13 results match your criteria Renal Corticomedullary Abscess

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Imaging technologies in the diagnosis and treatment of acute pyelonephritis.

Urologia 2017 Aug 18;84(3):179-184. Epub 2017 May 18.

 Department of Urology, I.M. Sechenov First State Medical University, Moscow - Russia.

Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibilities of ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosing acute pyelonephritis (AP) and renal abscess.

Patients And Methods: Two hundred and seven patients with AP were followed up from 2010 throughout 2015. All the patients were divided into three groups. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5301/uj.5000234DOI Listing
August 2017
34 Reads

Contrast harmonic ultrasonographic appearance of focal space-occupying renal lesions.

Vet Radiol Ultrasound 2010 Sep-Oct;51(5):516-22

Department of Veterinary Medical Imaging and Small Animal Orthopedics, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Salisburylaan 133, 9820 Merelbeke, Belgium.

To describe the contrast-enhanced ultrasonographic appearance of various focal, space-occupying renal lesions and determine its value in their detection and characterization. Following baseline B-mode sonography of 15 dogs and one cat with renal space-occupying lesion(s), contrast-enhanced sonography was performed. The resulting images were evaluated qualitatively using conspicuity and number of lesions, and enhancement patterns were assessed during early arterial and late corticomedullary phases. Read More

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November 2010
5 Reads

Renal corticomedullary abscess.

J Emerg Med 2007 Jan;32(1):119-21

Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir, Turkey.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jemermed.2006.05.038DOI Listing
January 2007
6 Reads
1.180 Impact Factor

Renal inflammatory disease: the current role of CT.

Crit Rev Diagn Imaging 1997 Oct;38(5):369-415

Department of Radiology, University of Texas-Houston Medical School 77030, USA.

Computed tomography (CT) plays a significant role in establishing the diagnosis in clinically equivocal cases of renal infection, determining the extent of the disease process, and assessing its complications. Gas, calculi, renal parenchymal calcifications, hemorrhage, and masses can be revealed with unenhanced CT. A subsequent study with contrast enhancement is crucial for the complete evaluation of patients with renal infection in order to demonstrate the areas of altered nephrogram that occur as a result of the inflammatory process and to identify complications. Read More

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October 1997
9 Reads

Bacterial urinary tract infections in diabetes.

Infect Dis Clin North Am 1997 Sep;11(3):735-50

Department of Medicine (Infectious Diseases), University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, USA.

Diabetes mellitus has a number of long-term effects on the genitourinary system. These effects predispose to bacterial urinary tract infections in the patient with diabetes mellitus. Bacteriuria is more common in diabetic women than in nondiabetic women because of a combination of host and local risk factors. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.2165/00003495-200262
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September 1997
8 Reads

Renal and perirenal abscesses.

Infect Dis Clin North Am 1997 Sep;11(3):663-80

Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA.

Our knowledge of the spectrum of renal abscesses has evolved as a result of more sensitive radiologic techniques. The classification of intrarenal abscesses currently includes acute focal bacterial nephritis, acute multifocal bacterial nephritis, renal cortical abscess, renal corticomedullary abscess, and xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis. The clinical presentation of these entities does not differentiate them, however, and various radiographic studies are helpful in making the diagnosis. Read More

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September 1997
4 Reads

CT of renal inflammatory disease.

Radiographics 1997 Jul-Aug;17(4):851-66; discussion 867-8

Department of Radiology, University of Texas Medical School, Houston, USA.

Although computed tomography (CT) is not routinely indicated in uncomplicated renal infection, it is of value in establishing the diagnosis in equivocal cases, in evaluating high-risk patients, and in determining the extent of disease. Unenhanced CT is useful in demonstrating gas, calculi, parenchymal calcifications, hemorrhage, and inflammatory masses. However, a contrast material-enhanced study is essential for complete evaluation of patients with renal inflammatory disease to demonstrate alterations in renal excretion of contrast material that occur as a result of the inflammatory process. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1148/radiographics.17.4.9225387DOI Listing
August 1997
5 Reads

Bacterial urinary tract infections in diabetes.

Infect Dis Clin North Am 1995 Mar;9(1):25-51

University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, USA.

Bacterial UTIs are a common problem in patients with diabetes mellitus. Bacteriuria is more common in diabetic women than in non-diabetics owing to a combination of host and local risk factors. Upper tract disease is also more common in this group. Read More

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March 1995
9 Reads

Renal and perirenal abscesses.

Infect Dis Clin North Am 1987 Dec;1(4):907-26

Department of Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.

Our knowledge of the spectrum of renal abscesses has increased as a result of more sensitive radiologic techniques. The classification of intrarenal abscess now includes acute focal bacterial nephritis and acute multifocal bacterial nephritis, as well as the previously recognized renal cortical abscess, renal corticomedullary abscess, and xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis. In general, the clinical presentation of these entities does not differentiate them; various radiographic studies can distinguish them, however. Read More

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December 1987
7 Reads

Renal allografts: evaluation by MR imaging.

Radiology 1986 May;159(2):435-41

The value of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in assessing renal transplants was prospectively studied in 45 patients with 46 allografts. Four allografts were imaged at two different times, and separate diagnoses were given for both examinations. Therefore, this study was based on 50 proved diagnoses: nine normally functioning allografts, four allografts with acute tubular necrosis (ATN), 29 with acute rejection, one with chronic rejection, five with cyclosporin nephrotoxicity, and two with local inflammation secondary to adjacent abscess. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1148/radiology.159.2.3515420DOI Listing
May 1986
5 Reads

Perinephric and intranephric abscesses: a review of the literature.

West J Med 1982 Feb;136(2):95-102

Perinephric and intranephric (renal cortical and corticomedullary) abscesses, which may coexist, are associated with considerable mortality (21 percent to 56 percent) and are often difficult to diagnose. Most cases of renal cortical abscess are due to hematogenous seeding from distant foci of infection (often involving Staphylococcus aureus), while corticomedullary and perinephric abscesses are most often due to complications of urinary tract infections. Newer noninvasive studies such as ultrasonography, computerized tomography, gallium scanning and indium-labeled leukocyte scanning may facilitate determination of the diagnosis. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1273539PMC
February 1982
3 Reads

Renal abscesses: classification and review of 40 cases.

Urology 1980 Oct;16(4):333-8

Renal abscesses are misdiagnosed often and, consequently, mistreated or treated too late. Forty cases of renal abscesses divided into anatomic categories--perinephric, renal cortical, and corticomedullary--are reviewed. Various conditions seem to predispose to renal abscesses: urinary tract infections, vesicoureteral reflux, calculi, or other medical problems. Read More

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October 1980
7 Reads
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