3,425 results match your criteria Preventive veterinary medicine[Journal]


Modeling the transmission dynamics of foot and mouth disease in Amhara region, Ethiopia.

Prev Vet Med 2019 Apr 8. Epub 2019 Apr 8.

Srinka Agricultural Research Center, ARARI, P.O. Box 74, Woldia, Ethiopia.

Foot and mouth disease (FMD) is contagious, acute viral disease of all cloven-hoofed animals. The disease is endemic in Ethiopia and causes multiple outbreak every year all over the country. While it is important to understand to the transmission dynamics of FMD outbreaks for appropriate control intervention, no such study has been done in Ethiopia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2019.04.002DOI Listing

Estimation of multidrug resistance variability in the National Antimicrobial Monitoring System.

Prev Vet Med 2019 Mar 12. Epub 2019 Mar 12.

Section of Epidemiology, Department of Population Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA. Electronic address:

Multidrug resistance is a serious problem raising the specter of infections for which there is no treatment. One of the most important tools in combating multidrug resistance is large scale monitoring programs, because they track resistance over large geographic areas and time scales. This large scope, however, can also introduce variability into the data. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2019.03.006DOI Listing

Epidemiology - an important tool for a sustainable aquaculture future.

Authors:
Edgar Brun

Prev Vet Med 2019 Mar 21. Epub 2019 Mar 21.

Norwegian Veterinary Institute, Ullevålsveien 68, 0106, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2019.03.015DOI Listing
March 2019
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Effects of management practices, animal transport and barn climate on animal health and antimicrobial use in Swiss veal calf operations.

Prev Vet Med 2019 Mar 12. Epub 2019 Mar 12.

Clinic for Ruminants Vetsuisse-Faculty, University of Bern, Switzerland. Electronic address:

To assess the effects of transport, management factors and barn climate on calf health, 43 Swiss veal farms (11 large farms fattening ≥100 calves and 32 small farms fattening >20 but <100 calves per year) were monitored in a prospective cohort study over a period of one year. Detailed questionnaires on farm structure, management, housing system and animal health were filled out with the farmers during bimonthly visits, and barn temperature, humidity, ammonia and CO concentrations were measured. Temperature and humidity were also measured continuously over 72 h once each in winter and summer. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2019.03.007DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Cost-effectiveness assessment of three components of the bovine tuberculosis surveillance system by intradermal tuberculin testing in French cattle farms by a scenario tree approach.

Prev Vet Med 2019 May 13;166:93-109. Epub 2019 Mar 13.

USC EPIMAI, Anses, Ecole Nationale Vétérinaire d'Alfort, F-94700, Maisons-Alfort, France.

In most officially bovine tuberculosis (bTB)-free countries, bTB has not been fully eradicated. Costly and time-consuming surveillance and control measures are therefore still in place to control this infection. An officially bTB-free status, both at the national and at the herd level, influences whether and when animals can be sold. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2019.03.004DOI Listing
May 2019
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Increased incidence rate of undesired early heifer departure in Mycoplasma bovis-antibody positive Danish dairy cattle herds.

Prev Vet Med 2019 May 14;166:86-92. Epub 2019 Mar 14.

Department of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark.

Mycoplasma bovis infections cause disease and production losses in cattle worldwide. The long-term consequences are not well described despite being important for management decisions during and after disease outbreaks. We investigated the association between M. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2019.03.013DOI Listing

Prevalence, phylogenetic and evolutionary analysis of porcine deltacoronavirus in Henan province, China.

Prev Vet Med 2019 May 1;166:8-15. Epub 2019 Mar 1.

College of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Henan Agricultural University, Zhengzhou, 450002, Henan, China; Key Laboratory for Animal-derived Food Safety of Henan Province, Zhengzhou, 450002, China. Electronic address:

Porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV) is a novel porcine enteric coronavirus that causes diarrhea, vomiting and dehydration in piglets. This newly virus has spread rapidly and has caused serious economic losses for pig industry since the outbreak in USA in 2014. In this study, 430 faecal and intestinal samples (143 faecal samples and 287 intestinal samples) were collected from individual pigs with diarrhea and 211 serum samples were also collected from the sows with mild diarrhea in 17 regions in Henan province, China from April 2015 to March 2018. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2019.02.017DOI Listing
May 2019
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Economic and epidemiological impact of different intervention strategies for subclinical and clinical mastitis.

Prev Vet Med 2019 May 6;166:78-85. Epub 2019 Mar 6.

Epidemiology Group, National Veterinary Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark; Section of Animal Welfare and Disease Control, Department of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Copenhagen University, Frederiksberg, Denmark.

The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare different combinations of intervention strategies for contagious or opportunistic subclinical and clinical intramammary infections (IMI). We simulated two different Danish dairy cattle herds with ten different intervention strategies focusing on cow-specific treatment or culling, including three baseline strategies without subclinical interventions. In one herd, the main causative pathogen of IMI was Staphylococcus (S. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2019.03.001DOI Listing

Why sold, not culled? Analysing farm and animal characteristics associated with livestock selling practices.

Prev Vet Med 2019 May 12;166:65-77. Epub 2019 Mar 12.

EpiCentre, School of Veterinary Science, Massey University, Private Bag 11222, Palmerston North, 4442, New Zealand.

Livestock disease simulation models that incorporate animal movements often assume (1) that farmers' livestock trading practices remain consistent over time in future, (2) that animals sold to other farms are chosen randomly from a herd, and (3) that the animals' fate on the destination farm is not influenced by their past production and movement histories. The objective of this study was to assess the extent to which these assumptions are violated in the real world using records from a national database in New Zealand that captures both milk production and movement data for individual dairy cattle. All individual animal milk test records from 2006 through 2010 were extracted from the database and processed to generate different animal and herd level variables including cow demographics, previous movement history, milk volume, and milk composition (somatic cell counts (SCC), protein percentage, and fat percentage). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2019.03.005DOI Listing
May 2019
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Progression and risk factors of pododermatitis in part-time group housed rabbit does in Switzerland.

Prev Vet Med 2019 May 11;166:56-64. Epub 2019 Mar 11.

Center for Proper Housing: Poultry and Rabbits (ZTHZ), Division of Animal Welfare, VPH Institute, University of Bern, Burgerweg 22, CH-3052 Zollikofen, Switzerland. Electronic address:

In rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus L.), pododermatitis is a chronic multifactorial skin disease that appears mainly on the plantar surface of the hind legs. This presumably progressive disease can cause pain leading to poor welfare, yet the progression of this disease has not been thoroughly assessed on the level of individual animals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2019.01.013DOI Listing
May 2019
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Demography and welfare status of free-roaming dogs in Yangmingshan National Park, Taiwan.

Prev Vet Med 2019 May 11;166:49-55. Epub 2019 Mar 11.

Center for General Education, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Section 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu, 300, Taiwan. Electronic address:

Free-roaming dogs (Canis familiaris) cause threats to native wildlife and public health and raise concerns for their welfare. Understanding the demography of free-roaming dog populations is essential for developing an effective management plan. An evaluation of their welfare status would be beneficial to earn public support for the management plan. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2019.03.009DOI Listing

Drivers for the development of an Animal Health Surveillance Ontology (AHSO).

Prev Vet Med 2019 May 9;166:39-48. Epub 2019 Mar 9.

Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Canada.

Comprehensive reviews of syndromic surveillance in animal health have highlighted the hindrances to integration and interoperability among systems when data emerge from different sources. Discussions with syndromic surveillance experts in the fields of animal and public health, as well as computer scientists from the field of information management, have led to the conclusion that a major component of any solution will involve the adoption of ontologies. Here we describe the advantages of such an approach, and the steps taken to set up the Animal Health Surveillance Ontological (AHSO) framework. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2019.03.002DOI Listing

Estimating the amount of Chronic Wasting Disease infectivity passing through abattoirs and field slaughter.

Prev Vet Med 2019 May 6;166:28-38. Epub 2019 Mar 6.

Department of Epidemiological Sciences, Animal & Plant Health Agency, Woodham Lane, Weybridge, KT15 3NB, United Kingdom.

Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) is a highly infectious, naturally occurring, transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE, or prion disease) affecting many cervid species. CWD has been widely circulating in North America since it was first reported in 1967. In 2016, the first European case of prion disease in deer was reported and confirmed in Norway. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2019.02.016DOI Listing
May 2019
3 Reads

Changing surveillance objectives during the different phases of an emerging vector-borne disease outbreak: The Schmallenberg virus example.

Prev Vet Med 2019 May 9;166:21-27. Epub 2019 Mar 9.

GD Animal Health, Department of Research and Development, Deventer, the Netherlands; Utrecht University, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Farm Animal Health, Utrecht, the Netherlands.

In the late summer of 2011, a sudden rise in incidence of fever, drop in milk production and diarrhoea was observed in dairy cows in the eastern region of the Netherlands and in north-western Germany. In the autumn of 2011, a novel orthobunyavirus was identified by metagenomic analyses in samples from acutely diseased cows on a farm near the German city of Schmallenberg, and was thereafter named Schmallenberg virus (SBV). Due to the novelty of the virus, there was an immediate need for knowledge regarding the epidemiological characteristics of SBV-infections to inform surveillance and control strategies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2019.03.008DOI Listing

Prevalence of Coxiella burnetii in cattle and buffalo populations in Punjab, India.

Prev Vet Med 2019 May 7;166:16-20. Epub 2019 Mar 7.

Sydney School of Veterinary Science, The University of Sydney, Camden, NSW, Australia.

Q fever is an important zoonosis of animal and public health significance but there is very limited information about its prevalence in the Punjab state of India. The current study was designed to estimate Q fever prevalence in cattle and buffalo populations of the state. We randomly selected 22 villages, one from each of the 22 districts of Punjab. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S01675877183070
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2019.03.003DOI Listing
May 2019
2 Reads

Biosecurity practices associated with influenza A virus seroprevalence in sows from southern Brazilian breeding herds.

Prev Vet Med 2019 May 26;166:1-7. Epub 2019 Feb 26.

Laboratório de Epidemiologia Veterinária, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Electronic address:

Influenza A virus (IAV) infection is a recognized cause of acute respiratory disease in pigs that can culminate in the decline of performance due to increasing feed conversion and costs of antimicrobial drugs to control secondary infections. Biosecurity practices are the key to prevent transmission of highly contagious agents. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of biosecurity practices on IAV seroprevalence through a cross-sectional study carried out in 404 sows from 21 herds. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S01675877183072
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2019.02.013DOI Listing
May 2019
2 Reads

Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis infection of calves - The impact of dam infection status.

Prev Vet Med 2019 Feb 20. Epub 2019 Feb 20.

Veterinary Epidemiology, Economics and Public Health, Department of Pathobiology and Population Sciences, The Royal Veterinary College, Hawkshead Lane, North Mymms, Hatfield, Herts, AL9 7TA, UK.

Johne's disease, caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), is a chronic condition of dairy cattle, and is endemic in the UK. Lack of understanding of the relative importance of different transmission routes reduces the impact of control scheme recommendations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2019.02.009DOI Listing
February 2019
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Modelling the impact of biosecurity practices on the risk of high pathogenic avian influenza outbreaks in Australian commercial chicken farms.

Prev Vet Med 2019 Apr 5;165:8-14. Epub 2019 Feb 5.

School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences and Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation, Charles Sturt University, Australia.

As of 2018, Australia has experienced seven outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in poultry since 1976, all of which involved chickens. There is concern that increases in free-range farming could heighten HPAI outbreak risk due to the potential for greater contact between chickens and wild birds that are known to carry low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI). We use mathematical models to assess the effect of a shift to free-range farming on the risk of HPAI outbreaks of H5 or H7 in the Australian commercial chicken industry, and the potential for intervention strategies to reduce this risk. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2019.02.002DOI Listing
April 2019
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Estimating the herd and cow level prevalence of bovine digital dermatitis on New Zealand dairy farms: A Bayesian superpopulation approach.

Prev Vet Med 2019 Apr 26;165:76-84. Epub 2019 Feb 26.

School of Veterinary Science, Massey University, Palmerston North, 4442, New Zealand.

A cross-sectional study of 127 dairy herds distributed across four regions of New Zealand (NZ) was conducted to estimate the regional herd-level prevalence of bovine digital dermatitis (BDD) and the prevalence of cows with BDD lesions within affected herds. Each herd was visited once during the 2016-2017 lactating season and the rear feet of all cows in the milking herd were examined to detect the presence of BDD lesions. Of the 127 herds examined, 63 had at least one cow with a detected BDD lesion. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2019.02.014DOI Listing

Impact of the subclinical small ruminant lentivirus infection of female goats on the litter size and the birth body weight of kids.

Prev Vet Med 2019 Apr 22;165:71-75. Epub 2019 Feb 22.

Laboratory of Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Nowoursynowska 159c, 02-776, Warsaw, Poland.

A longitudinal study was conducted in a single dairy goat herd to investigate the relationship between subclinical small ruminant lentivirus (SRLV) infection in does and litter size (LS) or birth body weight of kids (BW). Each year kids born to seropositive and seronegative does were weighed before the first consumption of colostrum. LS and BW of each kid were recorded. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2019.02.011DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

The informative value of an overview on antibiotic consumption, treatment efficacy and cost of clinical mastitis at farm level.

Prev Vet Med 2019 Apr 11;165:63-70. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Department of Animal Nutrition and Animal Health, University of Kassel, Nordbahnhofstraße 1a, D-37213, Witzenhausen, Germany.

This paper addresses whether it is worthwhile investing time in a more comprehensive documentation and analysis of farm specific data for mastitis treatment. Whilst most farmers keep some records, many refrain from investing more effort in making them more detailed. Therefore, information on farm-specific antibiotic consumption, effectiveness of treatments and the costs of mastitis are lacking; as well as the ability to identify and realise possibilities for improvement. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2019.02.004DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli from pigs from birth to slaughter and its association with antibiotic treatment.

Prev Vet Med 2019 Apr 12;165:52-62. Epub 2019 Feb 12.

German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, Max-Dohrn-Str. 8-10, 10589, Berlin, Germany.

The purpose of this longitudinal study was to describe the occurrence of antibiotic resistance in faecal Escherichia coli isolated from pigs between birth and slaughter and its association with antibiotic treatment. Four objectives were addressed: comparison of antibiotic resistance in isolates from a) treated vs. non-treated pigs, b) follow-up vs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2019.02.008DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Large-scale cross-sectional study of relationships between somatic cell count and milking-time test results in different milking systems.

Prev Vet Med 2019 Apr 7;165:44-51. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Production Animal Clinical Sciences, P.O. Box 369, Sentrum, N-0102 Oslo, Norway.

Milking-time testing (MTT) is a method for evaluating the vacuum conditions in the teatcup during milking. The purpose is to evaluate the possible impact of the milking and milking equipment on udder health and milk quality. The method is commonly implemented by herd health advisory services, but results are interpreted empirically due to lack of scientific documentation on relationships between MTT result variables and objective measures of udder health. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2019.02.007DOI Listing

A modified TOPSIS (Technique for Order of Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution) applied to choosing appropriate selection methods in ongoing surveillance for Avian Influenza in Canada.

Prev Vet Med 2019 Apr 10;165:36-43. Epub 2019 Feb 10.

Terrestrial Animal Health Epidemiology and Surveillance Section, Canadian Food Inspection Agency, 3200 Sicotte St., P.O. Box 5000, St-Hyacinthe, QC, J2S 7C6, Canada.

To achieve an appropriate and efficient sample in a surveillance program, the goals of the program should drive a careful consideration of the selection method or combination of selection methods to be applied. Therefore, the ongoing analysis and assessment of a surveillance system may include an assessment of the ability of the applied selection methods to generate an appropriate sample. There may be opinions from many technical experts (TEs) and many criteria to consider in a surveillance system so there is a need for methods to combine knowledge, priorities and preferences from a group of TEs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2019.02.006DOI Listing
April 2019
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What's in a name: Participatory epidemiology.

Prev Vet Med 2019 04 10;165:34-35. Epub 2019 Feb 10.

National Veterinary Institute, Uppsala, Sweden. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2019.01.009DOI Listing

Farm productive contexts and the dynamics of bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) transmission.

Prev Vet Med 2019 Apr 2;165:23-33. Epub 2019 Feb 2.

University of Turin, Department of Veterinary Sciences, Turin 10095, Italy.

Bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) is a viral disease that affects cattle and that is endemic to many European countries. It has a markedly negative impact on the economy, through reduced milk production, abortions, and a shorter lifespan of the infected animals. Cows becoming infected during gestation may give birth to Persistently Infected (PI) calves, which remain highly infective throughout their life, due to the lack of immune response to the virus. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S01675877173080
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2019.02.001DOI Listing
April 2019
7 Reads

Mortality, disease and associated antimicrobial use in commercial small-scale chicken flocks in the Mekong Delta of Vietnam.

Prev Vet Med 2019 Apr 11;165:15-22. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Oxford University Clinical Research Unit, Vietnam; Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health, Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University, Oxford, United Kingdom.

Raising chickens in small-scale flocks following all-in-all-out management is common in the Mekong Delta of Vietnam. These flocks represent an intermediate category between backyard and intensive (industrial) farming systems. However, little is known about the occurrence and burden of disease and/or mortality in such flocks, and their potential association with antimicrobial usage (AMU). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2019.02.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6418316PMC
April 2019
1 Read

Seroprevalence of Senecavirus A in sows and grower-finisher pigs in major swine producing-states in the United States.

Prev Vet Med 2019 Apr 29;165:1-7. Epub 2019 Jan 29.

Department of Veterinary Diagnostic and Production Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa, USA. Electronic address:

Senecavirus A (SVA) is a single-stranded RNA virus in the family Picornaviridae. Recently, SVA has been associated with idiopathic vesicular disease and increased neonate mortality outbreaks in the United States, Brazil, China, Colombia, and Thailand, with increasing incidence since 2014. Indirect detection by antibody detection methods, including indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA), virus neutralization assay, and competitive or indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), have been reported in clinical and experimental trials. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2019.01.012DOI Listing

Diagnostic performance of direct and indirect methods for assessing failure of transfer of passive immunity in dairy calves using latent class analysis.

Prev Vet Med 2019 Mar 5;164:72-77. Epub 2019 Feb 5.

Department of Health Management, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, Canada.

Accurate diagnosis of failure of transfer of passive immunity (FTPI) in newborn calves is an essential component of dairy farm management plan. Several methods (direct and indirect) are available for diagnosis of FTPI in dairy calves. However, the indirect methods offer an advantage over the direct methods in not requiring an experienced veterinarian, rapid, cost efficient and can be performed under field-setting. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2019.02.003DOI Listing

Effect of footbath protocols for prevention and treatment of digital dermatitis in dairy cattle: A systematic review and network meta-analysis.

Prev Vet Med 2019 Mar 28;164:56-71. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Department of Production Animal Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; Departments of Medicine and Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada.

Digital dermatitis (DD) is an infectious bacterial disease affecting cattle feet. Footbaths are a common herd-level control method for DD; however, variations in product, concentration, and frequency of use complicate comparisons between protocols. The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate all walk-through footbath protocols reported that determined efficacy for prevention and treatment of DD lesions in dairy cattle. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2019.01.011DOI Listing

Risk factors of clinical mastitis and antimicrobial susceptibility test results of mastitis milk from dairy cattle in western Thailand: Bayesian network analysis.

Prev Vet Med 2019 Mar 1;164:49-55. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

Section of Epidemiology, Department of Veterinary Public Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Kasetsart University, Kamphaeng Saen, Nakhon Pathom, 73140, Thailand. Electronic address:

Using Bayesian network analysis, this cross-sectional study aimed to identify the conditional probability among dairy farm practices, cow characteristics, bacteriological culture results, and antimicrobial susceptibility test results of milk from dairy cows with clinical mastitis in western Thailand. Data associated with risk factors and clinical signs were collected using a structured questionnaire that was administered to 34 small dairy holders. In total, 100 quarters of milk samples from 100 cows were used for Bayesian network analysis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2019.01.014DOI Listing
March 2019
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Backyard poultry production in Chile: animal health management and contribution to food access in an upper middle-income country.

Prev Vet Med 2019 Mar 23;164:41-48. Epub 2019 Jan 23.

Epidemiology Unit, Department of Preventive Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Universidad de Chile, Santiago, Chile. Electronic address:

Backyard production systems (BPS) that involve poultry are a good way to improve food security and poverty alleviation. Few studies have been carried out to quantify the contribution of poultry production to these households and the constraints they might face if a priority animal disease enters these systems. This study aims to characterize the poultry-rearing BPS in central Chile and to identify socio-economic factors associated to households' consumption of poultry. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2019.01.008DOI Listing

A register-based study on associations between vaccination, antimicrobial use and productivity in conventional Danish finisher pig herds during 2011 to 2014.

Prev Vet Med 2019 Mar 18;164:33-40. Epub 2019 Jan 18.

Department of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Grønnegårdsvej 8, 1870 Frederiksberg C, Denmark; Danish Agriculture & Food Council, Agro Food Park 13, 8200 Aarhus N, Denmark.

Reduction of antimicrobial use (AMU) in pigs is a priority to counteract development of antimicrobial resistance in animal and human pathogens. However, there is concern that Danish pig producers complying with official AMU restrictions might experience reduced herd health and productivity in the future, if alternative strategies are not available. Vaccination has been suggested as a strategy to prevent disease and minimise the need for antimicrobial treatments. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2019.01.007DOI Listing
March 2019
4 Reads

Revealing the structure of the associations between housing system, facilities, management and welfare of commercial laying hens using Additive Bayesian Networks.

Prev Vet Med 2019 Mar 9;164:23-32. Epub 2019 Jan 9.

Department of Animal Environment and Health, Unit of Animal Welfare, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7068, Uppsala, Sweden.

After the ban of battery cages in 1988, a welfare control programme for laying hens was developed in Sweden. Its goal was to monitor and ensure that animal welfare was not negatively affected by the new housing systems. The present observational study provides an overview of the current welfare status of commercial layer flocks in Sweden and explores the complexity of welfare aspects by investigating and interpreting the inter-relationships between housing system, production type (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2019.01.004DOI Listing

Forecasting herd-level porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) frequency trends in Ontario (Canada).

Prev Vet Med 2019 Mar 12;164:15-22. Epub 2019 Jan 12.

Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada. Electronic address:

Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus (PEDV) emerged in North America in 2013. The first case of PEDV in Canada was identified on an Ontario farm in January 2014. Surveillance was instrumental in identifying the initial case and in minimizing the spread of the virus to other farms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2019.01.005DOI Listing

Detection and molecular characterization of Giardia spp. in captive Psittaciformes in Brazil.

Prev Vet Med 2019 Mar 15;164:10-12. Epub 2019 Jan 15.

Universidade Estadual Paulista (Unesp), Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária, Araçatuba. Rua Clóvis Pestana, 793, CEP 16050-680, Bairro Dona Amélia, Araçatuba, SP, Brazil. Electronic address:

This study aimed to perform the detection and molecular characterization of Giardia spp. in Psittaciformes from the Southern and Southeastern regions of Brazil. Fecal samples were obtained from 359 adult exotic captive Psittaciformes belonging to 13 genera, randomly selected from 33 aviaries located in the Southern and Southeastern regions of Brazil during a bird exhibition at the 2015 Ornithological Championship of the Ornithological Federation of Brazil (FOB). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2019.01.006DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Characterization of swine movements in the United States and implications for disease control.

Prev Vet Med 2019 Mar 11;164:1-9. Epub 2019 Jan 11.

University of Minnesota, Department of Veterinary Population Medicine, 1988 Fitch Ave., St. Paul, MN, 55108, USA. Electronic address:

Understanding between-farm movement patterns is an essential component in developing effective surveillance and control programs in livestock populations. Quantitative knowledge on movement patterns is particularly important for the commercial swine industry, in which large numbers of pigs are frequently moved between farms. Here, we described the annual movement patterns between swine farms in three production systems of the United States and identified farms that may be targeted to increase the efficacy of infectious disease control strategies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2019.01.001DOI Listing

Effects of two new formulas of dietary buffers with a high buffering capacity containing Na or K on performance and metabolism of mid-lactation dairy cows.

Prev Vet Med 2019 Feb 8;163:87-92. Epub 2019 Jan 8.

Department of Animal Science, Campus of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of Tehran, Karaj, Tehran, 31587-77871, Iran.

The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of two new formulas of dietary buffers on intake, total tract digestibility, rumen pH, blood metabolites, and milk production of mid-lactation dairy cows. Nine multiparous cows (594 ± 46 kg BW; mean ± SD) averaging 120 ± 28 days in milk and producing 46.6 ± 3. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2019.01.003DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Incidences and risk factors for prolapse removal in Spanish sow herds.

Prev Vet Med 2019 Feb 3;163:79-86. Epub 2019 Jan 3.

School of Agriculture, Meiji University, Higashi-mita 1-1-1, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa, 214-8571, Japan.

Prolapses in sows are an emerging concern in pig production. The objectives of this study were to estimate the incidence rate of prolapses and to determine risk factors associated with prolapse occurrences. Data included 905,089 service records in 819,754 parity records of 155,238 sows from 144 swine herds in Spain. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2018.12.016DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Udder and teat conformational risk factors for elevated somatic cell count and clinical mastitis in New York Holsteins.

Prev Vet Med 2019 Feb 15;163:7-13. Epub 2018 Dec 15.

Department of Animal Science, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 14853, United States. Electronic address:

Our primary objective was to identify udder and teat conformational risk factors associated with the occurrence of elevated somatic cell count (SCC) and clinical mastitis using a prospective cohort study design with careful assessment of exposure and disease outcomes. Mastitis prevalence was evaluated by parity across 6 sampling periods representing key physiological transitions during lactation: 0-1 day in milk (DIM), 3-5 DIM, 10-14 DIM, 50-60 DIM, 90-110 DIM, and 210-230 DIM. Cows were scored for front and rear teat length, width, end shape, and placement, fore udder attachment, udder cleft, udder depth, rear udder height, and rear udder width. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S01675877183040
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2018.12.010DOI Listing
February 2019
9 Reads

Predictive models for early lactation diseases in transition dairy cattle at dry-off.

Prev Vet Med 2019 Feb 27;163:68-78. Epub 2018 Dec 27.

Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Michigan State University, 784 Wilson Rd, East Lansing, MI, 48824, USA. Electronic address:

During the transition period, dairy cattle undergo tremendous metabolic and physiological changes to prepare for milk synthesis and secretion. Failure to sufficiently regulate these changes may lead to metabolic stress, which increases risk of transition diseases. Metabolic stress is defined as a physiological state consisting of 3 components: aberrant nutrient metabolism, oxidative stress, and inflammation. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S01675877183057
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2018.12.014DOI Listing
February 2019
14 Reads

Evaluation of a biocide footbath solution in the occurrence and healing of digital dermatitis lesions in dairy cows: A clinical trial.

Prev Vet Med 2019 Feb 2;163:58-67. Epub 2019 Jan 2.

BIOEPAR, INRA, Oniris, Université Bretagne Loire, Nantes, 44307, France. Electronic address:

The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the implementation of different footbathing practices using a new biocide solution (Pink-Step™, Qalian, France) in the healing and the occurrence of bovine digital dermatitis (bDD) lesions. The investigation was conducted through a controlled within cow clinical trial in which the hind feet of cows from each farm were allocated either to the control group or to a moderate (MR) or (IR) intensive footbath-regimen groups. The trial involved 1036 cows (2072 feet) from 10 dairy farms located in western France where bDD was endemic. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2018.12.017DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Case study: Evaluating quarter and composite milk sampling for detection of subclinical intramammary infections in dairy cattle.

Prev Vet Med 2019 Feb 23;163:51-57. Epub 2018 Dec 23.

Department of Population Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 14853, United States. Electronic address:

Our objective was to evaluate a 200,000 cells/mL somatic cell count (SCC) cut-point on both the quarter and composite level to determine its effectiveness at identifying subclinical mastitis infections in one commercial dairy herd in Central New York. Milk samples from 107 Holstein cows were used for analysis. All cows were eligible for enrollment provided they had 4 working udder quarters, were >14 and <365 d in milk, and had no clinical mastitis event or treatment with intramammary antibiotics ≤14 d prior to d of sampling. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2018.12.013DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Impact of space allowance on performance traits, brain neurotransmitters and blood antioxidant activity of New Zealand White rabbits.

Prev Vet Med 2019 Feb 21;163:44-50. Epub 2018 Dec 21.

Biological Applications Department, Radioisotopes Applications Division, NRC, Atomic Energy Authority, Inshas, Cairo, Egypt.

The objective of this trial was to investigate the effect of space allowance on performance, welfare-related parameters and the levels of brain neurotransmitters in growing male rabbits. In a cage housing system, a total of 96 weaned rabbits were accommodated on three space allowance conditions (S = 1425 cm/rabbit; S = 850 cm/rabbit; S = 625 cm/rabbit), with 8 replicate cages per each group. Rabbits in the S and S groups showed better daily feed intake and feed conversion ratio compared with the high stocking density group (p = 0. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2018.12.011DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Field-derived estimates of costs for Peste des Petits Ruminants vaccination in Ethiopia.

Prev Vet Med 2019 Feb 15;163:37-43. Epub 2018 Dec 15.

Institute of Infection and Global Health, University of Liverpool, IC2 Building, 146 Brownlow Hill, Liverpool, L3 5RF, UK.

In 2015, the OIE and FAO launched a global eradication programme for Peste des Petits Ruminants (PPR). Vaccination is a major component of this strategy yet the costs of implementing a campaign are unknown or based on assumptions without field-based verification necessary for effective economic planning. This study used experiences of attending four PPR vaccination campaigns in Ethiopia to estimate various cost components in pastoral and mixed-crop livestock systems. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S01675877183073
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2018.12.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6351750PMC
February 2019
18 Reads

Evaluating the recently imposed English compulsory dog microchipping policy. Evidence from an English Local Authority.

Authors:
Christie Siettou

Prev Vet Med 2019 Feb 27;163:31-36. Epub 2018 Dec 27.

Division of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, Loughborough, LE12 5RD, United Kingdom.

This is the first empirical study examining the effectiveness of the newly imposed English compulsory dog microchipping policy. A dataset of 2974 records was retrieved from an English local authority's website. Records were from the period 2010-2018 and were analysed based on the three periods of the policy timeline: initial period includes data recorded prior to the intent of imposing the microchipping policy (April 1, 2010 - February 2, 2013); second period includes data recorded between the announcement of the intent and the date of the policy coming into effect (February 3, 2013-April 5, 2016); and the final period includes data recorded after the policy came into effect (April 6, 2016-July 4, 2018). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2018.12.015DOI Listing
February 2019
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An economic assessment of pseudorabies (Aujeszky' disease) elimination on hog farms in China.

Prev Vet Med 2019 Feb 13;163:24-30. Epub 2018 Dec 13.

Business Economics Group, Wageningen University and Research, Hollandseweg 1, 6706 KN, Wageningen, the Netherlands. Electronic address:

Hog pseudorabies (Aujeszky's disease) can incur serious losses for farm owners and even the entire hog industry by causing infertility, abortion, and stillbirth among sows, as well as diarrhoea, respiratory failure, and death among piglets. Pseudorabies virus could be prevented, controlled, and eliminated by clean-up at both farm and regional levels through a strict procedure of vaccination, quarantine, diagnosis, elimination of positive animals, and healthy animals nurturing. Using data from 63 large-scale hog farms from nine provinces (municipalities, autonomous regions) of China, we evaluated the economic consequences of hog pseudorabies clean-up in China's hog farms based on a partial budgeting method. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2018.12.005DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads
2.167 Impact Factor

Prediction model optimization using full model selection with regression trees demonstrated with FTIR data from bovine milk.

Prev Vet Med 2019 Feb 19;163:14-23. Epub 2018 Dec 19.

Department of Medical Science, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin, 2015 Linden Dr., Madison,53706, United States.

Predictive modeling is the development of a model that is best able to predict an outcome based on given input variables. Model algorithms are different processes that are used to define functions that transform the data within models. Common algorithms include logistic regression (LR), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), classification and regression trees (CART), naïve Bayes (NB), and k-nearest neighbor (KNN). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2018.12.012DOI Listing
February 2019
14 Reads

Comparison of physical and behavioral traits between dairy cows with low and high somatic cell count.

Prev Vet Med 2019 Feb 14;163:1-6. Epub 2018 Dec 14.

Department of Animal Biosciences, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Rd E, Guelph, ON, N1G 2W1, Canada. Electronic address:

The objective of this study was to examine associations of locomotion score, hygiene, body condition score (BCS), lying behavior, and milk production with dairy cow somatic cell count (SCC; low or high). Cows from 14 commercial free-stall dairy herds in Ontario, Canada were enrolled in a cross-sectional study. Each farm was visited for a total of 3 observation periods (at 5-wk intervals) on 2 occasions per period (7 d apart) until 3 Dairy Herd Improvement (DHI) milk tests had been completed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2018.12.009DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Surveillance of animal diseases through implementation of a Bayesian spatio-temporal model: A simulation example with neurological syndromes in horses and West Nile Virus.

Prev Vet Med 2019 Jan 26;162:95-106. Epub 2018 Nov 26.

Department of Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology and University of Gothenburg, SE-412 96 Gothenburg, Sweden. Electronic address:

A potentially sensitive way to detect disease outbreaks is syndromic surveillance, i.e. monitoring the number of syndromes reported in the population of interest, comparing it to the baseline rate, and drawing conclusions about outbreaks using statistical methods. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2018.11.010DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads