101 results match your criteria Perioperative Nursing Clinics [Journal]


Current Issues in Fluid and Electrolyte Management.

Authors:
Joshua Squiers

Nurs Clin North Am 2017 06;52(2):xi-xii

OHSU School of Nursing, OHSU School of Medicine, Division of Cardiac and Surgical Subspecialty Critical Care, Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Mail Code: SN-6S, 3455 SW US Veterans Hospital Road, Portland, OR 97239-2941, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnur.2017.03.001DOI Listing
June 2017
15 Reads

Neurologic Intensive Care Unit Electrolyte Management.

Nurs Clin North Am 2017 06 7;52(2):321-329. Epub 2017 Apr 7.

Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Road, Portland, OR 97239, USA. Electronic address:

Dysnatremia is a common finding in the intensive care unit (ICU) and may be a predictor for mortality and poor clinical outcomes. Depending on the time of onset (ie, on admission vs later in the ICU stay), the incidence of dysnatremias in critically ill patients ranges from 6.9% to 15%, respectively. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnur.2017.01.009DOI Listing
June 2017
34 Reads

Perioperative nurses' knowledge of indicators for pressure ulcer development in the surgical patient population.

Nurs Clin North Am 2015 Jun;50(2):411-35

Vanderbilt School of Nursing, Nashville, TN, USA.

Despite focused attention to improve the quality and safety of patient care, and the financial impact pressure ulcers (PUs) can have on a health care provider or institution, evidence supports that PUs continue to occur in other patient populations during admission to the hospital. An example of a patient population in which evidence indicates that the development of PUs occurs, is patients who have a surgical procedure. The article discusses a project designed to identify potential knowledge deficits among perioperative nurses of indicators for PU development in the surgical patient population. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnur.2015.03.006DOI Listing
June 2015
3 Reads

Blood pressure and the obese.

Nurs Clin North Am 2015 Jun;50(2):241-55

Department of Anesthesia, Baptist Memorial Hospital North Mississippi, 2301 South Lamar Boulevard, Oxford, MS 38655, USA. Electronic address:

With the prevalence of obesity escalating globally, an increasing number of patients who are obese are seeking elective or requiring emergency surgery. Certified registered nurse anesthetists are challenged to provide vigilant, safe care. The ability to provide supportive therapy and make anesthetic adjustments is often hindered with obesity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnur.2015.03.009DOI Listing
June 2015
7 Reads

Evidence in perioperative care.

Nurs Clin North Am 2014 Dec 20;49(4):485-92. Epub 2014 Nov 20.

Institute for Nursing Excellence, UCSF Centre for Evidence-Based Patient and Family Care: An Affiliate Centre if the Joanna Briggs Institute, Surgical Services Node, Joanna Briggs Institute, University of California San Francisco Medical Center, 2233 Post Street, Suite 201, Box 1834, San Francisco, CA 94115, USA. Electronic address:

Perioperative care is comprised of preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative care. Given the vulnerable status of the perioperative patient, coupled with the complex nature of these areas, evidence-based practice and clinical decision-making must be rooted in high-quality evidence for safe and effective patient and family care. Evidence-based practice is comprised of patient and family preferences, clinical expertise, and best available evidence. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnur.2014.08.004DOI Listing
December 2014
12 Reads

Part II: managing perioperative hyperglycemia in total hip and knee replacement surgeries.

Nurs Clin North Am 2014 Sep;49(3):299-308

Patient Care Consulting Services, The Queen's Medical Center, 1301 Punchbowl Street, Honolulu, HI 96813, USA.

Perioperative hyperglycemia management is an important factor in reducing the risk of surgical site infections (SSIs) in all patients regardless of existing history of diabetes. Reduction of SSIs is one of the quality indicators reported by the National Healthcare Safety Networks of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In 2009 and 2010, the orthopedic surgical unit had an increased number of SSIs above the CDC benchmark. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnur.2014.05.004DOI Listing
September 2014
4 Reads

Implementing basic infection control practices in disaster situations.

Nurs Clin North Am 2010 Jun;45(2):219-31

Perioperative Clinical Nurse Specialist Program, Graduate School of Nursing, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Graduate School of Nursing, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814, USA.

Infections, troublesome in even optimal health care environments, can be a source of serious and persistent concern for local populations and health care workers during a disaster, and in austere environments such as those found in Iraq and Afghanistan. For these scenarios, it is vital to have standard infection control practices in place and to have them used consistently. Only then will healthcare workers be able to contain the potential spread of disease and improve conditions for those affected. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnur.2010.02.011DOI Listing
June 2010
9 Reads

Hard labor: the personal experiences of two obstetric nurses in Balad, Iraq.

Nurs Clin North Am 2010 Jun;45(2):193-203

Perinatal Unit, Elmendorf Air Force Base Hospital, 5955 Zeamer Avenue/EAFB, Elmendorf Air Force Base, AK 99506, USA.

This article describes the experiences of two obstetric nurses as they deployed to the war zone in Iraq. Each discusses her role as a medical-surgical nurse and an emergency room nurse, respectively, and how she dealt with learning to practice in these areas. Each nurse came away from the experience with newfound confidence in her abilities and an appreciation for flexibility in practice. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnur.2010.02.007DOI Listing
June 2010
6 Reads

Nurse-administered laser in dermatology.

Authors:
Heather Jones

Nurs Clin North Am 2007 Sep;42(3):393-406, vi

Dermatologic and Cutaneous Laser Surgery, Department of Dermatology, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97229, USA.

Nurses have become an essential part of patient care in laser therapy. In dermatology, the potential for helping patients achieve excellent results for individual skin needs is exponential when combined with appropriate technology, evidence-based care, and a competent, conscientious nurse. This article explains how a laser functions, outlines the use of lasers in treating particular dermatologic conditions, provides guidelines for posttreatment care, and discusses the nurse's role in providing laser treatment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnur.2007.07.001DOI Listing
September 2007
3 Reads

Imagery in the clinical setting: a tool for healing.

Authors:
Terry Reed

Nurs Clin North Am 2007 Jun;42(2):261-77, vii

Beyond Ordinary Nursing, Certificate Program in Imagery, PO Box 8177, Foster City, CA 94404, USA.

This article addresses the why and how of imagery and its relation with holistic theories. The description of clinical applications, program development, and research demonstrates successful interventions in virtually every area of nursing. Case examples show the profound healing that is experienced by the patient and the nurse simultaneously through this work. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnur.2007.03.006DOI Listing
June 2007
3 Reads

Nursing considerations in the geriatric surgical patient: the perioperative continuum of care.

Nurs Clin North Am 2006 Jun;41(2):313-28, vii

University of Colorado Hospital, 4200 East Ninth Avenue, Denver, CO 80262, USA.

Although aging is a natural process, caring for an older person is not the same as caring for a middle-aged adult person. The perioperative and perianesthesia nurses need to be competent in geriatric nursing care and possess specialized knowledge and skills related to a myriad of geriatric issues. This article focuses on the special needs of the elderly population and how the perioperative nursing team may address their care best. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnur.2006.01.001DOI Listing
June 2006
7 Reads

Management of the special needs of the pregnant surgical patient.

Authors:
Sharon Romanoski

Nurs Clin North Am 2006 Jun;41(2):299-311, vii

Paoli Hospital, 255 West Lancaster Avenue, Paoli, PA 19355, USA.

This article summarizes the nursing care that should be provided to the pregnant patient during surgery and gives a brief discussion of the physiology of pregnancy as it relates to surgery and anesthesia. An overview of anesthesia considerations is presented and the nursing process using the guidelines for pregnant patients from the Association of Perioperative Registered Nurses is discussed, followed by nursing considerations for the most common surgical procedures that pregnant women undergo. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnur.2006.01.009DOI Listing
June 2006
3 Reads

Unique concerns of the pediatric surgical patient: pre-, intra-, and postoperatively.

Authors:
Dolly Ireland

Nurs Clin North Am 2006 Jun;41(2):265-98, vii

Crittenton Hospital Medical Center, 1101 West University Drive, Rochester, MI 48307, USA.

This article focuses on the unique concerns of pediatric surgical patients and emphasizes preparation of the family as an integrated unit. The statement from older standards of the American Nurses' Association that "children have the right to be treated with dignity and respect" remains a valid challenge for nurses caring for these patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnur.2006.01.007DOI Listing
June 2006
4 Reads

Bariatric surgery risks, benefits, and care of the morbidly obese.

Nurs Clin North Am 2006 Jun;41(2):249-63, vi

Wittgrove Bariatric Center, Scripps Memorial Hospital, 9438 Genesee Avenue, Suite 328, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.

The American Society for Bariatric Surgery defines morbid obesity as a lifelong, progressive, life-threatening, genetically-related, costly, multi-factorial disease of excess fat storage with multiple comorbidities. Obesity satisfies the definition of morbid obesity when it reaches the point of significant risk for obesity-related comorbidities. These significant comorbidities often result in either significant physical disability or even death. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnur.2006.01.008DOI Listing
June 2006
3 Reads

How religion, language and ethnicity impact perioperative nursing care.

Nurs Clin North Am 2006 Jun;41(2):231-48, vi

Orthopaedic Surgery Center, 264 Pleasant Street, Concord, NH 03301, USA.

Religion, language, and ethnicity play important roles in the perioperative arena. This article highlights some of the challenges that religion, language, and ethnicity can present and offers strategies for making the experience as positive as possible for all patients. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S002964650600003
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnur.2006.01.002DOI Listing
June 2006
5 Reads

Comparison of operating room lasers: uses, hazards, guidelines.

Authors:
Phyllis M Houck

Nurs Clin North Am 2006 Jun;41(2):193-218, vi

Paoli Hospital, 255 West Lancaster Avenue, Paoli, PA 19301, USA.

Although the discovery of laser light no longer can be termed recent, it took the medical community a long time to use its technology. Everyday, advances are being made in laser technology, and new applications are being discovered for this modality. Because lasers allow for the capture, control, and manipulation of energy, it is important for nurses to understand the basic biophysics of lasers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnur.2006.01.004DOI Listing
June 2006
3 Reads

Positioning impact on the surgical patient.

Nurs Clin North Am 2006 Jun;41(2):173-92, v

Department of Anesthesia, Paoli Hospital, 255 West Lancaster Avenue, Paoli, PA 19301-1792, USA.

The operating room is unknown territory to most health care providers. It frequently brings up thoughts of blood, strange smells, and cold temperatures. Many nursing programs have scheduled little, if any, time in this environment for students. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnur.2006.01.010DOI Listing
June 2006
4 Reads

Preoperative nursing assessment of the surgical patient.

Authors:
Andrea Bray

Nurs Clin North Am 2006 Jun;41(2):135-50, v

Highlands Ranch, CO, USA.

Thorough assessment of the surgical patient begins in the preoperative phase and extends throughout the perioperative experience. Patient-centered interviews gather critical data that contribute to a successful experience and a focused plan of care. Information collected, documented, and conveyed to the surgeon or physician assists in appropriate medical decision making. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnur.2006.01.006DOI Listing
June 2006
3 Reads

Perioperative nursing.

Authors:
Gratia M Nagle

Nurs Clin North Am 2006 Jun;41(2):xi-xv

5 Maude Circle, Paoli, PA 19301.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnur.2006.02.001DOI Listing
June 2006
8 Reads

Current surgical management of colorectal cancer.

Authors:
D Baker

Nurs Clin North Am 2001 Sep;36(3):579-92, xi-xii

Department of Surgery Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 21287, USA.

Colorectal cancer is the leading cause of death from gastrointestinal malignancies in the United States. Recent emphasis on screening of high-risk and no-risk individuals in addition to careful postoperative surveillance has decreased the incidence and improved the quality of life of survivors. Although multimodality approaches to treating colorectal cancer are favored, surgical resection continues to be the mainstay for a cure. Read More

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September 2001
2 Reads

Surgical therapies for lung carcinomas.

Authors:
S L Knippel

Nurs Clin North Am 2001 Sep;36(3):517-25, x-xi

Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030-4095, USA.

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death for men and women in the world today. Surgical resection of early stage non-small cell lung cancer is the recommended treatment option and offers the patient the best chance for survival. Nurses are instrumental in lung cancer prevention, early detection, delivery of quality perioperative care, and maximizing long-term patient survival. Read More

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September 2001
3 Reads

Guided imagery: replication study using coronary artery bypass graft patients.

Nurs Clin North Am 2000 Jun;35(2):417-25

Critical Care Clinical Nurse Specialist, Center for Advanced Nursing Practice, BryanLGH Medical Center, Lincoln, NE 68506, USA.

Replication of a guided imagery study, based on the work of D. Tusek and colleagues, was initiated for coronary artery bypass graft patients, using the Center for Advanced Nursing Practice's Evidence-Based Practice Model. Through the leadership of clinical nurse specialists and the support of perioperative and postoperative bedside clinicians, this initiative offered benefits to patients and served as a template for program expansion to other patient populations. Read More

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June 2000
2 Reads

Surgical alternatives for wounds.

Nurs Clin North Am 1999 Dec;34(4):873-93, vi

Plastic Surgical Center, Omaha, Nebraska 68131, USA.

Surgical alternatives in wound care are a primary consideration for the treatment of nonhealing and traumatic wounds. Using the Reconstructive Ladder as an outline, this article provides an overview of preoperative wound care and the indications for surgical options in wound care. An overview of nursing care is highlighted as each option is reviewed to include perioperative care of the patient. Read More

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December 1999
4 Reads

Legal issues in ambulatory surgery.

Authors:
D Ireland

Nurs Clin North Am 1997 Jun;32(2):469-76

Post Anesthesia Care Unit, William Beaumont Hospital-Troy, Troy, Michigan, USA.

Professional liability is an issue of increasing concern to all health care practitioners. The components that constitute professional liability are discussed. Issues that safeguard and define nursing practice are explored from the ambulatory setting perspective. Read More

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June 1997
2 Reads

Ambulatory surgery. Care of the special needs patient.

Authors:
K Litwack

Nurs Clin North Am 1997 Jun;32(2):457-68

College of Nursing, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131, USA.

This article discusses common pre-existing medical conditions seen in ambulatory surgical patients. Defining characteristics of the diseases are provided, etiology and treatment are described, and implications for perioperative nursing care are explained. Read More

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June 1997
6 Reads

Care of the pediatric patient in ambulatory surgery.

Authors:
K A Lancaster

Nurs Clin North Am 1997 Jun;32(2):441-55

Same Day Program, Pre-Admission Testing, Endoscopy, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire, USA.

Caring for the pediatric and adolescent patient in the ambulatory surgery unit is challenging for several reasons. The first 18 years are a period of rapid physical, cognitive, and psychosocial growth. Psychological preparation is very important to ensure the readiness of the child and family for surgery; however, the efficacy of the different methods of preparation varies. Read More

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June 1997
3 Reads

Patient teaching in ambulatory surgery.

Authors:
K A Lancaster

Nurs Clin North Am 1997 Jun;32(2):417-27

Same Day Program, Pre-Admission Testing, Endoscopy, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire, USA.

Patient teaching is one of the primary roles of the perioperative professional nurse working in ambulatory surgery. The trend towards more outpatient surgery with an increasing reliance on recovery at home assumes the patient and the family will provide care previously received in the hospital. Patient concerns center around receiving appropriate facts concerning preoperative preparation and postdischarge care. Read More

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June 1997
5 Reads

Ambulatory surgery. Preoperative assessment and health history interview.

Authors:
G D Williams

Nurs Clin North Am 1997 Jun;32(2):395-416

Admission Assessment Department, Our Lady of Lourdes Regional Medical Center, Lafayette, Louisiana 70508, USA.

Successful outcomes for the ambulatory surgery patient begin prior to admission. With skillful assessment, early identification of possible risk factors, appropriate interventions, and education to prepare the patient and the family for the care required preoperatively and postoperatively, many procedures previously requiring hospital admission can now be done through the ambulatory surgery department. Read More

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June 1997
4 Reads

The ambulatory surgical nurse. Evolution, competency, and vision.

Authors:
P M Brockway

Nurs Clin North Am 1997 Jun;32(2):387-94

Post Anesthesia Care Unit/Same Day Surgery, Memorial Hospital at Easton, Easton, Maryland, USA.

Ambulatory surgery is one of the fastest-growing specialties in health care today. This article reviews several of the key elements that have been instrumental in defining the evolution of the Ambulatory Surgical Unit and predicts its place in the new millennium. It offers a view of the broad expanse of knowledge needed to practice within the fast-paced world of the ambulatory nurse. Read More

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June 1997
2 Reads

Interdisciplinary quality improvement in the perioperative program. A collaborative model.

Nurs Clin North Am 1997 Mar;32(1):215-30

Perioperative Programs, Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

The practice at Children's Hospital has demonstrated the many benefits of the collaborative method of TQM. It allows the various disciplines to share their perspectives on patient care with other members of the health-care team. This broadens each person's perspective and generates respect for the work of others in achieving high levels of patient care. Read More

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March 1997
3 Reads

Unlicensed assistive personnel in the perioperative setting.

Nurs Clin North Am 1997 Mar;32(1):201-13

Perioperative Programs and Allied Services, Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

The present climate in health care, including a tendency toward more managed care and capitation systems, has caused hospital administrators and perioperative managers to reexamine traditional work systems and their associated costs. Some decisions around work redesign may be financially driven or based on the decreased availability of qualified professionals in the job market. The use of an increased number of unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP) in hospital settings has become a common redesign strategy to address both issues. Read More

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March 1997
6 Reads

An approach to pediatric perioperative care. Parent-present induction.

Nurs Clin North Am 1997 Mar;32(1):183-99

Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

Allowing a parent to be present for the induction of mask anesthesia may minimize the stressors of separation experienced by pediatric patients undergoing a surgical procedure. A parent-present anesthesia induction program has been implemented at Children's Hospital in Boston in response to issues which have been voiced by parents and staff members, regarding separation and emotional trauma. Patient and parent selection are important variables to a successful program. Read More

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March 1997
2 Reads

Latex allergy. Considerations for the care of pediatric patients and employee safety.

Authors:
M A Young M Meyers

Nurs Clin North Am 1997 Mar;32(1):169-82

Orthopedic Surgical Service, Main Operating Room, Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

Certain groups of patients and health care workers are at high risk for developing latex allergy. In the perioperative arena, there is an increased risk for this allergy due to the mode and frequency of latex exposure. Using a multidisciplinary team approach, nurses must institute policies and procedures for precautions to take with latex to ensure that patients and employees remain in a safe environment. Read More

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March 1997
3 Reads

Ethical issues in pediatric perioperative nursing.

Nurs Clin North Am 1997 Mar;32(1):153-68

Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

Pediatric perioperative nurses often face ethical issues in their daily practice. Some of these issues require the ability to make a quick decision. Resources and mechanisms nurses can use to gain the knowledge required for ethical decision making are to attend ethical, legal, and clinical conferences, read ethical articles in nursing, medical, legal and ethical journals, and discuss issues with colleagues. Read More

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March 1997
10 Reads

Streamlining the perioperative process.

Nurs Clin North Am 1997 Mar;32(1):141-51

Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

Health-care reform and capitated reimbursements have and will continue to influence decreased lengths of hospital stay and continued efficiency in perioperative nursing practice. Collaborative efforts by perioperative nurses, anesthesia care providers, and surgical staff should continue to emphasize concise documentation processes as well as comprehensive assessment and evaluation phases to prepare patients and families for earlier discharge and recovery at home. The objective of new documentation practices and streamlining perioperative preparation processes is to eliminate the duplication of information, meet standards set by professional organizations, and provide quality, efficient care along with patient and family satisfaction. Read More

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March 1997
6 Reads

Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

Nurs Clin North Am 1997 Mar;32(1):125-40

Multidisciplinary Intensive Care Unit, Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is prolonged cardiopulmonary bypass used to treat critically ill patients with severe but reversible cardiac and/or respiratory failure. The severity of their symptoms, the rapid deterioration in their conditions, the difficulty in mechanical transportation, and the risks of traveling with an ECMO circuit often prohibit cannulation in an operating room. Cannulation for and decannulation after ECMO therapy can be safely accomplished in the intensive care unit by utilizing experienced perioperative nurses. Read More

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March 1997
3 Reads

Lasers in pediatric surgery.

Nurs Clin North Am 1997 Mar;32(1):109-23

Arkansas Children's Hospital, Little Rock, Arkansas 72202, USA.

Lasers, once a laboratory curiosity, have quickly become a viable and valuable surgical instrument. They have been found useful in almost every surgical specialty. This chapter will discuss how laser light is produced and its effects on tissue. Read More

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March 1997
5 Reads

Current practices and advances in pediatric neurosurgery.

Nurs Clin North Am 1997 Mar;32(1):73-96

Neurosurgical Service, Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

Advances in the field of neuroscience are enhancing outcomes for pediatric neurosurgical patients. Innovative diagnostic tools that include ventriculoscopy for hydrocephalus; long-term monitoring with subdural and epidural electrodes for seizures; and intraoperative computer-assisted, three-dimensional imaging for tumors are currently aiding neurosurgeons. These advances in the care of pediatric patients require the perioperative nurse to reevaluate and expand the nurse's role to optimize patient outcomes. Read More

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March 1997
2 Reads

Advances in pediatric anesthesia.

Authors:
L S Burns

Nurs Clin North Am 1997 Mar;32(1):45-71

Department of Anesthesia, Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

Advances in many aspects of pediatric anesthesia have resulted in a significant reduction in morbidity and mortality in children. Research and development have created vast improvements in pharmacology. Sophisticated monitoring and improvements in equipment evolved from advances made in scientific technology. Read More

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March 1997
2 Reads

Perioperative pain management in children.

Nurs Clin North Am 1997 Mar;32(1):31-44

Pain Treatment Service, Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

In this article the authors review the developmental pathophysiology of pain and its effects on children. Assessment modalities for differing developmental levels in the pediatric patient are reviewed. Medical modalities including medications administered orally, patient-controlled analgesia, epidurals, and preemptive analgesia are described. Read More

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March 1997
3 Reads

Pediatric sedation. Essentials for the perioperative nurse.

Nurs Clin North Am 1997 Mar;32(1):17-30

Post Anesthesia Care Unit and Same Day Surgery, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas 77030, USA.

Sedation of children undergoing surgical procedures is one of many issues facing perioperative nurses today. This article reviews relevant professional guidelines for the practice of sedation in children and describes the implications for perioperative nurses. Topics covered include preparation of the patient, monitoring guidelines, and the use of pharmacological agents. Read More

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March 1997
2 Reads

Special considerations for the pediatric perioperative patient. A developmental approach.

Nurs Clin North Am 1997 Mar;32(1):1-16

Perioperative Programs, Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

Children are not just small adults. They have unique differences and needs both physiologically and psychosocially. The pediatric perioperative nurse is challenged to meet these needs by incorporating a knowledge of growth and development in all aspects of the plan of care. Read More

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March 1997
3 Reads

Clinical aspects of nurse anesthesia practice. Sedation and monitored anesthesia care.

Authors:
M Booth

Nurs Clin North Am 1996 Sep;31(3):667-82

Department of Nursing Science, Medical College of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA.

Safe monitoring of patients receiving sedation mandates that all care givers recognize the potential physiologic trespass of sedatives, hypnotics, and opioid-like drugs on cerebral or respiratory systems. They must be ready to recognize this affront immediately, have necessary resuscitative equipment available, possess prerequisite skills to intervene in adverse changes, and know when to seek additional help. The long history of CRNA practice has helped to define nursing roles in this important form of perioperative care. Read More

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September 1996
4 Reads

Peer review.

Nurs Clin North Am 1995 Jun;30(2):197-210

Perioperative Nursing Program, Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Peer review is a major component of a professional practice and shared governance model in which professional staff nurses are given responsibility for practice and patient outcomes. Careful planning is necessary for the development of a peer-review program. Components include definition of roles, responsibilities, and performance standards, as well as the development of an evaluation tool and process. Read More

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June 1995
3 Reads

The unborn surgical patient. A nursing frontier.

Authors:
L J Howell

Nurs Clin North Am 1994 Dec;29(4):681-94

Fetal Treatment Center, University of California, San Francisco.

The fetus can now be considered a patient. Sophisticated imaging techniques and prenatal tests have allowed precise diagnosis of fetal abnormalities. Subsequent recommendations for treatment are evolving depending on diagnosis and progression of disease. Read More

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December 1994
2 Reads

Pediatric laparoscopy and thoracoscopy.

Authors:
N J Tkacz

Nurs Clin North Am 1994 Dec;29(4):671-80

Department of Surgery, Maine Medical Center, Portland.

Although applications of MIS to the pediatric population appear limitless, it is important to continually assess what surgical procedure is in the best interest of the individual child. The pediatric expertise of the surgeon, anesthesiologist, and nursing staff along with their comfort with MIS should be thoroughly considered. The management of available resources also is of importance. Read More

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December 1994
2 Reads

Preparation for surgery and adjustment to hospitalization.

Nurs Clin North Am 1994 Dec;29(4):655-69

Department of Pediatrics, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

One of every four children will be hospitalized at least once before reaching school age. The physical and psychosocial stress of hospitalization may be influenced by the child's developmental level, causing behavioral changes, somatic complaints, and a prolonged hospital stay. Through the use of careful development assessments, preoperative tours, and therapeutic play techniques fears can be allayed, misconceptions corrected, emotionally charged issues addressed, and a positive self-image created. Read More

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December 1994
19 Reads

Caring for children with ostomies.

Authors:
G Garvin

Nurs Clin North Am 1994 Dec;29(4):645-54

Division of Patient Services, Children's Hospital Oakland, California.

Caring for children with ostomies comprehensively requires that the healthcare professional understand issues related to normal growth and development as well as more specific medical information about disease processes and ostomy care. Parents should have a working knowledge of routine ostomy care and need guidelines to assist them in recognizing ostomy complications. Complications range from mild to severe. Read More

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December 1994
3 Reads

Surgical intervention in children with HIV infection.

Nurs Clin North Am 1994 Dec;29(4):631-43

Section of Pediatric Surgery, Wyler Children's Hospital, University of Chicago Hospitals, Illinois.

AIDS is a complex disease with variable manifestations. Effective care can significantly impede the progression of this disease. Understanding the complexities of this illness allows nurses to develop an appropriate plan of care with sensitivity and acknowledgment of infected children's individual needs. Read More

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December 1994
3 Reads

Advances in pediatric solid organ transplantation.

Authors:
B V Wise

Nurs Clin North Am 1994 Dec;29(4):615-29

Johns Hopkins Children's Center, Baltimore, Maryland.

Thorough nursing assessment and intervention are necessary throughout the transplant period. As the demand and success of solid organ transplantation in the pediatric population grows, research in the area offers a bright future for transplantation. This has provided the impetus for changes in allocation policies such as providing extra points for pediatric renal transplant recipients and alternative surgical procedures, such as reduced liver grafts and living related donors. Read More

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December 1994
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