-translational modifications of histones contributes to transcriptional regulation and is essential for many cellular processes, including differentiation and development. KDM4A (JMJD2A) is a lysine demethylase with specificity towards di- and tri-methylated lysine 9 and lysine 36 of histone H3 (H3K9me2/me3 and H3K36me2/me3). Here, we report that as a maternal factor plays a key role in embryo survival and is vital for female fertility. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.155473DOI Listing
September 2017
85 Reads
2 Citations
6.462 Impact Factor

genetic cell lineage tracing reveals that oviductal secretory cells self-renew and give rise to ciliated cells.

Development 2017 09 25;144(17):3031-3041. Epub 2017 Jul 25.

Gynaecology Oncology Group, School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales, 2308, Australia

The epithelial lining of the fallopian tube is vital for fertility, providing nutrition to gametes and facilitating their transport. It is composed of two major cell types: secretory cells and ciliated cells. Interestingly, human ovarian cancer precursor lesions primarily consist of secretory cells. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.149989DOI Listing
September 2017
14 Reads

The VAPB homolog VPR-1 is a permissive signal for gonad development.

Development 2017 06;144(12):2187-2199

Department of Cell, Developmental and Integrative Biology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA

VAMP/synaptobrevin-associated proteins (VAPs) contain an N-terminal major sperm protein domain (MSPd) that is associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. VAPs have an intracellular housekeeping function, as well as an extracellular signaling function mediated by the secreted MSPd. Here we show that the VAP homolog VPR-1 is essential for gonad development. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.152207DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5482997PMC
June 2017
8 Reads

Incompatibility between mitochondrial and nuclear genomes during oogenesis results in ovarian failure and embryonic lethality.

Development 2017 07 2;144(13):2490-2503. Epub 2017 Jun 2.

Department of Biology, Indiana University Bloomington, IN 47401, USA

Mitochondrial dysfunction can cause female infertility. An important unresolved issue is the extent to which incompatibility between mitochondrial and nuclear genomes contributes to female infertility. It has previously been shown that a mitochondrial haplotype from ( ) is incompatible with a nuclear genome from the strain (), resulting in impaired development, which was enhanced at higher temperature. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.151951DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5536873PMC
July 2017
31 Reads

Histone acetyltransferase KAT8 is essential for mouse oocyte development by regulating reactive oxygen species levels.

Development 2017 06 15;144(12):2165-2174. Epub 2017 May 15.

Molecular and Cell Genetics Laboratory, The CAS Key Laboratory of Innate Immunity and Chronic Diseases, Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, School of Life Sciences, CAS Center for Excellence in Molecular Cell Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Genetics and Development, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Hefei, Anhui 230027, China

Proper oocyte development is crucial for female fertility and requires timely and accurate control of gene expression. K (lysine) acetyltransferase 8 (KAT8), an important component of the X chromosome dosage compensation system in , regulates gene activity by acetylating histone H4 preferentially at lysine 16. To explore the function of KAT8 during mouse oocyte development, we crossed mice with mice to specifically delete in oocytes. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.149518DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5482993PMC
June 2017
53 Reads
3 Citations
6.462 Impact Factor

A MAPK cascade couples maternal mRNA translation and degradation to meiotic cell cycle progression in mouse oocytes.

Development 2017 02 19;144(3):452-463. Epub 2016 Dec 19.

Life Sciences Institute, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China

Mammalian oocyte maturation depends on the translational activation of stored maternal mRNAs upon meiotic resumption. Cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein 1 (CPEB1) is a key oocyte factor that regulates maternal mRNA translation. However, the signal that triggers CPEB1 activation at the onset of mammalian oocyte maturation is not known. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.144410DOI Listing
February 2017
14 Reads

Development of the neurons controlling fertility in humans: new insights from 3D imaging and transparent fetal brains.

Development 2016 11;143(21):3969-3981

University of Lille, UMR-S 1172 - JPArc - Centre de Recherche Jean-Pierre AUBERT Neurosciences et Cancer, Lille 59000, France

Fertility in mammals is controlled by hypothalamic neurons that secrete gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). These neurons differentiate in the olfactory placodes during embryogenesis and migrate from the nose to the hypothalamus before birth. Information regarding this process in humans is sparse. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.139444DOI Listing
November 2016
15 Reads

Widespread failure to complete meiosis does not impair fecundity in parthenogenetic whiptail lizards.

Development 2016 12 17;143(23):4486-4494. Epub 2016 Oct 17.

Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Kansas City, MO 64110, USA

Parthenogenetic species of whiptail lizards in the genus Aspidoscelis constitute a striking example of speciation by hybridization, in which first-generation hybrids instantly attain reproductive isolation and procreate as clonal all-female lineages. Production of eggs containing a full complement of chromosomes in the absence of fertilization involves genome duplication prior to the meiotic divisions. In these pseudo-tetraploid oocytes, pairing and recombination occur exclusively between identical chromosomes instead of homologs; a deviation from the normal meiotic program that maintains heterozygosity. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.141283DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5201048PMC
December 2016
7 Reads

Drosophila dany is essential for transcriptional control and nuclear architecture in spermatocytes.

Development 2016 07;143(14):2664-76

Institute of Molecular Life Sciences (IMLS), University of Zurich, Zurich 8057, Switzerland

The terminal differentiation of adult stem cell progeny depends on transcriptional control. A dramatic change in gene expression programs accompanies the transition from proliferating spermatogonia to postmitotic spermatocytes, which prepare for meiosis and subsequent spermiogenesis. More than a thousand spermatocyte-specific genes are transcriptionally activated in early Drosophila spermatocytes. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.134759DOI Listing
July 2016
4 Reads

Nucleolar activity and CENP-C regulate CENP-A and CAL1 availability for centromere assembly in meiosis.

Development 2016 Apr;143(8):1400-12

Centre for Chromosome Biology, Biomedical Sciences, National University of Ireland Galway, Galway, Ireland

The centromere-specific histone CENP-A is the key epigenetic determinant of centromere identity. Whereas most histones are removed from mature sperm, CENP-A is retained to mark paternal centromeres. In Drosophila males we show that the centromere assembly factors CAL1 and CENP-C are required for meiotic chromosome segregation, CENP-A assembly and maintenance on sperm, as well as fertility. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.130625DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4852514PMC
April 2016
6 Reads

Sperm-borne miRNAs and endo-siRNAs are important for fertilization and preimplantation embryonic development.

Development 2016 Feb 30;143(4):635-47. Epub 2015 Dec 30.

Department of Physiology and Cell Biology, University of Nevada School of Medicine, 1664 North Virginia Street, MS 0575, Reno, NV 89557, USA

Although it is believed that mammalian sperm carry small noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs) into oocytes during fertilization, it remains unknown whether these sperm-borne sncRNAs truly have any function during fertilization and preimplantation embryonic development. Germline-specific Dicer and Drosha conditional knockout (cKO) mice produce gametes (i.e. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dev.biologists.org/lookup/doi/10.1242/dev.131755
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.131755DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4760322PMC
February 2016
11 Reads

Maternal BCAS2 protects genomic integrity in mouse early embryonic development.

Development 2015 Nov 1;142(22):3943-53. Epub 2015 Oct 1.

State Key Laboratory of Stem Cell and Reproductive Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China

Mammalian early embryos maintain accurate genome integrity for proper development within a programmed timeline despite constant assaults on their DNA by replication, DNA demethylation and genetic defects transmitted from germ cells. However, how genome integrity is safeguarded during mammalian early embryonic development remains unclear. BCAS2 (breast carcinoma amplified sequence 2), a core component of the PRP19 complex involved in pre-mRNA splicing, plays an important role in the DNA damage response through the RPA complex, a key regulator in the maintenance of genome integrity. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.129841DOI Listing
November 2015
30 Reads

Escape of X-linked miRNA genes from meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

Development 2015 Nov 22;142(21):3791-800. Epub 2015 Sep 22.

Department of Biology, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78249, USA

Past studies have indicated that transcription of all X-linked genes is repressed by meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) during the meiotic phase of spermatogenesis in mammals. However, more recent studies have shown an increase in steady-state levels of certain X-linked miRNAs in pachytene spermatocytes, suggesting that either synthesis of these miRNAs increases or that degradation of these miRNAs decreases dramatically in these cells. To distinguish between these possibilities, we performed RNA-FISH to detect nascent transcripts from multiple miRNA genes in various spermatogenic cell types. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.127191DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4647214PMC
November 2015
5 Reads

CSR-1 and P granules suppress sperm-specific transcription in the C. elegans germline.

Development 2015 May;142(10):1745-55

Kathryn W. Davis Center for Regenerative Biology and Medicine, Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory, Bar Harbor, ME 04672, USA

Germ granules (P granules) in C. elegans are required for fertility and function to maintain germ cell identity and pluripotency. Sterility in the absence of P granules is often accompanied by the misexpression of soma-specific proteins and the initiation of somatic differentiation in germ cells. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dev.biologists.org/cgi/doi/10.1242/dev.121434
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.121434DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4440928PMC
May 2015
5 Reads

Lysophosphatidic acid signalling in development.

Development 2015 Apr;142(8):1390-5

Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience Department, Dorris Neuroscience Center, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA

Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive phospholipid that is present in all tissues examined to date. LPA signals extracellularly via cognate G protein-coupled receptors to mediate cellular processes such as survival, proliferation, differentiation, migration, adhesion and morphology. These LPA-influenced processes impact many aspects of organismal development. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.121723DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4392601PMC
April 2015
11 Reads

The lncRNA Neat1 is required for corpus luteum formation and the establishment of pregnancy in a subpopulation of mice.

Development 2014 Dec 30;141(23):4618-27. Epub 2014 Oct 30.

Institute for Genetic Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0815, Japan.

Neat1 is a non-protein-coding RNA that serves as an architectural component of the nuclear bodies known as paraspeckles. Although cell-based studies indicate that Neat1 is a crucial regulator of gene expression, its physiological relevance remains unclear. Here, we find that Neat1 knockout (KO) mice stochastically fail to become pregnant despite normal ovulation. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.110544DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4302932PMC
December 2014
20 Reads

Histone H3.3 regulates dynamic chromatin states during spermatogenesis.

Development 2014 Sep 19;141(18):3483-94. Epub 2014 Aug 19.

Department of Cell Biology and Human Anatomy, Shriners Hospital For Children Northern California, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA Genome Center, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Shriners Hospital For Children Northern California, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA Institute of Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Shriners Hospital For Children Northern California, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA

The histone variant H3.3 is involved in diverse biological processes, including development, transcriptional memory and transcriptional reprogramming, as well as diseases, including most notably malignant brain tumors. Recently, we developed a knockout mouse model for the H3f3b gene, one of two genes encoding H3. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.106450DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4197731PMC
September 2014
8 Reads

SirT1 is required in the male germ cell for differentiation and fecundity in mice.

Development 2014 Sep 19;141(18):3495-504. Epub 2014 Aug 19.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Biology, Glenn Laboratory for the Science of Aging, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA

Sirtuins are NAD(+)-dependent deacylases that regulate numerous biological processes in response to the environment. SirT1 is the mammalian ortholog of yeast Sir2, and is involved in many metabolic pathways in somatic tissues. Whole body deletion of SirT1 alters reproductive function in oocytes and the testes, in part caused by defects in central neuro-endocrine control. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.110627DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4197722PMC
September 2014
22 Reads
8 Citations
6.460 Impact Factor

Lipocalin 2 binds to membrane phosphatidylethanolamine to induce lipid raft movement in a PKA-dependent manner and modulates sperm maturation.

Development 2014 May;141(10):2157-64

Laboratory of Animal Experiments for Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507, Japan.

Mammalian sperm undergo multiple maturation steps after leaving the testis in order to become competent for fertilization, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this process remain unclear. In terms of identifying factors crucial for these processes in vivo, we found that lipocalin 2 (Lcn2), which is known as an innate immune factor inhibiting bacterial and malarial growth, can modulate sperm maturation. Most sperm that migrated to the oviduct of wild-type females underwent lipid raft reorganization and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein shedding, which are signatures of sperm maturation, but few did so in Lcn2 null mice. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dev.biologists.org/cgi/doi/10.1242/dev.105148
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.105148DOI Listing
May 2014
11 Reads

Lgr4-mediated Wnt/β-catenin signaling in peritubular myoid cells is essential for spermatogenesis.

Development 2013 Apr;140(8):1751-61

Institute of Biomedical Sciences, East China Normal University, Shanghai, China.

Peritubular myoid cells (PMCs) are myofibroblast-like cells that surround the seminiferous tubules and play essential roles in male fertility. How these cells modulate spermatogenesis and the signaling pathways that are involved are largely unknown. Here we report that Lgr4 is selectively expressed in mouse PMCs in the testes, and loss of Lgr4 leads to germ cells arresting at meiosis I and then undergoing apoptosis. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.093641DOI Listing
April 2013
11 Reads

Endogenous Nodal signaling regulates germ cell potency during mammalian testis development.

Development 2012 Nov 3;139(22):4123-32. Epub 2012 Oct 3.

Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072, Australia.

Germ cells, the embryonic precursors of sperm or oocytes, respond to molecular cues that regulate their sex-specific development in the fetal gonads. In males in particular, the balance between continued proliferation and cell fate commitment is crucial: defects in proliferation result in insufficient spermatogonial stem cells for fertility, but escape from commitment and prolonged pluripotency can cause testicular germ cell tumors. However, the factors that regulate this balance remain unidentified. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.083006DOI Listing
November 2012
5 Reads

Maize multiple archesporial cells 1 (mac1), an ortholog of rice TDL1A, modulates cell proliferation and identity in early anther development.

Development 2012 Jul 13;139(14):2594-603. Epub 2012 Jun 13.

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.

To ensure fertility, complex somatic and germinal cell proliferation and differentiation programs must be executed in flowers. Loss-of-function of the maize multiple archesporial cells 1 (mac1) gene increases the meiotically competent population and ablates specification of somatic wall layers in anthers. We report the cloning of mac1, which is the ortholog of rice TDL1A. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dev.biologists.org/cgi/doi/10.1242/dev.077891
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.077891DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4496874PMC
July 2012
17 Reads

Inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase-controlled Ins(1,4,5)P3/Ca2+ is crucial for maintaining pollen dormancy and regulating early germination of pollen.

Development 2012 Jun 9;139(12):2221-33. Epub 2012 May 9.

National Key Laboratory of Plant Molecular Genetics, Shanghai Institute of Plant Physiology and Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 300 Fenglin Road, Shanghai 200032, China.

Appropriate pollen germination is crucial for plant reproduction. Previous studies have revealed the importance of dehydration in maintaining pollen dormancy; here, we show that phosphatidylinositol pathway-controlled Ins(1,4,5)P(3)/Ca(2+) levels are crucial for maintaining pollen dormancy in Arabidopsis thaliana. An interesting phenotype, precocious pollen germination within anthers, results from a disruption of inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase 12 (5PT12). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.081224DOI Listing
June 2012
72 Reads

Auxilin is required for formation of Golgi-derived clathrin-coated vesicles during Drosophila spermatogenesis.

Development 2011 Mar;138(6):1111-20

Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, 915 West State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2054, USA.

Clathrin has previously been implicated in Drosophila male fertility and spermatid individualization. To understand further the role of membrane transport in this process, we analyzed the phenotypes of mutations in Drosophila auxilin (aux), a regulator of clathrin function, in spermatogenesis. Like partial loss-of-function Clathrin heavy chain (Chc) mutants, aux mutant males are sterile and produce no mature sperm. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.057422DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3203210PMC
March 2011
13 Reads

OSBP- and FAN-mediated sterol requirement for spermatogenesis in Drosophila.

Development 2010 Nov 13;137(22):3775-84. Epub 2010 Oct 13.

Key Laboratory of Molecular and Developmental Biology, Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China.

Members of the oxysterol binding protein (OSBP) family are involved in diverse biological processes, including non-vesicular sterol transport and vesicle trafficking. The mechanisms by which OSBPs integrate functionally with developmental and physiological processes remain elusive. Here, we report the in vivo analysis of OSBP function in the model organism Drosophila. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.049312DOI Listing
November 2010
7 Reads

Somatic cAMP signaling regulates MSP-dependent oocyte growth and meiotic maturation in C. elegans.

Development 2009 Jul;136(13):2211-21

Department of Genetics, Cell Biology and Development, University of Minnesota, 6-160 Jackson Hall, 321 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA.

Soma-germline interactions control fertility at many levels, including stem cell proliferation, meiosis and gametogenesis, yet the nature of these fundamental signaling mechanisms and their potential evolutionary conservation are incompletely understood. In C. elegans, a sperm-sensing mechanism regulates oocyte meiotic maturation and ovulation, tightly coordinating sperm availability and fertilization. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.034595DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2729340PMC
July 2009
6 Reads

Gap junction communication between uterine stromal cells plays a critical role in pregnancy-associated neovascularization and embryo survival.

Development 2008 Aug 3;135(15):2659-68. Epub 2008 Jul 3.

Department of Veterinary Biosciences, and University of Illinois Urbana/Champaign, Urbana, IL 61802, USA.

In the uterus, the formation of new maternal blood vessels in the stromal compartment at the time of embryonic implantation is critical for the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy. Although uterine angiogenesis is known to be influenced by the steroid hormones estrogen (E) and progesterone (P), the underlying molecular pathways remain poorly understood. Here, we report that the expression of connexin 43 (Cx43), a major gap junction protein, is markedly enhanced in response to E in uterine stromal cells surrounding the implanted embryo during the early phases of pregnancy. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.019810DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2692722PMC
August 2008
5 Reads

Drosophila Pxt: a cyclooxygenase-like facilitator of follicle maturation.

Development 2008 Mar 23;135(5):839-47. Epub 2008 Jan 23.

Carnegie Institution, Department of Embryology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, 3520 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA.

Prostaglandins are local transient hormones that mediate a wide variety of biological events, including reproduction. The study of prostaglandin biology in a genetically tractable invertebrate model organism has been limited by the lack of clearly identified prostaglandin-mediated biological processes and prostaglandin metabolic genes, particularly analogs of cyclooxygenase (COX), the rate-limiting step in vertebrate prostaglandin synthesis. Here, we present pharmacological data that Drosophila ovarian follicle maturation requires COX-like activity and genetic evidence that this activity is supplied in vivo by the Drosophila peroxidase Pxt. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.017590DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2818214PMC
March 2008
5 Reads

Maternal-zygotic medaka mutants for fgfr1 reveal its essential role in the migration of the axial mesoderm but not the lateral mesoderm.

Development 2008 Jan;135(2):281-90

Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan.

The medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) is an emerging model organism for which a variety of unique developmental mutants have now been generated. Our recent mutagenesis screening of the medaka identified headfish (hdf), a null mutant for fgf receptor 1 (fgfr1), which fails to develop structures in the trunk and tail. Despite its crucial role in early development, the functions of Fgfr1-mediated signaling have not yet been well characterized due to the complexity of the underlying ligand-receptor interactions. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.011494DOI Listing
January 2008
5 Reads

Haploinsufficiency after successive loss of signaling reveals a role for ERECTA-family genes in Arabidopsis ovule development.

Development 2007 Sep 25;134(17):3099-109. Epub 2007 Jul 25.

Department of Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA.

The Arabidopsis genome contains three ERECTA-family genes, ERECTA (ER), ERECTA-LIKE 1 (ERL1) and ERL2 that encode leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases. This gene family acts synergistically to coordinate cell proliferation and growth during above-ground organogenesis with the major player, ER, masking the loss-of-function phenotypes of the other two members. To uncover the specific developmental consequence and minimum threshold requirement for signaling, ER-family gene function was successively eliminated. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.004788DOI Listing
September 2007
35 Reads

Regulation of redox metabolism in the mouse oocyte and embryo.

Development 2007 Feb 21;134(3):455-65. Epub 2006 Dec 21.

Laboratoire de Biologie du Développement UMR 7009 CNRS/Paris VI, Observatoire, Station Zoologique, Villefranche sur Mer, France.

Energy homeostasis of the oocyte is a crucial determinant of fertility. Following ovulation, the oocyte is exposed to the unique environment of the Fallopian tube, and this is reflected in a highly specialised biochemistry. The minute amounts of tissue available have made the physiological analysis of oocyte intermediary metabolism almost impossible. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.02744DOI Listing
February 2007
5 Reads

Sperm plasma membrane breakdown during Drosophila fertilization requires sneaky, an acrosomal membrane protein.

Development 2006 Dec 8;133(24):4871-9. Epub 2006 Nov 8.

Department of Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA.

Fertilization typically involves membrane fusion between sperm and eggs. In Drosophila, however, sperm enter eggs with membranes intact. Consequently, sperm plasma membrane breakdown (PMBD) and subsequent events of sperm activation occur in the egg cytoplasm. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.02671DOI Listing
December 2006
10 Reads

Arabidopsis microRNA167 controls patterns of ARF6 and ARF8 expression, and regulates both female and male reproduction.

Development 2006 Nov 4;133(21):4211-8. Epub 2006 Oct 4.

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Department of Biology, CB #3280, Coker Hall, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3280, USA.

In flowering plants, diploid sporophytic tissues in ovules and anthers support meiosis and subsequent haploid gametophyte development. These analogous reproductive functions suggest that common mechanisms may regulate ovule and anther development. Two Arabidopsis Auxin Response Factors, ARF6 and ARF8, regulate gynoecium and stamen development in immature flowers. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dev.biologists.org/cgi/doi/10.1242/dev.02602
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.02602DOI Listing
November 2006
13 Reads

Promotion of oogenesis and embryogenesis in the C. elegans gonad by EFL-1/DPL-1 (E2F) does not require LIN-35 (pRB).

Development 2006 Aug 19;133(16):3147-57. Epub 2006 Jul 19.

Department of Genetics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.

In Caenorhabditis elegans, EFL-1 (E2F), DPL-1 (DP) and LIN-35 (pRb) act coordinately in somatic tissues to inhibit ectopic cell division, probably by repressing the expression of target genes. EFL-1, DPL-1 and LIN-35 are also present in the germline, but do not always act together. Strong loss-of-function mutations in either efl-1 or dpl-1 cause defects in oogenesis that result in sterility, while lin-35 mutants are fertile with reduced broods. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.02490DOI Listing
August 2006
11 Reads
38 Citations
6.462 Impact Factor

Basonuclin: a novel mammalian maternal-effect gene.

Development 2006 May 19;133(10):2053-62. Epub 2006 Apr 19.

Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania, PA 19104, USA.

Basonuclin is a zinc-finger protein found in abundance in oocytes. It qualifies as a maternal-effect gene because the source of pre-implantation embryonic basonuclin is maternal. Using a transgenic-RNAi approach, we knocked down basonuclin specifically in mouse oocytes, which led to female sub-fertility. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.02371DOI Listing
May 2006
6 Reads

The Caenorhabditis elegans spe-38 gene encodes a novel four-pass integral membrane protein required for sperm function at fertilization.

Development 2005 Jun;132(12):2795-808

Waksman Institute and Department of Genetics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA.

A mutation in the Caenorhabditis elegans spe-38 gene results in a sperm-specific fertility defect. spe-38 sperm are indistinguishable from wild-type sperm with regards to their morphology, motility and migratory behavior. spe-38 sperm make close contact with oocytes but fail to fertilize them. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dev.biologists.org/cgi/doi/10.1242/dev.01868
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.01868DOI Listing
June 2005
8 Reads

The CCCH tandem zinc-finger protein Zfp36l2 is crucial for female fertility and early embryonic development.

Development 2004 Oct 1;131(19):4883-93. Epub 2004 Sep 1.

Laboratory of Signal Transduction, National Institute of Environmental Health Science, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, USA.

The CCCH tandem zinc finger protein, Zfp36l2, like its better-known relative tristetraprolin (TTP), can decrease the stability of AU-rich element-containing transcripts in cell transfection studies; however, its physiological importance is unknown. We disrupted Zfp36l2 in mice, resulting in decreased expression of a truncated protein in which the N-terminal 29 amino acids had been deleted (DeltaN-Zfp36l2). Mice derived from different clones of ES cells exhibited complete female infertility, despite evidence from embryo and ovary transplantation experiments that they could gestate and rear wild-type young. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.01336DOI Listing
October 2004
13 Reads

PTX3 plays a key role in the organization of the cumulus oophorus extracellular matrix and in in vivo fertilization.

Development 2004 Apr 3;131(7):1577-86. Epub 2004 Mar 3.

Department of Public Health and Cell Biology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome 00133, Italy.

PTX3 is a prototypic long pentraxin that plays a non-redundant role in innate immunity against selected pathogens and in female fertility. Here, we report that the infertility of Ptx3(-/-) mice is associated with severe abnormalities of the cumulus oophorus and failure of in vivo, but not in vitro, oocyte fertilization. PTX3 is produced by mouse cumulus cells during cumulus expansion and localizes in the matrix. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dev.biologists.org/cgi/doi/10.1242/dev.01056
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.01056DOI Listing
April 2004
11 Reads

GP130, the shared receptor for the LIF/IL6 cytokine family in the mouse, is not required for early germ cell differentiation, but is required cell-autonomously in oocytes for ovulation.

Development 2003 Sep;130(18):4287-94

Division of Developmental Biology, Children's Hospital, Cincinnati, OH 45229, USA.

GP130 is the shared receptor for members of the IL6 family of cytokines. Members of this family have been shown to enhance the survival of migratory (E10.5) or postmigratory (E12. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 2003
7 Reads

Requirement for two nearly identical TGIF-related homeobox genes in Drosophila spermatogenesis.

Development 2003 Jul;130(13):2853-65

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Columbia University, 701 West 168th Street, HHSC 1104, New York, NY 10032, USA.

The genetic analysis of spermatogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster has led to the identification of several genes that control the onset of meiosis, spermatid differentiation, or both. We described two tightly linked and nearly identical homeobox genes of the TGIF (TG-interacting factor) subclass called vismay and achintya that are essential for spermatogenesis in Drosophila. In flies deficient for both genes, spermatogenesis is blocked prior to any spermatid differentiation and before the first meiotic division. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
July 2003
4 Reads

Sply regulation of sphingolipid signaling molecules is essential for Drosophila development.

Development 2003 Jun;130(11):2443-53

Department of Biology and Molecular Biology Institute, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182-4614, USA.

Sphingosine-1-phosphate is a sphingolipid metabolite that regulates cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis through specific signaling pathways. Sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase catalyzes the conversion of sphingosine-1-phosphate to ethanolamine phosphate and a fatty aldehyde. We report the cloning of the Drosophila sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase gene (Sply) and demonstrate its importance for adult muscle development and integrity, reproduction and larval viability. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
June 2003
22 Reads

The Arabidopsis mutant feronia disrupts the female gametophytic control of pollen tube reception.

Development 2003 May;130(10):2149-59

Institute of Plant Biology & Zürich-Basel Plant Science Center, University of Zürich, Zollikerstrasse107, 8008 Zürich, Switzerland.

Reproduction in angiosperms depends on communication processes of the male gametophyte (pollen) with the female floral organs (pistil, transmitting tissue) and the female gametophyte (embryo sac). Pollen-pistil interactions control pollen hydration, germination and growth through the stylar tissue. The female gametophyte is involved in guiding the growing pollen tube towards the micropyle and embryo sac. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
May 2003
69 Reads

The Drosophila Pox neuro gene: control of male courtship behavior and fertility as revealed by a complete dissection of all enhancers.

Development 2002 Dec;129(24):5667-81

Institute for Molecular Biology, University of Zürich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zürich, Switzerland.

We have dissected the entire cis-regulatory region of the Drosophila Pox neuro gene with regard to its enhancers, and have analyzed their functions by the selective addition to Pox neuro null mutant flies of one or several functions, each regulated by a complete or partial enhancer. We have identified at least 15 enhancers with an astounding complexity in arrangement and substructure that regulate Pox neuro functions required for the development of the peripheral and central nervous system and of most appendages. Many of these functions are essential for normal male courtship behavior and fertility. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
December 2002
5 Reads

Dominant mutations in the Caenorhabditis elegans Myt1 ortholog wee-1.3 reveal a novel domain that controls M-phase entry during spermatogenesis.

Development 2002 Nov;129(21):5009-18

Department of Biology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA.

Regulatory phosphorylation of the Cdc2p kinase by Wee1p-type kinases prevents eukaryotic cells from entering mitosis or meiosis at an inappropriate time. The canonical Wee1p kinase is a soluble protein that functions in the eukaryotic nucleus. All metazoa also have a membrane-associated Wee1p-like kinase named Myt1, and we describe the first genetic characterization of this less well-studied kinase. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 2002
6 Reads

Drosophila E2f2 promotes the conversion from genomic DNA replication to gene amplification in ovarian follicle cells.

Development 2001 Dec;128(24):5085-98

Department of Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.

Drosophila contains two members of the E2F transcription factor family (E2f and E2f2), which controls the expression of genes that regulate the G1-S transition of the cell cycle. Previous genetic analyses have indicated that E2f is an essential gene that stimulates DNA replication. We show that loss of E2f2 is viable, but causes partial female sterility associated with changes in the mode of DNA replication in the follicle cells that surround the developing oocyte. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
December 2001
7 Reads