13 results match your criteria Photodermatology photoimmunology & photomedicine[Journal]

  • Page 1 of 1

Effects of red light on inflammation and skin barrier recovery following acute perturbation. Pilot study results in healthy human subjects.

Photodermatol Photoimmunol Photomed 2018 Dec 5. Epub 2018 Dec 5.

Department of Dermatology, Radboud University Medical Center, René Descarstesdreef 1, 6500 HB, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

In an original article recently published in Photodermatology, Photoimmunology and Photomedicine (1), we aimed to prove therapeutic effects of photobiomodulation (PBM) based on clinical outcomes by investigating the impact of UV-free blue light at 453 nm on the recovery of the skin barrier and on the cutaneous inflammatory response elicited by acute perturbation of the skin of healthy human volunteers. In this Letter we describe a study of same design and scope in which we investigated the impact of LED red light at 656 nm. Briefly, tape stripping and histamine iontophoresis were performed on the forearm of 22 healthy volunteers in two consecutive weeks: in one week, challenges were followed by irradiation with red light at 656 nm, in the other week (control), no light was administered. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/phpp.12444DOI Listing
December 2018
4 Reads

More manuscript submissions, higher quality science for Photodermatology, Photoimmunology & Photomedicine.

Authors:
Akimichi Morita

Photodermatol Photoimmunol Photomed 2018 05;34(3):166

Department of Geriatric and Environmental Dermatology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya, 467-8601, Japan.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/phpp.12393DOI Listing
May 2018
1 Read

The Skin Microbiome: Is It Affected by UV-induced Immune Suppression?

Front Microbiol 2016 10;7:1235. Epub 2016 Aug 10.

Research Unit for Photodermatology, Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Graz Graz, Austria.

Human skin apart from functioning as a physical barricade to stop the entry of pathogens, also hosts innumerable commensal organisms. The skin cells and the immune system constantly interact with microbes, to maintain cutaneous homeostasis, despite the challenges offered by various environmental factors. A major environmental factor affecting the skin is ultraviolet radiation (UV-R) from sunlight. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2016.01235DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4979252PMC
August 2016
2 Reads

Desired response to phototherapy vs photoaggravation in psoriasis: what makes the difference?

Exp Dermatol 2016 12;25(12):937-944

Cellular Photoimmunology Group, Infectious Diseases and Immunology, Sydney Medical School, Charles Perkins Centre, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

Psoriasis commonly responds beneficially to UV radiation from natural sunlight or artificial sources. Therapeutic mechanisms include the proapoptotic and immunomodulating effects of UV, affecting many cells and involving a variety of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, downregulating the Th17/IL-23 response with simultaneous induction of regulatory immune cells. However, exposure to UV radiation in a subset of psoriasis patients leads to exacerbation of the disease. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/exd.13137DOI Listing
December 2016
5 Reads

Serotonin signalling is crucial in the induction of PUVA-induced systemic suppression of delayed-type hypersensitivity but not local apoptosis or inflammation of the skin.

Exp Dermatol 2016 07 18;25(7):537-43. Epub 2016 Apr 18.

Department of Immunology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA.

Psoralen and UVA (PUVA) has immunosuppressive and proapoptotic effects, which are thought to be responsible alone or in combination for its therapeutic efficacy. However, the molecular mechanism by which PUVA mediates its effects is not well understood. Activation of the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) pathway has been suggested to be involved in the modulation of T-cell responses and found to mediate UVB-induced immune suppression. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/exd.12990DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4927393PMC
July 2016
32 Reads
2 Citations
3.762 Impact Factor

Levels and function of regulatory T cells in patients with polymorphic light eruption: relation to photohardening.

Br J Dermatol 2015 Aug 30;173(2):519-26. Epub 2015 Jul 30.

Research Unit for Photodermatology, Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Graz, Auenbrugger Platz 8, A-8036, Graz, Austria.

Background: We hypothesized that regulatory T cells (Tregs) are involved in the immunological abnormalities seen in patients with polymorphic light eruption (PLE).

Objectives: To investigate the number and suppressive function of peripheral Tregs in patients with PLE compared with healthy controls.

Methods: Blood sampling was done in 30 patients with PLE [seeking or not seeking 311-nm ultraviolet (UV)B photohardening] as well as 19 healthy controls at two time points: TP1, March to June (before phototherapy); and TP2, May to August (after phototherapy). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/bjd.13930
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjd.13930DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4564948PMC
August 2015
3 Reads

Mast cells are required for phototolerance induction and scratching abatement.

Exp Dermatol 2015 Jul 16;24(7):491-6. Epub 2015 Apr 16.

Research Unit for Photodermatology, Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria.

Dermal mast cells protect the skin from inflammatory effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation and are required for UV-induced immune suppression. We sought to determine a potential mechanistic role of mast cells in reducing the sensitivity to UV radiation (i.e. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/exd.12687DOI Listing
July 2015
9 Reads
5 Citations
3.762 Impact Factor

Polymorphous light eruption: clinic aspects and pathogenesis.

Dermatol Clin 2014 Jul;32(3):315-34, viii

Research Unit for Photodermatology, Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Graz, Auenbruggerplatz 8, Graz A-8036, Austria. Electronic address:

Polymorphous light eruption is an immunologically mediated photodermatosis with high prevalence, particularly among young women in temperate climates, characterized by pruritic skin lesions of variable morphology, occurring in spring or early summer on sun-exposed body sites. A resistance to ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-induced immunosuppression and a subsequent delayed-type hypersensitivity response to a photoantigen have been suggested as key factors in the disease. Molecular and immunologic disturbances associated with disease pathogenesis include a failure of skin infiltration by neutrophils and other regulatory immune cells on UVR exposure linked to a disturbed cytokine microenvironment. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.det.2014.03.012DOI Listing
July 2014
11 Reads

Effect of xenogenic repair enzymes on photoimmunology and photocarcinogenesis.

Authors:
H Stege

J Photochem Photobiol B 2001 Dec;65(2-3):105-8

Clinical and Experimental Photodermatology, Department of Dermatology, University of Düsseldorf, Moorenstrasse 5, 40225 Düsseldorf, Germany.

Exposure to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation leads to an increased generation of UVB-induced skin damage in humans. The most important UVB-induced side effects are UVB-induced immunosuppression and photocarcinogenesis and there is a large body of evidence that cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) induced by UVB radiation play a pivotal role in both processes. The topical application of DNA repair enzymes is a new innovative strategy to reduce the amount of CPDs in human skin. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
December 2001
3 Reads

Photodermatology: progress, problems and prospects.

Authors:
F P Gasparro

Eur J Dermatol 2000 Jun;10(4):250-4

Department of Dermatology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA.

Photodermatology is a sub-specialty of photobiology. As such it includes all aspects of photobiology related to the skin ranging from sun exposure and its consequences (both short term and long term) to the therapeutic effects derived from exposure to natural or artificial radiation. In this review the terms photodermatology and photomedicine are used in a somewhat interchangeable fashion, although the former is really a portion of the latter. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
June 2000
2 Reads

The low-dose model of UVB-induced immunosuppression.

Photodermatol 1988 Aug;5(4):151-61

Department of Dermatology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas.

Recent interest in photoimmunology has led to the development of the low-dose model of UVB-induced immunosuppression, an experimental framework in which inhibition of contact hypersensitivity is associated with alterations in the morphology and the antigen-presenting function of Langerhans cells in locally irradiated skin, and with the appearance of hapten-specific T-suppressor cells in systemic circulation. This article reviews the scientific data that has been generated from the utilization of this model. It focuses particular attention on current evidence that identifies distinct epidermal cell populations as key sources of the immunosuppression evoked by low-dose UVB. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
August 1988
2 Reads

Immunological consequences of ultraviolet radiation exposure.

Photodermatol 1986 Oct;3(5):284-97

Depending on the dose and conditions of administration, ultraviolet radiation (UVR) can function as either a complete carcinogen, a co-carcinogenic agent, or an immunologic modulator. Although much is known about its carcinogenic properties, only recently have investigations been aimed at defining the mechanisms by which UVR mediates its effect on the immune system. The objective of this article is to present the necessary background and results of recent studies that provide the basis for defining some of the local and systemic effects that UVR has on an individual's immunologic potential. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
October 1986
3 Reads

Skin cancer, photoimmunology, and urocanic acid.

Authors:
M L Kripke

Photodermatol 1984 Aug;1(4):161-3

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
August 1984
2 Reads
  • Page 1 of 1