1,052 results match your criteria Pulmonary Edema High-Altitude


HSP-70-Mediated Hyperbaric Oxygen Reduces Brain and Pulmonary Edema and Cognitive Deficits in Rats in a Simulated High-Altitude Exposure.

Biomed Res Int 2018 1;2018:4608150. Epub 2018 Nov 1.

Department of Emergency Medicine, Chi Mei Medical Center, Tainan, Taiwan.

High-mountain sickness is characterized by brain and pulmonary edema and cognitive deficits. The definition can be fulfilled by a rat model of high-altitude exposure (HAE) used in the present study. This study aimed to investigate the protective effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) and to determine the underlying mechanisms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2018/4608150DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6236768PMC
November 2018

Research advances in pathogenesis and prophylactic measures of acute high altitude illness.

Respir Med 2018 Dec 8;145:145-152. Epub 2018 Nov 8.

College of Biosystems Engineering and Food Science, Zhejiang Key Laboratory for Agro-Food Processing, Zhejiang Engineering Center for Food Technology and Equipment, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310058, Zhejiang, China. Electronic address:

After ascent to high altitude (≥2500 m), the inability of the human body to adapt to the hypobaric and hypoxia environment can induce tissue hypoxia, then a series of high altitude illnesses including acute mountain sickness (AMS), high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE), and high altitude cerebral edema (HACE) would develop. Symptoms of AMS include headache, dizziness, nausea, and vomiting; HAPE is characterized by orthopnea, breathlessness at rest, cough, pink frothy sputum, and results in obvious pulmonary edema that poses significant harm to people; HACE is characterized by ataxia and decreased consciousness, leading to coma and brain herniation which would be fatal if not treated promptly. This review article provides a current understanding of the pathophysiology of these three forms of high altitude illness and elaborates the current prevention and treatment measures of these diseases. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rmed.2018.11.004DOI Listing
December 2018

Impairment of left atrial mechanics does not contribute to the reduction in stroke volume after active ascent to 4559 m.

Scand J Med Sci Sports 2018 Oct 29. Epub 2018 Oct 29.

University Institute of Sports Medicine, Prevention and Rehabilitation and Research Institute of Molecular Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation, Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg, Austria.

Hypoxia challenges left ventricular (LV) function due to reduced energy supply. Conflicting results exist whether high-altitude exposure impairs LV diastolic function and thus contributes to the high altitude-induced increase in systolic pulmonary artery pressure (sPAP) and reduction in stroke volume (SV). This study aimed to assess LV diastolic function, LV end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP), and LA mechanics using comprehensive echocardiographic imaging in healthy volunteers at 4559 m. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/sms.13325
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/sms.13325DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

Lung Ultrasound Is Accurate for the Diagnosis of High-Altitude Pulmonary Edema: A Prospective Study.

Can Respir J 2018 1;2018:5804942. Epub 2018 Oct 1.

Department of High Altitude Disease, Xizang Military General Hospital, Lhasa, China.

Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of lung ultrasonography (LUS) for high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE).

Background: LUS has proven to be a reliable tool for the diagnosis of pulmonary diseases, including pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and pneumothorax. LUS also has potential for the diagnosis of HAPE. Read More

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https://www.hindawi.com/journals/crj/2018/5804942/
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2018/5804942DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6188731PMC
October 2018
6 Reads

Changes in corneal thickness in patients with high-altitude pulmonary edema after systemic oxygen therapy.

Indian J Ophthalmol 2018 Nov;66(11):1554-1557

Department of Community Medicine, Army College of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.

Purpose: High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPO) is an acute medical emergency occurring typically in lowlanders, who ascend rapidly to heights of 3000 m or more. It presents with marked dyspnea on exertion, fatigue with minimal-to-moderate effort, prolonged recovery time, and dry cough with manifestations of cyanosis, tachycardia, tachypnea, and temperature which generally does not increase beyond 38.5°C. Read More

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http://www.ijo.in/text.asp?2018/66/11/1554/244073
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/ijo.IJO_642_18DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6213672PMC
November 2018
4 Reads

Advances in the available non-biological pharmacotherapy prevention and treatment of acute mountain sickness and high altitude cerebral and pulmonary oedema.

Expert Opin Pharmacother 2018 Dec 11;19(17):1891-1902. Epub 2018 Oct 11.

c Department of Medicine , University of Birmingham , Edgbaston , UK.

Introduction: The physiological responses on exposure to high altitude are relatively well known, but new discoveries are still being made, and novel prevention and treatment strategies may arise. Basic information has changed little since our previous review in this journal 10 years ago, but considerable more detail on standard therapies, and promising new approaches are now available. Areas covered: Herein, the authors review the role of pharmacological agents in preventing and treating high-altitude illnesses. Read More

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https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14656566.2018.1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14656566.2018.1528228DOI Listing
December 2018
6 Reads

High Altitude Illness: Knowledge, Practice, and Attitudes of Porters in Nepal.

Wilderness Environ Med 2018 Dec 3;29(4):431-436. Epub 2018 Oct 3.

Department of Health, Human Performance and Athletics, Linfield College, McMinnville, OR (Dr Peterson).

Introduction: Porters working at high altitude face a number of preventable health risks ranging from frostbite to potentially fatal high-altitude pulmonary and cerebral edema. Porters are often recruited from impoverished low-altitude areas, poorly equipped in terms of protective clothing, and tasked with carrying loads that equal or exceed their body mass to high elevations. Despite a large population of porters working throughout mountainous parts of the world, there is little documentation regarding knowledge levels, attitudes, and practices related to the prevention of altitude illness in this population. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S10806032183010
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wem.2018.06.002DOI Listing
December 2018
6 Reads

NR3C2 Gene is Associated with Susceptibility to High-Altitude Pulmonary Edema in Han Chinese.

Wilderness Environ Med 2018 Dec 3;29(4):488-492. Epub 2018 Oct 3.

Research Center for High Altitude Medical Sciences, School of Medicine, Qinghai University, Qinghai, China (Drs Yang, Tang, Ga, and Ge); Basic and Applied Key Laboratory for High Altitude Medical Science and Technology of Qinghai, Qinghai, China (Drs Yang, Tang, Ga, and Ge); Qinghai-Utah United Key Laboratory for High Altitude Medical Science, Qinghai, China (Drs Yang, Tang, Ga, and Ge).

Introduction: The mineralocorticoid receptor is encoded by the NR3C2 gene and plays an important role in regulating vascular tone in high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE). This study aimed to investigate the association of the polymorphisms in the NR3C2 gene with HAPE susceptibility in Han Chinese.

Methods: We enrolled 133 HAPE patients and 131 matched healthy Han Chinese from the Yushu area in Qinghai, where the altitude is greater than 3500 m. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S10806032183012
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wem.2018.07.006DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Intonation of Nrf2 and Hif1-α pathway by curcumin prophylaxis: A potential strategy to augment survival signaling under hypoxia.

Respir Physiol Neurobiol 2018 Dec 27;258:12-24. Epub 2018 Sep 27.

Haematology Division, Defence Institute of Physiology and Allied Sciences, Timarpur, Delhi- 54, India. Electronic address:

Background: Pulmonary surfactant oxidation leads to alveolar collapse- a condition often noticed in high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE). The present study was aimed to determine the effect of curcumin prophylaxis in augmenting the phase II antioxidant enzymes and surfactant proteins expression in enabling the pulmonary surfactant homeostasis under hypoxia.

Methods: A549 cells were exposed to 3% hypoxia for different time durations (1 h, 3 h, 6 h, 12 h and 24 h). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.resp.2018.09.008DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Clinical, Laboratory and Imaging Features of High Altitude Pulmonary Edema in Tibetan Plateau.

Chin Med Sci J 2018 Sep;33(3):160-173

Department of Cardiology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853, China.

Objective To analyze characteristics of high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) in Chinese patients.Methods We performed a retrospective study of 98 patients with HAPE. We reviewed the medical records and summarized the clinical, laboratory and imaging characteristics of these cases, and compared the results on admission with those determined before discharge. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.24920/11813DOI Listing
September 2018
6 Reads

Rapidly Progressing Fatal High-Altitude Illness in a Patient with Hyperthyroidism.

Authors:
Sang Jae Noh Ho Lee

High Alt Med Biol 2018 Sep 4;19(3):288-290. Epub 2018 Sep 4.

Department of Forensic Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Research Institute of Clinical Medicine of Chonbuk National University-Biomedical Research Institute of Chonbuk National University Hospital and Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences , Jeonju-si, Korea.

Noh, Sang Jae and Ho Lee. Rapidly progressing fatal high-altitude illness in a patient with hyperthyroidism. High Alt Med Biol. Read More

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https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/ham.2017.0137
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/ham.2017.0137DOI Listing
September 2018
7 Reads

Higher ascent, trouble breathing: High altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE).

Pan Afr Med J 2018;30:43. Epub 2018 May 18.

Nepal International Clinic, Kathmandu, Nepal, Oxford University Clinical Research Unit-Nepal, Center for Tropical Medicine and Global Health, University of Oxford, UK.

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http://www.panafrican-med-journal.com/content/article/30/43/
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http://dx.doi.org/10.11604/pamj.2018.30.43.15181DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6110567PMC
October 2018
9 Reads

The effects of respiratory inhaled drugs on the prevention of acute mountain sickness.

Medicine (Baltimore) 2018 Aug;97(32):e11788

Department of Transfusion Medicine.

Background: Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is common in high-altitude travelers, and may lead to life-threatening high-altitude cerebral edema (HACE) or high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE). The inhaled drugs have a much lower peak serum concentrations and a shorter half-life period than oral drugs, which give them a special character, greater local effects in the lung. Meanwhile, short-term administration of inhaled drugs results in almost no adverse reactions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000011788DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6133459PMC
August 2018
15 Reads

A case-control study of the genetic polymorphism of IL6 and HAPE risk in a Chinese Han population.

Clin Respir J 2018 Sep;12(9):2419-2425

Key Laboratory of Molecular Mechanism and Intervention Research for Plateau Diseases of Tibet Autonomous Region, School of Medicine, Xizang Minzu University, Xianyang, Shaanxi, China.

Aims: The role of inflammatory cytokines in High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of IL4 and IL6 gene polymorphism in the development of HAPE in Chinese people.

Methods: In the present study, we screened ten polymorphisms of IL4 and IL6 gene in 265 HAPE and 303 healthy volunteers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/crj.12922DOI Listing
September 2018
3 Reads
2.200 Impact Factor

From Ocean Deep to Mountain High: Similar Computed Tomography Findings in Immersion and High-Altitude Pulmonary Edema.

Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2018 Oct;198(8):1088-1089

1 Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/rccm.201803-0581IMDOI Listing
October 2018
8 Reads

Right Heart-Pulmonary Circulation at High Altitude and the Development of Subclinical Pulmonary Interstitial Edema.

Authors:
Lorenza Pratali

Heart Fail Clin 2018 Jul;14(3):333-337

Department of Institute of Clinical Physiology, National research Council, Via Moruzzi 1, Pisa 56214, Italy. Electronic address:

Most healthy subjects can develop a subclinical interstitial pulmonary edema that is a complex and multifactor phenomenon, still with unanswered questions, and might be one line of defense against the development of severe symptomatic lung edema. Whether the acute, reversible increase in lung fluid content is really an innocent and benign part of the adaptation to extreme physiologic condition or rather the clinically relevant marker of an individual vulnerability to life-threatening high altitude pulmonary edema remains to be established in future studies. Thus the question if encouraging more conservative habits to climb is right or not remains open. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S15517136183002
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.02.008DOI Listing
July 2018
8 Reads

Interventions for treating acute high altitude illness.

Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2018 06 30;6:CD009567. Epub 2018 Jun 30.

Cochrane Ecuador. Centro de Investigación en Salud Pública y Epidemiología Clínica (CISPEC). Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud Eugenio Espejo, Universidad Tecnológica Equinoccial, Quito, Ecuador.

Background: Acute high altitude illness is defined as a group of cerebral and pulmonary syndromes that can occur during travel to high altitudes. It is more common above 2500 metres, but can be seen at lower elevations, especially in susceptible people. Acute high altitude illness includes a wide spectrum of syndromes defined under the terms 'acute mountain sickness' (AMS), 'high altitude cerebral oedema' and 'high altitude pulmonary oedema'. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/14651858.CD009567.pub2
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD009567.pub2DOI Listing
June 2018
8 Reads

High altitude trekking after lung transplantation: a prospective study using lung ultrasound to detect comets tails for interstitial pulmonary edema in lung transplant recipients and healthy volunteers.

Transpl Int 2018 11 9;31(11):1245-1253. Epub 2018 Jul 9.

Department of Thoracic Surgery, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

The intensity of physical activity which can be tolerated after lung transplantation and the tolerance to prolonged exercise at high altitude are poorly investigated. Lung ultrasound comet tails have been used in the diagnosis of interstitial pulmonary edema and high pulmonary altitude edema. The aim was to assess the number of lung ultrasound comet tails and to monitor changes in the optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) during a climb to the top of Mount Kilimanjaro in 10 lung transplant recipients and 10 healthy controls at three different altitude levels: 1360, 3505, 4900 m. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tri.13307DOI Listing
November 2018
27 Reads

High-Altitude Acute Pulmonary Edema after 48 Hours in a Ski Station.

Arch Bronconeumol 2018 Jun 2. Epub 2018 Jun 2.

Servicio de Neumología, Hospital Universitario Virgen de las Nieves, Granada, España.

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S03002896183018
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arbres.2018.04.020DOI Listing
June 2018
8 Reads

Text mining and network analysis to find functional associations of genes in high altitude diseases.

Comput Biol Chem 2018 Aug 2;75:101-110. Epub 2018 May 2.

DRDO-BU Center for Life Sciences, Bharathiar University Campus, Coimbatore, 641046, India; Data Mining and Text Mining Laboratory, Department of Bioinformatics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore, 641046, India. Electronic address:

Background And Objectives: Travel to elevations above 2500 m is associated with the risk of developing one or more forms of acute altitude illness such as acute mountain sickness (AMS), high altitude cerebral edema (HACE) or high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE). Our work aims to identify the functional association of genes involved in high altitude diseases.

Method: In this work we identified the gene networks responsible for high altitude diseases by using the principle of gene co-occurrence statistics from literature and network analysis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compbiolchem.2018.05.002DOI Listing
August 2018
1 Read

Substrate stiffness-dependent exacerbation of endothelial permeability and inflammation: mechanisms and potential implications in ALI and PH (2017 Grover Conference Series).

Pulm Circ 2018 Apr-Jun;8(2):2045894018773044

12264 Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Maryland Baltimore, School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.

The maintenance of endothelial barrier integrity is absolutely essential to prevent the vascular leak associated with pneumonia, pulmonary edema resulting from inhalation of toxins, acute elevation to high altitude, traumatic and septic lung injury, acute lung injury (ALI), and its life-threatening complication, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In addition to the long-known edemagenic and inflammatory agonists, emerging evidences suggest that factors of endothelial cell (EC) mechanical microenvironment such as blood flow, mechanical strain of the vessel, or extracellular matrix stiffness also play an essential role in the control of endothelial permeability and inflammation. Recent studies from our group and others have demonstrated that substrate stiffening causes endothelial barrier disruption and renders EC more susceptible to agonist-induced cytoskeletal rearrangement and inflammation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2045894018773044DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5987909PMC
May 2018
2 Reads

Comparison of Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter between both eyes: A Bedside Ultrasonography Approach.

Indian J Crit Care Med 2018 Mar;22(3):150-153

Ex- Director General Medical Services (Army), New Delhi, India.

Context: Optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) has long been accepted as a reliable proxy of intracranial pressure especially in critical care and bedside settings. The present consensus is to measure ONSD in both eyes and take average value, which is cumbersome and a potential cause of discomfort to the patient.

Aim: We aim to compare the values of ONSD of the right and left eye in a random sample as measured by bedside ocular ultrasonography (USG) in Indian adults. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/ijccm.IJCCM_498_17DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5879856PMC
March 2018
3 Reads

The STAR Data Reporting Guidelines for Clinical High Altitude Research.

High Alt Med Biol 2018 03 9;19(1):7-14. Epub 2018 Feb 9.

8 Department of Emergency Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center , Stanford, California.

Brodmann Maeder, Monika, Hermann Brugger, Matiram Pun, Giacomo Strapazzon, Tomas Dal Cappello, Marco Maggiorini, Peter Hackett, Peter Baärtsch, Erik R. Swenson, Ken Zafren (STAR Core Group), and the STAR Delphi Expert Group. The STARdata reporting guidelines for clinical high altitude research. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/ham.2017.0160DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5905862PMC
March 2018
2 Reads

The plasma level changes of VEGF and soluble VEGF receptor-1 are associated with high-altitude pulmonary edema.

J Med Invest 2018 ;65(1.2):64-68

Department of Neurology, Qinghai Provincial People's Hospital.

Hypoxia-induced plasma levels of VEGF and sFlt-1 are responsible for increased vascular permeability occurred in both brain and pulmonary edema. Currently, it remains unclear the exact roles of VEGF and sFlt-1 in High Altitude Pulmonary Edema (HAPE) pathogenesis. In this study, plasma levels of VEGF and sFlt-1 from 10 HAPE and 10 non-HAPE subjects were measured and compared. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2152/jmi.65.64DOI Listing
September 2018
2 Reads

Sequencing the exons of human glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1) gene in Han Chinese with high-altitude pulmonary edema.

J Physiol Anthropol 2018 Mar 27;37(1). Epub 2018 Mar 27.

Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Medical College, Qinghai University, Xining, 810001, Qinghai, China.

Background: High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is a serious acute mountain sickness that mainly occurs in non-acclimatized individuals after rapid ascent to high altitude. The precise etiology of HAPE remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate whether NR3C1 gene polymorphism is associated with the susceptibility to HAPE. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40101-018-0168-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5869773PMC
March 2018
4 Reads

Patent Foramen Ovale and Hypoxemia.

Cardiol Rev 2019 Jan/Feb;27(1):34-40

Department of Cardiology, University Hospital of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.

Patent foramen ovale (PFO), an embryonic remnant of the fetal circulation, is present in 20-25% of adults. Although recent observational studies and clinical trials have established the link between PFO-mediated right-to-left shunting with cryptogenic stroke and migraine with aura, the role of a PFO in exacerbating hypoxemic medical conditions (ie, sleep apnea, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pulmonary hypertension, platypnea-orthodeoxia, pulmonary arteriovenous malformation, high-altitude pulmonary edema, and exercise desaturation) remains less understood. PFO-mediated hypoxemia occurs when deoxygenated venous blood from the right atrium enters and mixes with oxygenated arterial blood in the left atrium. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CRD.0000000000000205DOI Listing
March 2018
5 Reads
2.410 Impact Factor

Pulmonary vascular endothelium: the orchestra conductor in respiratory diseases: Highlights from basic research to therapy.

Eur Respir J 2018 Apr 4;51(4). Epub 2018 Apr 4.

Faculty of Medicine, Dept of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UK.

The European Respiratory Society (ERS) Research Seminar entitled "Pulmonary vascular endothelium: orchestra conductor in respiratory diseases - highlights from basic research to therapy" brought together international experts in dysfunctional pulmonary endothelium, from basic science to translational medicine, to discuss several important aspects in acute and chronic lung diseases. This review will briefly sum up the different topics of discussion from this meeting which was held in Paris, France on October 27-28, 2016. It is important to consider that this paper does not address all aspects of endothelial dysfunction but focuses on specific themes such as: 1) the complex role of the pulmonary endothelium in orchestrating the host response in both health and disease (acute lung injury, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, high-altitude pulmonary oedema and pulmonary hypertension); and 2) the potential value of dysfunctional pulmonary endothelium as a target for innovative therapies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1183/13993003.00745-2017DOI Listing
April 2018
84 Reads

The Influence of CO and Exercise on Hypobaric Hypoxia Induced Pulmonary Edema in Rats.

Front Physiol 2018 28;9:130. Epub 2018 Feb 28.

Department of Undersea Medicine, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research and Naval Medical Research Center, Silver Spring, MD, United States.

Individuals with a known susceptibility to high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) demonstrate a reduced ventilation response and increased pulmonary vasoconstriction when exposed to hypoxia. It is unknown whether reduced sensitivity to hypercapnia is correlated with increased incidence and/or severity of HAPE, and while acute exercise at altitude is known to exacerbate symptoms the effect of exercise training on HAPE susceptibility is unclear. To determine if chronic intermittent hypercapnia and exercise increases the incidence of HAPE in rats. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fphys.2018.00130DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5835685PMC
February 2018
1 Read

Interventions for preventing high altitude illness: Part 2. Less commonly-used drugs.

Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2018 03 12;3:CD012983. Epub 2018 Mar 12.

Methodology Research Unit, National Institute of Pediatrics, Insurgentes Sur 3700 - C, Col. Insurgentes Cuicuilco, Coyoacan, Mexico City, Distrito Federal, Mexico, 04530.

Background: High altitude illness (HAI) is a term used to describe a group of mainly cerebral and pulmonary syndromes that can occur during travel to elevations above 2500 metres (˜ 8200 feet). Acute mountain sickness (AMS), high altitude cerebral oedema (HACE) and high altitude pulmonary oedema (HAPE) are reported as potential medical problems associated with high altitude ascent. In this second review, in a series of three about preventive strategies for HAI, we assessed the effectiveness of five of the less commonly used classes of pharmacological interventions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD012983DOI Listing
March 2018
4 Reads

An Approach to Children with Pulmonary Edema at High Altitude.

High Alt Med Biol 2018 03 22;19(1):91-98. Epub 2018 Feb 22.

2 Heart Institute and Pediatric Heart-Lung Center, Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado School of Medicine and Children's Hospital Colorado , Aurora, Colorado.

Liptzin, Deborah R., Steven H. Abman, Ann Giesenhagen, and D. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/ham.2017.0096DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5905943PMC
March 2018
2 Reads

Elevated Vasodilatory Cyclases and Shorter Telomere Length Contribute to High-Altitude Pulmonary Edema.

High Alt Med Biol 2018 03 14;19(1):60-68. Epub 2018 Feb 14.

1 CSIR-Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology , Delhi, India .

Rain, Manjari, Himanshi Chaudhary, Ritushree Kukreti, Tashi Thinlas, Ghulam Mohammad, and Qadar Pasha. Elevated vasodilatory cyclases and shorter telomere length contribute to high-altitude pulmonary edema. High Alt Med Biol. Read More

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http://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/ham.2017.0136
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/ham.2017.0136DOI Listing
March 2018
5 Reads
1.820 Impact Factor

Transcriptomic profiling reveals gene expression kinetics in patients with hypoxia and high altitude pulmonary edema.

Gene 2018 Apr 31;651:200-205. Epub 2018 Jan 31.

Research Center for High Altitude Medicine, Qinghai University, Xining 810001, China. Electronic address:

Objective: High altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is a life threatening condition occurring in otherwise healthy individuals who rapidly ascend to high altitude. However, the molecular mechanisms of its pathophysiology are not well understood. The objective of this study is to evaluate differential gene expression in patients with HAPE during acute illness and subsequent recovery. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S03781119183006
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gene.2018.01.052DOI Listing
April 2018
8 Reads

Inhaled Budesonide Does Not Affect Hypoxic Pulmonary Vasoconstriction at 4559 Meters of Altitude.

High Alt Med Biol 2018 03 3;19(1):52-59. Epub 2018 Jan 3.

4 University Institute of Sports Medicine, Prevention and Rehabilitation; Research Institute of Molecular Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation, Paracelsus Medical University , Salzburg, Austria .

Berger, Marc Moritz, Franziska Macholz, Peter Schmidt, Sebastian Fried, Tabea Perz, Daniel Dankl, Josef Niebauer, Peter Bärtsch, Heimo Mairbäurl, and Mahdi Sareban. Inhaled budesonide does not affect hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction at 4559 meters of altitude. High Alt Med Biol 19:52-59, 2018. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/ham.2017.0113DOI Listing
March 2018
7 Reads

Acute high-altitude illness.

S Afr Med J 2017 Nov 27;107(12):1047-1048. Epub 2017 Nov 27.

Medical Director, Oxford University Clinical Research Unit-Nepal, Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, UK.

Letter by Basnyat on article by Hofmeyr et al. (Hofmeyr R, Tölken G, De Decker R. Acute high-altitude illness. Read More

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http://www.samj.org.za/index.php/samj/article/view/12154
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7196/SAMJ.2017.v107i12.12863DOI Listing
November 2017
6 Reads

Subclinical pulmonary dysfunction contributes to high altitude pulmonary edema susceptibility in healthy non-mountaineers.

Sci Rep 2017 Nov 2;7(1):14892. Epub 2017 Nov 2.

Defence Institute of Physiology and Allied Sciences. Timarpur, Delhi, 110054, India.

HAPE susceptible (HAPE-S, had HAPE episode in past) subjects may have subclinical cardio-pulmonary dysfunction. We compared the results of pulmonary function tests in 25 healthy HAPE-S non-mountaineers and 19 matched HAPE resistant (HAPE-R, no HAPE episode in past). Acute normobaric hypoxia (FIo 0. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-14947-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5668232PMC
November 2017
11 Reads

Association between regulator of telomere elongation helicase1 (RTEL1) gene and HAPE risk: A case-control study.

Medicine (Baltimore) 2017 Sep;96(39):e8222

aKey Laboratory of Molecular Mechanism and Intervention Research for Plateau Diseases of Tibet Autonomous Region bKey Laboratory of High Altitude Environment and Genes Related to Diseases of Tibet Autonomous Region cKey Laboratory for Basic Life Science Research of Tibet Autonomous Region, School of Medicine, Xizang Minzu University, Xianyang, Shaanxi dSchool of Life Science, Northwest University, Xi'an, China.

High altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is a paradigm of pulmonary edema. Mutations in regulator of telomere elongation helicase1 (RTEL1) represent an important contributor to risk for pulmonary fibrosis. However, little information is found about the association between RTEL1 and HAPE risk. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000008222DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5626330PMC
September 2017
16 Reads

[Application of lung ultrasound examination in severe high altitude pulmonary edema].

Zhonghua Wei Zhong Bing Ji Jiu Yi Xue 2017 Sep;29(9):815-820

Department of EICU, Qinghai University Affiliated Hospital, Xining 810001, Qinghai, China (Ma DH, Bao HY, Shi HX, Li CR, Zhong SN, Liu M, Hou M); Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Tumor Hospital of Gansu Province, Lanzhou 730050, Gansu, China (Zhang H); Department of Physician, Haixi Zhou People's Hospital, Delingha 817099, Qinghai, China (Li WT). Corresponding author: Ma Dehua, Email:

Objective: To investigate the application value of lung ultrasonic on severe high altitude pulmonary edema.

Methods: A prospective, single-blind, case-control study was conducted. Sixty patients with severe high altitude pulmonary edema admitted to Qinghai University Affiliated Hospital from February 2015 to May 2017 were enrolled. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3760/cma.j.issn.2095-4352.2017.09.010DOI Listing
September 2017
11 Reads

Reentry High Altitude Pulmonary Edema in the Himalayas.

High Alt Med Biol 2017 12 14;18(4):425-427. Epub 2017 Sep 14.

3 Oxford University Clinical Research Unit , Kathmandu, Nepal .

Baniya, Santosh, Christopher Holden, and Buddha Basnyat. Reentry high altitude pulmonary edema in the Himalayas. High Alt Med Biol. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/ham.2017.0088DOI Listing
December 2017
9 Reads

Electron Microscopy Observation of Human Pulmonary Ultrastructure in Two Patients with High-Altitude Pulmonary Edema.

High Alt Med Biol 2017 Sep 6;18(3):288-291. Epub 2017 Sep 6.

1 First Department of Medicine, Shinshu University School of Medicine , Matsumoto, Japan .

We examined the pulmonary ultrastructure in tissue from two patients with high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) by electron microscopy. In one case, we found that neutrophils were trapped in pulmonary capillary lumen of alveolar-capillary wall and part of the cytoplasm of a neutrophil protruded and adhered to the capillary endothelium. There were several degranulated vacuoles in the cytoplasm of the neutrophil. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/ham.2016.0163DOI Listing
September 2017
3 Reads

High-Altitude Pulmonary Edema in Mountain Community Residents.

High Alt Med Biol 2017 Sep 28;18(3):278-284. Epub 2017 Aug 28.

Ebert Family Santos, Frisco, CO.

Ebert-Santos, Christine. High-altitude pulmonary edema in mountain community residents. High Alt Med Biol. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/ham.2016.0100DOI Listing
September 2017
3 Reads

Reply: Unilateral Pulmonary Edema after Visiting High Altitude.

Ann Am Thorac Soc 2017 Sep;14(9):1492-1493

1 University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, McGovern Medical School Houston, Texas.

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http://www.atsjournals.org/doi/10.1513/AnnalsATS.201707-538L
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1513/AnnalsATS.201707-538LEDOI Listing
September 2017
5 Reads

Unilateral High-Altitude Pulmonary Edema.

Ann Am Thorac Soc 2017 Sep;14(9):1492

2 Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Perugia Perugia, Italy.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1513/AnnalsATS.201705-358LEDOI Listing
September 2017
4 Reads

Air blood barrier phenotype correlates with alveolo-capillary O equilibration in hypobaric hypoxia.

Respir Physiol Neurobiol 2017 12 8;246:53-58. Epub 2017 Aug 8.

Ambulatorio di Fisiologia Clinica e dello Sport, Scuola di Specializzazione in Medicina dello Sport, Università di Milano-Bicocca. Via Cadore, 48 20900 Monza, Italy.

The O diffusion limitation across the air blood barrier (DO and subcomponents Dm and Vc) was evaluated in 17 healthy participants exposed to hypobaric hypoxia (HA, 3840m, PO ∼90mmHg). A 10% decrease in alveolar volume (VA) in all participants suggested the development of sub-clinical interstitial lung edema. In >80% of participants DO/VA increased, reflecting an individual strategy to cope with the hypoxia stimulus by remodulating Vc or Dm. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.resp.2017.08.006DOI Listing
December 2017
32 Reads

Remote ischemic preconditioning does not prevent acute mountain sickness after rapid ascent to 3,450 m.

J Appl Physiol (1985) 2017 Nov 10;123(5):1228-1234. Epub 2017 Aug 10.

Division of Sports Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine VII, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany; and.

Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) has been shown to protect remote organs, such as the brain and the lung, from damage induced by subsequent hypoxia or ischemia. Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is a syndrome of nonspecific neurologic symptoms and in high-altitude pulmonary edema excessive hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) plays a pivotal role. We hypothesized that RIPC protects the brain from AMS and attenuates the magnitude of HPV after rapid ascent to 3,450 m. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/japplphysiol.00505.2017DOI Listing
November 2017
6 Reads

Impact of a Newly Constructed Motor Vehicle Road on Altitude Illness in the Nepal Himalayas.

Wilderness Environ Med 2017 Dec 7;28(4):332-338. Epub 2017 Aug 7.

Himalayan Rescue Association (HRA), Kathmandu, Nepal (Drs Reisman, Deonarain, and Basnyat); Oxford University Clincal Research Unit-Nepal, Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom and Nepal International Clinic, Kathmandu, Nepal (Dr Basnyat).

Objective: This study investigated the impact that motor vehicle travel along a newly constructed road has on altitude illness (including acute mountain sickness, high-altitude cerebral edema, and high-altitude pulmonary edema). The new road from Besisahar (760 m) to Manang (3540 m) in Nepal was completed in December 2014.

Methods: We enrolled all patients diagnosed with altitude illness at the Himalayan Rescue Association Manang clinic in fall 2016. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wem.2017.06.003DOI Listing
December 2017
3 Reads

High Altitude Pulmonary Edema in a Mining Worker With an Abnormal Rise in Pulmonary Artery Pressure in Response to Acute Hypoxia Without Prior History of High Altitude Pulmonary Edema.

Wilderness Environ Med 2017 Sep 30;28(3):234-238. Epub 2017 Jun 30.

Department of Mountain and Sleep Medicine and Pulmonary Hypertension, National Center of Cardiology and Internal Medicine, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan (Drs. Akunov, Sartmyrzaeva, Maripov, Muratali uulu, Mamazhakypov, Sydykov, and Sarybaev); Kyrgyz-Indian Mountain Biomedical Research Center, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan (Drs Akunov, Sartmyrzaeva, Maripov, Muratali uulu, and Sarybaev). Electronic address:

High altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is a potentially life-threatening form of noncardiogenic pulmonary edema that may develop in otherwise healthy individuals upon ascent to high altitude. A constitutional susceptibility has been noted in some individuals, whereas others appear not to be susceptible at all. In our report, we present a case of HAPE triggered by concurrent respiratory tract infection and strenuous exercise in a mining worker with an abnormal rise in pulmonary artery pressure in response to acute hypoxia, without a prior history of HAPE during almost a year of commuting between high altitude and lowland areas. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wem.2017.04.003DOI Listing
September 2017
10 Reads

Interventions for preventing high altitude illness: Part 1. Commonly-used classes of drugs.

Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2017 06 27;6:CD009761. Epub 2017 Jun 27.

Department of Critical Care Medicine, Hospital de San José, Fundación Universitaria de Ciencias de la Salud, Bogotá, Colombia.

Background: High altitude illness (HAI) is a term used to describe a group of cerebral and pulmonary syndromes that can occur during travel to elevations above 2500 metres (8202 feet). Acute hypoxia, acute mountain sickness (AMS), high altitude cerebral oedema (HACE) and high altitude pulmonary oedema (HAPE) are reported as potential medical problems associated with high altitude. In this review, the first in a series of three about preventive strategies for HAI, we assess the effectiveness of six of the most recommended classes of pharmacological interventions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD009761.pub2DOI Listing
June 2017
15 Reads