102 results match your criteria Post Head Injury Endocrine Complications


The interplay between neuroendocrine and sleep alterations following traumatic brain injury.

NeuroRehabilitation 2018 ;43(3):327-345

Centre for Neuro Skills, Encino, CA, USA.

Background: Sleep and endocrine disruptions are prevalent after traumatic brain injury (TBI) and are likely to contribute to morbidity.

Objective: To describe the interaction between sleep and hormonal regulation following TBI and elucidate the impact that alterations of these systems have on cognitive responses during the posttraumatic chronic period.

Methods: Review of preclinical and clinical literature describing long-lasting endocrine dysregulation and sleep alterations following TBI. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.medra.org/servlet/aliasResolver?alias=iospress&am
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-182483DOI Listing
January 2019
7 Reads

The incidence of vocal fold motion impairment after primary thyroid and parathyroid surgery for a single high-volume academic surgeon determined by pre- and immediate post-operative fiberoptic laryngoscopy.

Int J Surg 2018 Aug 14;56:73-78. Epub 2018 Jun 14.

Division of Head and Neck Endocrine Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. Electronic address:

Background: Vocal fold motion impairment (VFMI) is a well-recognized complication of thyroid and parathyroid surgery. Preoperative counseling requires a thorough understanding of the incidence, risk factors, and value of early diagnosis of postoperative VFMI. Our objective is to describe the incidence of and risk factors for VFMI for a single high-volume academic surgeon, and to assess the utility of immediate postoperative fiberoptic laryngoscopy (FOL) in early diagnosis of VFMI. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijsu.2018.06.014DOI Listing
August 2018
11 Reads

Timing and extension of lymphadenectomy in medullary thyroid carcinoma: A case series from a single institution.

Int J Surg 2017 May;41 Suppl 1:S70-S74

University of Perugia, Medical School, Endocrine Surgery Unit, S. Maria University Hospital, Terni, Italy. Electronic address:

Background: Medullary thyroid carcinoma is an aggressive tumor and presents with significant morbidity and mortality and a high rate of lymph node metastases. The combination of total thyroidectomy and cervical lymphadenectomy is the essential treatment for those patients presenting with cervical lymph node metastases.

Materials And Methods: A retrospective analysis of 117 patients operated for medullary thyroid carcinoma over a period of 15 years at a single institution. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijsu.2017.04.026DOI Listing
May 2017
11 Reads

Preoperative vitamin D level as predictor of post-thyroidectomy hypocalcemia in patients sustaining transient parathyroid injury.

Head Neck 2017 07 29;39(7):1378-1381. Epub 2017 Mar 29.

Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Division of Head and Neck Oncologic and Microvascular Surgery, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Virginia.

Background: Several studies have sought to identify predictors of postoperative hypocalcemia after total thyroidectomy; however, there have been conflicting results regarding the impact of preoperative vitamin D deficiency.

Methods: The medical records of patients undergoing total thyroidectomy were retrospectively reviewed. The number of parathyroid glands identified or reimplanted at the time of surgery was used as a marker of transient parathyroid gland damage. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hed.24775DOI Listing

Delayed Diagnosis of TSH-Secreting Adenoma Attributed to Worsening Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms in a Military Veteran Because of Provider Anchoring Bias.

Mil Med 2017 03;182(3):e1849-e1853

Endocrinology Service, Department of Medicine, San Antonio Military Medical Center, 3851 Roger Brooke Drive, JBSA-Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234.

Introduction: Anchoring bias occurs when clinicians hold on to previously known information about a patient, with failure to consider the full realm of possibilities to explain new findings. We present a case of delayed diagnosis of thyroid-stimulating-hormone-secreting pituitary adenoma (TSHoma), a rare disorder, in a military veteran whose symptoms were misconstrued as being caused from worsening of his prior diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Anchoring bias in this case led to 2-year delay in the correct diagnosis. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.7205/MILMED-D-16-00241DOI Listing
March 2017
4 Reads

Can early clinical parameters predict post-traumatic pituitary dysfunction in severe traumatic brain injury?

Acta Neurochir (Wien) 2016 12 25;158(12):2347-2353. Epub 2016 Oct 25.

Ist Department of Internal Medicine, University of Pécs, 13 Ifjusag, Pécs, Hungary, 7624.

Background: Post-traumatic hypopituitarism is a major complication after severe head trauma. The aim of our study was to evaluate the possible role of early clinical parameters in the development of endocrine deficits.

Methods: Data on endocrine function, on-admission clinical-, laboratory-, and ICU-monitored parameters were available in 63 patients of the surviving 86 severe head injury patients (post-resuscitation GCS under 8) treated at one neurosurgical center during a 10-year period. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00701-016-2995-x
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00701-016-2995-xDOI Listing
December 2016
3 Reads

Prospective study of hypothalamo-hypophyseal dysfunction in children and adolescents following traumatic brain injury.

Biomed Pap Med Fac Univ Palacky Olomouc Czech Repub 2017 Mar 19;161(1):80-85. Epub 2016 Sep 19.

Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital Olomouc and Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc, Czech Republic.

Background And Aims: Retrospective studies of TBI have found a neuroendocrine dysfunction following traumatic brain injury in 23 to 60% of adults and 15 to 21% of children. Our aims were to determine the prevalence of hypothalamo-hypophyseal dysfunction in children following brain injury, assess its relationship to the type of injury and the course of the acute post-traumatic phase.

Patients And Methods: Body development (growth, pubertal development, and skeletal maturity) were evaluated in 58 patients (21 girls) after a brain injury rated 3 to 12 on the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5507/bp.2016.047DOI Listing
March 2017
31 Reads

Endocrine dysfunction following traumatic brain injury: a 5-year follow-up nationwide-based study.

Sci Rep 2016 09 9;6:32987. Epub 2016 Sep 9.

Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, National Taiwan University College of Public Health, Taipei, Taiwan.

Post-traumatic endocrine dysfunction is a complication of traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, there is lack of long-term follow-up and large sample size studies. This study included patients suffering from TBI registered in the Health Insurance Database. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep32987DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5017132PMC
September 2016
8 Reads

Neuroendocrine Disturbances One to Five or More Years after Traumatic Brain Injury and Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Data from the German Database on Hypopituitarism.

J Neurotrauma 2016 08 31;33(16):1544-53. Epub 2016 Mar 31.

11 Clinical Neuroendocrinology Group, Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry , Munich, Germany .

Neuroendocrine disturbances are common after traumatic brain injury (TBI) and aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), but only a few data exist on long-term anterior pituitary deficiencies after brain injury. We present data from the Structured Data Assessment of Hypopituitarism after TBI and SAH, a multi-center study including 1242 patients. We studied a subgroup of 351 patients, who had sustained a TBI (245) or SAH (106) at least 1 year before endocrine assessment (range 1-55 years) in a separate analysis. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/neu.2015.4109DOI Listing
August 2016
19 Reads

[Hypopituitarism following traumatic brain injury: diagnostic and therapeutic issues].

Authors:
A-L Lecoq P Chanson

Ann Endocrinol (Paris) 2015 Oct;76(6 Suppl 1):S10-8

INSERM Unité 1185, Faculté de Médecine Paris-Sud, 63 rue Gabriel Péri, 94276 Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France; Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Service d'Endocrinologie et des Maladies de la Reproduction, Hôpital Bicêtre, 94275 Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France; Université Paris-Sud, UMR S1185, 94276 Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France.

Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a well-known public health problem worldwide and is a leading cause of death and disability, particularly in young adults. Besides neurological and psychiatric issues, pituitary dysfunction can also occur after TBI, in the acute or chronic phase. The exact prevalence of post-traumatic hypopituitarism is difficult to assess due to the wide heterogeneity of published studies and bias in interpretation of hormonal test results in this specific population. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0003-4266(16)30003-8DOI Listing
October 2015
19 Reads

International survey on the identification and neural monitoring of the EBSLN during thyroidectomy.

Laryngoscope 2016 Jan 9;126(1):285-91. Epub 2015 Oct 9.

Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Sao Paulo, Brazil.

Objectives/hypothesis: Surgical management of the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (EBSLN) during thyroidectomy is complex. We hypothesized that there exist variations in surgical behaviors patterns in the management of the EBSLN during thyroidectomy.

Study Design: A prospective Web-based anonymous survey (www. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/lary.25548DOI Listing
January 2016
17 Reads

GH deficiency after traumatic brain injury: improvement in quality of life with GH therapy: analysis of the KIMS database.

Eur J Endocrinol 2015 Apr 12;172(4):371-81. Epub 2015 Jan 12.

Department of Obesity and EndocrinologyInstitute of Ageing and Chronic Disease, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L9 7AL, UKPfizer Endocrine CarePfizer, Inc., Sollentuna, SwedenBarts and the London School of Medicine and DentistryWilliam Harvey Research Institute, Centre for Endocrinology, Queen Mary University of London, London, UKDepartment of Women's and Children's HealthUppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden

Objective: Prevalence of GH deficiency (GHD) caused by traumatic brain injury (TBI) is highly variable. Short-term studies show improvement in quality of life (QoL) during GH replacement (GHR), but long-term data are lacking. The aim of this study was to analyse the clinical characteristics of post-traumatic hypopituitarism and the QoL effects of long-term GHR. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.eje-online.org/content/172/4/371.full.pdf
Web Search
http://www.eje-online.org/cgi/doi/10.1530/EJE-14-0654
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1530/EJE-14-0654DOI Listing
April 2015
34 Reads

Predictors of post-traumatic pituitary failure during long-term follow-up.

Hormones (Athens) 2015 Jul-Sep;14(3):383-91

Objective: There is increasing awareness among physicians of the risks of traumatic brain injury (TBI)-induced hypopituitarism. We have assessed the prevalence and risk factors of post-traumatic hypopituitarism by analyzing the TBI database of the University of Pecs.

Design: This consecutive analysis of 126 TBI survivors (mean age: 42. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.14310/horm.2002.1564DOI Listing
May 2016
22 Reads

Differential recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy rates after thyroidectomy.

Surgery 2014 Nov 17;156(5):1157-66. Epub 2014 Oct 17.

Department of Epidemiology and Preventative Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Introduction: Recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) palsy is a devastating complication of thyroidectomy. Although neurapraxia is thought to be the most common cause, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The objectives of this study were to examine the differential palsy rates between the left and right RLNs, and the role of intraoperative nerve swelling as a risk factor of postoperative palsy. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.surg.2014.07.018DOI Listing
November 2014
6 Reads

Sleep and wake disturbances following traumatic brain injury.

Pathol Biol (Paris) 2014 Oct 7;62(5):252-61. Epub 2014 Aug 7.

Center for advanced research in sleep medicine, hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal, 5400, boulevard Gouin Ouest, Montréal, Québec, H4J 1C5, Canada; Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, succursale Centre-ville, Montréal, Québec, Canada. Electronic address:

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health concern in industrialised countries. Sleep and wake disturbances are among the most persistent and disabling sequelae after TBI. Yet, despite the widespread complaints of post-TBI sleep and wake disturbances, studies on their etiology, pathophysiology, and treatments remain inconclusive. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.patbio.2014.05.014DOI Listing
October 2014
1 Read

Adipsic diabetes insipidus and venous thromboembolism (VTE): recommendations for addressing its hypercoagulability.

Hormones (Athens) 2014 Jul-Sep;13(3):420-3

Clinic of Endocrinology, Medical Faculty, Belgrade University, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade, Serbia.

Adipsic diabetes insipidus (ADI) is a rare disorder. It can occur after transcranial surgery for craniopharyngeoma, suprasellar pituitary adenoma and anterior communicating artery aneurysm but also with head injury, toluene exposure and developmental disorders. It is often associated with significant hypothalamic dysfunction and complications like obesity, sleep apnea, thermoregulatory disorders, seizures and venous thromboembolism (VTE). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.14310/horm.2002.1496DOI Listing
October 2015
15 Reads

Traumatic brain injury and neuro-endocrine disruption: medical and psychosocial rehabilitation.

NeuroRehabilitation 2014 ;34(4):625-36

The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, Chicago, IL, USA.

Introduction: Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) initiates a cascade of neuromodulatory damage that blurs the distinctions between physical and psychological medicine. Monitoring endocrine function through labs is not part of the medical care algorithm for treatment of TBI, but the clinical symptoms are easily misidentified as they include: depression, fatigue, poor concentration, irritability and a decline in overall cognitive functioning. The reciprocal flow of change between neuroendocrine health and psychosocial health is well established within the field of neuroscience, social psychology, endocrinology and behavioral neurology, but has not translated into patient care. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.medra.org/servlet/aliasResolver?alias=iospress&am
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-141074DOI Listing
October 2014
39 Reads

Sensorimotor cortex ablation induces time-dependent response of ACTH cells in adult rats: behavioral, immunohistomorphometric and hormonal study.

Physiol Behav 2014 Feb 27;125:30-7. Epub 2013 Nov 27.

Department of Cytology, Institute for Biological Research "Sinisa Stankovic", University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia.

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) represents a serious event with far reaching complications, including pituitary dysfunction. Pars distalis corticotropes (ACTH cells), that represent the active module of hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis, seem to be affected as well. Since pituitary failure after TBI has been associated with neurobehavioral impairments the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of TBI on recovery of motor functions, morphology and secretory activity of ACTH cells in the pituitary of adult rats. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.physbeh.2013.11.005DOI Listing
February 2014
7 Reads

Inhibition of natriuresis in median eminence polydipsia: effects after intake of diets with different osmolalities and after hypertonic NaCl administration.

Acta Neurobiol Exp (Wars) 2013 ;73(3):326-37

Department of Psychobiology, University of Granada, Granada, Spain,

Lesions in the hypothalamic median eminence (ME) induce polydipsia and polyuria in male rats. A first experiment was designed to examine the effect of salt consumption (standard 0.25 percent Na+ vs. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
April 2014
2 Reads

Impact of neuromonitoring of recurrent laryngeal nerve and surgical loupes on the outcome of thyroidectomy. A retrospective chart review.

Saudi Med J 2013 Aug;34(8):824-8

Department of Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

Objective: To determine whether the post-operative complication rate of thyroidectomy can be reduced using surgical loupes to identify parathyroid gland and recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) with simultaneous intraoperative neuromonitoring of RLN.

Methods: This retrospective chart review was conducted from December 2012 to March 2013 at the Ear, Nose, Throat, and Head-Neck Department of King Saud Hospital, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The study group included patients who underwent primary thyroid surgeries performed from July 2007 to September 2011, older than 16 years old, without history of vocal cord palsy, hypocalcemia, and sternotomy. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
August 2013
12 Reads

Pituitary function and functional outcome in adults after severe traumatic brain injury: the long-term perspective.

J Neurotrauma 2013 Feb;30(4):271-80

Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.

Post-traumatic hypopituitarism (PTHP) has been linked to disability and decreased quality of life. However, no studies have addressed the long-term consequences of PTHP in adults with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) only. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between pituitary function, quality of life, and functioning in 51 patients (16-65 years of age) with severe TBI who were admitted to Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg from 1999 to 2002. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/neu.2012.2494DOI Listing
February 2013
5 Reads

Sutureless total thyroidectomy: a safe and cost-effective alternative.

ANZ J Surg 2011 Jul-Aug;81(7-8):510-4

University of Sydney Endocrine Surgical Unit, NSW, Australia.

Background: Advanced vessel sealing devices provide an alternative to conventional ligation techniques for thyroidectomy. To date, most studies have been inadequately powered to explore differences in the infrequent post-operative complications following thyroidectomy. This study is designed to compare the outcomes of sutureless thyroidectomy and conventional thyroidectomy for recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury, permanent hypoparathyroidism, and haematoma formation. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
May 2012
2 Reads

Structured assessment of hypopituitarism after traumatic brain injury and aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in 1242 patients: the German interdisciplinary database.

J Neurotrauma 2011 Sep 29;28(9):1693-8. Epub 2011 Aug 29.

Medizinische Klinik-Innenstadt, Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich, Germany.

Clinical studies have demonstrated that traumatic brain injury (TBI) and aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) are frequent causes of long-term disturbances of hypothalamo-pituitary function. This study aimed to assess the prevalence and associated factors of post-traumatic hypopituitarism in a large national registry of patients with TBI and SAH. Data were collected from 14 centers in Germany and Austria treating patients for TBI or SAH and performing endocrine assessments. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/neu.2011.1887DOI Listing
September 2011
17 Reads

Methylprednisolone exacerbates acute critical illness-related corticosteroid insufficiency associated with traumatic brain injury in rats.

Brain Res 2011 Mar 22;1382:298-307. Epub 2011 Jan 22.

Department of Neurosurgery, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin 300052, PR China.

Emerging evidence demonstrates that severe illness could induce critical illness-related corticosteroid insufficiency (CIRCI) and cause poor prognosis. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that methylprednisolone (MP), a synthetic glucocorticoid, promotes post-traumatic apoptosis in both the hypothalamus and pituitary, resulting in acute CIRCI and increased mortality in the acute phase of traumatic brain injury (TBI). We tested this hypothesis by measuring acute CIRCI in rats subjected to fluid percussion injury (FPI) and treated with MP (5-30mg/kg). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brainres.2011.01.045DOI Listing
March 2011
2 Reads

Spontaneous recovery from isolated post-traumatic central hypogonadism in a woman.

Hormones (Athens) 2010 Oct-Dec;9(4):332-7

Clinical Experimental Department of Medicine and Pharmacology, Section of Endocrinology, Policlinico Universitario G. Martino, University of Messina, Messina, Italy.

Objective: Hypopituitarism is a recognized complication of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). Resolution of established anterior pituitary hormones deficiency is rare.

Case Report: A woman was initially presented at the age of 22 years with amenorrhoea. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.hormones.gr/pdf/332-337.pdf
Web Search
March 2011
2 Reads

Transarterial embolization of traumatic carotid-superior hypophyseal arterial cavernous fistula. A case report.

Interv Neuroradiol 2010 Sep 25;16(3):278-81. Epub 2010 Oct 25.

Department of Neurosurgery, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.

A 26-year-old man presented with symptoms of progressive bilateral exophthalmos and swelling of the eyelids after a severe head injury. Angiography confirmed a direct carotid-superior hypophyseal arterial (SHA) cavernous fistula with petrosal sinus and intracavernous sinus drainage. Successful transarterial coil embolization of the fistula was performed with resolution of the patient's symptoms. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3278002PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/159101991001600308DOI Listing
September 2010
1 Read

Fatigue after traumatic brain injury: Association with neuroendocrine, sleep, depression and other factors.

Brain Inj 2010 ;24(12):1379-88

PM&R, San Jose, CA, USA.

Objective: Define associations between post-traumatic brain injury (TBI) fatigue and abnormalities in neuroendocrine axes, sleep, mood, cognition and physical functioning.

Design: Survey.

Setting: Large community hospital-based rehabilitation centre. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/02699052.2010.52
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/02699052.2010.523041DOI Listing
February 2011
5 Reads

[First manic episode in the elderly--consider a subdural haematoma due to head trauma as cause].

Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd 2010 ;154:A1235

De Gelderse Roos, afd. Ouderen, Arnhem, The Netherlands.

A manic episode in old age presents a diagnostic challenge to the clinician due to the different symptomatology often difficult to distinguish from delirium, dementia, agitated depression and psychosis. To complicate matters further, a first episode of mania in later life is very often based on underlying physical and cerebral pathology ('secondary mania'). Many causes of 'secondary mania', including neurological, systemic or endocrine diseases, infections, intoxications, apnoea, post-thoracic surgery and vitamin B12 deficiency have been described to date, but there have been no reports on subdural haematomas in this context. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
June 2010
3 Reads

Salivary biosensors for screening trauma-related psychopathology.

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2010 May;22(2):269-78

Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, 23-009 UCLA School of Dentistry, University of California, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1668, USA.

After facial trauma, a distinct subset of patients goes on to develop mental health problems including recalcitrant psychopathology. Early identification of maladaptive stress reactions provides opportunities for initiating preemptive mental health interventions and hinges on the surgeon's ability to differentiate between transient distress and precursors of recalcitrant psychiatric sequelae. The comprehensive care of injured patients will benefit greatly from objective adjuncts and decision-making tools to complement the clinical evaluation. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2010.01.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2858052PMC
May 2010
1 Read

[Late evaluation of the pituitary-gonadal axis in survivors of severe traumatic brain injury].

Arq Bras Endocrinol Metabol 2009 Nov;53(8):1012-9

Hospital Universitário, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, SC, Brasil.

Objective: The purpose of this study is to evaluate pituitary function impairment in order to verify the prevalence of sex hormone deficiency and to analyze the profile of TBI population.

Methods: Thirty patients were studied, 22 were male and 8 were female. All patients had their gonadal function assessed and they were evaluated at a median of 4 years post-trauma. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 2009
9 Reads

Hypogonadism after traumatic brain injury.

Arq Bras Endocrinol Metabol 2009 Nov;53(8):908-14

Hospital Universitário, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, SC, Brasil.

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the most common cause of death and disability in young adults. Post-TBI neuroendocrine disorders have been increasingly acknowledged in recent years due to their potential contribution to morbidity and, probably, to mortality after trauma. Marked alterations of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis during the post-TBI acute and chronic phases have been reported. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 2009
4 Reads

Delayed diagnosis of hypopituitarism following severe traumatic brain injury.

BMJ Case Rep 2010 Sep 29;2010. Epub 2010 Sep 29.

Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Rookwood Hospital, Cardiff, UK.

The following case illustrates a 10-year delay in the diagnosis of hypopituitarism after severe traumatic brain injury in a 22-year-old man crushed by a forklift truck. His symptoms of mood changes, headaches and sleep pattern disturbances were attributed to post traumatic brain injury syndrome resulting in a delay in diagnosing the underlying pathology. Following recurrent episodes of symptomatic hyponatraemia, hypopituitarism was diagnosed. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bcr.12.2009.2526DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3028089PMC
September 2010
32 Reads
1 Citation

Long-term outcome of functional post-thyroidectomy voice and swallowing symptoms.

Surgery 2009 Dec;146(6):1174-81

Division of Endocrine Surgery, Department of Surgery, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy.

Background: Voice and swallowing symptoms are frequently reported early after thyroidectomy even in the absence of laryngeal nerves injury. We evaluated the short-term and long-term outcomes of these functional alterations.

Methods: Consenting patients undergoing total thyroidectomy (TT) were enrolled. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.surg.2009.09.010DOI Listing
December 2009
10 Reads

Permanent central diabetes insipidus after mild traumatic brain injury.

Brain Inj 2009 Dec;23(13-14):1095-8

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan, PR China.

Aim: The patients in the permanent diabetes insipidus (DI) group are more likely to have more severe TBI, which is defined by a post-resuscitational and pre-sedational Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 8/15 or less. This study presents a case of permanent, central DI following mild traumatic brain injury with post-resuscitation GCS 13/15.

Case Report: A 17-year-old boy suffered from mild brain injury and experienced permanent DI without any anatomical changes on image in the early stage of traumatic brain injury. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/02699050903379396DOI Listing
December 2009
3 Reads

Early stress response: a vulnerability framework for functional impairment following mild traumatic brain injury.

Res Theory Nurs Pract 2009 ;23(1):42-61

Michigan State University, USA.

Nearly 64% of people with mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) experience prolonged symptoms and functional impairments lasting months or years postinjury. Explanations for delayed recovery have varied and lacked a guiding framework, hindering intervention science. Using theory substruction and adapting McLean and associates' biopsychosocial model for chronic pain after trauma, we suggest that perceived psychological stress and associated neurobiological responses may predict risk for functional impairment. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
July 2009
34 Reads

Traumatic brain injury causes long-term reduction in serum growth hormone and persistent astrocytosis in the cortico-hypothalamo-pituitary axis of adult male rats.

J Neurotrauma 2009 Aug;26(8):1315-24

Department of Emergency Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA.

Unlabelled: In humans, traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes pathological changes in the hypothalamus (HT) and the pituitary. One consequence of TBI is hypopituitarism, with deficiency of single or multiple hormones of the anterior pituitary (AP), including growth hormone (GH). At present no animal model of TBI with ensuing hypopituitarism has been demonstrated. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/neu.2008.0751DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2850256PMC
August 2009
1 Read

Surgical complications after endoscopic transsphenoidal pituitary surgery.

J Clin Neurosci 2009 Jun 16;16(6):786-9. Epub 2009 Mar 16.

Department of Neurosurgery, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Mainz, Germany.

Between January 2004 and June 2007 we conducted a retrospective analysis to assess post-operative complications related to endoscopic pituitary surgery in a series of 150 patients. Patients were treated with an endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach to the sellar region for removal of pathological sellar and suprasellar lesions. We analysed the complications in groups according to the anatomical structures of the approach and the functional systems of the pituitary gland (anterior and posterior endocrine systems), and compared them to a large historical series using the traditional microsurgical transsphenoidal approach. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jocn.2008.09.002DOI Listing
June 2009
4 Reads

Neuroendocrine disorders after traumatic brain injury.

J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 2008 Jul;79(7):753-9

Academic Department of Endocrinology, Beaumont Hospital and RCSI Medical School, Dublin, Ireland.

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the most common cause of death and disability in young adults living in industrialised countries, in which 180-250 persons per 100 000 per year die or are hospitalised as a result. Neuroendocrine derangements after TBI have received increasing recognition in recent years because of their potential contribution to morbidity, and possibly mortality, after trauma. Marked changes of the hypothalamo-pituitary axis have been documented in the acute phase of TBI, with as many as 80% of patients showing evidence of gonadotropin deficiency, 18% of growth hormone deficiency, 16% of corticotrophin deficiency and 40% of patients demonstrating vasopressin abnormalities leading to diabetes insipidus or the syndrome of inappropriate anti-diuresis. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://jnnp.bmj.com/cgi/doi/10.1136/jnnp.2007.132837
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jnnp.2007.132837DOI Listing
July 2008
3 Reads

Does the type and severity of brain injury predict hypothalamo-pituitary dysfunction? Does post-traumatic hypopituitarism predict worse outcome?

Pituitary 2008 ;11(3):255-61

Department of Medical Endocrinology, PE2131, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Several studies have reported a close association between traumatic brain injury (TBI) and pituitary dysfunction, and expert panels have recently proposed recommendations for hormone assessment and replacement for pituitary insufficiency after TBI. Given the high incidence of TBI, identification of reliable predictors is of utmost importance in order to secure a cost-effective screening strategy. It has not yet been possible to identify early hormone alterations as a useful tool for the prediction of long-term post-traumatic hypopituitarism, whereas indicators of increased trauma severity have been reported as predictive in an increasing number of studies. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007/s11102-008-0102
Web Search
http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11102-008-0102-x
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11102-008-0102-xDOI Listing
September 2008
1 Read

Adrenal insufficiency following traumatic brain injury in adults.

Curr Opin Crit Care 2008 Apr;14(2):163-6

Department of Neurosurgery, University of Texas Medical School, Houston, Texas 77030, USA.

Purpose Of Review: Hypoadrenalism occurs in approximately 25% of patients soon after traumatic brain injury. Neurosurgeons or critical care physicians should be prepared to diagnose and treat this and other related hormonal deficiencies.

Recent Findings: The severity of traumatic brain injury, location of basilar skull fractures and edema or hemorrhage within the hypothalamic-pituitary axis appear correlated with secondary adrenal failure. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://pdfs.journals.lww.com/co-criticalcare/2008/04000/Adre
Web Search
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MCC.0b013e3282f57528DOI Listing
April 2008
3 Reads

Endocrine sequelae of traumatic brain injury in childhood.

Horm Res 2007 10;68 Suppl 5:14-7. Epub 2007 Dec 10.

Department of Paediatrics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.

Background: Anterior pituitary hormone dysfunction may be an important feature of long-term morbidity in survivors of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The hypothalamic-pituitary structures are vulnerable to damage following head injury. Therefore, pituitary dysfunction, which may be detected months or years after injury, is now well recognised as a long-term consequence of TBI in adults. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000110465DOI Listing
March 2008
45 Reads

Magnetic resonance imaging changes in the pituitary gland following acute traumatic brain injury.

Intensive Care Med 2008 Mar 29;34(3):468-75. Epub 2007 Nov 29.

University Division of Anaesthesia, Cambridge University Foundation Hospitals NHS Trust, Hills Road, Box 93, CB2 2QQ Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, UK.

Objective: The objective was to study the anatomical changes in the pituitary gland following acute moderate or severe traumatic brain injury (TBI).

Design: Retrospective, observational, case-control study.

Setting: Neurosciences Critical Care Unit of a university hospital. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00134-007-0902-xDOI Listing
March 2008
9 Reads

Acute and long-term pituitary insufficiency in traumatic brain injury: a prospective single-centre study.

Clin Endocrinol (Oxf) 2007 Oct;67(4):598-606

Department of Medical Endocrinology, the University Hospital of Copenhagen, Denmark.

Objective: To assess the prevalence of hypopituitarism following traumatic brain injury (TBI), describe the time-course and assess the association with trauma-related parameters and early post-traumatic hormone alterations.

Design: A 12-month prospective study.

Patients: Forty-six consecutive patients with TBI (mild: N = 22; moderate: N = 9; severe: N = 15). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2265.2007.02931.xDOI Listing
October 2007
9 Reads

Predictors of anterior pituitary insufficiency after traumatic brain injury.

Clin Endocrinol (Oxf) 2008 Feb 4;68(2):206-12. Epub 2007 Sep 4.

Neurological Clinic Bad Aibling, Kolbermoorer Strasse, Bad Aibling, Germany.

Background: Several studies have reported a high prevalence of hypopituitarism after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Risk stratification is a prerequisite for cost-effective hormonal screening of these patients. However, it is still unclear which risk factors predispose patients to develop anterior hypopituitarism after TBI. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2265.2007.03020.xDOI Listing
February 2008
1 Read

Histologic study of the human pituitary gland in acute traumatic brain injury.

Brain Inj 2007 Jun;21(6):651-6

Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Purpose: Approximately 25% of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) may develop partial or complete hypopituitarism. The causative mechanisms involved in its development are not clear. To the authors' knowledge, there have been no recent morphologic studies of the pituitary following TBI. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02699050701426956DOI Listing
June 2007
5 Reads

Fatigue after TBI: association with neuroendocrine abnormalities.

Brain Inj 2007 Jun;21(6):559-66

Rehabilitation Research Center, San Jose, CA 95128, USA.

Objective: Evaluate the association between neuroendocrine findings and fatigue after traumatic brain injury (TBI) Research design: Prospective, observational.

Methods And Procedures: Sixty-four individuals at least 1 year post-TBI underwent neuroendocrine testing including thyroid, adrenal, gonadal axes and growth hormone (GH) after glucagon stimulation with assessment of fatigue using the Global Fatigue Index (GFI) and the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS).

Main Outcomes And Results: GFI and FSS scores were significantly higher within this sample compared to published control data. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02699050701426915DOI Listing
June 2007
5 Reads

Traumatic brain injury induced hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction: a paediatric perspective.

Pituitary 2007 ;10(4):373-80

Department of Paediatrics, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Level 8/Box 116, Cambridge CB2 2QQ, UK.

In survivors of traumatic brain injury (TBI), impairment in anterior pituitary hormone function may be an important cause of long-term morbidity. Histopathological evidence from post-mortem studies suggests that the hypothalamic-pituitary structures are vulnerable to damage following head injury. Pituitary dysfunction, present months or years after injury, is now well recognised in adults, however, little evidence is known about this potential complication in children and adolescents. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11102-007-0052-8DOI Listing
January 2008
15 Reads

Algorithm for safe and effective reoperative thyroid bed surgery for recurrent/persistent papillary thyroid carcinoma.

Head Neck 2007 Dec;29(12):1069-74

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

Background: The aim of this study was to review our experience with reoperative thyroid bed surgery (RTBS) for recurrent/persistent papillary thyroid cancer (PTC), and present an algorithm for safe and effective RTBS.

Methods: This is a retrospective study. Records of 33 consecutive patients who underwent RTBS for recurrent/persistent PTC in a previously operated thyroid bed, and were operated upon by the senior author (R. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hed.20634DOI Listing
December 2007
9 Reads

Prevalence and predictive factors of post-traumatic hypopituitarism.

Clin Endocrinol (Oxf) 2007 Aug 24;67(2):193-201. Epub 2007 May 24.

Department of Medical Endocrinology, the University Hospital of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.

Objective: To estimate the prevalence and predictive factors of hypopituitarism following traumatic brain injury (TBI).

Design: A cross-sectional cohort study.

Patients: One hundred and four hospitalized TBI patients (26F/78M), median age 41 (range 18-64) years, body mass index (BMI) 25 (17-39) kg/m(2); severity: mild [Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score 13-15) n = 44, moderate (GCS 9-12) n = 20, severe (GCS < 9) n = 40]. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2265.2007.02860.xDOI Listing
August 2007
2 Reads

Post traumatic pituitary apoplexy with contiguous intra cerebral hematoma operated through endonasal route--a case report.

Pituitary 2007 ;10(3):291-4

Department of Neurosurgery, King George's Medical University, Lucknow 226003, India.

Pituitary apoplexy is a clinical syndrome occurring as a consequence of fulminant expansion of pituitary tumor due to massive infarction, necrosis, and hemorrhage. Its association with head injury is rare and only few reports are available. Shear forces on stalk and arterial vasospasm have been proposed to be the possible reasons. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11102-007-0015-0DOI Listing
April 2008
3 Reads