99 results match your criteria Repetitive Head Injury Syndrome


Management of concussion in soccer.

Acta Neurochir (Wien) 2019 Mar 28;161(3):425-433. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Department of Neurosurgery, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.

Background: When participating in contact sports, (mild) head trauma is a common incident-observed in both professional and amateur sports. When head trauma results in transient neurological impairment, a sports-related concussion has occurred. Acute concussion, repetitive concussions, as well as cumulative "sub-concussive" head impacts may increase the risk of developing cognitive and behavioral deficits for athletes, as well as accelerated cerebral degeneration. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00701-019-03807-6DOI Listing
March 2019
3 Reads

Histological dating of subdural hematoma in infants.

Int J Legal Med 2019 Mar 15;133(2):539-546. Epub 2018 Dec 15.

Forensic Department, APHM, La Timone, 264 rue St Pierre, 13385, Marseille, Cedex 05, France.

Background: After infant deaths due to non-accidental head injury (NAHI) with subdural hematoma (SDH), the magistrates ask experts to date the traumatic event. To do so, the expert only has tools based on adult series of NAHI. We aimed to develop an SDH dating system applicable to infants aged under 3 years. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00414-018-1980-8DOI Listing
March 2019
5 Reads

Chronic traumatic encephalopathy: fluid biomarkers.

Handb Clin Neurol 2018 ;158:323-333

Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Mölndal, Sweden; Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, Sweden.

Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neuropathologic condition that has been described in individuals who have been exposed to repetitive head impacts, including concussions and subconcussive trauma. CTE cannot currently be diagnosed during life. Clinical symptoms of CTE (including changes in mood, behavior, and cognition) are nonspecific and may develop after a latency phase following the injuries. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-444-63954-7.00030-6DOI Listing
March 2019
5 Reads

Neuropsychiatry of sport-related concussion.

Handb Clin Neurol 2018 ;158:153-162

Department of Psychiatry, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, United States.

Changes in mood, emotions, and behavior are common components of the acute clinical picture of sport-related concussion (SRC). Common concussion symptom inventories such as the Sport Concussion Assessment Tool-5 (SCAT5) contain a large number of questions that assess these neuropsychiatric domains. In fact, of 22 items assessed by the SCAT5, arguably only five of the items do not overlap with symptoms assessed by standard measures of anxiety and depression, suggesting that concussion is best viewed as a neuropsychiatric syndrome. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-444-63954-7.00016-1DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Head trauma in sports - clinical characteristics, epidemiology and biomarkers.

J Intern Med 2018 Nov 27. Epub 2018 Nov 27.

Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Mölndal, Sweden.

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is clinically divided into a spectrum of severities, with mild TBI being the least severe form and a frequent occurrence in contact sports, such as ice hockey, American football, rugby, horse riding and boxing. Mild TBI is caused by blunt nonpenetrating head trauma that causes movement of the brain and stretching and tearing of axons, with diffuse axonal injury being a central pathogenic mechanism. Mild TBI is in principle synonymous with concussion; both have similar criteria in which the most important elements are acute alteration or loss of consciousness and/or post-traumatic amnesia following head trauma and no apparent brain changes on standard neuroimaging. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/joim.12863
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/joim.12863DOI Listing
November 2018
11 Reads

Blast-induced "PTSD": Evidence from an animal model.

Neuropharmacology 2019 02 15;145(Pt B):220-229. Epub 2018 Sep 15.

Department of Neurology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, One Gustave Levy Place, New York, NY 10029, USA; Department of Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, One Gustave Levy Place, New York, NY 10029, USA; Mount Sinai Alzheimer's Disease Research Center and the Ronald M. Loeb Center for Alzheimer's Disease, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA; Neurology Service, James J. Peters Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 130 West Kingsbridge Road, Bronx, NY 10468, USA. Electronic address:

A striking observation among veterans returning from the recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan has been the co-occurrence of blast-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PTSD and mTBI might coexist due to additive effects of independent psychological and physical traumas experienced in a war zone. Alternatively blast injury might induce PTSD-related traits or damage brain structures that mediate responses to psychological stressors, increasing the likelihood that PTSD will develop following a subsequent psychological stressor. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropharm.2018.09.023DOI Listing
February 2019
31 Reads

Efficacy of a repeat testing protocol for cognitive fatigue assessment: a preliminary study in postconcussive syndrome participants.

Concussion 2017 Dec 20;2(4):CNC44. Epub 2017 Dec 20.

Department of Rehabilitation, Nutrition & Sport, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Melbourne, VIC 3086, Australia.

Aim: A small but notable number of individuals who suffer a concussion report ongoing cognitive difficulties. This preliminary study investigated the efficacy of repetitive test application to discern cognitive impairment in those with ongoing symptoms.

Methods: Participants (n = 17) with continuing self-reported symptoms following a concussion (∼9 months postinjury) were compared with 17 age group matched controls for working memory and word-list learning. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/cnc-2017-0002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6122690PMC
December 2017
27 Reads

The Swimmer's Shoulder: Multi-directional Instability.

Curr Rev Musculoskelet Med 2018 Jun;11(2):167-171

Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, Hospital for Special Surgery, 535 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021, USA.

Purpose Of Review: Swimmer's shoulder is the term used to describe the problem of shoulder pain in swimmers. Originally described as supraspinatus tendon impingement under the coracoacromial arch, it is now understood that several different pathologies can cause shoulder pain in competitive swimmers, including subacromial impingement syndrome, overuse and subsequent muscle fatigue, scapular dyskinesis, and laxity and instability.

Recent Findings: Swimmers may develop increased shoulder laxity over time due to repetitive use. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12178-018-9485-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5970120PMC
June 2018
36 Reads

Anterior cervical arthrodesis for chronic hangman's fracture in a patient with osteopetrosis: a case report.

Arch Orthop Trauma Surg 2018 Jun 10;138(6):783-789. Epub 2018 Feb 10.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, National Hospital Organization Fukuyama Medical Center, 4-14-17, Okinogami-cho, Fukuyama, Hiroshima, 720-8520, Japan.

Introduction: Osteopetrosis is a clinical syndrome characterized by the failure of osteoclasts to resorb bone. Affected patients usually suffer from repetitive fractures due to this pathological state. Surgical treatment of these fractures is often complicated by the difficulty of working with the extremely hard and brittle bones. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00402-018-2901-5DOI Listing
June 2018
7 Reads

Pathophysiological and behavioral deficits in developing mice following rotational acceleration-deceleration traumatic brain injury.

Dis Model Mech 2018 01 30;11(1). Epub 2018 Jan 30.

Department of Spine Surgery, Orthopedics Hospital affiliated to the Second Bethune Hospital, Jilin University, Changchun 130041, China

Abusive head trauma (AHT) is the leading cause of death from trauma in infants and young children. An AHT animal model was developed on 12-day-old mice subjected to 90° head extension-flexion sagittal shaking repeated 30, 60, 80 and 100 times. The mortality and time until return of consciousness were dependent on the number of repeats and severity of the injury. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dmm.030387DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5818073PMC
January 2018
18 Reads

Pre-clinical models in pediatric traumatic brain injury-challenges and lessons learned.

Childs Nerv Syst 2017 Oct 6;33(10):1693-1701. Epub 2017 Sep 6.

Safar Center for Resuscitation Research, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, 4401 Penn Ave, Pittsburgh, PA, 15224, USA.

Purpose: Despite the enormity of the problem and the lack of new therapies, research in the pre-clinical arena specifically using pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) models is limited. In this review, some of the key models addressing both the age spectrum of pediatric TBI and its unique injury mechanisms will be highlighted. Four topics will be addressed, namely, (1) unique facets of the developing brain important to TBI model development, (2) a description of some of the most commonly used pre-clinical models of severe pediatric TBI including work in both rodents and large animals, (3) a description of the pediatric models of mild TBI and repetitive mild TBI that are relatively new, and finally (4) a discussion of challenges, gaps, and potential future directions to further advance work in pediatric TBI models. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00381-017-3474-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5909721PMC
October 2017
4 Reads

Research Gaps and Controversies in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: A Review.

JAMA Neurol 2017 10;74(10):1255-1262

Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Florida, Gainesville.

Importance: Scientific and lay interest in negative outcomes associated with exposure to repetitive brain trauma (RBT) continues to strengthen. Concerns about the association between RBT and dementia began more than a century ago, but have resurfaced in the last decade with the more recently described chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is a tauopathy associated with RBT that has become inextricably linked to conversations about sport-related concussion and mild traumatic brain injury. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamaneurol.2017.2396DOI Listing
October 2017
36 Reads

Concussion diagnosis and management: Knowledge and attitudes of family medicine residents.

Can Fam Physician 2017 Jun;63(6):460-466

Associate Professor in the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Toronto and a sports medicine physician at Markham Stouffville Hospital and the Scarborough and Rouge Hospital.

Objective: To assess the knowledge of, attitudes toward, and learning needs for concussion diagnosis and management among family medicine residents.

Design: E-mail survey.

Setting: University of Toronto in Ontario. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5471087PMC
June 2017
4 Reads

Concussion.

Am J Med 2017 08 11;130(8):885-892. Epub 2017 May 11.

Department of Neurology, Brigham and Women's Faulkner Hospital, Boston, Mass. Electronic address:

Concussion has been recognized as a clinical entity for more than 1000 years. Throughout the 20th century it was studied extensively in boxers, but it did not pique the interest of the general population because it is the accepted goal of the boxer to inflict such an injury on their opponent. In 2002, however, the possibility that repetitive concussions could result in chronic brain damage and a progressive neurologic disorder was raised by a postmortem evaluation of a retired player in the most popular sports institution in the United States, the National Football League. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjmed.2017.04.016DOI Listing
August 2017
8 Reads

A systematic review of potential long-term effects of sport-related concussion.

Br J Sports Med 2017 Jun 28;51(12):969-977. Epub 2017 Apr 28.

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Harvard Medical School; Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital; MassGeneral Hospital for Children Sports Concussion Program; & Home Base, a Red Sox Foundation and Massachusetts General Hospital Program, Boston, USA.

Objective: Systematic review of possible long-term effects of sports-related concussion in retired athletes.

Data Sources: Ten electronic databases.

Study Selection: Original research; incidence, risk factors or causation related to long-term mental health or neurological problems; individuals who have suffered a concussion; retired athletes as the subjects and possible long-term sequelae defined as 10 years after the injury. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bjsports-2017-097791DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5466926PMC
June 2017
23 Reads

Astroglial activation and altered amyloid metabolism in human repetitive concussion.

Neurology 2017 Apr 10;88(15):1400-1407. Epub 2017 Mar 10.

From the Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology (P.S., K.H., E.P., K.B., H.Z.), Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg; Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory (P.S., K.H., E.P., K.B., H.Z.), Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal; Division of Medical Sciences, Department of Health Sciences (Y.T.), Luleå University of Technology; Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery (N.M.), Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Washington University School of Medicine (D.L.B.), St. Louis, MO; and Department of Molecular Neuroscience (H.Z.), UCL Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London, UK.

Objective: To determine whether postconcussion syndrome (PCS) due to repetitive concussive traumatic brain injury (rcTBI) is associated with CSF biomarker evidence of astroglial activation, amyloid deposition, and blood-brain barrier (BBB) impairment.

Methods: A total of 47 participants (28 professional athletes with PCS and 19 controls) were assessed with lumbar puncture (median 1.5 years, range 0. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000003816DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5386435PMC
April 2017
9 Reads

The Current Status of Research on Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

World Neurosurg 2017 Jun 27;102:533-544. Epub 2017 Feb 27.

Department of Neurological Surgery, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, USA.

Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) evolved from the term dementia pugilistica describing the dementia found in many boxers to its current use in describing the dementia and depression sometimes found in athletes subjected to multiple concussions or subconcussive blows to the head. Concurrently, the neuropathology evolved to specify a unique type of tauopathy found in perivascular spaces at the depth of sulci and other features not typically seen in neurodegenerative tauopathies. Four stages of CTE have been proposed, with 4 corresponding clinical syndromes of traumatic encephalopathy syndrome. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wneu.2017.02.084DOI Listing
June 2017
9 Reads

Combined focal myoclonus and dystonia secondary to a cerebellar hemorrhage: a case report.

BMC Neurol 2016 Nov 17;16(1):228. Epub 2016 Nov 17.

Department of Neurology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul, 110-774, Republic of Korea.

Background: Myoclonus is a clinical sign characterized by sudden, brief jerky, shock-like involuntary movements of a muscle or group of muscles. Dystonia is defined as a syndrome of sustained muscle contractions, frequently causing twisting and repetitive movements or abnormal postures. Cases of myoclonus or dystonia secondary to a structural lesion in the cerebellum have been reported. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12883-016-0745-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5114754PMC
November 2016
8 Reads

Severely Altered-Consciousness Status and Profuse Vomiting in Infants: Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome (FPIES), a Challenging Diagnosis.

Pediatr Emerg Care 2018 Oct;34(10):e187-e189

In infants, the causes of acute repetitive vomiting and severely altered-consciousness status include a broad differential diagnosis, that is, primarly sepsis, infectious gastroenteritis, head injury, and intoxication, as well as neurologic, metabolic, and cardiologic condition diseases. In patients developing such symptoms, allergy as an etiological cause is often not considered by primary care physicians. With this case report, we aim to draw the attention of general pediatricians, emergency physicians, and intensivists to the fact that non-immunoglobulin E-mediated food allergic gastrointestinal disorders such as food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome should be considered in patients with sepsis-like symptoms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEC.0000000000000921DOI Listing
October 2018
5 Reads

Neurochemical Aftermath of Repetitive Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

JAMA Neurol 2016 Nov;73(11):1308-1315

Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, Sweden.

Importance: Evidence is accumulating that repeated mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) incidents can lead to persistent, long-term debilitating symptoms and in some cases a progressive neurodegenerative condition referred to as chronic traumatic encephalopathy. However, to our knowledge, there are no objective tools to examine to which degree persistent symptoms after mTBI are caused by neuronal injury.

Objective: To determine whether persistent symptoms after mTBI are associated with brain injury as evaluated by cerebrospinal fluid biochemical markers for axonal damage and other aspects of central nervous system injury. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamaneurol.2016.2038DOI Listing
November 2016
15 Reads

Factors Influencing Clinical Correlates of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE): a Review.

Neuropsychol Rev 2016 12 25;26(4):340-363. Epub 2016 Aug 25.

Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.

Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neuropathologically defined disease reportedly linked to a history of repetitive brain trauma. As such, retired collision sport athletes are likely at heightened risk for developing CTE. Researchers have described distinct pathological features of CTE as well a wide range of clinical symptom presentations, recently termed traumatic encephalopathy syndrome (TES). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11065-016-9327-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5507554PMC
December 2016
33 Reads

The Controversial Second Impact Syndrome: A Review of the Literature.

Pediatr Neurol 2016 09 13;62:9-17. Epub 2016 Apr 13.

Division of Pediatric Neurology, Department of Neurology, Indiana University School of Medicine and Riley Hospital for Children at Indiana University Health, Indianapolis, Indiana. Electronic address:

Background: Second impact syndrome is a devastating injury that primarily affects athletic children and young adults. It occurs when a second concussion occurs before symptoms from the first concussion have resolved. Diffuse and often catastrophic cerebral edema results. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pediatrneurol.2016.03.009DOI Listing
September 2016
2 Reads

[Late-onset Neurodegenerative Diseases Following Traumatic Brain Injury: Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) and Alzheimer's Disease Secondary to TBI (AD-TBI)].

Brain Nerve 2016 Jul;68(7):849-57

Department of Functional Brain Imaging Research, Clinical Research Cluster, National Institute of Radiological Sciences.

Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease, which is associated with mild repetitive traumatic brain injury (TBI). This long-term and progressive symptom due to TBI was initially called punch-drunk syndrome or dementia pugilistica, since it was believed to be associated with boxing. However, serial neuropathological studies of mild repetitive TBI in the last decade have revealed that CTE occurs not only in boxers but also in a wider population including American football players, wrestlers, and military personnel. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.11477/mf.1416200517DOI Listing
July 2016
27 Reads

A Clinical Approach to the Diagnosis of Traumatic Encephalopathy Syndrome: A Review.

JAMA Neurol 2016 Jun;73(6):743-9

Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor.

Importance: Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) refers to pathologic changes that have been found in some individuals with a history of repetitive traumatic impact to the head (hereinafter referred to as head trauma). These changes cannot be assessed during the clinical evaluation of a living patient.

Observations: The neuropathologic features, taxonomy, history, role of biomarkers in diagnosis, and existing criteria of CTE are reviewed. Read More

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http://archneur.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?doi=10.1001/jam
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamaneurol.2015.5015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4922002PMC
June 2016
56 Reads

Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy and Movement Disorders: Update.

Curr Neurol Neurosci Rep 2016 May;16(5):46

Division of Neurology, Krembil Neuroscience Centre, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Canada.

Association of repetitive brain trauma with progressive neurological deterioration has been described since the 1920s. Punch drunk syndrome and dementia pugilistica (DP) were introduced first to explain symptoms in boxers, and more recently, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) has been used to describe a neurodegenerative disease in athletes and military personal with a history of multiple concussions. Although there are many similarities between DP and CTE, a number of key differences are apparent especially when comparing movement impairments. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007%2Fs11910-016-06
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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11910-016-0648-3
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11910-016-0648-3DOI Listing
May 2016
8 Reads

Cyclic Head Rotations Produce Modest Brain Injury in Infant Piglets.

J Neurotrauma 2017 01 11;34(1):235-247. Epub 2016 May 11.

7 Department of Bioengineering, University of Pennsylvania , Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Repetitive back-and-forth head rotation from vigorous shaking is purported to be a central mechanism responsible for diffuse white matter injury, subdural hemorrhage, and retinal hemorrhage in some cases of abusive head trauma (AHT) in young children. Although animal studies have identified mechanisms of traumatic brain injury (TBI) associated with single rapid head acceleration-decelerations at levels experienced in a motor vehicle crash, few experimental studies have investigated TBI from repetitive head rotations. The objective of this study was to systematically investigate the post-injury pathological time-course after cyclic, low-velocity head rotations in the piglet and compare them with single head rotations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/neu.2015.4352DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5198060PMC
January 2017
19 Reads

Type and occurrence of serious complications in patients after mild traumatic brain injury.

Bratisl Lek Listy 2016 ;117(1):22-5

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains a major public health and socio-economic problem, and 70-90% of all TBIs are classified as mild. Mild TBIs and concussions are mostly considered to be non-serious conditions with symptoms subsiding within a few days or weeks. However in 10-15% of patients, the symptoms persist one year after concussion and mostly include headache, fatigue, irritability, and cognitive problems (e. Read More

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May 2016
3 Reads

Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: The Neuropathological Legacy of Traumatic Brain Injury.

Annu Rev Pathol 2016 05 13;11:21-45. Epub 2016 Jan 13.

Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, United Kingdom; email:

Almost a century ago, the first clinical account of the punch-drunk syndrome emerged, describing chronic neurological and neuropsychiatric sequelae occurring in former boxers. Thereafter, throughout the twentieth century, further reports added to our understanding of the neuropathological consequences of a career in boxing, leading to descriptions of a distinct neurodegenerative pathology, termed dementia pugilistica. During the past decade, growing recognition of this pathology in autopsy studies of nonboxers who were exposed to repetitive, mild traumatic brain injury, or to a single, moderate or severe traumatic brain injury, has led to an awareness that it is exposure to traumatic brain injury that carries with it a risk of this neurodegenerative disease, not the sport or the circumstance in which the injury is sustained. Read More

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http://www.annualreviews.org/doi/10.1146/annurev-pathol-0126
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-pathol-012615-044116DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5367053PMC
May 2016
26 Reads

Occupational mononeuropathies in industry.

Handb Clin Neurol 2015 ;131:411-26

Occupational Health Unit, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.

Peripheral nerve injuries have the potential to cause significant disability and can be commonly associated with recreational and occupational activities. Acute nerve injuries are mainly related to violent trauma, while repeated mechanical trauma due to external forces or repetitive motions can produce chronic nerve compression injury. This chapter will present a narrative review of the existing evidence of the association between peripheral compressive nerve disorders and work-related risk factors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-444-62627-1.00021-4DOI Listing
August 2016
7 Reads

The Use of Ophthalmic Ultrasonography to Identify Retinal Injuries Associated With Abusive Head Trauma.

Ann Emerg Med 2016 05 17;67(5):620-4. Epub 2015 Oct 17.

Division of Emergency Medicine, Children's National Health System, Washington, DC; Department of Pediatrics, George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Washington, DC.

Abusive head trauma includes any nonaccidental injury inflicted to a child's head and body. It is often characterized by, but not limited to, the repetitive acceleration-deceleration forces with or without blunt head impact. It has a mortality rate of 30%, and 80% of survivors experience permanent neurologic damage. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annemergmed.2015.09.027DOI Listing
May 2016
9 Reads

Neural correlates of self-injurious behavior in Prader-Willi syndrome.

Hum Brain Mapp 2015 Oct 14;36(10):4135-43. Epub 2015 Jul 14.

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Stanford University, Stanford, California.

Individuals with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), a genetic disorder caused by mutations to the q11-13 region on chromosome 15, commonly show severe skin-picking behaviors that can cause open wounds and sores on the body. To our knowledge, however, no studies have examined the potential neural mechanisms underlying these behaviors. Seventeen individuals with PWS, aged 6-25 years, who showed severe skin-picking behaviors, were recruited and scanned on a 3T scanner. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hbm.22903DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4844454PMC
October 2015
6 Reads

Temporal MRI characterization, neurobiochemical and neurobehavioral changes in a mouse repetitive concussive head injury model.

Sci Rep 2015 Jun 10;5:11178. Epub 2015 Jun 10.

Program for Neurotrauma, Neuroproteomics &Biomarkers Research, Departments of Psychiatry &Neuroscience, McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA.

Single and repeated sports-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), also referred to as concussion, can result in chronic post-concussive syndrome (PCS), neuropsychological and cognitive deficits, or chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). However PCS is often difficult to diagnose using routine clinical, neuroimaging or laboratory evaluations, while CTE currently only can be definitively diagnosed postmortem. We sought to develop an animal model to simulate human repetitive concussive head injury for systematic study. Read More

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http://www.nature.com/articles/srep11178
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep11178DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4461921PMC
June 2015
21 Reads

A paralabral cyst of the hip joint causing sciatica: case report and review of literature.

Malays J Med Sci 2014 Jul;21(4):57-60

Department of Orthopedics, Pramukswami Medical College, Sri Krishna Hospital, Karamsad -388325, Anand, India.

The prolapse of the intervertebral disc is most common cause of sciatica; rare causes of sciatica are pelvic fractures, pelvic tumors, piriformis syndrome, a rupture of medial head of gastronemius and sacroiliac joint dysfunction. We report the case of a 30-year-old male with a paralabral cyst of the hip joint with an acetabular labral tear causing sciatica. Our patient had an acetabular labral tear caused by a repetitive micro-trauma and external rotation injury. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4418116PMC
July 2014
3 Reads
2 Citations

Acute sports-related traumatic brain injury and repetitive concussion.

Handb Clin Neurol 2015 ;127:157-72

NeuroSport Research Laboratory, Michigan NeuroSport, School of Kinesiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.

Concussions are described as functional, not structural injuries, and therefore cannot be easily detected through standard diagnostic imaging. The vast differences between individual athletes makes identifying and evaluating sport-related concussion one of the most complex and perplexing injuries faced by medical personnel. The literature, as well as most consensus statements, supports the use of a multifaceted approach to concussion evaluation on the sideline of the athletic field. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-444-52892-6.00010-6DOI Listing
August 2016
9 Reads

Chronic traumatic encephalopathy: contributions from the Boston University Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy.

Brain Inj 2015 ;29(2):154-63

Centre for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy, Boston University School of Medicine , Boston, MA , USA .

Objective: Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease associated with repetitive brain trauma (RBT). Initially described in boxers, CTE has now been found in other contact sport athletes with a history of RBT. In recent years, there has been tremendous media attention regarding CTE, primarily because of the deaths of high profile American football players who were found to have CTE upon neuropathological examination. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/02699052.2014.965215DOI Listing
September 2015
16 Reads

Chronic traumatic encephalopathy and other long-term sequelae.

Authors:
Barry D Jordan

Continuum (Minneap Minn) 2014 Dec;20(6 Sports Neurology):1588-604

Purpose Of Review: Growing public health concern exists over the incidence of chronic traumatic brain injury (TBI) in athletes participating in contact sports. Chronic TBI represents a spectrum of disorders associated with long-term consequences of single or repetitive TBI and includes chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), chronic postconcussion syndrome, and chronic neurocognitive impairment. Neurologists should be familiar with the different types of chronic TBI and their diagnostic criteria. Read More

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http://pdfs.journals.lww.com/continuum/2014/12000/Chronic_Tr
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/01.CON.0000458972.94013.e1DOI Listing
December 2014
6 Reads

Post-operative Adult Onset Tic Disorder: A Rare Presentation.

Indian J Psychol Med 2014 Oct;36(4):428-30

Department of Psychiatry, Government Medical College, Kota, Rajasthan, India.

Tics are rapid and repetitive muscle contractions resulting in stereotype movements and vocalizations that are experienced as involuntary. Onset before 18-year is a diagnostic criterion for tic disorders. Children and adolescents may exhibit tic behaviors after a stimulus or in response to an internal urge. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0253-7176.140740DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4201799PMC
October 2014
3 Reads

Frequency and impact of recurrent traumatic brain injury in a population-based sample.

J Neurotrauma 2015 May 25;32(10):674-81. Epub 2015 Feb 25.

1 National Institute for Stroke and Applied Neuroscience, Auckland University of Technology , Auckland, New Zealand .

The aim of this study was to determine the frequency, mechanism(s), and impact of recurrent traumatic brain injury (TBI) over a 1-year period. Population-based TBI incidence and 1-year outcomes study with embedded case-control analysis. All participants (adults and children) who experienced a recurrent TBI (more than one) in the 12 months after an index injury and matched controls who sustained one TBI within the same period were enrolled in a population-based TBI incidence and outcomes study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/neu.2014.3579DOI Listing
May 2015
10 Reads

Chronic gliosis and behavioral deficits in mice following repetitive mild traumatic brain injury.

J Neurosurg 2014 Dec 30;121(6):1342-50. Epub 2014 Sep 30.

Division of Emergency Medicine.

Object: With the recent increasing interest in outcomes after repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (rmTBI; e.g., sports concussions), several models of rmTBI have been established. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3171/2014.7.JNS14272DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5660896PMC
December 2014
37 Reads

Biomechanical studies in an ovine model of non-accidental head injury.

J Biomech 2014 Aug 11;47(11):2578-83. Epub 2014 Jun 11.

School of Medical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Frome Road, Adelaide 5005, SA, Australia.

This paper presents the head kinematics of a novel ovine model of non-accidental head injury (NAHI) that consists only of a naturalistic oscillating insult. Nine, 7-to-10-day-old anesthetized and ventilated lambs were subjected to manual shaking. Two six-axis motion sensors tracked the position of the head and torso, and a triaxial accelerometer measured head acceleration. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbiomech.2014.06.002DOI Listing
August 2014
3 Reads

Noninvasive brain stimulation for persistent postconcussion symptoms in mild traumatic brain injury.

J Neurotrauma 2015 Jan;32(1):38-44

1 Department of Psychology, McGill University Health Center (MUHC), Department of Neurology/Neurosurgery and Department of Psychology, McGill University, and Mental Illness and Addiction Axis, Research Institute of the MUHC, McGill University , Montreal, Quebec, Canada .

Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is typically followed by various postconcussive symptoms (PCS), including headache, depression, and cognitive deficits. In 15-25% of cases, PCS persists beyond the usual 3-month recovery period, interfering with activities of daily living and responding poorly to pharmacotherapy. We tested the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) for alleviating PCS. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/neu.2014.3449DOI Listing
January 2015
3 Reads

Military-related traumatic brain injury and neurodegeneration.

Alzheimers Dement 2014 Jun;10(3 Suppl):S242-53

VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA, USA.

Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) includes concussion, subconcussion, and most exposures to explosive blast from improvised explosive devices. mTBI is the most common traumatic brain injury affecting military personnel; however, it is the most difficult to diagnose and the least well understood. It is also recognized that some mTBIs have persistent, and sometimes progressive, long-term debilitating effects. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jalz.2014.04.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4255273PMC
June 2014
3 Reads

Chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

Authors:
Bennet Omalu

Prog Neurol Surg 2014 6;28:38-49. Epub 2014 Jun 6.

University of California, Davis, Medical Center, Sacramento, Calif., and San Joaquin General Hospital and San Joaquin County Coroner's Division, French Camp, Calif., USA.

Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative syndrome, which is caused by single, episodic, or repetitive blunt force impacts to the head and transfer of acceleration-deceleration forces to the brain. CTE presents clinically as a composite syndrome of mood disorders and behavioral and cognitive impairment, with or without sensorimotor impairment. Symptoms of CTE may begin with persistent symptoms of acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) following a documented episode of brain trauma or after a latent period that may range from days to weeks to months and years, up to 40 years following a documented episode of brain trauma or cessation of repetitive TBI. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000358761DOI Listing
February 2015
31 Reads

Evaluation of the Military Functional Assessment Program: Preliminary Assessment of the Construct Validity Using an Archived Database of Clinical Data.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2015 Jul-Aug;30(4):E11-20

Warfighter Health Division, US Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory, Fort Rucker, Alabama (Dr Kelley and Estrada and Ms Grandizio); and Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Dr Ranes). Dr Kelley is now at the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Department of Transportation. Ms Grandizio is now at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.

Background: Several important factors must be considered when deciding to return a soldier to duty after a traumatic brain injury (TBI). Premature return increases risk for not only second-impact syndrome during the acute phase but also permanent changes from repetitive concussions. Thus, there is a critical need for return-to-duty (RTD) assessment criteria that encompass the spectrum of injury and disease experienced by US soldiers, particularly TBI. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000060DOI Listing
April 2016
17 Reads

Iatrogenic velopharyngeal insufficiency caused by neonatal nasogastric feeding tube.

Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol 2014 Aug 10;78(8):1410-2. Epub 2014 May 10.

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA.

Complications from a prolonged nasogastric tube intubation, though seldom reported, are well described. Herein we describe the first two reported cases of velopharyngeal insufficiency secondary to velopharyngeal scarring and immobility from repetitive nasogastric tube insertions and prolonged use. Differing only in location, the proposed pathophysiologic mechanism of injury is identical to that of the nasogastric tube syndrome, a rare and serious, well described entity consisting of bilateral vocal fold paralysis due to pressure-induced ulceration of the posterior cricoarytenoid musculature. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijporl.2014.04.051DOI Listing
August 2014
6 Reads

[The throwing shoulder].

Orthopade 2014 Mar;43(3):223-9

Klinik für Orthopädische Chirurgie und Traumatologie des Bewegungsapparates, Kantonsspital St. Gallen, Rorschacherstr. 95, 9007, St. Gallen, Schweiz.

Background: During the throwing motion high forces are placed on the athlete's shoulder and extreme positions of external rotation and abduction are reached. The dynamic and static stabilizers of the glenohumeral joint need to handle a delicate balance between shoulder mobility and stability.

Causes Of Injury: Repetitive forces lead to adaptive osseous, capsular, ligament and muscular changes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00132-013-2144-7DOI Listing
March 2014
7 Reads

The neuropathology of sport.

Acta Neuropathol 2014 Jan 24;127(1):29-51. Epub 2013 Dec 24.

VA Boston HealthCare System, 150 South Huntington Ave, Boston, MA, 02130, USA,

The benefits of regular exercise, physical fitness and sports participation on cardiovascular and brain health are undeniable. Physical activity reduces the risk for cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and stroke, and produces beneficial effects on cholesterol levels, antioxidant systems, inflammation, and vascular function. Exercise also enhances psychological health, reduces age-related loss of brain volume, improves cognition, reduces the risk of developing dementia, and impedes neurodegeneration. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00401-013-1230-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4255282PMC
January 2014
72 Reads

Chronic neuropathological and neurobehavioral changes in a repetitive mild traumatic brain injury model.

Ann Neurol 2014 Feb 20;75(2):241-54. Epub 2014 Feb 20.

Roskamp Institute, Sarasota, FL; James A. Haley Veterans Administration Medical Center, Tampa, FL; Department of Life Sciences, Open University, Milton Keynes, United Kingdom.

Objective: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a recognized risk factor for later development of neurodegenerative disease. However, the mechanisms contributing to neurodegeneration following TBI remain obscure.

Methods: In this study, we have utilized a novel mild TBI (mTBI) model to examine the chronic neurobehavioral and neuropathological outcomes following single and repetitive mTBI at time points from 6 to 18 months following injury. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ana.24064DOI Listing
February 2014
9 Reads

Shaken adult syndrome: report of 2 cases.

JAMA Ophthalmol 2013 Nov;131(11):1468-70

Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Wisconsin, Madison.

Importance: To establish that the intracranial and ophthalmologic findings present in victims of abusive head trauma can also be seen in shaken adults.

Observations: We report 2 cases of shaken adults with intracranial and ophthalmologic findings that resulted from repetitive acceleration-deceleration injury. These findings included intracranial hemorrhages, hemorrhages involving the optic nerve sheath, intraretinal and subretinal hemorrhages, and macular folds. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2013.5073DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4049539PMC
November 2013
3 Reads