5,261 results match your criteria Q Fever


Use of Axenic Culture Tools to Study Coxiella burnetii.

Curr Protoc Microbiol 2018 May 18:e52. Epub 2018 May 18.

Paul G. Allen School for Global Animal Health, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington.

Coxiella burnetii is a highly infectious obligate intracellular bacterium and the etiological agent of the zoonosis Query (Q) fever. This Gram-negative gamma-proteobacterium has adapted to replicate within a specialized compartment in mammalian phagocytic cells, known as the Coxiella-containing vacuole (CCV). Knowledge of critical characteristics of the CCV microenvironment (e. Read More

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May 2018
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Characterization of strains from ruminants in a host-based model.

New Microbes New Infect 2018 Jul 2;24:8-13. Epub 2018 Mar 2.

French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health Safety (ANSES), Sophia Antipolis Laboratory, Animal Q Fever Unit, Sophia Antipolis, France.

is a small Gram-negative intracellular bacterium and is the causative agent of Q fever, which is a zoonotic disease with a worldwide distribution. Domesticated ruminants are the main reservoir of the disease, but the bacterium is able to infect a wide range of hosts, including humans, arthropods and invertebrates. Virulence studies of strains usually require a suitable animal model. Read More

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Zoonoses under our noses.

Microbes Infect 2018 Jun 15. Epub 2018 Jun 15.

Living Systems Institute, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter EX4 4QD Exeter United Kingdom.

One Health is an effective approach for the management of zoonotic disease in humans, animals and environments. Examples of the management of bacterial zoonoses in Europe and across the globe demonstrate that One Health approaches of international surveillance, information-sharing and appropriate intervention methods are required to successfully prevent and control disease outbreaks in both endemic and non-endemic regions. Additionally, a One Health approach enables effective preparation and response to bioterrorism threats. Read More

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zDALY: An adjusted indicator to estimate the burden of zoonotic diseases.

One Health 2018 Jun 28;5:40-45. Epub 2017 Nov 28.

Institute of Health and Society (IRSS), Université catholique de Louvain, Clos Chapelle aux champs, 30, 1200 Bruxelles, Belgium.

The burden of human diseases in populations, or for an individual, is frequently estimated in terms of one of a number of Health Adjusted Life Years (HALYs). The Disability Adjusted Life Year (DALY) is a widely accepted HALY metric and is used by the World Health Organization and the Global Burden of Disease studies. Many human diseases are of animal origin and often cause ill health and production losses in domestic animals. Read More

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Autoimmunity and B-cell dyscrasia in acute and chronic Q fever: A review of the literature.

Eur J Intern Med 2018 Jun 13. Epub 2018 Jun 13.

Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Radboud university medical center, P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB, Nijmegen, The Netherlands; Radboud Expert Center for Q fever, Radboud university medical center, P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Electronic address:

Q fever infection can lead to chronic Q fever, a potentially lethal disease occurring in 1-5% of patients infected with Coxiella burnetii, characterized by the persistence of this intracellular bacterium. It usually presents as endocarditis, infected vascular aneurysms, or infected vascular prostheses. This systematic review of the literature discusses the various autoimmune syndromes and B-cell dyscrasias in acute and chronic Q fever patients, that may interfere with or impede recognition and diagnosis of Q fever. Read More

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FISH and PNA FISH for the diagnosis of Q fever endocarditis and vascular infections.

J Clin Microbiol 2018 Jun 13. Epub 2018 Jun 13.

Aix Marseille Université, IRD, AP-HM, MEPHI, IHU-Méditerranée Infection, 19-21 Boulevard Jean Moulin, 13005 Marseille, France

Endocarditis and vascular infections are common manifestations of persistent localized infection due to and recently, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was proposed as an alternative tool for their diagnosis. In this study, we evaluated the efficiency of FISH in a series of valve and vascular samples infected by We tested 23 -positive valves and thrombus samples obtained from patients with Q fever endocarditis. Seven aneurysms and thrombus specimens were retrieved from patients with Q fever vascular infection. Read More

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June 2018
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Arthropod Borne and Zoonotic Infections Among Military Personnel in Georgia.

J Spec Oper Med 2018 ;18(2):136-140

Military personnel are at an increased risk for exposure to arthropod- borne and zoonotic pathogens. The prevalence of these pathogens has not been adequately described in the country of Georgia. As the Georgian military moves toward an increased level of capability and the adoption of European Union and North Atlantic Treaty Organization standards, international field exercises will become more frequent and will likely involve an increasing number of international partners. Read More

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January 2018

Q fever spondylitis: 2 cases report.

Med Clin (Barc) 2018 Jun 7. Epub 2018 Jun 7.

Departamento d Enfermedades Infecciosas, Corporació Hospital Parc Taulí de Sabadell, Sabadell, Barcelona, España.

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Review of 20 years of human acute Q fever notifications in Victoria, 1994-2013.

Aust Vet J 2018 Jun;96(6):223-230

Asia-Pacific Centre for Animal Health, Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Melbourne, VIC, Australia.

Objective: To describe the epidemiological and clinical features of acute Q fever in Victoria from 1994 to 2013.

Design: Retrospective case series and spatiotemporal analyses of human notification data.

Methods: Records for all confirmed cases of Q fever in Victoria notified between 1994 and 2013 were reviewed. Read More

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Willingness of veterinarians in Australia to recommend Q fever vaccination in veterinary personnel: Implications for workplace health and safety compliance.

PLoS One 2018 1;13(6):e0198421. Epub 2018 Jun 1.

Sydney School of Veterinary Sciences, Faculty of Science, the University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW, Australia.

Q fever vaccine uptake among veterinary nurses in Australia is low, suggesting veterinarians are not recommending the vaccination to veterinary personnel. This study aimed to determine the willingness of veterinarians to recommend Q fever vaccination to veterinary personnel and to identify factors influencing Q fever vaccine uptake by veterinary nurses in Australia. An online cross sectional survey targeted veterinarians and veterinary nurses in Australia in 2014. Read More

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Vascular infection with outside-in vertebral destruction in chronic Q fever.

Lancet Infect Dis 2018 Jun;18(6):603

Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases and Radboud Expert Centre for Q Fever, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen 6500 HB, Netherlands.

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June 2018
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[Atypical pneumonia - important facts for the general practitioner].

MMW Fortschr Med 2018 May;160(10):41-44

Sektion Klinische Infektiologie, Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik IV, Campus Innenstadt, Klinikum der Universität, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, München, Deutschland.

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May 2018
3 Reads

Rapid and Visual Detection of Using Recombinase Polymerase Amplification Combined with Lateral Flow Strips.

Biomed Res Int 2018 12;2018:6417354. Epub 2018 Apr 12.

Huadong Research Institute for Medicine and Biotechniques, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, China.

, a global-distributed biological warfare agent, is the causative agent of Q fever. Correct diagnosis of Q fever is challenging and developing a fast, simple, and reliable detection method is necessary. In this study, recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) assay combined with lateral flow (LF) test was developed targeting 23S rRNA gene of Xinqiao strain. Read More

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April 2018
2 Reads

Familiarity of general practitioners with Q fever decreases hospitalisation risk.

Neth J Med 2018 May;76(4):184-189

National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, the Netherlands.

Introduction: Between 2007 and 2010, the Netherlands experienced large outbreaks of Q fever with over 4000 cases. There were unexplained geographical differences in hospitalisation rates of notified patients. We examined the extent of this geographic variation in Q fever hospitalisation and its potential association with general practitioner (GP) experience with Q fever. Read More

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Genetic diversity of Coxiella burnetii in domestic ruminants in central Italy.

BMC Vet Res 2018 May 29;14(1):171. Epub 2018 May 29.

Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale dell'Abruzzo e del Molise "G. Caporale", Campo Boario, 64100, Teramo, Italy.

Background: As the epidemiology of human Q Fever generally reflects the spread of Coxiella burnetii in ruminant livestock, molecular characterization of strains is essential to prevent human outbreaks. In this study we report the genetic diversity of C. burnetii in central Italy accomplished by MST and MLVA-6 on biological samples from 20 goat, sheep and cow farms. Read More

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May 2018
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Interferon-γ and CXCL10 responses related to complaints in patients with Q fever fatigue syndrome.

Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis 2018 Jul 26;37(7):1385-1391. Epub 2018 May 26.

Radboud Expertise Center for Q fever, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases 463, Radboud University Medical Center, P.O. Box 9101, 6500, HB, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Approximately 20% of patients with acute Q fever develop Q fever fatigue syndrome (QFS), a debilitating fatigue syndrome. This study further investigates the role of C. burnetii-specific IFNγ, but also IL-2, CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXLC11 production in QFS patients. Read More

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Outbreaks of abortions by Coxiella burnetii in small ruminant flocks and a longitudinal serological approach on archived bulk tank milk suggest Q fever emergence in Central Portugal.

Transbound Emerg Dis 2018 May 25. Epub 2018 May 25.

Agrarian Superior School, Polytechnic Institute of Viseu, Viseu, Portugal.

Q fever is a worldwide zoonotic infectious disease caused by Coxiella burnetii and sheep and goats are known to be the main reservoir for human infection. This study describes the epidemiological and laboratory findings of C. burnetii outbreaks affecting sheep and goat flocks and also provides the results of a prospective serosurvey in bulk tank milk samples to assess C. Read More

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Airborne geographical dispersal of Q fever from livestock holdings to human communities: a systematic review and critical appraisal of evidence.

BMC Infect Dis 2018 May 15;18(1):218. Epub 2018 May 15.

UQ Spatial Epidemiology Laboratory, School of Veterinary Science, The University of Queensland, Gatton, QLD, 4343, Australia.

Background: Q fever is a zoonotic disease caused by Coxiella burnetii. This bacterium survives harsh conditions and attaches to dust, suggesting environmental dispersal is a risk factor for outbreaks. Spatial epidemiology studies collating evidence on Q fever geographical contamination gradients are needed, as human cases without occupational exposure are increasing worldwide. Read More

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Current and Future Use of Chloroquine and Hydroxychloroquine in Infectious, Immune, Neoplastic, and Neurological Diseases: A Mini-Review.

Clin Drug Investig 2018 May 8. Epub 2018 May 8.

Department of Clinical Experimental Oncology, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, IFO, Via Elio Chianesi 53, 00144, Rome, Italy.

The process of finding new therapeutic indications for currently used drugs, defined as 'repurposing', is receiving growing attention. Chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine, with an original indication to prevent or cure malaria, have been successfully used to treat several infectious (HIV, Q fever, Whipple's disease, fungal infections), rheumatological (systemic lupus erythematosus, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren's syndrome), and other immunological diseases. Indeed, they have anti-inflammatory, immunomodulating, anti-infective, antithrombotic, and metabolic effects. Read More

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May 2018
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Comparison of genomes of strains using formal order analysis.

New Microbes New Infect 2018 May 27;23:86-92. Epub 2018 Feb 27.

OmSTU, Omsk, Russia.

The  strain NL3262 was isolated during the Q fever outbreak in the Netherlands in 2007-2010. Formal-order analysis (FOA) was used to study the similarity of the genome (chromosome and plasmid) of this strain with the genomes from other strains. Chromosomes from ten strains and eight plasmids were studied with FOA tools such as 'Map of genes' and 'Matrix of similarity. Read More

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European Society for Coxiellosis, Chlamydioses, Anaplasmoses and Rickettsioses - American Society for Rickettsiology joint meeting 2017.

Authors:
P-E Fournier

New Microbes New Infect 2018 May 13;23. Epub 2018 Feb 13.

French Reference Center for the Diagnosis and Study of Rickettsioses, Q Fever and Bartonelloses, VITROME, Institut Hospitalo-Universitaire Méditerranée-Infection, Marseille, France.

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Survey of rabies vaccination status of Queensland veterinarians and veterinary students.

Aust Vet J 2018 May;96(5):155-160

College of Public Health, Medical and Veterinary Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia.

Background: To determine the rabies vaccination status of Queensland veterinarians and veterinary students and their perception of zoonotic risk from Australian bat lyssavirus (ABLV).

Design: Cross-sectional questionnaire surveys.

Methods: Questionnaires were sent by post in 2011 to veterinary surgeons registered in Queensland, to final-year veterinary students at James Cook University via SurveyMonkey® in 2013 and to final-year veterinary students at James Cook University and University of Queensland via SurveyMonkey® in 2014. Read More

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Primary and secondary arterial fistulas during chronic Q fever.

J Vasc Surg 2018 Apr 20. Epub 2018 Apr 20.

Department of Medical Microbiology and Infection Control, Jeroen Bosch Hospital, 's-Hertogenbosch, The Netherlands.

Objective: After primary infection with Coxiella burnetii, patients may develop acute Q fever, which is a relatively mild disease. A small proportion of patients (1%-5%) develop chronic Q fever, which is accompanied by high mortality and can be manifested as infected arterial or aortic aneurysms or infected vascular prostheses. The disease can be complicated by arterial fistulas, which are often fatal if they are left untreated. Read More

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Rare case of otomastoiditis due to chronic infection.

BMJ Case Rep 2018 Apr 21;2018. Epub 2018 Apr 21.

Department of Internal Medicine, Centro Hospitalar e Universitário de Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal.

Q fever is a zoonotic disease caused by that usually presents with non-specific or benign constitutional symptoms. Diagnosis is often challenging and, after acute Q fever, 1%-5% of patients can develop chronic disease. We present an 80-year-old male patient who was admitted due to a 3 months history of fever, productive cough, myalgia, weight loss, headache and hearing loss. Read More

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April 2018
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Seroprevalence of brucellosis and Q fever (Coxiellosis) in cattle herds in Maigana and Birnin Gwari agro-ecological zone of Kaduna State, Nigeria.

Trop Anim Health Prod 2018 Apr 19. Epub 2018 Apr 19.

Department of Veterinary Microbiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Ilorin, Ilorin, Kwara State, Nigeria.

A cross sectional study was conducted to determine the seroprevalence and risk factors of brucellosis and Q fever in cattle in Maigana and Birnin Gwari agro-ecological zone of Kaduna State, Nigeria. This study aimed at determining the significance of Brucella spp. and Coxiella burnetti infections in cattle. Read More

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Rodent-borne diseases and their public health importance in Iran.

PLoS Negl Trop Dis 2018 04 19;12(4):e0006256. Epub 2018 Apr 19.

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Research Centre for Emerging and Reemerging Infectious Diseases, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran, Iran.

Background: Rodents are reservoirs and hosts for several zoonotic diseases such as plague, leptospirosis, and leishmaniasis. Rapid development of industry and agriculture, as well as climate change throughout the globe, has led to change or increase in occurrence of rodent-borne diseases. Considering the distribution of rodents throughout Iran, the aim of this review is to assess the risk of rodent-borne diseases in Iran. Read More

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April 2018
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Veterinary Students' Knowledge and Perceptions About Antimicrobial Stewardship and Biosecurity-A National Survey.

Antibiotics (Basel) 2018 Apr 18;7(2). Epub 2018 Apr 18.

Asia-Pacific Centre for Animal Health, Department of Veterinary Biosciences, Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, Melbourne Veterinary School, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3050, Australia.

A better understanding of veterinary students’ perceptions, attitudes, and knowledge about antimicrobial stewardship and biosecurity could facilitate more effective education of future veterinarians about these important issues. A multicenter cross-sectional study was performed by administering a questionnaire to veterinary students expected to graduate in 2017 or 2018 in all Australian veterinary schools. Four hundred and seventy-six of 1246 students (38%) completed the survey. Read More

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Prevalence of Selected Zoonotic Diseases and Risk Factors at a Human-Wildlife-Livestock Interface in Mpumalanga Province, South Africa.

Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis 2018 06 17;18(6):303-310. Epub 2018 Apr 17.

3 Centre for Emerging Zoonotic and Parasitic Diseases, National Institute for Communicable Diseases , Sandringham, South Africa .

A lack of surveillance and diagnostics for zoonotic diseases in rural human clinics limits clinical awareness of these diseases. We assessed the prevalence of nine zoonotic pathogens in a pastoral, low-income, HIV-endemic community bordering wildlife reserves in South Africa. Two groups of participants were included: malaria-negative acute febrile illness (AFI) patients, called febrilers, at three clinics (n = 74) and second, farmers, herders, and veterinary staff found at five government cattle dip-tanks, called dip-tanksters (n = 64). Read More

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June 2018
2 Reads

A Coxiella burnetii phospholipase A homolog pldA is required for optimal growth in macrophages and developmental form lipid remodeling.

BMC Microbiol 2018 Apr 16;18(1):33. Epub 2018 Apr 16.

Coxiella Pathogenesis Section, Laboratory of Bacteriology, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Hamilton, Montana, USA.

Background: Many gram-negative bacteria produce an outer membrane phospholipase A (PldA) that plays an important role in outer membrane function and is associated with virulence.

Results: In the current study, we characterized a pldA mutant of Coxiella burnetii, an intracellular gram-negative pathogen and the agent of human Q fever. The C. Read More

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April 2018
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Coxiella burnetii, a hidden pathogen in interstitial lung disease?

Clin Infect Dis 2018 Apr 6. Epub 2018 Apr 6.

Aix-Marseille Univ, IRD, APHM, MEPHI, IHU-Méditerranée Infection, Marseille, France.

We report 7 patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD) on CT-scan reviewing. C. burnetii was diagnosed in situ in one lung biopsy performed. Read More

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Does Q fever contribute to pathogenesis of non-Hodgkin lymphoma?

Lancet Haematol 2018 May 9;5(5):e186-e187. Epub 2018 Apr 9.

Division of Blood Disorders, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA. Electronic address:

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Exposure to Coxiella burnetii and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma: a retrospective population-based analysis in the Netherlands.

Lancet Haematol 2018 May 9;5(5):e211-e219. Epub 2018 Apr 9.

Department of Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases, University Medical Center Utrecht and Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands.

Background: An association between Coxiella burnetii and non-Hodgkin lymphoma has been suggested. After a large Q fever epidemic in the Netherlands (2007-10), we postulated that the incidence of non-Hodgkin lymphoma would be increased during and after the epidemic in areas with a high endemicity of Q fever compared with those with low endemicity.

Methods: We did a retrospective population-based analysis and calculated relative risks (RRs) of non-Hodgkin lymphoma during 1-year periods before, during, and after the Q fever epidemic, for areas with intermediate and high endemicity of Q fever compared with low endemic areas. Read More

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Serosurveillance of Coxiellosis (Q-fever) and Brucellosis in goats in selected provinces of Lao People's Democratic Republic.

PLoS Negl Trop Dis 2018 04 12;12(4):e0006411. Epub 2018 Apr 12.

Mahidol-Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit, Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand.

Goat raising is a growing industry in Lao People's Democratic Republic, with minimal disease investigation to date, especially zoonoses. This study determined the proportional seropositivity of two zoonotic diseases: Q fever (causative agent Coxiella burnetii) and Brucellosis (Brucella species) in goats across five provinces (Vientiane Capital, Xayaboury, Xiengkhuang, Savannakhet and Attapeu). A total of 1458 goat serum samples were tested using commercial indirect ELISA for both pathogens, plus Rose Bengal agglutination test for Brucellosis. Read More

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An outbreak of Q fever associated with parturient cat exposure at an animal refuge and veterinary clinic in southeast Queensland.

Aust N Z J Public Health 2018 Apr 12. Epub 2018 Apr 12.

Queensland Health - Communicable Diseases Branch, Queensland.

Objective: To determine the source of a Q fever outbreak in humans at an animal refuge and veterinary clinic in southeast Queensland from October to December 2016.

Methods: Case interviews and a retrospective cohort study of animal refuge and veterinary clinic staff using a self-administered questionnaire related to clinical history of Q fever, Q fever vaccination status and workplace activities during the exposure period.

Results: Seven cases (six confirmed, one probable) were identified. Read More

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April 2018
3 Reads

Identification of novel MITEs (miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements) in Coxiella burnetii: implications for protein and small RNA evolution.

BMC Genomics 2018 Apr 11;19(1):247. Epub 2018 Apr 11.

Program in Cellular, Molecular and Microbial Biology, Division of Biological Sciences, University of Montana, Missoula, MT, USA.

Background: Coxiella burnetii is a Gram-negative gammaproteobacterium and zoonotic agent of Q fever. C. burnetii's genome contains an abundance of pseudogenes and numerous selfish genetic elements. Read More

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April 2018
4 Reads

Q fever: A rural disease with potential urban consequences

Aust J Gen Pract 2018 03;47(3):5555

BSc(Hons), MBBS, PhD, FRCPA, FASM, FACTM, Australian Rickettsial Reference Laboratory, University Hospital Geelong, Vic; NSW Health Pathology, Nepean Hospital, Penrith, NSW.

Background: Q fever often presents as an undifferentiated febrile illness. Cases occur throughout Australia, with higher rates occurring in northern New South Wales and southern Queensland.

Objective: This article aims to provide clinicians with an overview of Q fever, and covers epidemiology, clinical features, laboratory diagnosis, sequelae, management and prevention. Read More

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Coxiella burnetii in dairy goats with a history of reproductive disorders in Brazil.

Acta Trop 2018 Jul 3;183:19-22. Epub 2018 Apr 3.

Department of Veterinary Medicine, Laboratory of Infectious-Contagious Diseases of Domestic Animals, Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco, Rua Dom Manoel de Medeiros, 52171-900, Recife, PE, Brazil. Electronic address:

Coxiella burnetii, an intracellular bacterium, is the agent of Q fever/coxiellosis, a worldwide zoonosis. Dairy animals are the primary reservoirs of C. burnetii, and although the disease is usually asymptomatic or subclinical, abortion is a serious clinical outcome among small ruminants. Read More

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July 2018
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Doxycycline desensitization in chronic Q fever-A critical tool for the clinician.

IDCases 2018 20;11:70-72. Epub 2018 Feb 20.

Infectious Diseases Unit, Bnai-Zion Medical Center, Sderot Eliyahu Golomb 47, Haifa Affiliated with Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel.

We present the case of a 45 year old woman with acute Q fever pneumonia who progressed to the chronic phase of the disease despite azithromycin therapy. A trial of doxycycline was halted because of severe allergy and she was put on clarithromycin and later moxifloxacin. Failure of both drugs required desensitization to doxycycline with escalating doses. Read More

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February 2018

Coxiella burnetii in Infertile Dairy Cattle With Chronic Endometritis.

Vet Pathol 2018 07 22;55(4):539-542. Epub 2018 Mar 22.

1 Department of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Production, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, Italy.

Coxiella burnetii is an obligate intracellular pathogen and the cause of Q fever in many animal species and humans. Several studies have reported the association between C. burnetii and abortion, premature delivery, stillbirth, and weak offspring. Read More

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July 2018
2 Reads

Estimating the incubation period of acute Q fever, a systematic review.

Epidemiol Infect 2018 Apr 21;146(6):665-672. Epub 2018 Mar 21.

Field Epidemiology Service, National Infection Service,Public Health England,West Midlands,UK.

Estimates of the incubation period for Q fever vary substantially between different reviews and expert advice documents. We systematically reviewed and quality appraised the literature to provide an evidence-based estimate of the incubation period of the Q fever by the aerosolised infection route. Medline (OVIDSP) and EMBASE were searched with the search limited to human studies and English language. Read More

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April 2018
2 Reads

Epidemiology of Q-fever in goats in Hubei province of China.

Trop Anim Health Prod 2018 Mar 20. Epub 2018 Mar 20.

University College of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, The Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Bahawalpur, 63100, Pakistan.

Coxiella burnetii (C. burnetii) is an intracellular bacterium, which causes zoonotic disease called Q-fever. However, scarce information is known about the epidemiology of Q-fever in goats in Hubei province of China. Read More

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Coxiella burnetii endocarditis on bioprosthetic aortic valve, with peripheral arterial embolism.

Cardiovasc Pathol 2018 May - Jun;34:38-39. Epub 2018 Feb 16.

Department of Nephrology, AP-HP, Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, F-75015 Paris, France.

Acute limb ischemia related to Coxiella burnetii endocarditis is rare. We report an original case of a 68-year-old man hospitalized for recurrent acute left limb ischemia in a context of atrial flutter, which revealed C. burnetii endocarditis. Read More

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February 2018
2 Reads

Herd prevalence and genotypes of Coxiella burnetii in dairy cattle bulk tank milk in Gyeongsang provinces of South Korea.

Trop Anim Health Prod 2018 Mar 16. Epub 2018 Mar 16.

College of Veterinary Medicine, Kyungpook National University, 80 Daehakro, Bukgu, Daegu, 41566, South Korea.

Coxiella burnetii is the causative agent of the zoonotic Q fever, and its reservoirs include ticks and livestock, which are key sources of transmission to humans. Although there have been several studies on the prevalence of C. burnetii antibodies in dairy cattle bulk tank milk (BTM), there is a lack of information on the molecular detection of C. Read More

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Osteoarticular manifestations of Q fever: a case series and literature review.

Clin Microbiol Infect 2018 Mar 14. Epub 2018 Mar 14.

Service de Maladies Infectieuses, CHU de Poitiers, France.

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March 2018
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Q fever in Spain: Description of a new series, and systematic review.

PLoS Negl Trop Dis 2018 03 15;12(3):e0006338. Epub 2018 Mar 15.

Department of Internal Medicine, University Teaching Hospital, Santiago de Compostela, A Coruña, Spain.

Background: Forms of presentation of Q fever vary widely across Spain, with differences between the north and south. In the absence of reported case series from Galicia (north-west Spain), this study sought to describe a Q-fever case series in this region for the first time, and conduct a systematic review to analyse all available data on the disease in Spain.

Methods: Patients with positive serum antibodies to Coxiella burnetii from a single institution over a 5-year period (January 2011-December 2015) were included. Read More

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March 2018
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A contemporary 16-year review of Coxiella burnetii infective endocarditis in a tertiary cardiac center in Queensland, Australia.

Infect Dis (Lond) 2018 Jul 8;50(7):531-538. Epub 2018 Mar 8.

c Health Support Queensland Pathology Queensland , Herston , Australia.

Background: Coxiella burnetii endocarditis can be difficult to diagnose leading to delays in treatment. This retrospective case series study was undertaken to understand the epidemiologic trends and clinical features of Q fever endocarditis in Southeast Queensland, Australia.

Methods: Clinical records of patients from a single center with coding diagnosis of C. Read More

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July 2018
2 Reads

Seroprevalence of antibodies and chronic Q fever among post-mortal and living donors of tissues and cells from 2010 to 2015 in the Netherlands.

Euro Surveill 2018 Mar;23(9)

Sanquin Plasma Products, Amsterdam (previously BISLIFE Foundation, Leiden), The Netherlands.

BackgroundAfter a large Q fever outbreak in the Netherlands in the period from 2007 to 2010, the risk of Q fever transmission through tissue and cell transplantation from undiagnosed chronic Q fever cases became a potential issue. We aimed to evaluate the risk of Q fever transmission through tissue and cell transplantation. We performed a retrospective observational cohort study among 15,133 Dutch donors of tissues and stem cells from 2010 to 2015 to assess seroprevalence of antibodies, to identify factors associated with presence of antibodies, and to assess the proportion of undiagnosed chronic Q fever cases. Read More

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March 2018
7 Reads

Exploratory investigation of Q fever in apparently healthy meat sheep flocks in Belgium.

Transbound Emerg Dis 2018 Mar 2. Epub 2018 Mar 2.

Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Research Unit for Epidemiology and Risk Analysis applied to Veterinary Sciences (UREAR-ULiège), Fundamental and Applied Research for Animals & Health (FARAH) Center, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium.

Q fever is a cosmopolitan disease affecting both humans and many animal species. Although sheep are often implicated in human Q fever outbreaks, the disease remains largely underestimated in meat sheep flocks. In order to fulfil this gap, a preliminary study was performed aiming to investigate the serological and molecular aspects of infection with Coxiella burnetii among meat sheep flocks in Belgium. Read More

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Coxiella burnetii Subverts p62/Sequestosome 1 and Activates Nrf2 Signaling in Human Macrophages.

Infect Immun 2018 May 23;86(5). Epub 2018 Apr 23.

Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas, USA

is the causative agent of human Q fever, a debilitating flu-like illness that can progress to chronic disease presenting as endocarditis. Following inhalation, is phagocytosed by alveolar macrophages and generates a lysosome-like replication compartment termed the parasitophorous vacuole (PV). A type IV secretion system (T4SS) is required for PV generation and is one of the pathogen's few known virulence factors. Read More

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May 2018
1 Read