1,123 results match your criteria Pulmonary Edema High-Altitude


Effect of Calcium-Channel Blockade on the Cold-Induced Vasodilation Response.

Wilderness Environ Med 2020 May 29. Epub 2020 May 29.

University of Utah, Division of Emergency Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT.

Introduction: Cold-induced vasodilation (CIVD) is seen in the extremities during exposure to cold. A strong vasodilation response has been associated with a decreased risk of cold injury. Increasing CIVD might further decrease this risk. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wem.2020.03.002DOI Listing

Nifedipine and Amlodipine Are Associated With Improved Mortality and Decreased Risk for Intubation and Mechanical Ventilation in Elderly Patients Hospitalized for COVID-19.

Cureus 2020 May 12;12(5):e8069. Epub 2020 May 12.

Internal Medicine, Interfaith Medical Center, Brooklyn, USA.

Dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers (CCB) are typically used agents in the clinical management of hypertension. Yet, they have also been utilized in the treatment of various pulmonary disorders with vasoconstriction. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has been implicated in the development of vasoconstrictive, proinflammatory, and pro-oxidative effects. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.7759/cureus.8069DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7219014PMC

COVID-19 Lung Injury Is Different From High Altitude Pulmonary Edema (Re: High Alt Med Biol [Epub ahead of print]; DOI: 10.1089/ham.2020.0055).

High Alt Med Biol 2020 Apr 30. Epub 2020 Apr 30.

International Commission for Alpine Rescue Medical Commission (ICAR MedCom), Zurich, Switzerland.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/ham.2020.0061DOI Listing

The search for a model of high-altitude pulmonary oedema must continue.

Acta Physiol (Oxf) 2020 Apr 28:e13485. Epub 2020 Apr 28.

Sports Medicine, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/apha.13485DOI Listing

COVID-19 Lung Injury and High Altitude Pulmonary Edema: A False Equation with Dangerous Implications.

Ann Am Thorac Soc 2020 Apr 24. Epub 2020 Apr 24.

University of Washington, Medicine, Seattle, Washington, United States.

Amid efforts to care for the large number of patients with COVID-19, there has been considerable speculation about whether the lung injury seen in these patients is different than ARDS from other causes. One idea that has garnered considerable attention, particularly on social media and in free open access medicine is the notion that lung injury due to COVID-19 is more similar to high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE). Drawing on this concept, it has also been proposed that treatments typically employed in the management of HAPE and other forms of acute altitude illness, pulmonary vasodilators and acetazolamide, should be considered for COVID-19. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1513/AnnalsATS.202004-327FRDOI Listing

Genetics of pulmonary hypertension and high-altitude pulmonary edema.

J Appl Physiol (1985) 2020 May 23;128(5):1432-1438. Epub 2020 Apr 23.

Centre for Pulmonary Hypertension, Thoraxklinik Heidelberg gGmbH at Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg Germany.

Heritable pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is an autosomal dominantly inherited disease caused by mutations in the () gene and/or genes of its signaling pathway in ~85% of patients. A genetic predisposition to high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) has long been suspected because of familial HAPE cases, but very few possibly disease-causing mutations have been identified to date. This minireview provides an overview of genetic analyses investigating common polymorphisms in HAPE-susceptible patients and the directed identification of disease-causing mutations in PAH patients. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/japplphysiol.00113.2020DOI Listing

A Review of Medical Problems in Himalayan Porters.

High Alt Med Biol 2020 Apr 20. Epub 2020 Apr 20.

Mountain Medicine Society of Nepal (MMSN), Kathmandu, Nepal.

Porters have accompanied trekkers and climbers to high altitude since the earliest expeditions in the Himalayas. As the existing body of knowledge on high-altitude medicine expands, the focus remains on trekkers or climbers. And published literature on medical problems in the large porter population remains sparse. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/ham.2020.0004DOI Listing

COVID-19 Lung Injury is Not High Altitude Pulmonary Edema.

High Alt Med Biol 2020 04 13. Epub 2020 Apr 13.

University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine, 12225, Altitude Research Center, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, PO Box 275, Ridgway, Colorado, United States, 81432.

Not applicable. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/ham.2020.0055DOI Listing

Methazolamide in high-altitude illnesses.

Eur J Pharm Sci 2020 May 3;148:105326. Epub 2020 Apr 3.

Department of Pharmacology, Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China. Electronic address:

As a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor and a methylated lipophilic analogue of acetazolamide, Methazolamide has higher lipid solubility, less plasma protein binding and renal excretion, and fewer side effects, compared to acetazolamide. Methazolamide can increase systemic metabolic acidosis and sequentially improve ventilation and oxygenation level. The increased oxygenation level leads to reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, relived cerebral edema, mitigated hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, abrogated hypoxic fatigue, and decreased excessive erythrocytosis. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejps.2020.105326DOI Listing

Finally, a promising model for high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE)-A Mountaineers' Malady.

Authors:
Mikko Nikinmaa

Acta Physiol (Oxf) 2020 Jun 16;229(2):e13472. Epub 2020 Apr 16.

Department of Biology, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/apha.13472DOI Listing

Acetazolamide, Nifedipine and Phosphodiesterase Inhibitors: Rationale for Their Utilization as Adjunctive Countermeasures in the Treatment of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19).

Cureus 2020 Mar 20;12(3):e7343. Epub 2020 Mar 20.

Internal Medicine, Interfaith Medical Center, Brooklyn, USA.

Effective treatments for Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak are urgently needed. While anti-viral approaches and vaccines are being considered immediate countermeasures are unavailable. The aim of this article is to outline a perspective on the pathophysiology of COVID-19 in the context of the currently available clinical data published in the literature. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.7759/cureus.7343DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7096066PMC

Early Hours in the Development of High Altitude Pulmonary Edema- Time Course and Mechanisms.

Authors:
Erik R Swenson

J Appl Physiol (1985) 2020 Mar 26. Epub 2020 Mar 26.

Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, University of Washington, United States.

Clinically evident high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is one of severe cyanosis, dyspnea and edema. This usually occurs within 1-2 days of ascent often with additional stresses of exercise and sleep-related hypoventilation. The earliest events in HAPE occur rapidly and progress through clinically silent and then minimally recognized problems. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/japplphysiol.00824.2019DOI Listing

Effect of mindfulness meditation protocol in subjects with various psychometric characteristics at high altitude.

Brain Behav 2020 May 23;10(5):e01604. Epub 2020 Mar 23.

Neuroscience Research Lab, Department of Neurology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India.

Introduction: Incidence of high altitude-related sickness is increasing due to more number of people visiting the areas of high altitude which may result in life-threatening conditions including acute mountain sickness (AMS), high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE), high altitude cerebral edema (HACE), and High-altitude pulmonary hypertension (HAPH). We hypothesized that an advanced yoga regimen may be beneficial in dealing with the physiology of acclimatization.

Methods: Anthropometric, Biochemical, and Psychological assessments were carried out in 48 participants before and after the advance meditation program (AMP) in the experimental group. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/brb3.1604DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7218243PMC

Uncommon causes of noncardiogenic pulmonary edema.

Nurse Pract 2020 04;45(4):26-32

Lynn Coletta Simko is an associate professor at Duquesne University School of Nursing, Pittsburgh, Pa. Alicia L. Culleiton is a faculty member at Ohio Valley School of Nursing, Kennedy Township, Pa.

Although acute respiratory distress syndrome is the most common cause of noncardiogenic pulmonary edema, NPs also should be familiar with several other less common causes, including transfusion-related acute lung injury, neurogenic pulmonary edema, preeclampsia/eclampsia, opioid overdose, high-altitude pulmonary edema, and pulmonary embolism. This article addresses the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnostics, treatment, and nursing considerations associated with each uncommon cause of noncardiogenic pulmonary edema. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.NPR.0000657300.99895.45DOI Listing

Rapid Ascent to 4559 m Is Associated with Increased Plasma Components of the Vascular Endothelial Glycocalyx and May Be Associated with Acute Mountain Sickness.

High Alt Med Biol 2020 Mar 17. Epub 2020 Mar 17.

Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, VA Puget Sound Health Care System, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.

Swenson, Kai Erik, Marc Moritz Berger, Mahdi Sareban, Franziska Macholz, Peter Schmidt, Lisa Maria Schiefer, Heimo Mairbäurl, and Erik Richard Swenson. Rapid ascent to 4559 m is associated with increased plasma components of the vascular endothelial glycocalyx and may be associated with acute mountain sickness. 00:000-000, 2020. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/ham.2019.0081DOI Listing

Primer for Mainstreaming Mind-Body Techniques for Extreme Climates-Insights and Future Directions.

Medicines (Basel) 2020 Mar 6;7(3). Epub 2020 Mar 6.

Neuroscience Research Lab, Department of Neurology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh 160012, India.

The deprivation of oxygen reaching the tissues (also termed as hypoxia) affects the normal functioning of the body. This results in development of many diseases like ischemia, glaucoma, MCI (Mild Cognitive Impairment), pulmonary and cerebral edema, stress and depression. There are no effective drugs that can treat such diseases. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/medicines7030012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7151557PMC

Deregulated hypoxic response in myeloid cells: A model for high-altitude pulmonary oedema (HAPE).

Acta Physiol (Oxf) 2020 Jun 16;229(2):e13461. Epub 2020 Mar 16.

Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.

Aim: High-altitude pulmonary oedema (HAPE) is a non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema that can occur during rapid ascent to a high-altitude environment. Classically, HAPE has been described as a condition resulting from a combination of pulmonary vasoconstriction and hypertension. Inflammation has been described as important in HAPE, although as a side effect of pulmonary oedema rather than as a causative factor. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/apha.13461DOI Listing

Angiotensin-converting enzyme gene insertion/deletion polymorphism and high-altitude pulmonary edema: An updated meta-analysis.

Authors:
Yan Zheng Jin Huang

J Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone Syst 2020 Jan-Mar;21(1):1470320319900039

Emergency Department, The People's Hospital of Anji, China.

Objective: The purpose of the study was to investigate the association between angiotensin-converting enzyme gene insertion/deletion polymorphism and high-altitude pulmonary edema.

Methods: A systematic search for relevant literature was performed in MEDLINE, CNKI, and EMBASE. The pooled odds ratios and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals were calculated in STATA 12. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1470320319900039DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7052470PMC
February 2020

Sleeping with Elevated Upper Body Does Not Attenuate Acute Mountain Sickness: Pragmatic Randomized Clinical Trial.

Am J Med 2020 Feb 17. Epub 2020 Feb 17.

German Aerospace Center (DLR), Institute of Aerospace Medicine, Cologne, Germany; Chair of Aerospace Medicine, Medical Faculty, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany. Electronic address:

Purpose: Acute mountain sickness commonly occurs following ascent to high altitude and is aggravated following sleep. Cephalad fluid shifts have been implicated. We hypothesized that sleeping with the upper body elevated by 30º reduces the risk of acute mountain sickness. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjmed.2020.01.024DOI Listing
February 2020

High-Altitude Decompression Sickness Treated with Hyperbaric Therapy and Extracorporeal Oxygenation.

Aerosp Med Hum Perform 2020 Feb;91(2):106-109

High-altitude decompression sickness (HADCS) is a rare condition that has been associated with aircraft accidents. To the best of our knowledge, the present paper is the first case report of a patient treated for severe HADCS using recompression therapy and veno-venous extracorporeal oxygenation (VV-ECMO) with a complete recovery. After depressurization of a cabin, the 51-yr-old jet pilot was admitted to the Military Institute of Medicine with a life-threatening HADCS approximately 6 h after landing from a high-altitude flight, in a dynamically deteriorating condition, with progressing dyspnea and edema, reporting increasing limb paresthesia, fluctuating consciousness, and right-sided paresis. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3357/AMHP.5457.2020DOI Listing
February 2020

Genetic Predisposition to High-Altitude Pulmonary Edema.

High Alt Med Biol 2020 Mar 23;21(1):28-36. Epub 2020 Jan 23.

Laboratory of Molecular Genetic Diagnostics, Institute of Human Genetics, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany.

Exaggerated pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a hallmark of high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE). The objective of this study was therefore to investigate genetic predisposition to HAPE by analyzing PAH candidate genes in a HAPE-susceptible (HAPE-S) family and in unrelated HAPE-S mountaineers. Eight family members and 64 mountaineers were clinically and genetically assessed using a PAH-specific gene panel for 42 genes by next-generation sequencing. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/ham.2019.0083DOI Listing

Transient Cerebral Ischemia at High Altitude and Hyper-Responsiveness to Hypoxia.

High Alt Med Biol 2020 Mar 22;21(1):105-108. Epub 2020 Jan 22.

Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Hôpital Jean-Verdier, Service de Physiologie et Explorations Fonctionnelles, Bondy, France.

A 36-year-old woman with no medical history participated in a trekking in Ladakh up to 5300 m of altitude. She was well acclimatized and presented no previous sign of acute mountain sickness, high altitude pulmonary edema or high altitude cerebral edema. After an intense effort to catch up with her group, she became breathless and complained of visual disturbances, fatigue, dizziness, and confusion. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/ham.2019.0100DOI Listing

The effects of a graded increase in chronic hypoxia exposure duration on healthy rats at high-altitude.

Int J Clin Exp Pathol 2019 1;12(6):1975-1991. Epub 2019 Jun 1.

School of Disaster Medical Research, Tianjin University Tianjin, China.

To investigate the effects of chronic hypoxia exposure at high altitude on the formation of pulmonary edema in rats, we randomized rats into normoxic control groups and hypoxic 24, 48, and 72-hour exposure groups. In the hypoxic exposure group, the arterial blood gas, wet-dry weight ratio (W/D), lung tissue permeability index (LPI), bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and plasma levels of the inflammatory factors were measured after continuous, chronic hypoxic exposure for a corresponding time, and the pathological changes in the lung tissue and the expression of tight junction-associated protein occludin were observed. We found that the contents of arterial blood gas, W/D, LPI, BALF and plasma IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-10 in the hypoxic exposure group were significantly different from the contents of arterial blood gas in the normoxic control group. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6949644PMC

Iron and Sphingolipids as Common Players of (Mal)Adaptation to Hypoxia in Pulmonary Diseases.

Int J Mol Sci 2020 Jan 2;21(1). Epub 2020 Jan 2.

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Lab., Health Sciences Department, University of Milan, Via A. di Rudinì, 8, 20142 Milan, Italy.

Hypoxia, or lack of oxygen, can occur in both physiological (high altitude) and pathological conditions (respiratory diseases). In this narrative review, we introduce high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), and Cystic Fibrosis (CF) as examples of maladaptation to hypoxia, and highlight some of the potential mechanisms influencing the prognosis of the affected patients. Among the specific pathways modulated in response to hypoxia, iron metabolism has been widely explored in recent years. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms21010307DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6981703PMC
January 2020

Structural and functional alterations of nitric oxide synthase 3 due to missense variants associate with high-altitude pulmonary edema through dynamic study.

J Biomol Struct Dyn 2020 Jan 17:1-16. Epub 2020 Jan 17.

Genomics and Molecular Medicine, CSIR-Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology, Delhi, India.

The human endothelial nitric oxide synthase () is 28 Kbp at 7q36.1 and encodes protein comprising of 1280 amino acids. Being a major source of nitric oxide, the enzyme is crucial to the vascular homeostasis and thereby to be an important pharmaceutical target. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07391102.2019.1711190DOI Listing
January 2020
2.983 Impact Factor

Susceptibility to high-altitude pulmonary edema is associated with increased pulmonary arterial stiffness during exercise.

J Appl Physiol (1985) 2020 Mar 19;128(3):514-522. Epub 2019 Dec 19.

Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin.

High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE), a reversible form of capillary leak, is a common consequence of rapid ascension to high altitude and a major cause of death related to high-altitude exposure. Individuals with a prior history of HAPE are more susceptible to future episodes, but the underlying risk factors remain uncertain. Previous studies have shown that HAPE-susceptible subjects have an exaggerated pulmonary vasoreactivity to acute hypoxia, but incomplete data are available regarding their vascular response to exercise. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/japplphysiol.00153.2019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7099440PMC

Serious Altitude Illness at the South Pole.

Aerosp Med Hum Perform 2020 Jan;91(1):46-50

Gradual ascent is impractical for personnel deploying to the South Pole due to logistical challenges. Prevention of altitude illness relies on prophylactic medications such as acetazolamide and behavioral modifications including hydration and avoidance of overexertion. We present three recent cases of altitude illness that occurred in previously healthy individuals at the South Pole. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3357/AMHP.5467.2020DOI Listing
January 2020

Long Non-coding RNA LINC-PINT and LINC00599 Polymorphisms are Associated With High-altitude Pulmonary Edema in Chinese.

Arch Bronconeumol 2019 Nov 21. Epub 2019 Nov 21.

Key Laboratory of Molecular Mechanism and Intervention Research for Plateau Diseases of Tibet Autonomous Region, School of Medicine, Xianyang, Shaanxi, China; Key Laboratory of High Altitude Environment and Genes Related to Diseases of Tibet Autonomous Region, School of Medicine, Xianyang, Shaanxi, China; Key Laboratory for Basic Life Science Research of Tibet Autonomous Region, School of Medicine, Xizang Minzu University, Xianyang, Shaanxi, China. Electronic address:

Background: High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is a kind of non-cardiogenic edema with high incidence and life-threatening. This study was designed to explore the association of LINC-PINT and LINC00599 polymorphisms with HAPE susceptibility.

Methods: This study included 244 HAPE patients and 243 age-, sex-matched healthy controls from the Chinese population. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arbres.2019.09.021DOI Listing
November 2019
1.816 Impact Factor

High-altitude illness: Management approach.

Turk J Emerg Med 2019 Oct 19;19(4):121-126. Epub 2019 Sep 19.

Emergency Department, King's College Hospital, London, UK.

In high altitudes, usually above 2500 m, travelers are faced with decreased partial pressure of oxygen along with decreased barometric pressure. High-altitude illness, a syndrome of acute mountain sickness, high-altitude cerebral edema and high-altitude pulmonary edema, occurs due to the hypobaric hypoxia when there is inadequate acclimatization. This review provides detailed information about pathophysiology, clinical features, prevention and treatment strategies for high-altitude illness according to the current literature. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tjem.2019.09.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6819752PMC
October 2019

[High altitude illness and related diseases - a review].

Laeknabladid 2019 Nov;105(11):499-507

Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Landspítali University Hospital of Iceland.

Upon reaching a height over 2500 m above seal level symptoms of altitude illness can develop over 1 - 5 days. The risk is mainly -determined by the altitude and rate of ascent and the symptoms vary. Most common are symptoms of acute mountain illness (AMS) but more dangerous high altitude cerebral edema (HACE) and high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) can also develop. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.17992/lbl.2019.11.257DOI Listing
November 2019
1 Read

High-altitude pulmonary oedema: Newer treatment modalities for an age-old problem.

Indian J Med Res 2019 06;149(6):778-782

Department of Medicine, Armed Forces Medical College, Pune, India.

Background & Objectives: High-altitude pulmonary oedema (HAPE) continues to challenge the healthcare providers at remote, resource-constrained settings. High-altitude terrain itself precludes convenience of resources. This study was conducted to evaluate the rise in peripheral capillary saturation of oxygen (SpO) by the use of a partial rebreathing mask (PRM) in comparison to Hudson's mask among patients with HAPE. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_1981_17DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6755783PMC
June 2019
3 Reads
1.661 Impact Factor

Roles of the hypoximir microRNA-424/322 in acute hypoxia and hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular leakage.

FASEB J 2019 11 28;33(11):12565-12575. Epub 2019 Aug 28.

Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan.

Acute mountain sickness (AMS) occurs in up to 25% of unacclimatized persons who ascend to 3000 m and can result in high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE). MicroRNAs (miRs) can regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Hypoxia selectively disrupts endothelial tight junction complexes through a hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α)-dependent mechanism. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://www.fasebj.org/doi/10.1096/fj.201900564RR
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1096/fj.201900564RRDOI Listing
November 2019
10 Reads

The Hen or the Egg: Impaired Alveolar Oxygen Diffusion and Acute High-altitude Illness?

Int J Mol Sci 2019 Aug 22;20(17). Epub 2019 Aug 22.

Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and General Critical Care Medicine, University Hospital Salzburg, 5020 Salzburg, Austria.

Individuals ascending rapidly to altitudes >2500 m may develop symptoms of acute mountain sickness (AMS) within a few hours of arrival and/or high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE), which occurs typically during the first three days after reaching altitudes above 3000-3500 m. Both diseases have distinct pathologies, but both present with a pronounced decrease in oxygen saturation of hemoglobin in arterial blood (SO). This raises the question of mechanisms impairing the diffusion of oxygen (O) across the alveolar wall and whether the higher degree of hypoxemia is in causal relationship with developing the respective symptoms. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms20174105DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6747186PMC
August 2019
3 Reads

Is it time to revise the acclimatization schedule at high altitude? Evidence from a field trial in Western Himalayas.

Med J Armed Forces India 2019 Jul 14;75(3):251-258. Epub 2018 Aug 14.

Consultant (Surgery), O/o DGAFMS, Ministry of Defence, 'M' Block, New Delhi, 110001, India.

Background: In Western Himalayas, Indian Army soldiers take 11 days (6 days of acclimatization and 5 days of travel) on a sea-level to high altitude road (SH road) to reach a high altitude location (HAL) situated at an altitude of 11,500 feet from sea-level location (SLL) at an altitude of 1150 feet while following acclimatization schedule (AS). AS has an extra safety margin over the conventional 'mountaineering thumb rule' of not exceeding 500 m sleeping altitude above 3000 m altitude. We carried out this randomised field trial to study the feasibility of moving large number of troops rapidly from SLL to HAL on SH road in western Himalayas in 4 days under pharmaco-prophylaxis. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mjafi.2018.01.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6676319PMC
July 2019
3 Reads

Swiss Mountain Guides: Medical Education, Knowledge, and Practice.

High Alt Med Biol 2019 09 2;20(3):251-261. Epub 2019 Aug 2.

Internal Medicine, Lausanne University Hospital and University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland.

Mountain guides work daily in remote areas and high-altitude locations where specific hypoxia-related and common medical problems may occur. Arrival of rescue teams can be delayed, so mountain guides often have to rely on their own capabilities to provide first aid. Therefore, IFMGA-recognized Swiss mountain guides receive a specific medical education and are equipped with a dedicated medical kit. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/ham.2018.0124DOI Listing
September 2019
2 Reads

Emergence of AnnexinVpos CD31neg CD42blow/neg extracellular vesicles in plasma of humans at extreme altitude.

PLoS One 2019 1;14(8):e0220133. Epub 2019 Aug 1.

Institute for Medical Microbiology, Immunology and Hygiene, University Hospital Cologne, Cologne, Germany.

Background: Hypobaric hypoxia has been reported to cause endothelial cell and platelet dysfunction implicated in the formation of microvascular lesions, and in its extremes may contribute to vascular leakage in high altitude pulmonary edema or blood brain barrier disruption leading to cerebral micro-hemorrhage (MH). Platelet function in the development of microvascular lesions remained ill defined, and is still incompletely understood. In this study platelet- and endothelial cell-derived extracellular vesicles (PEV and EEV, respectively) and cell adhesion molecules were characterized in plasma samples of members of a high altitude expedition to delineate the contribution of platelets and endothelial cells to hypobaric hypoxia-induced vascular dysfunction. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0220133PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6675110PMC
March 2020
3 Reads

Mitochondrial DNA sequencing reveals association of variants and haplogroup M33a2'3 with High altitude pulmonary edema susceptibility in Indian male lowlanders.

Sci Rep 2019 07 29;9(1):10975. Epub 2019 Jul 29.

Defence Institute of Physiology and Allied Sciences, Timarpur, Delhi, 110054, India.

High Altitude Pulmonary Edema (HAPE) is a threatening disorder caused due to acute exposure to high altitude above 3000 m. Apart from multiple factors involved, the genetic factors also play an important function in the pathogenesis of HAPE. This study aims to evaluate the role of mtDNA polymorphism and their association with haplogroup in understanding the etiology of HAPE. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-47500-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6662842PMC
July 2019
3 Reads
5.078 Impact Factor

Effects of Adrenergic Agonists and Antagonists on Cardiopulmonary Function During Normobaric Hypoxia in Rat.

Front Physiol 2019 5;10:860. Epub 2019 Jul 5.

Carl-Ludwig-Institute for Physiology, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.

Pulmonary edema (PE) is an issue widely noted in acute exposure to hypoxia as seen in high altitude climbers, yet the etiology of this is not defined. Previous studies in rats showed that both hypoxia and strong sympathetic activation may induce PE. As acute exposure to hypoxia is accompanied by sympathetic activation, we assume that this may impair pulmonary circulation and contribute to the development of hypoxic PE. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fphys.2019.00860DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6624647PMC
July 2019
5 Reads

Pediatric High Altitude Cerebral Edema in the Nepal Himalayas.

Wilderness Environ Med 2019 Sep 11;30(3):306-309. Epub 2019 Jul 11.

Department of Emergency Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA.

High altitude cerebral edema (HACE) is a rare complication of ascent to altitudes of over 2500 m (8200 ft). We are not aware of a previously published case report of HACE in a patient under the age of 18 y. We report on 2 cases of suspected HACE in 2 patients, aged 12 and 16 y, who presented to the Manang Himalayan Rescue Association clinic at 3500 m. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wem.2019.05.003DOI Listing
September 2019
6 Reads

[Effects of simulated high-altitude hypobaric hypoxia on cardiac structure and function in rats].

Zhongguo Ying Yong Sheng Li Xue Za Zhi 2019 Feb;35(2):173-177

Clinical College of PLA Army General Hospital, Anhui Medical University, Beijing 100700.

Objective: To investigate the effects of simulated hypobaric hypoxia environment at 7 000 m above sea level on cardiac structure and function in rats.

Methods: A total of 96 male SD rats were randomly divided into high-altitude hypobaric hypoxia group (hypoxia group) and normobaric normoxia group (control group). Rats of hypoxia group were placed in a large cabin simulated 7 000 m high-altitude hypobaric hypoxia environment. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.12047/j.cjap.5751.2019.038DOI Listing
February 2019
9 Reads

Wilderness Medical Society Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Prevention and Treatment of Acute Altitude Illness: 2019 Update.

Wilderness Environ Med 2019 Dec 24;30(4S):S3-S18. Epub 2019 Jun 24.

Altitude Research Center, Division of Pulmonary Sciences and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO.

To provide guidance to clinicians about best preventive and therapeutic practices, the Wilderness Medical Society (WMS) convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based guidelines for prevention and treatment of acute mountain sickness, high altitude cerebral edema, and high altitude pulmonary edema. Recommendations are graded based on the quality of supporting evidence and the balance between the benefits and risks/burdens according to criteria put forth by the American College of Chest Physicians. The guidelines also provide suggested approaches to prevention and management of each form of acute altitude illness that incorporate these recommendations. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wem.2019.04.006DOI Listing
December 2019
11 Reads

The Complexity of Diagnosing High-Altitude Pulmonary Edema: A Case Report and Review of the Differential Diagnosis of Greater Than Expected Hypoxemia at Altitude.

High Alt Med Biol 2019 06;20(2):181-186

1 Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado.

High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is a common presumptive diagnosis for a patient who experiences significant dyspnea and cyanosis at altitude. In this study, we present a case of a 58-year-old woman who was initially diagnosed with HAPE, although further evaluation revealed the presence of two underlying contributors to her significant hypoxemia at altitude. We discuss the medical workup for causes of greater than expected hypoxemia at altitude and the role some relevant medical comorbidities may play. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/ham.2018.0109DOI Listing
June 2019
8 Reads

Endothelial cell Piezo1 mediates pressure-induced lung vascular hyperpermeability via disruption of adherens junctions.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2019 06 11;116(26):12980-12985. Epub 2019 Jun 11.

Department of Pharmacology, University of Illinois College of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612;

Increased pulmonary microvessel pressure experienced in left heart failure, head trauma, or high altitude can lead to endothelial barrier disruption referred to as capillary "stress failure" that causes leakage of protein-rich plasma and pulmonary edema. However, little is known about vascular endothelial sensing and transduction of mechanical stimuli inducing endothelial barrier disruption. Piezo1, a mechanosensing ion channel expressed in endothelial cells (ECs), is activated by elevated pressure and other mechanical stimuli. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.pnas.org/lookup/doi/10.1073/pnas.1902165116
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1902165116DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6600969PMC
June 2019
12 Reads

Mountain neurology.

Pract Neurol 2019 Oct 8;19(5):404-411. Epub 2019 Jun 8.

Internal Medicine, Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre, Moshi, United Republic of Tanzania.

Mountain climbers may develop specific illnesses that largely depend on the altitude reached and the rate of ascent. The popularity of travel to high altitude destinations, extreme tourist activities and mountain climbing means that neurologists in low-altitude countries are increasingly likely to encounter neurological problems and disorders in people exposed to high altitude. Additionally, they may have to advise patients with pre-existing neurological conditions on the risks of ascent to altitude. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://pn.bmj.com/lookup/doi/10.1136/practneurol-2017-001783
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/practneurol-2017-001783DOI Listing
October 2019
7 Reads

Ultrasound in Austere Environments.

High Alt Med Biol 2019 06 21;20(2):103-111. Epub 2019 May 21.

2 Division of Wilderness Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.

Ultrasonography is a noninvasive, reliable, repeatable, and inexpensive technology that has dramatically changed the practice of medicine. The clinical use of portable ultrasound devices has grown tremendously over the last 10 years in the fields of intensive care, emergency medicine, and anesthesiology. In this review we present the various ways that handheld portable ultrasound devices can be used in austere environments. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/ham.2018.0121DOI Listing
June 2019
17 Reads

Transcriptome profiles revealed the mechanisms underlying the adaptation of yak to high-altitude environments.

Sci Rep 2019 05 17;9(1):7558. Epub 2019 May 17.

Key Laboratory of Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau Animal Genetic Resource Reservation and Utilization, Sichuan Province and Ministry of Education, Southwest Minzu University, Chengdu, P. R. China.

The yak is a valuable species in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau of China. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms underlying its adaptation to high-altitude environments remain largely unknown. In the present study, comparative transcriptome sequencing was performed for lung and gluteus tissues from two species of low-altitude cattle (Sanjiang and Holstein cattle), Tibetan cattle (living at a moderate altitude), and yak (living at a high altitude) and the differentially expressed genes were validated using real-time quantitative PCR. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-43773-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6525198PMC
May 2019
12 Reads