56 results match your criteria Public Health Ethics [Journal]


Ethical Considerations for Global Health Decision-Making: Justice-Enhanced Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of New Technologies for .

Public Health Ethics 2018 Nov 18;11(3):275-292. Epub 2018 Jul 18.

Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute and Universität Basel.

We sought to assess formally the extent to which different control and elimination strategies for human African trypanosomiasis (Gambiense HAT) would exacerbate or alleviate experiences of societal disadvantage that traditional economic evaluation does not take into account. Justice-enhanced cost-effectiveness analysis (JE-CEA) is a normative approach under development to address social justice considerations in public health decision-making alongside other types of analyses. It aims to assess how public health interventions under analysis in comparative evaluation would be expected to influence the clustering of disadvantage across three core dimensions of well-being: agency, association and respect. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phy013DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6225893PMC
November 2018
1 Read

Research and Global Health Emergencies: On the Essential Role of Best Practice.

Authors:
Nayha Sethi

Public Health Ethics 2018 Nov 24;11(3):237-250. Epub 2018 Jul 24.

Liminal Spaces, Mason Institute, University of Edinburgh.

This article addresses an important, overlooked regulatory challenge during global health emergencies (GHEs). It provides novel insights into how, and why, best practice can support decision makers in interpreting and implementing key guidance on conducting research during GHEs. The ability to conduct research before, during and after such events is crucial. Read More

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https://academic.oup.com/phe/article/11/3/237/5058083
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phy014DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6225813PMC
November 2018
6 Reads

Influenza Vaccination Strategies Should Target Children.

Public Health Ethics 2018 Jul 8;11(2):221-234. Epub 2017 Dec 8.

University of Oxford.

Strategies to increase influenza vaccination rates have typically targeted healthcare professionals (HCPs) and individuals in various high-risk groups such as the elderly. We argue that they should (instead or as well) focus on increasing vaccination rates in children. Because children suffer higher influenza incidence rates than any other demographic group, and are major drivers of seasonal influenza epidemics, we argue that influenza vaccination strategies that serve to increase uptake rates in children are likely to be more effective in reducing influenza-related morbidity and mortality than those targeting HCPs or the elderly. Read More

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https://academic.oup.com/phe/article/11/2/221/4716924
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phx021DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6093440PMC
July 2018
18 Reads

The Acceptability of Online Consent in a Self-Test Serosurvey of Responders to the 2014-2016 West African Ebola Outbreak.

Public Health Ethics 2018 Jul 22;11(2):201-212. Epub 2017 Dec 22.

Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

Online participation in research is used increasingly to recruit geographically dispersed populations. Obtaining online consent is convenient, yet we know little about the acceptability of this practice. We carried out a serostudy among personnel returning to the UK/Ireland following deployment to West Africa during the 2014-2016 Ebola epidemic. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phx027DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6093377PMC
July 2018
3 Reads

Governing in Community-Based Research: Lessons from Canada's HIV Research Sector on Ethics, Publics and the Care of the Self.

Public Health Ethics 2017 Nov 12;10(3):315-328. Epub 2016 May 12.

Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto.

In this paper, we extend Michel Foucault's final works on the 'care of the self' to an empirical examination of research practice in community-based research (CBR). We use Foucault's 'morality of behaviors' to analyze interview data from a national sample of Canadian CBR practitioners working with communities affected by HIV. Despite claims in the literature that ethics review is overly burdensome for non-traditional forms of research, our findings suggest that many researchers using CBR have an ambivalent but ultimately productive relationship with institutional research ethics review requirements. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phw024DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5927123PMC
November 2017
3 Reads

Out of Alignment? Limitations of the Global Burden of Disease in Assessing the Allocation of Global Health Aid.

Public Health Ethics 2017 Nov 11;10(3):244-256. Epub 2017 Aug 11.

Biomedical Ethics Unit, Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics & Occupational Health, McGill University.

The Global Burden of Disease (GBD) project quantifies the impact of different health conditions by combining information about morbidity and premature mortality within a single metric, the Disability Adjusted Life Year. One important goal for the GBD project has been to inform decisions about global health priorities. A number of recent studies have used GBD data to argue that global health funding fails to align with the GBD. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phx012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5927004PMC
November 2017
2 Reads

Global Health Solidarity.

Public Health Ethics 2017 Jul 6;10(2):212-224. Epub 2016 May 6.

Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel.

For much of the 20th century, vulnerability to deprivations of health has often been defined by geographical and economic factors. Those in wealthy, usually 'Northern' and 'Western', parts of the world have benefited from infrastructures, and accidents of geography and climate, which insulate them from many serious threats to health. Conversely, poorer people are typically exposed to more threats to health, and have lesser access to the infrastructures needed to safeguard them against the worst consequences of such exposure. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phw021DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5927163PMC
July 2017
2 Reads

Epigenetics Changes Nothing: What a New Scientific Field Does and Does Not Mean for Ethics and Social Justice.

Public Health Ethics 2018 Apr 14;11(1):69-81. Epub 2017 Aug 14.

Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Occupational Health, Department of the Social Studies of Medicine, Biomedical Ethics Unit, McGill University.

Recently, ethicists have posited that consideration of epigenetic mechanisms presents novel challenges to concepts of justice and equality of opportunity, such as elevating the importance of environments in bioethics and providing a counterpoint to gross genetic determinism. We argue that new findings in epigenetic sciences, including those regarding intergenerational health effects, do not necessitate reconceptualization of theories of justice or the environment. To the contrary, such claims reflect a flawed understanding of epigenetics and its relation to genetics that may unintentionally undermine appeals to social justice. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phx013DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6307350PMC
April 2018
1 Read

Research Ethics Governance in Times of Ebola.

Public Health Ethics 2017 Apr 1;10(1):49-61. Epub 2016 Nov 1.

Department of Family and Community Medicine and Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto.

The Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) ethics review board (ERB) has been solicited in an unprecedented way to provide advice and review research protocols in an 'emergency' mode during the recent Ebola epidemic. Twenty-seven Ebola-related study protocols were reviewed between March 2014 and August 2015, ranging from epidemiological research, to behavioural research, infectivity studies and clinical trials with investigational products at (very) early development stages. This article examines the MSF ERB's experience addressing issues related to both the process of review and substantive ethical issues in this context. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phw039DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5444563PMC
April 2017
32 Reads

How do 'Public' Values Influence Individual Health Behaviour? An Empirical-Normative Analysis of Young Men's Discourse Regarding HIV Testing Practices.

Public Health Ethics 2016 Nov 23;9(3):264-275. Epub 2015 Nov 23.

University of British Columbia.

Philosophical arguments stemming from the public health ethics arena suggest that public health interventions ought to be subject to normative inquiry that considers relational values, including concepts such as solidarity, reciprocity and health equity. As yet, however, the extent to which 'public' values influence the 'autonomous' decisions of the public remains largely unexplored. Drawing on interviews with 50 men in Vancouver, Canada, this study employs a critical discourse analysis to examine participants' decisions and motivations to voluntarily access HIV testing and/or to accept a routine HIV test offer. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phv031DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5081038PMC
November 2016
3 Reads

Culling and the Common Good: Re-evaluating Harms and Benefits under the One Health Paradigm.

Public Health Ethics 2016 Nov 3;9(3):244-254. Epub 2016 May 3.

Department of Community Health Sciences, Cummings School of Medicine and Department of Ecosystem and Public Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Calgary.

One Health (OH) is a novel paradigm that recognizes that human and non-human animal health is interlinked through our shared environment. Increasingly prominent in public health responses to zoonoses, OH differs from traditional approaches to animal-borne infectious risks, because it also aims to promote the health of animals and ecological systems. Despite the widespread adoption of OH, culling remains a key component of institutional responses to the risks of zoonoses. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phw019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5081039PMC
November 2016
8 Reads

Letter to the Editor: New Study Raises Questions about Effectiveness of Nicotine Replacement Therapy.

Public Health Ethics 2016 Jul 12;9(2):229-230. Epub 2016 Jun 12.

Departments of Philosophy and Clinical Medicine, Macquarie University.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phw027DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4985906PMC
July 2016
7 Reads

Analysis of the Paternalistic Justification of an Agenda Setting Public Health Policy: The Case of Tobacco Plain Packaging.

Public Health Ethics 2016 Jul 30;9(2):208-228. Epub 2016 May 30.

University of Glasgow.

This article analyses the paternalistic justification of the world's first mandatory tobacco plain packaging policy, which came into force in Australia in 2012. The policy is setting international precedence, with a range of developed and developing countries planning and implementing similar policies. Understanding the paternalistic dimension of the policy is therefore of imminent international importance. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phw007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4985898PMC
July 2016
3 Reads

Towards a 'Sociorelational' Approach to Conceptualizing and Managing Addiction.

Public Health Ethics 2016 Jul 15;9(2):198-207. Epub 2016 Apr 15.

Department of Behavioural Sciences and Philosophy, University of Turku.

This article looks at how and why addiction should be understood as a 'sociorelational' (social and relational) disorder, and what this implies on a policy level in terms of the treatment and prevention of addiction. In light of scientific research, we argue that the neurobiological changes that underlie addiction are heavily influenced by sociorelational processes. We thereby advocate for a conceptual approach in which autonomy in addiction is a sociorelational concept, and social environments are considered autonomy undermining or autonomy promoting. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phw013DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4985901PMC
July 2016
3 Reads

Lifestyle Vaccines and Public Health: Exploring Policy Options for a Vaccine to Stop Smoking.

Public Health Ethics 2016 Jul 14;9(2):183-197. Epub 2016 Mar 14.

Maastricht University, School CAPHRI, Department of Health, Ethics, and Society.

Experimental vaccines are being developed for the treatment of 'unhealthy lifestyles' and associated chronic illnesses. Policymakers and other stakeholders will have to deal with the ethical issues that this innovation path raises: are there morally justified reasons to integrate these innovative biotechnologies in future health policies? Should public money be invested in further research? Focusing on the case of an experimental nicotine vaccine, this article explores the ethical aspects of 'lifestyle vaccines' for public health. Based on findings from a qualitative study into a vaccine for smoking cessation, the article articulates possible value conflicts related to nicotine vaccination as an intervention in tobacco control. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phw004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4985897PMC
July 2016
5 Reads

Comment on Jennings, 'Right Relation and Right Recognition in Public Health Ethics: Thinking through the Republic of Health'.

Authors:
Keith Syrett

Public Health Ethics 2016 Jul 16;9(2):180-182. Epub 2015 Apr 16.

Cardiff School of Law and Politics, Cardiff University, UK.

This paper offers a brief comment on Jennings' preceding paper, focusing on the capacity of a republican approach to public health ethics to facilitate reconceptualization of the right to health in situations of limited resources through a relational reading. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phv009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4985892PMC
July 2016
2 Reads

Right, Well-being and the Republic of Health: A Response to Jennings.

Authors:
David Owen

Public Health Ethics 2016 Jul 13;9(2):178-179. Epub 2016 Apr 13.

University of Southampton.

This commentary offers a response to Bruce Jennings' arguments concerning republicanism and health. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phw009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4985899PMC
July 2016
4 Reads

Right Relation and Right Recognition in Public Health Ethics: Thinking Through the Republic of Health.

Authors:
Bruce Jennings

Public Health Ethics 2016 Jul 26;9(2):168-177. Epub 2015 Nov 26.

Center for Humans and Nature and Vanderbilt University.

The further development of public health ethics will be assisted by a more direct engagement with political theory. In this way, the moral vocabulary of the liberal tradition should be supplemented-but not supplanted-by different conceptual and normative resources available from other traditions of political and social thought. This article discusses four lines of further development that the normative conceptual discourse of public health ethics might take. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phv032DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4985894PMC
July 2016
5 Reads

Commentary on Nielsen and Landes, 'Fighting Status Inequalities: Non-domination and Non-interference'.

Authors:
Cillian McBride

Public Health Ethics 2016 Jul 31;9(2):166-167. Epub 2016 Mar 31.

School of Politics, International Studies and Philosophy, Queen's University Belfast.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phw010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4985900PMC
July 2016
2 Reads

The Moral Physiology of Inequality: Response to 'Fighting Status Inequalities: Non-domination vs Non-interference'.

Authors:
Stephen John

Public Health Ethics 2016 Jul 20;9(2):164-165. Epub 2015 Apr 20.

Department of History and Philosophy of Science, University of Cambridge.

In this article, I respond to 'Fighting Status Inequalities'. I first note a niggle about the paper's assumption that lowering socio-economic inequalities will lower the social gradient in health. I then suggest two further ways in which neorepublicanism may relate to social epidemiology: in terms of 'moral physiology' and through analysing which inequalities are unjust. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phv006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4985891PMC
July 2016
2 Reads
1.269 Impact Factor

Fighting Status Inequalities: Non-domination vs Non-interference.

Public Health Ethics 2016 Jul 2;9(2):155-163. Epub 2015 Dec 2.

Copenhagen University.

Status inequalities seem to play a fairly big role in creating inequalities in health. This article assumes that there can be good reasons to fight status inequalities in order to reduce inequalities in health. It examines whether the neorepublican ideal of non-dominance does a better job as a theoretical foil for this as compared to a liberal notion of non-interference. Read More

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https://academic.oup.com/phe/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/phe/
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phv029DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4985893PMC
July 2016
8 Reads

Public Health Interventions as Regulatory Governance: The Place of Political Theory.

Authors:
Karen Yeung

Public Health Ethics 2016 Jul 3;9(2):153-154. Epub 2016 May 3.

Director, Centre for Technology, Ethics, Law & Society (TELOS), The Dickson Poon School of Law, King's College London and Distinguished Visiting Fellow, Melbourne Law School.

This is a reply to Steve Latham's Article for the Republicanism special issue. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phw016DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4985902PMC
July 2016
3 Reads

Republicanism and the Paradox of Public Health Preconditions Comments on Steve Latham.

Authors:
Leticia Morales

Public Health Ethics 2016 Jul 16;9(2):150-152. Epub 2015 Dec 16.

Institute for Health and Social Policy, McGill University.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phv035DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4985896PMC
July 2016
3 Reads

Political Theory, Values and Public Health.

Authors:
Stephen R Latham

Public Health Ethics 2016 Jul 9;9(2):139-149. Epub 2015 Dec 9.

Interdisciplinary Center for Bioethics, Yale University.

This article offers some general criticisms of the idea that any political theory can legitimate public health interventions, and then some particular criticisms of Civic Republicanism as a political theory for public health. Civic Republicanism, I argue, legitimizes liberty-infringing public health interventions by demanding high levels of civic engagement in framing and reviewing them; to demand such engagement in pursuit of such a baseline value as health will leave insufficient civic energy for the pursuit of higher values. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phv033DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4985895PMC
July 2016
4 Reads

Public Health and Political Theory: The Importance of Taming Individualism.

Authors:
A M Viens

Public Health Ethics 2016 Jul 30;9(2):136-138. Epub 2016 May 30.

University of Southampton.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phw025DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4985905PMC
July 2016
3 Reads

Democracy, Law and Relationships of Domination-A Response to 'Can Republicanism Tame Public Health?'

Authors:
Paul Scott

Public Health Ethics 2016 Jul 28;9(2):134-135. Epub 2016 Apr 28.

School of Law, University of Southampton.

This brief comment responds to some of the issues raised by Daniel Weinstock's paper on the application of the republican ideal to public health. It considers the application outside of that specific context of both the problem Weinstock identifies and the solution he proposes. It queries, with reference to the different sorts of relationships of domination which exist, whether a republican approach to public health might not be better to seek to begin from private relationships of domination and to define its scope with reference to such relationships. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phw023DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4985904PMC
July 2016
2 Reads

Can Republicanism Tame Public Health?

Authors:
Daniel Weinstock

Public Health Ethics 2016 Jul 11;9(2):125-133. Epub 2016 May 11.

Institute for Health and Social Policy, McGill University.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phw018DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4985903PMC
July 2016
2 Reads

Introduction: Towards a Republic of Health?

Public Health Ethics 2016 Jul 22;9(2):123-124. Epub 2016 Jun 22.

University of Southampton.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phw028DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4985907PMC
July 2016
4 Reads

Doing 'Upstream' Priority-Setting for Global Health with Justice: Moving from Vision to Practice?

Authors:
Keith Syrett

Public Health Ethics 2018 Nov 3;11(3):265-274. Epub 2016 Jun 3.

Cardiff School of Law and Politics, Cardiff University.

The vision of global health with justice which Larry Gostin articulates in his book envisages a switch to 'upstream' priority-setting for expenditure on health, with a focus upon social determinants and a goal of redressing health inequalities. This article explores what is meant by this proposal and offers a critical evaluation of it. It is argued that difficulties arise in respect of the ethical and evidential bases for such an approach to the setting of priorities, while significant challenges may also arise in the necessary modification of structures of governance. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phw026DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6225889PMC
November 2018
1 Read

Reply to Ackermann.

Public Health Ethics 2016 Apr 14;9(1):121-122. Epub 2016 Jan 14.

Departments of Philosophy and Clinical Medicine, Macquarie University.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phv039DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5926905PMC
April 2016
2 Reads

Ethical Criteria for Human Challenge Studies in Infectious Diseases.

Public Health Ethics 2016 Apr 27;9(1):92-103. Epub 2015 Sep 27.

University of Oxford.

Purposeful infection of healthy volunteers with a microbial pathogen seems at odds with acceptable ethical standards, but is an important contemporary research avenue used to study infectious diseases and their treatments. Generally termed 'controlled human infection studies', this research is particularly useful for fast tracking the development of candidate vaccines and may provide unique insight into disease pathogenesis otherwise unavailable. However, scarce bioethical literature is currently available to assist researchers and research ethics committees in negotiating the distinct issues raised by research involving purposefully infecting healthy volunteers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phv026DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5926904PMC
April 2016
4 Reads

An Ethical Justification for Expanding the Notion of Effectiveness in Vaccine Post-Market Monitoring: Insights from the HPV Vaccine in Canada.

Public Health Ethics 2016 Apr 29;9(1):78-91. Epub 2015 Jan 29.

University of Toronto.

Health regulators must carefully monitor the real-world safety and effectiveness of marketed vaccines through post-market monitoring in order to protect the public's health and promote those vaccines that best achieve public health goals. Yet, despite the fact that vaccines used in collective immunization programmes should be assessed in the context of a public health response, post-market effectiveness monitoring is often limited to assessing immunogenicity or limited programmatic features, rather than assessing effectiveness across populations. We argue that post-market monitoring ought to be expanded in two ways to reflect a 'public health notion of post-market effectiveness', which incorporates normative public health considerations: (i) effectiveness monitoring should yield higher quality data and grant special attention to underrepresented and vulnerable populations; and (ii) the scope of effectiveness should be expanded to include a consideration of the various social factors that maximize (and minimize) a vaccine's effectiveness at the population level, paying particular attention to how immunization programmes impact related health gradients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phu049DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4778494PMC
April 2016
6 Reads

Potential Conflict of Interest and Bias in the RACGP's Smoking Cessation Guidelines: Are GPs Provided with the Best Advice on Smoking Cessation for their Patients?

Public Health Ethics 2015 Nov 20;8(3):319-331. Epub 2015 Apr 20.

Macquarie University.

Patient visits are an important opportunity for general practitioners (GPs) to discuss the risks of smoking and cessation strategies. In Australia, the guidelines on cessation published by the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (the ) represent a key resource for GPs in this regard. The predominant message of the is that pharmacotherapy should be recommended as first-line therapy for smokers expressing an interest in quitting. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phv010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4638060PMC
November 2015
11 Reads

The Return of Lombroso? Ethical Aspects of (Visions of) Preventive Forensic Screening.

Public Health Ethics 2015 Nov 28;8(3):270-283. Epub 2015 Jan 28.

Department of Philosophy, Linguistics and Theory of Science & Centre for Ethics, Law and Mental Health, University of Gothenburg.

The vision of legendary criminologist Cesare Lombroso to use scientific theories of individual causes of crime as a basis for screening and prevention programmes targeting individuals at risk for future criminal behaviour has resurfaced, following advances in genetics, neuroscience and psychiatric epidemiology. This article analyses this idea and maps its ethical implications from a public health ethical standpoint. Twenty-seven variants of the new Lombrosian vision of forensic screening and prevention are distinguished, and some scientific and technical limitations are noted. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phu048DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4638059PMC
November 2015
5 Reads

Is Antimicrobial Resistance a Slowly Emerging Disaster?

Public Health Ethics 2015 Nov 30;8(3):255-265. Epub 2015 Jun 30.

Institute of Experimental Medicine, Christian-Albrechts University Kiel.

The problem of antimicrobial resistance is so dire that people are predicting that the era of antibiotics may be coming to an end, ushering in a 'post-antibiotic' era. A comprehensive policy response is therefore urgently needed. A part of this response will require framing the problem in such a way that adequately reflects its nature as well as encompassing an approach that has the best prospect of success. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phv015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4638061PMC
November 2015
15 Reads

The Ethical Significance of Antimicrobial Resistance.

Public Health Ethics 2015 Nov 30;8(3):209-224. Epub 2015 Sep 30.

Southampton Law School, University of Southampton.

In this paper, we provide a state-of-the-art overview of the ethical challenges that arise in the context of antimicrobial resistance (AMR), which includes an introduction to the contributions to the symposium in this issue. We begin by discussing why AMR is a distinct ethical issue, and should not be viewed purely as a technical or medical problem. In the second section, we expand on some of these arguments and argue that AMR presents us with a broad range of ethical problems that must be addressed as part of a successful policy response to emerging drug resistance. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phv025DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4638062PMC
November 2015
11 Reads

Caribbean Heat Threatens Health, Well-being and the Future of Humanity.

Public Health Ethics 2015 Jul;8(2):196-208

Old Dominion University, Center for Global Health, Health Sciences and Windward Islands Research and Education Foundation (WINDREF).

Climate change has substantial impacts on public health and safety, disease risks and the provision of health care, with the poor being particularly disadvantaged. Management of the associated health risks and changing health service requirements requires adequate responses at local levels. Health-care providers are central to these responses. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phv008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4498417PMC
July 2015
2 Reads

A Global Public Goods Approach to the Health of Migrants.

Public Health Ethics 2015 Jul;8(2):121-129

University of Birmingham.

This paper explores a global public goods approach to the health of migrants. It suggests that this approach establishes that there are a number of health goods which must be provided to migrants not because these are theirs by right (although this may independently be the case), but because these goods are primary goods which fit the threefold criteria of global public goods. There are two key advantages to this approach: first, it is non-confrontational and non-oppositional, and second, it provides self-interested arguments to provide at least some health goods to migrants and thus appeals to those little moved by rights-based arguments. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phv013DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4498418PMC
July 2015
3 Reads

The Restaurant Food Hot Potato: Stop Passing it on-A Commentary on Mah and Timming's, 'Equity in Public Health Ethics: The Case of Menu Labelling Policy at the Local Level'.

Authors:
Kathryn L MacKay

Public Health Ethics 2015 Apr;8(1):90-93

University of Birmingham.

In the case discussion, 'Equity in Public Health Ethics: The Case of Menu Labelling Policy at the Local Level' (2014), Mah and Timming state that menu labelling would 'place requirements for information disclosure on private sector food businesses, which, as a policy instrument, is arguably less intrusive than related activities such as requiring changes to the food content'. In this commentary on Mah and Timming's case study, I focus on discussing how menu-labelling policy permits governments to avoid addressing the heart of the problem, which is high-calorie, high-sodium restaurant food. Menu labelling policy does not address food content in a way that is meaningful for change, instead relying on individuals to change their behaviour given new information. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phu046DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4370213PMC
April 2015
2 Reads

Ensuring Access to HIV Prevention Services in South African HIV Vaccine Trials: Correspondence Between Guidelines and Practices.

Authors:
Zaynab Essack

Public Health Ethics 2014 Jul;7(2):195-206

HIV AIDS Vaccines Ethics Group (HAVEG), School of Applied Human Sciences, College of Humanities, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Pietermaritzburg, South Africa.

Researchers and sponsors are required to assist HIV prevention trial participants to remain HIV-uninfected by ensuring access to prevention services. Ethics guidelines require that these HIV risk-reduction services be state of the art. This and related ethics recommendations have been intensely debated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phu010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4097012PMC
July 2014
5 Reads

Using Social Networking Sites for Communicable Disease Control: Innovative Contact Tracing or Breach of Confidentiality?

Public Health Ethics 2014 Apr;7(1):47-50

Consultant in Communicable Disease Control, North West London Health Protection Team, Public Health England.

Social media applications such as Twitter, YouTube and Facebook have attained huge popularity, with more than three billion people and organizations predicted to have a social networking account by 2015. Social media offers a rapid avenue of communication with the public and has potential benefits for communicable disease control and surveillance. However, its application in everyday public health practice raises a number of important issues around confidentiality and autonomy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/pht023DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3969525PMC
April 2014
2 Reads

Enhancing Children against Unhealthy Behaviors-An Ethical and Policy Assessment of Using a Nicotine Vaccine.

Public Health Ethics 2013 Jul;6(2):197-206

Sapir Academic College, Israel.

Health behaviors such as tobacco use contribute significantly to poor health. It is widely recognized that efforts to prevent poor health outcomes should begin in early childhood. Biomedical enhancements, such as a nicotine vaccine, are now emerging and have potential to be used for primary prevention of common diseases. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/pht006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3712401PMC
July 2013
3 Reads

Ancillary Care: From Theory to Practice in International Clinical Research.

Public Health Ethics 2013 Jul 13;6(2):154-169. Epub 2013 Jun 13.

Monash University.

How international research might contribute to justice in global health has not been substantively addressed by bioethics. This article describes how the provision of ancillary care can link international research to the reduction of global health disparities. It identifies the ancillary care obligations supported by a theory of global justice, showing that Jennifer Ruger's health capability paradigm requires the delivery of ancillary care to trial participants for a limited subset of conditions that cause severe morbidity and mortality. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/pht015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3712402PMC
July 2013
3 Reads

Social Epigenetics and Equality of Opportunity.

Public Health Ethics 2013 Jul 15;6(2):142-153. Epub 2013 Jul 15.

Center for Translational Genomics and Bioinformatics, CEHUM, Universidade Do Minho and San Raffaele Scientific Institute.

Recent epidemiological reports of associations between socioeconomic status and epigenetic markers that predict vulnerability to diseases are bringing to light substantial biological effects of social inequalities. Here, we start the discussion of the moral consequences of these findings. We firstly highlight their explanatory importance in the context of the research program on the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) and the social determinants of health. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/pht019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3712403PMC
July 2013
4 Reads

Conceptualizing a Human Right to Prevention in Global HIV/AIDS Policy.

Public Health Ethics 2012 Nov 5;5(3):263-282. Epub 2012 Dec 5.

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Given current constraints on universal treatment campaigns, recent advances in public health prevention initiatives have revitalized efforts to stem the tide of HIV transmission. Yet, despite a growing imperative for prevention-supported by the promise of behavioral, structural and biomedical approaches to lower the incidence of HIV-human rights frameworks remain limited in addressing collective prevention policy through global health governance. Assessing the evolution of rights-based approaches to global HIV/AIDS policy, this review finds that human rights have shifted from collective public health to individual treatment access. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phs034DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3515946PMC
November 2012
4 Reads

In Search of the 'New Informal Legitimacy' of Médecins Sans Frontières.

Authors:
Philippe Calain

Public Health Ethics 2012 Apr 30;5(1):56-66. Epub 2011 Dec 30.

Unité de Recherche sur les Enjeux et Pratiques Humanitaires (UREPH), Médecins Sans Frontières-Switzerland.

FOR MEDICAL HUMANITARIAN ORGANIZATIONS, MAKING THEIR SOURCES OF LEGITIMACY EXPLICIT IS A USEFUL EXERCISE, IN RESPONSE TO: misperceptions, concerns over the 'humanitarian space', controversies about specific humanitarian actions, challenges about resources allocation and moral suffering among humanitarian workers. This is also a difficult exercise, where normative criteria such as international law or humanitarian principles are often misrepresented as primary sources of legitimacy. This essay first argues for a morally principled definition of humanitarian medicine, based on the selfless intention of individual humanitarian actors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phr036DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3309926PMC
April 2012
4 Reads

Can Broad Consent be Informed Consent?

Authors:
Mark Sheehan

Public Health Ethics 2011 Nov 3;4(3):226-235. Epub 2011 Aug 3.

Oxford BRC Ethics Fellow and James Martin Research Fellow, Oxford NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, the Ethox Centre and the Institute for Science and Ethics, University of Oxford.

In biobanks, a broader model of consent is often used and justified by a range of different strategies that make reference to the potential benefits brought by the research it will facilitate combined with the low level of risk involved (provided adequate measures are in place to protect privacy and confidentiality) or a questioning of the centrality of the notion of informed consent. Against this, it has been suggested that the lack of specific information about particular uses of the samples means that such consent cannot be fully autonomous and so is unethical. My answer to the title question is a definite 'yes'. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phr020DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3218673PMC
November 2011
3 Reads

Reasons Why Post-Trial Access to Trial Drugs Should, or Need not be Ensured to Research Participants: A Systematic Review.

Public Health Ethics 2011 Jul 11;4(2):160-184. Epub 2011 Jul 11.

Wellcome Trust Research Fellow, Centre of Medical Law and Ethics, School of Law, King's College London.

Background: researchers and sponsors increasingly confront the issue of whether participants in a clinical trial should have post-trial access (PTA) to the trial drug. Legislation and guidelines are inconsistent, ambiguous or silent about many aspects of PTA. Recent research highlights the potential importance of systematic reviews (SRs) of reason-based literatures in informing decision-making in medicine, medical research and health policy. Read More

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https://academic.oup.com/phe/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/phe/
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phr013DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3133737PMC
July 2011
3 Reads

Working with Concepts: The Role of Community in International Collaborative Biomedical Research.

Public Health Ethics 2011 Apr 2;4(1):26-39. Epub 2011 Mar 2.

The Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI)- Wellcome Trust Research programme; The Centre for Clinical Vaccinology and Tropical Medicine, Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University; The Ethox Centre, Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, Oxford University.

The importance of communities in strengthening the ethics of international collaborative research is increasingly highlighted, but there has been much debate about the meaning of the term 'community' and its specific normative contribution. We argue that 'community' is a contingent concept that plays an important normative role in research through the existence of morally significant interplay between notions of community and individuality. We draw on experience of community engagement in rural Kenya to illustrate two aspects of this interplay: (i) that taking individual informed consent seriously involves understanding and addressing the influence of communities in which individuals' lives are embedded; (ii) that individual participation can generate risks and benefits for communities as part of the wider implications of research. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phr007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3058176PMC
April 2011
3 Reads

A Commentary on Jaffe and Hope's Proposed Ethical Framework.

Authors:
Jerome A Singh

Public Health Ethics 2010 Nov 17;3(3):303-304. Epub 2010 Nov 17.

Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA), Durban, South Africa; Dalla Lana School of Public Health and Joint Centre for Bioethics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; McLaughlin-Rotman Centre for Global Health, University Health Network and University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phq029DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2984561PMC
November 2010
4 Reads