2,892 results match your criteria Psittacosis


[Laboratory diagnosis of rare diseases].

Lakartidningen 2018 Nov 27;115. Epub 2018 Nov 27.

Klinisk kemi och Klinisk och experimentell medicin, Linköpings Universitet - Linköping , Sweden -.

Psittacosis (parrot fever) is underdiagnosed in Sweden, possibly due to lack of awareness, and the fact that only five out of 24 clinical microbiology laboratories routinely perform the PCR test for Chlamydia psittaci. The test has shown 100% sensitivity and 100% sensitivity for the pathogen in samples from the lower part of the respiratory tract which caters for a high predictive value in patients with symptoms and signs of community-acquired atypical pneumonias, provided optimal patient selection. Knowledge and awareness of treatable rare diseases amongst healthcare personnel combined with conveniently available cost-effective diagnostic techniques is essential for improvements in the handling of rare diseases. Read More

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November 2018
2 Reads

[Psittacosis - a forgotten diagnosis in Sweden?]

Lakartidningen 2018 Nov 27;115. Epub 2018 Nov 27.

Clinical Microbiology - Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset Solna, Sweden Clinical Microbiology - Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset Solna, Sweden.

Psittacosis, parrot fever, is an infectious disease caused by Chlamydophila psittaci, a common pathogen among birds. The clinical course ranges from a mild flu-like illness to severe disease that requires intensive care in humans. We report three cases of severe pneumonia where C. Read More

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November 2018
2 Reads

Chlamydophila psittaci pneumonia associated to exposure to fulmar birds (Fulmaris glacialis) in the Faroe Islands.

Infect Dis (Lond) 2018 Sep 21:1-5. Epub 2018 Sep 21.

a Medical Department, Infectious Diseases Division , National Hospital Faroe Islands , Tórshavn , Faroe Islands.

Background: For more than 200 years people in the Faroe Islands have supplemented their food by hunting different species of wild birds in the Faroe Islands. Traditionally, juvenile fulmars (Fulmarus glacialis) are caught at sea in late August. The fulmars may be infected or colonized with the bacterium Chlamydophila psittaci which may infect the hunter by the respiratory route and mostly presents as an atypical pneumonia, also called psittacosis or ornithosis or parrot fever. Read More

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September 2018
8 Reads

Laboratory methods for case finding in human psittacosis outbreaks: a systematic review.

BMC Infect Dis 2018 Aug 30;18(1):442. Epub 2018 Aug 30.

Centre for Infectious Diseases, Epidemiology and Surveillance, Centre for Infectious Disease Control, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands.

Background: Psittacosis outbreak investigations require rapid identification of cases in order to trace possible sources and perform public health risk assessments. In recent outbreaks in the Netherlands, such investigations were hampered by the non-specificity of laboratory testing methods to identify human Chlamydia psittaci infections.

Method: A systematic search of PubMed and Scopus databases of literature published between 01 January, 1986 and 03 July, 2017 was done to find best practices of laboratory-testing methods used in psittacosis outbreaks of two or more human cases. Read More

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August 2018
17 Reads

Gestational Psittacosis Resulting in Neonatal Death Identified by Next-Generation RNA Sequencing of Postmortem, Formalin-Fixed Lung Tissue.

Open Forum Infect Dis 2018 Aug 22;5(8):ofy172. Epub 2018 Aug 22.

The University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, Utah.

Psittacosis is a rare zoonosis that can cause severe disease and adverse outcomes during pregnancy. We identified a previously elusive case of psittacosis causing premature delivery and infant death by next-generation RNA sequencing of postmortem tissues. Hypothesis-free pathogen detection in postmortem specimens can increase the yield of epidemiologic and cause-of-death studies. Read More

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August 2018
2 Reads

Virulence-related comparative transcriptomics of infectious and non-infectious chlamydial particles.

BMC Genomics 2018 Aug 2;19(1):575. Epub 2018 Aug 2.

Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Leibniz Institute for Natural Product Research and Infection Biology - Hans Knöll Institute (HKI), Beutenbergstraße 11A, 07745, Jena, Germany.

Background: Members of the phylum Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular pathogens of humans and animals and have a serious impact on host health. They comprise several zoonotic species with varying disease outcomes and prevalence. To investigate differences in virulence, we focused on Chlamydia psittaci, C. Read More

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August 2018
8 Reads

Wild and domestic bird faeces likely source of psittacosis transmission-A case-control study in Sweden, 2014-2016.

Zoonoses Public Health 2018 11 8;65(7):790-797. Epub 2018 Jul 8.

The Public Health Agency of Sweden, Stockholm, Sweden.

Psittacosis is a zoonotic disease transmitted by birds. In Sweden, where psittacosis is notifiable, an average of eight cases per year were reported between 2002 and 2012. In 2013, an unusual increase in cases in southern Sweden was associated with exposure to wild birds. Read More

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November 2018
16 Reads

Chlamydiosis in farmed chickens in Slovakia and zoonotic risk for humans.

Ann Agric Environ Med 2018 Jun 23;25(2):320-325. Epub 2018 Feb 23.

Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, Pavol Jozef Šafárik University, Košice, Slovakia.

Introduction: Chlamydia psittaci is an obligate intracellular Gram-negative bacterium causing respiratory disease (chlamydiosis) or asymptomatic carriage in poultry. In humans, it is a zoonotic agent of ornithosis/psittacosis. Due to low awareness of the disease and variable clinical presentation, psittacosis is often remains unrecognised as such by general practitioners. Read More

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June 2018
10 Reads

A Psittacosis Outbreak among English Office Workers with Little or No Contact with Birds, August 2015.

PLoS Curr 2018 Apr 27;10. Epub 2018 Apr 27.

Public Health England East Midlands, Nottingham, United Kingdom.

Introduction: On 14th August 2015 an office manager informed Public Health England of five employees known to have been diagnosed with pneumonia over the previous three weeks. We investigated to establish whether an outbreak occurred and to identify and control the source of infection.

Methods: We undertook case finding for self-reported pneumonia cases at local businesses (July-August 2015). Read More

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April 2018
10 Reads

Chlamydia psittaci and C. avium in feral pigeon (Columba livia domestica) droppings in two cities in the Netherlands.

Vet Q 2018 Dec 5;38(1):63-66. Epub 2018 Jun 5.

b Department of Bacteriology and Epidemiology , Wageningen Bioveterinary Research , Lelystad , The Netherlands.

Background: Feral pigeons (Columba livia domestica) live and breed in many city centres and contact with their droppings can be a hazard for human health if the birds carry Chlamydia psittaci.

Objective: The aim of this study was to establish whether pigeon droppings in two Dutch cities (Utrecht and Haarlem) contain C. psittaci and/or C. Read More

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December 2018
6 Reads

An epizootic of Chlamydia psittaci equine reproductive loss associated with suspected spillover from native Australian parrots.

Emerg Microbes Infect 2018 May 16;7(1):88. Epub 2018 May 16.

Animal Research Centre, University of the Sunshine Coast, 91 Sippy Downs Drive, Sippy Downs, 4556, QLD, Australia.

Chlamydia psittaci is an avian pathogen capable of spill-over infections to humans. A parrot C. psittaci strain was recently detected in an equine reproductive loss case associated with a subsequent cluster of human C. Read More

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May 2018
1 Read

An unusual presentation of a case of human psittacosis.

Respir Med Case Rep 2018 2;23:138-142. Epub 2018 Feb 2.

Dept. of Respiratory Medicine, Ghent University Hospital, Corneel Heymanslaan 10, B-9000, Ghent, Belgium.

Background: is a gram-negative, obligate intracellular organism. Birds are the main reservoir, but also non-avian domestic animals and humans can be infected. In humans it mostly causes respiratory infections due to occupational exposure with varying severity. Read More

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February 2018
3 Reads

Veterinary Students' Knowledge and Perceptions About Antimicrobial Stewardship and Biosecurity-A National Survey.

Antibiotics (Basel) 2018 Apr 18;7(2). Epub 2018 Apr 18.

Asia-Pacific Centre for Animal Health, Department of Veterinary Biosciences, Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, Melbourne Veterinary School, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3050, Australia.

A better understanding of veterinary students’ perceptions, attitudes, and knowledge about antimicrobial stewardship and biosecurity could facilitate more effective education of future veterinarians about these important issues. A multicenter cross-sectional study was performed by administering a questionnaire to veterinary students expected to graduate in 2017 or 2018 in all Australian veterinary schools. Four hundred and seventy-six of 1246 students (38%) completed the survey. Read More

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April 2018
5 Reads

ERK1/2 and the Bcl-2 Family Proteins Mcl-1, tBid, and Bim Are Involved in Inhibition of Apoptosis During Persistent Chlamydia psittaci Infection.

Inflammation 2018 Aug;41(4):1372-1383

Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory for Special Pathogens Prevention and Control, Institute of Pathogenic Biology, Medical College, University of South China, Hengyang, China; and Hunan Province Cooperative Innovation Center for Molecular Target New Drug Study, Hengyang, 421001, China.

Chlamydia psittaci is an obligate intracellular pathogen that can cause zoonosis. Persistent C. psittaci infection can inhibit apoptosis in host cells, thus extending their survival and enabling them to complete their growth cycle. Read More

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August 2018
3 Reads

A preliminary survey of Chlamydia psittaci genotypes from native and introduced birds in New Zealand.

N Z Vet J 2018 May 1;66(3):162-165. Epub 2018 Mar 1.

a School of Veterinary Science , Massey University , Palmerston North 4410 , New Zealand.

Aim: To describe the Chlamydia psittaci genotypes in samples from native and introduced birds from New Zealand by analysis of the sequence variation of the ompA gene.

Methods: DNA was extracted from samples collected from a non-random sample of birds; either swabs from live asymptomatic birds or birds with clinical signs, or formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples from historical post-mortem cases. The presence of C. Read More

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May 2018
1 Read

Seroprevalence of among Employees of Two German Duck Farms.

Eur J Microbiol Immunol (Bp) 2017 Dec 19;7(4):267-273. Epub 2017 Oct 19.

Institute for Medical Microbiology, University Medical Center Göttingen, Kreuzbergring 57, 37075 Göttingen, Germany.

Psittacosis is a zoonotic infectious disease that is caused by To determine the occupational risk of getting the infection, we investigated the seroprevalence of among employees of two German duck farms and two slaughterhouses according to their level of exposure to the pathogen during the years 2010, 2007, and 2004. In summary, we found low seroprevalence (≈ 8%) throughout the study population almost irrespective of the duty of a given worker. Surprisingly, in 2010, the anti-. Read More

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December 2017
3 Reads

CHLAMYDIA PSITTACI IN FERAL ROSY-FACED LOVEBIRDS ( AGAPORNIS ROSEICOLLIS) AND OTHER BACKYARD BIRDS IN MARICOPA COUNTY, ARIZONA, USA.

J Wildl Dis 2018 04 25;54(2):248-260. Epub 2018 Jan 25.

6   University of Georgia, College of Veterinary Medicine, Infectious Diseases Laboratory, 110 Riverbend Road, Athens, Georgia 30602, USA.

In 2013, a mortality event of nonnative, feral Rosy-faced Lovebirds ( Agapornis roseicollis) in residential backyards in Maricopa County, Arizona, US was attributed to infection with Chlamydia psittaci. In June 2014, additional mortality occurred in the same region. Accordingly, in August 2014 we sampled live lovebirds and sympatric bird species visiting backyard bird feeders to determine the prevalence of DNA and the seroprevalence of antibodies to C. Read More

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April 2018
13 Reads

Disease burden of psittacosis in the Netherlands.

Epidemiol Infect 2018 02 24;146(3):303-305. Epub 2018 Jan 24.

Centre for Epidemiology and Surveillance of Infectious Diseases,National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM),P.O. Box 1,3720 BA Bilthoven,The Netherlands.

Psittacosis (infection with Chlamydia psittaci) can have diverse presentations in humans, ranging from asymptomatic infection to severe systemic disease. Awareness of psittacosis and its presentations are low among clinicians and the general public. Therefore, underdiagnosis and thereby underestimation of the incidence and public health importance of psittacosis is very likely. Read More

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February 2018
3 Reads

Molecular evidence to suggest pigeon-type Chlamydia psittaci in association with an equine foal loss.

Transbound Emerg Dis 2018 Jun 19;65(3):911-915. Epub 2018 Jan 19.

Centre for Animal Health Innovation, University of the Sunshine Coast, Sippy Downs, NSW, Australia.

Chlamydia psittaci is an important avian pathogen with spillover from infected wild and domesticated birds also posing a risk to human health. We recently reported a case of C. psittaci equine placentitis associated with further spillover to humans. Read More

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June 2018
3 Reads

The role of zoonotic chlamydial agents in ruminants abortion.

Iran J Microbiol 2017 Oct;9(5):288-294

Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran.

Background And Objectives: Enzootic abortion of ewes (EAE) is caused by infection of sheep and goats by bacterium. Chlamydial abortion in bovine could occur by and is the causative agent of psittacosis or ornithosis disease in humans and birds. It also causes acute pneumonia in cattle and sheep. Read More

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October 2017
9 Reads

Development of a multiplex TaqMan real-time PCR assay for the detection of Chlamydia psittaci and Chlamydia pneumoniae in human clinical specimens.

Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis 2018 Mar 27;90(3):167-170. Epub 2017 Nov 27.

Division of Bacterial Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA. Electronic address:

Diagnosis of Chlamydia psittaci and Chlamydia pneumoniae infections has traditionally relied on serological assays. We developed a multiplex real-time PCR assay for detection of C. psittaci, C. Read More

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March 2018
7 Reads

Circulating and broncho-alveolar interleukin-6 in relation to body temperature in an experimental model of bovine Chlamydia psittaci infection.

PLoS One 2017 27;12(12):e0189321. Epub 2017 Dec 27.

Institute of Molecular Pathogenesis at 'Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut' (Federal Research Institute for Animal Health), Jena, Germany.

In rodent models of experimentally induced fever, the important role of interleukin-6 (IL-6) as a circulating endogenous pyrogen is well established. Studies employing larger animal species and real infections are scarce. Therefore, we assessed bioactive IL-6 in peripheral blood and in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of calves after intra-bronchial inoculation with vital Chlamydia psittaci (Cp), with inactivated Cp, or with BGM cells. Read More

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January 2018
9 Reads

Hypercalcemia in children: three cases report with unusual clinical presentations.

J Bras Nefrol 2017 Apr-Jun;39(2):213-216

Universidade Estadual de Campinas.

Hypercalcemia is a rare condition in childhood; the most common causes are primary hyperparathyroidism, malignancy, prolonged immobilisation, thyrotoxicosis, thiazide diuretic, supplements containing calcium, milk-alkali syndrome, vitamin D intoxication, infections and idiopathic. We present three cases of severe hypercalcemia of unusual causes in children. The first patient had high fever, poor general condition, weight loss and myalgia. Read More

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July 2018
6 Reads

Equine chlamydiosis-An emerging infectious disease requiring a one health surveillance approach.

Zoonoses Public Health 2018 02 5;65(1):218-221. Epub 2017 Oct 5.

Population Health Unit, Hunter New England Local Health, Wallsend, NSW, Australia.

Psittacosis is a rare but potentially fatal zoonosis caused by Chlamydia psittaci, an organism that is typically associated with bird contact. However C. psittaci is capable of infecting other non-avian hosts, such as horses, sheep, cattle and goats. Read More

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February 2018
43 Reads

The JAK/STAT3 signaling pathway mediates inhibition of host cell apoptosis by Chlamydia psittaci infection.

Pathog Dis 2017 09;75(7)

College of Public Health, University of South China, 28 West Changsheng Rd., Hengyang, Hunan 421001, China.

The JAK-STAT3 signaling pathway is a key regulator of cell growth, motility, migration, invasion and apoptosis in mammalian cells. Infection with intracellular pathogens of the genus Chlamydia can inhibit host cell apoptosis, and here we asked whether the JAK-STAT3 pathway participates in chlamydial anti-apoptotic activity. We found that, compared with uninfected cells, levels of JAK1 and STAT3 mRNA as well as total and phosphorylated JAK1 and STAT3 protein, were significantly increased in C. Read More

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September 2017
9 Reads

Chlamydia psittaci (psittacosis) as a cause of community-acquired pneumonia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Epidemiol Infect 2017 11 26;145(15):3096-3105. Epub 2017 Sep 26.

National Institute for Public Health and the Environment,Centre for Infectious Disease Control,Antonie van Leeuwenhoeklaan 9,3721 MA Bilthoven,the Netherlands.

Psittacosis is a zoonotic infectious disease caused by the transmission of the bacterium Chlamydia psittaci from birds to humans. Infections in humans mainly present as community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). However, most cases of CAP are treated without diagnostic testing, and the importance of C. Read More

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November 2017
8 Reads

Compendium of Measures to Control Chlamydia psittaci Infection Among Humans (Psittacosis) and Pet Birds (Avian Chlamydiosis), 2017.

J Avian Med Surg 2017 Sep;31(3):262-282

Psittacosis, also known as parrot fever and ornithosis, is a bacterial infection that can cause severe pneumonia and other serious health problems in humans. It is caused by Chlamydia psittaci. Reclassification of the order Chlamydiales in 1999 into 2 genera (Chlamydia and Chlamydophila) was not wholly accepted or adopted. Read More

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September 2017
26 Reads

Transcription of seven genes in a model of interferon‑γ-induced persistent Chlamydia psittaci infection.

Mol Med Rep 2017 Oct 2;16(4):4835-4842. Epub 2017 Aug 2.

Institute of Pathogenic Biology, Medical College, University of South China, Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory for Special Pathogens Prevention and Control, Hengyang, Hunan 421001, P.R. China.

The obligate intracellular bacterium Chlamydia psittaci is the causative agent of psittacosis in birds and humans. The capability of this zoonotic pathogen to develop a persistent phase may serve a role in the chronicity of infections, in addition to the failure of antibiotic therapy or immunoprophylaxis. In the present study, a C. Read More

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October 2017
18 Reads

Temporal and spatial analysis of psittacosis in association with poultry farming in the Netherlands, 2000-2015.

BMC Infect Dis 2017 07 26;17(1):519. Epub 2017 Jul 26.

Centre for Infectious Disease Control, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, The Netherlands.

Background: Human psittacosis is a highly under diagnosed zoonotic disease, commonly linked to psittacine birds. Psittacosis in birds, also known as avian chlamydiosis, is endemic in poultry, but the risk for people living close to poultry farms is unknown. Therefore, our study aimed to explore the temporal and spatial patterns of human psittacosis infections and identify possible associations with poultry farming in the Netherlands. Read More

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July 2017
10 Reads

Epidemiological and molecular characteristics of Chlamydia psittaci from 8 human cases of psittacosis and 4 related birds in Argentina.

Rev Argent Microbiol 2017 Oct - Dec;49(4):323-327. Epub 2017 Jul 19.

Instituto de Virología «Dr. J.M. Vanella», Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Córdoba, Argentina.

In Argentina, the epidemiological and molecular characteristics of Chlamydia psittaci infections are still not sufficiently known. A total of 846 respiratory and 10 ocular samples from patients with suspected human psittacosis were tested for C. psittaci from January 2010 to March 2015. Read More

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July 2017
34 Reads

An outbreak of psittacosis at a veterinary school demonstrating a novel source of infection.

One Health 2017 Jun 24;3:29-33. Epub 2017 Feb 24.

School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, NSW, Australia.

In November 2014, New South Wales Health was notified of a cluster of respiratory illness in a veterinary school. Active case finding identified another case at a local equine stud. All cases had exposure to the equine fetal membranes of Mare A. Read More

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June 2017
14 Reads

Methods for Real-Time PCR-Based Diagnosis of Chlamydia pneumoniae, Chlamydia psittaci, and Chlamydia abortus Infections in an Opened Molecular Diagnostic Platform.

Methods Mol Biol 2017 ;1616:171-181

Institute of Microbiology, University Hospital Center, University of Lausanne, Rue du Bugnon 48, 1011, Lausanne, Switzerland.

The advances in molecular biology of the last decades have dramatically improved the field of diagnostic bacteriology. In particular, PCR-based technologies have impacted the diagnosis of infections caused by obligate intracellular bacteria such as pathogens from the Chlamydiacae family. Here, we describe a real-time PCR-based method using the Taqman technology for the diagnosis of Chlamydia pneumoniae, Chlamydia psittaci, and Chlamydia abortus infection. Read More

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March 2018
12 Reads

A new equine and zoonotic threat emerges from an old avian pathogen, Chlamydia psittaci.

Clin Microbiol Infect 2017 Oct 2;23(10):693-694. Epub 2017 Jun 2.

Institute of Microbiology, University of Lausanne and University Hospital Center, Lausanne, Switzerland.

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October 2017
2 Reads

Intersectoral action for health: preventing psittacosis spread after one reported case.

Epidemiol Infect 2017 08 30;145(11):2263-2268. Epub 2017 May 30.

Departamento de Patologia,Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, FMVZ/USP,Av. Prof. Dr. Orlando Marques de Paiva,87. Cidade Universitária 'Armando de Salles Oliveira',São Paulo-SP 05508-270,Brazil.

Zoonotic diseases are a significant health threat for humans and animals. To better understand the epidemiology, etiology, and pathology of infectious agents affecting humans and animals combined approaches are needed. Here we describe an epidemiological investigation conducted by physicians and veterinarians after a reported case of psittacosis. Read More

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August 2017
11 Reads

Persistence of Chlamydia psittaci in Various Temperatures and Times.

Avian Dis 2017 Mar;61(1):40-45

E Avian Health Research Unit, Department of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand.

Chlamydia psittaci, an obligate intracellular gram-negative bacteria, causes an important zoonotic disease in humans, namely, psittacosis. The objective of this study was to determine the persistent viability of C. psittaci at various temperature conditions. Read More

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March 2017
9 Reads

Recombinant protein CPSIT_0846 induces protective immunity against Chlamydia psittaci infection in BALB/c mice.

Pathog Dis 2017 04;75(3)

Pathogenic Biology Institute, Medical College, University of South China, Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory for Special Pathogens Prevention and Control, Hengyang 421001, China.

Chlamydia psittaci is an obligate intracellular bacteria that causes respiratory disease in poultry and humans. Currently, there are no licensed vaccines against chlamydial infection in humans. The transmembrane head protein CPSIT_0846 of C. Read More

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April 2017
15 Reads

Multilocus sequence typing identifies an avian-like Chlamydia psittaci strain involved in equine placentitis and associated with subsequent human psittacosis.

Emerg Microbes Infect 2017 Feb 15;6(2):e7. Epub 2017 Feb 15.

Centre for Animal Health Innovation, Faculty of Science, Health, Education and Engineering, University of the Sunshine Coast, Sippy Downs, QLD 4556, Australia.

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February 2017
21 Reads

Legionnaire's Disease and its Mimics: A Clinical Perspective.

Infect Dis Clin North Am 2017 03;31(1):95-109

Division of Infectious Disease, Rhode Island Hospital, The Miriam Hospital, Brown University Alpert School of Medicine, Providence, RI, USA.

Whenever the cardinal manifestations of a disorder occur in similar disorders, there is potential for a disease mimic. Legionnaire's disease has protean manifestations and has the potential to mimic or be mimicked by other community acquired pneumonias (CAPs). In CAPs caused by other than Legionella species, the more characteristic features in common with legionnaire's disease the more difficult the diagnostic conundrum. Read More

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March 2017
5 Reads

Legionnaire's Disease: Cardiac Manifestations.

Authors:
John L Brusch

Infect Dis Clin North Am 2017 03;31(1):69-80

Medical Department, Cambridge Health Alliance, 1493 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA; Division of Infectious Diseases, Cambridge Health Alliance, 1493 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA; Ambulatory Medicine, Cambridge Health Alliance, 1493 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA; Medicine, Harvard Medical School, 25 Shattuck Street, Boston, MA 02155, USA. Electronic address:

Most cardiac infections with Legionella are secondary to bacteremias arising from a pulmonary focus. Other possible sites of origin are infected sternotomy wounds or equipment contaminated by Legionella spp. Legionella endocarditis is truly a "stealth" infection, with almost no hallmarks of bacterial endocarditis. Read More

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March 2017
5 Reads

Atypical Chlamydia Psittaci Pneumonia. Four Related Cases.

Arch Bronconeumol 2017 May 7;53(5):277-279. Epub 2016 Dec 7.

Servicio de Neumología, Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Madrid, España. Electronic address:

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May 2017
8 Reads

Deficiency of LIGHT signaling pathway exacerbates Chlamydia psittaci respiratory tract infection in mice.

Microb Pathog 2016 Nov 8;100:250-256. Epub 2016 Oct 8.

College of Public Health, University of South China, 28 West Changsheng Rd., Hengyang, Hunan 421001, China. Electronic address:

LIGHT, a costimulatory member of the immunoglobulin superfamily (Ig SF), can greatly impact T cell activation. The role of the LIGHT signaling pathway in chlamydial infection was evaluated in mice following respiratory tract infection with Chlamydia psittaci. Compared with wild type (WT) mice, LIGHT knockout (KO) mice showed significant reduction of body weight, much lower survival rate, higher bacterial burden, prolonged infection time courses and more severe pathological changes in lung tissue. Read More

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November 2016
20 Reads

Birds of a feather: an uncommon cause of pneumonia and meningoencephalitis.

BMJ Case Rep 2016 Sep 12;2016. Epub 2016 Sep 12.

Department of Microbiology, UHCW, Coventry, UK Department of Microbiology, George Eliot Hospital NHS Trust, Nuneaton, Warwickshire, UK.

A 61-year-old man was admitted with a 1-week history of influenza-like symptoms during a period of increased influenza virus activity. He soon developed type 2 respiratory failure and became increasingly drowsy. He later suffered a convulsive episode in the intensive care unit (ICU) which self-terminated. Read More

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September 2016
4 Reads

Psittacosis: Rare Respiratory Problem in Children.

J Coll Physicians Surg Pak 2016 Aug;26(8):702-3

Department of Paediatrics, The Children's Hospital and The Institute of Child Health, Lahore.

Psittacosis is a rare disease particularly in children with usual presentation of respiratory and constitutional symptoms. The cases may remain undiagnosed or diagnosis may be delayed because of lack of awareness among the paediatricians and physicians. Early diagnosis is very important as this is potentially curable and preventable disease. Read More

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August 2016
10 Reads

Australian human and parrot Chlamydia psittaci strains cluster within the highly virulent 6BC clade of this important zoonotic pathogen.

Sci Rep 2016 08 4;6:30019. Epub 2016 Aug 4.

Centre for Animal Health Innovation, University of the Sunshine Coast, Sippy Downs, Australia.

Chlamydia psittaci is an avian pathogen and zoonotic agent of atypical pneumonia. The most pathogenic C. psittaci strains cluster into the 6BC clade, predicted to have recently emerged globally. Read More

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August 2016
8 Reads

Chlamydia psittaci infection increases mortality of avian influenza virus H9N2 by suppressing host immune response.

Sci Rep 2016 07 11;6:29421. Epub 2016 Jul 11.

Unit of Cellular Biology &Microbial Infection, CNRS UMR3691, Institut Pasteur, 75015 Paris, France.

Avian influenza virus subtype H9N2 (H9N2) and Chlamydia psittaci (C. psittaci) are frequently isolated in chickens with respiratory disease. However, their roles in co-infection remain unclear. Read More

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July 2016
14 Reads

Chlamydia-host cell interaction not only from a bird's eye view: some lessons from Chlamydia psittaci.

FEBS Lett 2016 Nov 26;590(21):3920-3940. Epub 2016 Jul 26.

Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut, Institute of Immunology, Isle of Riems, Germany.

Chlamydia psittaci causes psittacosis/ornithosis in birds and is an economically important pathogen for poultry farming. It also infects nonavian domestic animals as well as rodents, and is a zoonotic human pathogen responsible for atypical pneumonia. The bacterium efficiently disseminates in host organisms causing pulmonary and systemic disease. Read More

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November 2016
8 Reads

Development of a Novel PmpD-N ELISA for Chlamydia psittaci Infection.

Biomed Environ Sci 2016 May;29(5):315-22

Key Lab of Animal Epidemiology and Zoonosis of Ministry of Agriculture, College of Veterinary Medicine, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193, China.

Objective: Chlamydia psittaci is an avian respiratory pathogen and zoonotic agent. The wide prevalence of C. psittaci poses a threat to the poultry industry and its employees. Read More

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May 2016
13 Reads

First Identification of Chlamydia psittaci in the Acute Illness and Death of Endemic and Endangered Psittacine Birds in Mexico.

Avian Dis 2016 06;60(2):540-4

A Department of Avian Medicine and Poultry Husbandry, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Production, National Autonomous University of Mexico, Coyoacan 04510, D.F., Mexico.

A mortality episode of endemic and endangered psittacine birds from the genera Ara and Amazona occurred during January 2015. The birds were housed in a management unit for wildlife conservation that receives wild-caught birds from illegal trade. In total, 11 (57%) adult birds of different origins that shared these accommodations died. Read More

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June 2016
18 Reads

Oral Uptake of Chlamydia psittaci by Ducklings Results in Systemic Dissemination.

PLoS One 2016 11;11(5):e0154860. Epub 2016 May 11.

ANSES, Animal Health Laboratory, Bacterial Zoonoses Unit, Maisons-Alfort, France.

Enteric infections caused by Chlamydia (C.) psittaci are frequent in ducks, but mostly remain subclinical under field conditions. To emulate natural infection, we investigated the pathogenic potential of a C. Read More

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July 2017
9 Reads