5,424 results match your criteria Q Fever


A possible link between recurrent upper respiratory tract infections and lower cytokine production in patients with Q fever fatigue syndrome.

Eur J Immunol 2019 Apr 18. Epub 2019 Apr 18.

Radboud Expertise Center for Q fever, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Radboud university medical center, P.O. Box 9101, 6500, HB, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.

Besides fatigue, many Q fever fatigue syndrome (QFS) patients also complain of frequently recurring upper respiratory tract infections with severe symptoms. We investigated whether immunologic dysregulation contributes to these complaints. Cytokine and chemokine production was measured after stimulating monocytes of QFS patients and sex-matched healthy controls with LPS and several viral ligands. Read More

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https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/eji.20184801
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eji.201848012DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

The prevalence of spp. in different natural surface water samples collected from northwest of Iran.

Iran J Microbiol 2019 Feb;11(1):19-24

National Reference Laboratory for Plague, Tularemia and Q Fever, Research Centre for Emerging and Reemerging Infectious Diseases, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Akanlu, Kabudar Ahang, Hamadan, Iran.

Background And Objectives: has a wide distribution in northern hemisphere of the world. Up to now, there was little information about the spp. situation in the environmental samples in Iran. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6462269PMC
February 2019
1 Read

Systematic Review of Important Bacterial Zoonoses in Africa in the Last Decade in Light of the 'One Health' Concept.

Pathogens 2019 Apr 16;8(2). Epub 2019 Apr 16.

Infectious Diseases and Anti-Infective Therapy Research Group, Sharjah Medical Research Institute and College of Pharmacy, University of Sharjah, Sharjah 27272, UAE.

Zoonoses present a major public health threat and are estimated to account for a substantial part of the infectious disease burden in low-income countries. The severity of zoonotic diseases is compounded by factors such as poverty, living in close contact with livestock and wildlife, immunosuppression as well as coinfection with other diseases. The interconnections between humans, animals and the environment are essential to understand the spread and subsequent containment of zoonoses. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/pathogens8020050DOI Listing
April 2019
3 Reads

Mast Cell Cytonemes as a Defense Mechanism against Coxiella burnetii.

MBio 2019 Apr 16;10(2). Epub 2019 Apr 16.

Aix-Marseille Université, IRD, APHM, MEPHI, IHU-Méditerranée Infection, Marseille, France

Mast cells (MCs) are critical mediators of inflammation; however, their microbicidal activity against invading pathogens remains largely unknown. Here, we describe a nonpreviously reported antibacterial mechanism used by MCs against , the agent of Q fever. We show that interaction with MCs does not result in bacterial uptake but rather induces the formation of extracellular actin filaments named cytonemes. Read More

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http://mbio.asm.org/lookup/doi/10.1128/mBio.02669-18
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mBio.02669-18DOI Listing
April 2019
4 Reads

[Zoonoses related to leisure activities].

Authors:
Nadia Haddad

Rev Prat 2019 Mar;69(3):336-340

UMR BIPAR, Ecole nationale vétérinaire d'Alfort, Anses, INRA, université Paris-Est, Maisons- Alfort, France.

Zoonoses related to leisure activities. Many zoonoses can be contracted by humans during recreational activities. In the context of a walk, some of them, such as Lyme disease, are transmissible by biological vectors, particularly ticks, or by aerosol (Q fever, hantavirose), whereas others can be contracted in case of aquatic activities (leptospirosis), hunting (tularaemia), and visits to pet farms or fairs (especially the hemolytic uremic syndrome). Read More

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March 2019
3 Reads

Development of an indirect ELISA based on whole cell Brucella abortus S99 lysates for detection of IgM anti-Brucella antibodies in human serum.

Comp Immunol Microbiol Infect Dis 2019 Apr 19;63:87-93. Epub 2019 Jan 19.

Department of Molecular Biology, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Pasteur Ave., Tehran, 13164, Iran. Electronic address:

Background: Brucellosis is the most common zoonotic diseases worldwide. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate the diagnostic performance of an indirect-ELISA (I-ELISA) method based on whole cell Brucella abortus S99 lysates for detection of IgM anti-Brucella antibodies in a human serum.

Materials And Methods: The study was conducted in two species-rich endemic areas of Iran (Tehran and Lorestan provinces). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cimid.2019.01.007DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read
2.015 Impact Factor

High prevalence and risk factors of Coxiella burnetii in milk of dairy animals with a history of abortion in Iran.

Comp Immunol Microbiol Infect Dis 2019 Apr 2;63:127-130. Epub 2019 Feb 2.

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatics, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran, Iran; National Reference Laboratory of Plague, Tularemia and Q Fever, Research Centre for Emerging and Reemerging Infectious Diseases, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Akanlu, Kabudar-Ahang, Hamadan, Iran.

Coxiella burnetii is causative agent of Q fever, which is a public health problem in most countries. The aim of this study was to study the prevalence rate of C. burnetii in raw milk of dairy animals in Iran with previous history of abortion. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S01479571193002
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cimid.2019.01.015DOI Listing
April 2019
5 Reads

Chemokine Receptor 7 is Essential for Coxiella burnetii Whole-Cell Vaccine Induced Cellular Immunity but Dispensable for Vaccine Mediated Protective Immunity.

J Infect Dis 2019 Apr 2. Epub 2019 Apr 2.

Department of Microbial Pathogenesis and Immunology, Texas A&M Health Science Center, College of Medicine, Bryan, TX.

Background: Protective immunity against Coxiella burnetii infection is conferred by vaccination with virulent (PI-WCV), but not avirulent (PII-WCV) whole-cell inactivated bacterium. The only well characterized antigenic difference between virulent and avirulent C. burnetii is they have smooth and rough LPS respectively. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jiz146DOI Listing

Prevalence of Coxiella burnetii in cattle and buffalo populations in Punjab, India.

Prev Vet Med 2019 May 7;166:16-20. Epub 2019 Mar 7.

Sydney School of Veterinary Science, The University of Sydney, Camden, NSW, Australia.

Q fever is an important zoonosis of animal and public health significance but there is very limited information about its prevalence in the Punjab state of India. The current study was designed to estimate Q fever prevalence in cattle and buffalo populations of the state. We randomly selected 22 villages, one from each of the 22 districts of Punjab. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S01675877183070
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2019.03.003DOI Listing
May 2019
1 Read

Limitation of TCA Cycle Intermediates Represents an Oxygen-Independent Nutritional Antibacterial Effector Mechanism of Macrophages.

Cell Rep 2019 Mar;26(13):3502-3510.e6

Mikrobiologisches Institut, Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität (FAU) Erlangen-Nürnberg, 91054 Erlangen, Germany. Electronic address:

In hypoxic and inflamed tissues, oxygen (O)-dependent antimicrobial defenses are impaired due to a shortage of O. To gain insight into the mechanisms that control bacterial infection under hypoxic conditions, we infected macrophages with the obligate intracellular pathogen Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever. Our experiments revealed that hypoxia impeded C. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2019.02.103DOI Listing

Case Report: Scrub Typhus and Q Fever Coinfection.

Am J Trop Med Hyg 2019 Mar 25. Epub 2019 Mar 25.

Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Chosun University, Gwangju, South Korea.

A 56-year-old female goat herder had scrub typhus that persisted after receiving doxycycline for 5 days. Her symptoms continued, prompting us to perform further examinations that revealed coinfection of Q fever and scrub typhus via molecular and serological testing. We also isolated using BALB/c mice and L929 cells. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.18-0092DOI Listing
March 2019
4 Reads

Chronic Q Fever with Vascular Involvement: Progressive Abdominal Pain in a Patient with Aortic Aneurysm Repair in the United States.

Case Rep Infect Dis 2019 19;2019:5369707. Epub 2019 Feb 19.

Rickettsial Zoonoses Branch, Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.

Q fever is a zoonotic bacterial infection caused by . Chronic Q fever comprises less than five percent of all Q fever cases and, of those, endocarditis is the most common presentation (up to 78% of cases), followed by vascular involvement. Risk factors for chronic Q fever with vascular involvement include previous vascular surgery, preexisting valvular defects, aneurysms, and vascular prostheses. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2019/5369707DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6399537PMC
February 2019

Response to: Q fever mortality in the Netherlands, why so high?

Clin Microbiol Infect 2019 Mar 23. Epub 2019 Mar 23.

University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1198743X193010
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cmi.2019.03.004DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Coxiella seroprevalence and risk factors in large ruminants in Bihar and Assam, India.

Acta Trop 2019 Mar 19;194:41-46. Epub 2019 Mar 19.

International Livestock Research Institute, Southeast Asia Regional Office, 298 Kim Ma, 100000 Hanoi, Viet Nam; Zoonosis Science Centre, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Clinical Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden. Electronic address:

Coxiellosis is a zoonotic disease caused by the ubiquitous bacteria Coxiella burnetii, which can be spread either through ticks or through body fluids. In humans the infection is characterized by a febrile disease; ruminants may abort and reduce their milk yield, causing serious production losses for the farmer. In India, the disease has been known to be present since the 1970s, but little is known about the epidemiology in most states. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.actatropica.2019.03.022DOI Listing
March 2019
2.270 Impact Factor

The sexual dimorphism of anticardiolipin autoantibodies in acute Q fever patients.

Clin Microbiol Infect 2019 Mar 18. Epub 2019 Mar 18.

Aix-Marseille Univ, IRD, APHM, MEPHI, IHU-Méditerranée Infection, Marseille, France; Laboratoire d'immunologie, Hôpital de la Conception, Marseille, France.

Objectives: Q fever is a zoonotic disease caused by C. burnetii which affects men more than women (sex ratio men/women: 2.2). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cmi.2019.02.030DOI Listing

Disease in the dust: experiences of Q fever during drought in Australia.

Authors:
Juliet Archibald

Perspect Public Health 2019 03;139(2):77-78

Medical student, University of Newcastle, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1757913918823423DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Epidemiological, clinical and laboratory characteristics of acute Q fever in an endemic area in Israel, 2006-2016.

Epidemiol Infect 2019 Jan;147:e131

Infectious Diseases Unit,Meir Medical Center,Kfar Saba,Israel.

Our purpose was to describe the clinical, epidemiological and laboratory characteristics of patients hospitalised with acute Q fever in an endemic area of Israel. We conducted a historical cohort study of all patients hospitalised with a definite diagnosis of acute Q fever, and compared them to patients suspected to have acute Q fever, but diagnosis was ruled out. A total of 38 patients had a definitive diagnosis, 47% occurred during the autumn and winter seasons, only 18% lived in rural regions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0950268818003576DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

Seroprevalence of Q fever in cattle, sheep and goats in the Volta region of Ghana.

Vet Med Sci 2019 Mar 11. Epub 2019 Mar 11.

Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research, University of Ghana, Legon, Ghana.

Q fever is a zoonotic disease caused by Coxiella burnetii, a causative agent of abortion in livestock and febrile illness in humans. Outbreaks of human cases of Q fever have been reported in Australia and the Netherlands, which was linked to abortions in goat and sheep farms. In Ghana, information on Q fever in both livestock and humans is scanty. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/vms3.160DOI Listing

Risk factors for bacterial zoonotic pathogens in acutely febrile patients in Mpumalanga Province, South Africa.

Zoonoses Public Health 2019 Mar 11. Epub 2019 Mar 11.

Division of Public Health Surveillance and Response, Division of the National Health Laboratory Service, National Institute for Communicable Diseases, Johannesburg, South Africa.

Endemic zoonoses, such as Q fever and spotted fever group (SFG) rickettsiosis, are prevalent in South Africa, yet often undiagnosed. In this study, we reviewed the demographics and animal exposure history of patients presenting with acute febrile illness to community health clinics in Mpumalanga Province to identify trends and risk factors associated with exposure to Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever, and infection by SFG Rickettsia spp. Clinical and serological data and questionnaires elucidating exposure to animals and their products were obtained from 141 acutely febrile patients between 2012 and 2016. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/zph.12577DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

EpiNATO-2: Enhancing Situational Awareness and Overall Force Health Protection While Deployed in the Combined Joint NATO Environment: Describing the Identified 2016 Q Fever Outbreak in Kosovo Force (KFOR).

J Spec Oper Med Spring 2019;19(1):76-80

EpiNATO-2 is the only interoperable health surveillance system that is defined in North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) doctrine. It was first implemented in the Kosovo Force and European Union Training Mission Mali in 2013. EpiNATO-2 is mandated for use during all NATO operations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/DOI Listing

Fever of unknown origin and Q-fever: a case series in a Bulgarian hospital.

Caspian J Intern Med 2019 ;10(1):102-106

Department of Infectious Diseases, Military Medical Academy, Sofia, Bulgaria.

Background: Fever of unknown origin (FUO) is a perplexing medical problem. The causes for FUO are more than 200 diseases. The aim of the study was to present human clinical cases of infection debuting as FUO. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.22088/cjim.10.1.102DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6386320PMC
January 2019
3 Reads

Seroprevalence of Q fever among metropolitan and non-metropolitan blood donors in New South Wales and Queensland, 2014-2015.

Med J Aust 2019 Apr 8;210(7):309-315. Epub 2019 Mar 8.

National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance of Vaccine Preventable Diseases, Sydney, NSW.

Objectives: To estimate the prevalence of exposure to the causative agent of Q fever (Coxiella burnetii) and of current infections among blood donors in Australia.

Design, Setting: Cross-sectional study in metropolitan Sydney and Brisbane, and in non-metropolitan regions with high Q fever notification rates (Hunter New England in New South Wales; Toowoomba in Queensland).

Participants: Blood donors attending Red Cross collection centres during October 2014 - June 2015 who provided sera and completed a questionnaire on Q fever vaccination status, diagnosis and knowledge, and exposure history. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.5694/mja2.13004
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5694/mja2.13004DOI Listing
April 2019
8 Reads

First molecular and serological evidence of Coxiella burnetti infection among sheep and goats of Jammu province of India.

Microb Pathog 2019 May 5;130:100-103. Epub 2019 Mar 5.

Division of Biotechnology, Defence Research and Development Establishment, Gwalior, Madhya Pradesh, India.

The epidemiology and prevalence of Q fever in India is largely unknown. There are very few serologic and molecular reports of Q fever in India and these are old reports. The objective of this study was to investigate, for the first time, the presence of Coxiella burnetii infection in sheep and goat flocks of Jammu province of Jammu and Kashmir, India. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.micpath.2019.02.034DOI Listing
May 2019
2 Reads

Molecular Detection of Coxiella burnetii in Cattle on Ulleung Island, Korea: A Population-based Study with Four Years of Follow Up.

Korean J Parasitol 2019 Feb 26;57(1):69-73. Epub 2019 Feb 26.

College of Veterinary Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 41566, Korea.

In a population-based study with 4 years of follow up, we evaluated the prevalence of Coxiella burnetii in cattle on Ulleung Island, Korea. In this study, the rates of C. burnetii infection in cattle on Ulleung Island were determined by PCR and were found to be 0. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3347/kjp.2019.57.1.69DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6409217PMC
February 2019
5 Reads

Characterizing Early Stages of Human Alveolar Infection by the Q Fever Agent, .

Infect Immun 2019 Mar 4. Epub 2019 Mar 4.

Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205

Human Q fever is caused by the intracellular bacterial pathogen Q fever presents with acute flu-like and pulmonary symptoms or can progress to chronic, severe endocarditis. After human inhalation, is engulfed by alveolar macrophages and transits through the phagolysosomal maturation pathway, resisting lysosomal acidic pH to form a parasitophorous vacuole (PV) in which to replicate. Previous studies showed that replicates efficiently in primary human alveolar macrophages (hAMs) in human lung tissue. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/IAI.00028-19DOI Listing
March 2019
5 Reads

Current perspectives on the transmission of Q fever: Highlighting the need for a systematic molecular approach for a neglected disease in Africa.

Acta Trop 2019 May 1;193:99-105. Epub 2019 Mar 1.

School of Applied Sciences, Edinburgh Napier University, Sighthill Court, Edinburgh, EH11 4BN, UK. Electronic address:

Q fever is a bacterial worldwide zoonosis (except New Zealand) caused by the Gram-negative obligate intracellular bacterium Coxiella burnetii (C. burnetii). The bacterium has a large host range including arthropods, wildlife and companion animals and is frequently identified in human and livestock populations. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0001706X193008
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.actatropica.2019.02.032DOI Listing
May 2019
5 Reads

Promiscuous CD4 Epitope Clusters Associated With Human Recall Responses Are Candidates for a Novel T-Cell Targeted Multi-Epitope Q Fever Vaccine.

Front Immunol 2019 15;10:207. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Vaccine and Immunotherapy Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, United States.

, the causative agent of Q fever, is a Gram-negative intracellular bacterium transmitted via aerosol. Regulatory approval of the Australian whole-cell vaccine Q-VAX® in the US and Europe is hindered by reactogenicity in previously exposed individuals. The aim of this study was to identify and rationally select epitopes for design of a safe, effective, and less reactogenic T-cell targeted human Q fever vaccine. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2019.00207DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6384241PMC
February 2019
2 Reads

Re: chronic Q-fever-related complications and mortality: data from a nationwide cohort.

Clin Microbiol Infect 2019 Feb 27. Epub 2019 Feb 27.

Aix-Marseille University, IRD, APHM, MEPHI, Marseille, France; IHU-Méditerranée Infection, Marseille, France. Electronic address:

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1198743X193008
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cmi.2019.02.021DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Is a One Health Approach Utilized for Q Fever Control? A Comprehensive Literature Review.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2019 Feb 28;16(5). Epub 2019 Feb 28.

School of Public Health, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5005, Australia.

Q fever, a zoonotic disease transmitted from animals to humans, is a significant public health problem with a potential for outbreaks to occur. Q fever prevention strategies should incorporate human, animal, and environmental domains. A One Health approach, which engages cross-sectoral collaboration among multiple stakeholders, may be an appropriate framework and has the underlying principles to control Q fever holistically. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16050730DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6427780PMC
February 2019
4 Reads

Analytics for Investigation of Disease Outbreaks: Web-Based Analytics Facilitating Situational Awareness in Unfolding Disease Outbreaks.

JMIR Public Health Surveill 2019 Feb 25;5(1):e12032. Epub 2019 Feb 25.

Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, United States.

Background: Information from historical infectious disease outbreaks provides real-world data about outbreaks and their impacts on affected populations. These data can be used to develop a picture of an unfolding outbreak in its early stages, when incoming information is sparse and isolated, to identify effective control measures and guide their implementation.

Objective: This study aimed to develop a publicly accessible Web-based visual analytic called Analytics for the Investigation of Disease Outbreaks (AIDO) that uses historical disease outbreak information for decision support and situational awareness of an unfolding outbreak. Read More

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http://publichealth.jmir.org/2019/1/e12032/
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2196/12032DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6409513PMC
February 2019
3 Reads

MyD88 Is Required for Efficient Control of Infection and Dissemination.

Front Immunol 2019 8;10:165. Epub 2019 Feb 8.

Institute of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology and Hygiene, Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany.

The intracellular pathogen causes Q fever, a usually self-limiting respiratory infection that becomes chronic and severe in some patients. Innate immune recognition of and its role in the decision between resolution and chronicity is not understood well. However, TLR2 is important for the response to in mice, and genetic polymorphisms in have been associated with chronic Q fever in humans. Read More

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https://www.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fimmu.2019.00165
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2019.00165DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6376249PMC
February 2019
4 Reads

The sero-epidemiology of Coxiella burnetii (Q fever) across livestock species and herding contexts in Laikipia County, Kenya.

Zoonoses Public Health 2019 05 20;66(3):316-324. Epub 2019 Feb 20.

Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Query fever (Q fever), is among the most highly infectious zoonotic pathogens transmitted among livestock, with chronic effects challenging to veterinary and medical detection and care systems. Transmission among domestic livestock species can vary regionally due to herd management practices that determine which livestock species are raised, whether or not livestock are in contact with wildlife, and the susceptibility of these livestock to infection. To explore how different livestock management practices are associated with the risk of infection in multispecies environments, we carried out a comparative study of three types of herd management systems in the central Kenyan county of Laikipia: agro-commercial, mixed conservancy/commercial, and smallholder ranches. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/zph.12567DOI Listing
May 2019
1 Read

Acute Q fever endocarditis: a paradigm shift following the systematic use of transthoracic echocardiography during acute Q fever.

Clin Infect Dis 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Aix-Marseille Univ, IRD, APHM, MEPHI, IHU-Méditerranée Infection, Marseille, France.

Aims: As Q fever, caused by Coxiella burnetii, is a major health challenge due to its cardiovascular complications, we aim to detect acute Q fever valvular injury to improve therapeutic management.

Methods And Results: In the French national reference center for Q fever, we prospectively collected data from patients with acute Q fever and valvular injury. We identified a new clinical entity, acute Q fever endocarditis, defined as valvular lesion potentially caused by C. Read More

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https://academic.oup.com/cid/advance-article/doi/10.1093/cid
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciz120DOI Listing
February 2019
6 Reads

Comparative virulence of diverse Coxiella burnetii strains.

Virulence 2019 12;10(1):133-150

a Coxiella Pathogenesis Section, Laboratory of Bacteriology, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases , National Institutes of Health , Hamilton , MT , USA.

Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular, gram-negative bacterium that causes the zoonosis Q fever. This disease typically presents as an acute flu-like illness with persistent, focalized infections occurring less frequently. Clinical outcomes of Q fever have been associated with distinct genomic groups of C. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/21505594.2019.1575715DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6389282PMC
December 2019
2 Reads

Seroprevalence of Q fever among high-risk occupations in the Ilam province, the west of Iran.

PLoS One 2019 19;14(2):e0211781. Epub 2019 Feb 19.

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Research Centre for Emerging and Reemerging infectious diseases, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran, Iran.

Background: Q fever is a zoonotic disease of great public health importance in Iran. This disease is presented with high phase I antibody development in chronic and high phase II antibody in the acute form of illness. This study was conducted to evaluate the seroprevalence of Q fever among high-risk occupations in the Ilam province in Western Iran. Read More

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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0211781PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6380538PMC
February 2019
8 Reads
3.234 Impact Factor

Q fever: more common than we think, and what this means for prevention.

Med J Aust 2019 Apr 18;210(7):305-306. Epub 2019 Feb 18.

Sullivan & Nicolaides Pathology, Brisbane, QLD.

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https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.5694/mja2.50024
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5694/mja2.50024DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

Acute Q-fever infection in a dairy products maker without direct animal contact.

Intern Med J 2019 Feb;49(2):272-273

Department of Infectious Diseases, Northern Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14197DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Molecular prevalence of Coxiella burnetii in milk in Iran: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Trop Anim Health Prod 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Rajaie Cardiovascular Medical and Research Center, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Q fever is a major zoonotic disease in the world. The aim of this meta-analysis was to estimate the prevalence of Coxiella burnetii in animal milk in Iran. We systematically reviewed the literature to identify eligible studies from January 2008 to June 2016 in English or Farsi (Persian) databases. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11250-019-01807-3DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads
0.817 Impact Factor

Human Tick-Borne Diseases in Australia.

Front Cell Infect Microbiol 2019 28;9. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Neuroinflammation Group, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

There are 17 human-biting ticks known in Australia. The bites of , and can cause paralysis, inflammation, and severe local and systemic reactions in humans, respectively. Six ticks, including , and may transmit , or subsp. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fcimb.2019.00003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6360175PMC
January 2019
7 Reads

RpoS Regulates Genes Involved in Morphological Differentiation and Intracellular Growth.

J Bacteriol 2019 Apr 26;201(8). Epub 2019 Mar 26.

Coxiella Pathogenesis Section, Laboratory of Bacteriology, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Hamilton, Montana, USA

, the etiological agent of Q fever, undergoes a unique biphasic developmental cycle where bacteria transition from a replicating (exponential-phase) large cell variant (LCV) form to a nonreplicating (stationary-phase) small cell variant (SCV) form. The alternative sigma factor RpoS is an essential regulator of stress responses and stationary-phase physiology in several bacterial species, including , which has a developmental cycle superficially similar to that of Here, we used a Δ mutant to define the role of RpoS in intracellular growth and SCV development. Growth yields following infection of Vero epithelial cells or THP-1 macrophage-like cells with the mutant in the SCV form, but not the LCV form, were significantly lower than that of wild-type bacteria. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.00009-19DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6436347PMC
April 2019
5 Reads

Genetic evidence of Coxiella burnetii infection in acute febrile illnesses in Iran.

PLoS Negl Trop Dis 2019 02 11;13(2):e0007181. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Rajaie Cardiovascular Medical and Research Center, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Mounting evidence suggests that Q-fever is more prevalent in Iran than originally believed. However, in most parts of the country, clinicians do not pay enough attention to Q fever in their differential diagnosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Coxiella burnetii in suspected cases of acute Q fever in north-western Iran using molecular techniques. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0007181DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6386404PMC
February 2019
4 Reads

Early Cytokine Response After Vaccination with Phase I in an Infected Herd of Dairy Cattle.

J Vet Res 2018 Dec 31;62(4):469-476. Epub 2018 Dec 31.

Department of Microbiology and Clinical Immunology, cracow, Poland.

Introduction: (.) , the aetiological agent of Q fever, is able to modulate the macrophage/T-lymphocyte axis in an infected organism and impair synthesis of monokines and lymphokines.

Material And Methods: The purpose of this research was to determine the levels of the cytokines that play a key role in the response to antigens (IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-10, IFN-γ and TNF-α) in the serum of animals originating from an infected herd prior to vaccination (day 0) and at 1, 7, and 21 days afterwards. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2478/jvetres-2018-0076DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6364170PMC
December 2018
1 Read

Noncanonical Inhibition of mTORC1 by Coxiella burnetii Promotes Replication within a Phagolysosome-Like Vacuole.

MBio 2019 02 5;10(1). Epub 2019 Feb 5.

Coxiella Pathogenesis Section, Laboratory of Bacteriology, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Hamilton, Montana, USA

The Q fever agent is a Gram-negative bacterium that invades macrophages and replicates inside a specialized lysosomal vacuole. The pathogen employs a type 4B secretion system (T4BSS) to deliver effector proteins into the host cell that modify the containing vacuole (CCV) into a replication-permissive niche. Mature CCVs are massive degradative organelles that acquire lysosomal proteins. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mBio.02816-18DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6428759PMC
February 2019
10 Reads

Brucellosis in an adult female from Fate Bell Rock Shelter, Lower Pecos, Texas (4000-1300 BP).

Authors:
Christine Jones

Int J Paleopathol 2019 Mar 31;24:252-264. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

Texas A&M University-Central Texas, 1001 Leadership Place, Killeen, TX, 76549, United States. Electronic address:

Objective: This project is a case study discussing the differential diagnosis of multiple osteolytic vertebral lesions typical of brucellosis from an adult female from Fate Bell Rock Shelter in the Lower Pecos, Texas (4000-1300 BP).

Materials: One middle to late adult female with exceptional preservation of the vertebrae.

Methods: All skeletal remains were observed with low power magnification and the vertebrae were examined in greater detail using computed tomography (CT). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpp.2019.01.005DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Swab cloths as a tool for revealing environmental contamination by Q fever in ruminant farms.

Transbound Emerg Dis 2019 Jan 31. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

EPIA, UMR 0346, Epidémiologie des maladies animales et zoonotiques, VetAgro Sup, INRA, Saint Genès Champanelle, France.

Q fever is a zoonotic abortive disease of ruminants mostly transmitted by inhalation of aerosols contaminated by Coxiella burnetii. Clusters of cases or even epidemics regularly occur in humans but, to date, there is no consensus about the best way to carry out outbreak investigations in order to identify potential farms at risk. Although environmental samples might be useful during such investigations, there are few baseline data on the presence of C. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tbed.13137DOI Listing
January 2019

Repellency effect of flumethrin pour-on formulation against vectors of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever.

East Mediterr Health J 2019 Jan 23;24(11):1082-1087. Epub 2019 Jan 23.

Department of Medical Entomology and Vector Control, School of Public Health and National Institute of Health Research, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran.

Background: Ticks are able to transmit important diseases to humans, including Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Q fever, Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever, summer Russian encephalitis, and relapsing fever.

Aims: To determine the repellency effect of 1% flumethrin pour-on formulation against hard ticks.

Methods: The concentration of flumethrin pour-on formulation was 1 mg/10 kg body weight and was administered on the dorsal midline from the head to the base of the tail. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.26719/emhj.18.004DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

A Short Report on the Lack of a Pyrogenic Response of Australian Genomic Group IV Isolates of in Guinea Pigs.

Trop Med Infect Dis 2019 Jan 25;4(1). Epub 2019 Jan 25.

Australian Rickettsial Reference Laboratory, University Hospital Geelong, Geelong, Victoria 3220, Australia.

This small study reports on a non-pyrogenic response of five different Australian isolates of (. They were all members of Genomic Group IV and obtained from three cases of acute human infection, one case of chronic human infection and one case of goat abortion. The guinea pigs infected with these isolates did not develop fever (temperature ≥40. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed4010018DOI Listing
January 2019

Cytokine profiles in patients with Q fever fatigue syndrome.

J Infect 2019 Jan 23. Epub 2019 Jan 23.

Radboud Expertise Center for Q Fever, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Radboud University Medical Center, P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB, Nijmegen, the Netherlands; Department of Internal Medicine, Radboud University Medical Center, P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB, Nijmegen, the Netherlands; Radboud Center for Infectious Diseases, Radboud University Medical Center, P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB, Nijmegen, the Netherlands. Electronic address:

Background: Q fever fatigue syndrome (QFS) is a state of prolonged fatigue following around 20% of acute Q fever cases. It is thought that chronic inflammation plays a role in its etiology. To test this hypothesis we measured circulating cytokines and the ex-vivo cytokine production in patients with QFS and compared with various control groups. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jinf.2019.01.006DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

A review on the seroprevalence of Coxiella burnetii in farm ruminants in various countries.

Vet Ital 2018 Dec 31;54(4):1113. Epub 2018 Dec 31.

Laboratory of Hygiene of Foods of Animal Origin, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Thessaly.

Q fever is a zoonosis caused by Coxiella burnetii, an obligate intracellular gram‑negative bacterium. Infection by C. burnetii has been demonstrated in many animal species, but ruminants are the major reservoirs and the main sources of human infection. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12834/VetIt.1113.6046.3DOI Listing
December 2018
3 Reads

The International Collaborative on Fatigue Following Infection (COFFI).

Fatigue 2018 19;6(2):106-121. Epub 2018 Jan 19.

Kirby Institute, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Background: The purpose of the Collaborative on Fatigue Following Infection (COFFI) is for investigators of post-infection fatigue (PIF) and other syndromes to collaborate on these enigmatic and poorly understood conditions by studying relatively homogeneous populations with known infectious triggers. Utilizing COFFI, pooled data and stored biosamples will support both epidemiological and laboratory research to better understand the etiology and risk factors for development and progression of PIF.

Methods: COFFI consists of prospective cohorts from the UK, Netherlands, Norway, USA, New Zealand and Australia, with some cohorts closed and some open to recruitment. Read More

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https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/21641846.2018.1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/21641846.2018.1426086DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6333416PMC
January 2018
14 Reads