172 results match your criteria Pediatrics Foreign Body Ingestion


Foreign-Body Ingestions of Young Children Treated in US Emergency Departments: 1995-2015.

Pediatrics 2019 Apr 12. Epub 2019 Apr 12.

Center for Injury Research and Policy, The Research Institute, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio; and.

Objectives: To describe the epidemiology of foreign-body ingestions (FBIs) of children <6 years of age who were treated in US emergency departments from 1995 to 2015.

Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis using data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System for children <6 years of age who were treated because of concern of FBI from 1995 to 2015. National estimates were generated from the 29 893 actual cases reviewed. Read More

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http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/lookup/doi/10.1542/ped
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2018-1988DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

Foreign Body Removal in Children Using Foley Catheter or Magnet Tube from Gastrointestinal Tract.

Pediatr Gastroenterol Hepatol Nutr 2019 Mar 5;22(2):132-141. Epub 2019 Mar 5.

Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Korea.

Foreign body (FB) ingestion of children is a common pediatric emergency requiring medical attention. Pediatric emergency physicians and gastroenterologists often encounter nervous and distressed situations, because of children presenting with this condition in the common clinical practice. When determining the appropriate timing and indications for intervention, physicians should consider multiple patient- and FB-related factors. Read More

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https://synapse.koreamed.org/DOIx.php?id=10.5223/pghn.2019.2
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5223/pghn.2019.22.2.132DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6416381PMC
March 2019
5 Reads

Let's stop lesions induced by magnet ingestion.

Arch Pediatr 2019 Apr 2;26(3):131-132. Epub 2019 Mar 2.

Pediatric gastroenterology department, hopital Robert-Debré, AP-HP, Denis-Diderot faculty, INSERM, 75019 Paris, France.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arcped.2019.01.002DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Mistaken Asymptomatic Carinal Foreign Body in a Child.

Pediatr Emerg Care 2019 Jan;35(1):e11-e13

From the Departments of Paediatrics and Medicine, Schulich School of Medicine, University of Western Ontario, Children's Hospital at London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario, Canada.

Foreign body aspirations are commonly seen in emergency departments (EDs) worldwide, presenting with cough, dyspnea, wheeze, and decreased air entry. Chest radiographs are commonly utilized diagnostic tools to confirm foreign object aspiration. The following is a case report of a child who presented in the ED with a carinal push-pin aspiration and a lack of respiratory symptoms; an extremely rare ED presentation of foreign body aspirations masquerading as a foreign body ingestion. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEC.0000000000001707DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

Chest Radiograph Alone Is Sufficient as the Foreign Body Survey for Children Presenting With Coin Ingestion.

Pediatr Emerg Care 2018 Nov 19. Epub 2018 Nov 19.

Department of Radiology, British Columbia Children's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Objectives: Radiographic survey of the entire aerodigestive tract (nares to anus) is common practice in children presenting to the emergency department following coin ingestion. The purpose of our study was to determine the optimal protocol for radiographic survey post-coin ingestion. We hypothesized that for children presenting with a clear history of coin ingestion a frontal chest radiograph including the entire esophagus is adequate to guide treatment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEC.0000000000001688DOI Listing
November 2018
4 Reads

Double Fogarty balloon catheter technique for difficult to retrieve esophageal foreign bodies.

J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2018 Nov 20;47(1):72. Epub 2018 Nov 20.

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, Canada.

Background: Foreign body ingestion is common, especially in the pediatric population. Plans for retrieval should be tailored to the specific esophageal foreign bodies.

Case Presentation: We present a difficult to retrieve esophageal foreign body in a 3-year-old girl who ingested a 2 cm glass pebble. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40463-018-0318-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6247742PMC
November 2018
11 Reads

Indications for chest X-rays in children and how to obtain and interpret them.

Nurs Child Young People 2018 11 26;30(6):30-37. Epub 2018 Oct 26.

Torbay Hospital, Torquay, England.

Chest X-ray (CXR) is one of the most common radiological investigations undertaken in practice with children. CXRs are requested for a number of suspected diagnoses, including pneumonia, pneumothorax and foreign body aspiration or ingestion. They may also be requested as part of a skeletal survey or to confirm the position of central and umbilical lines, as well as nasogastric tubes. Read More

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https://journals.rcni.com/doi/10.7748/ncyp.2018.e1141
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7748/ncyp.2018.e1141DOI Listing
November 2018
14 Reads

Electronic medical record-based tools aid in timely triage of disc-shaped foreign body ingestions.

Laryngoscope 2018 12 19;128(12):2697-2701. Epub 2018 Sep 19.

Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois.

Objectives/hypothesis: Children presenting to the emergency department with coin-shaped foreign body (FB) ingestion must be evaluated urgently to rule out a button battery. As many of these ingestions are well-appearing on presentation, delays in triage put patients at risk for further injury.

Study Design: Quality initiative. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/lary.27279DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Button battery and magnet ingestions in the pediatric patient.

Curr Opin Pediatr 2018 10;30(5):653-659

Department of Pediatrics.

Purpose Of Review: Pediatric foreign body ingestion is a common occurrence that presents a challenge both to pediatric gastroenterologists and primary care providers. Increasing prevalence of smaller, more technologically advanced toys in the household has resulted in an increased exposure to higher voltage batteries and powerful magnets that carry a high incidence of morbidity and mortality. This review highlights the latest findings regarding the patients at risk for button battery and magnet ingestions, the symptoms of presentation, and complications of these objects in contributing to long-standing gastrointestinal injury. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MOP.0000000000000665DOI Listing
October 2018
29 Reads

Predictors of nature of ingested foreign bodies in children & assessment of operative outcomes.

Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol 2018 Oct 24;113:150-155. Epub 2018 Jul 24.

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Lady Hardinge Medical College & Associated Hospitals, Shaheed Bhagat Singh Marg, New Delhi, 110001, India.

Objective: To examine sensitivity/specificity of history & radiology to identify ingested foreign body (FB) and develop a protocol for management of ingested FBs in paediatric patients; to assess outcomes of removal of lithium button battery foreign body (LBBFB).

Methods: Retrospective review. Children presenting to ENT emergency with suspected FB ingestion underwent rigid esophagoscopy and FB removal. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S01655876183034
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijporl.2018.07.032DOI Listing
October 2018
3 Reads
1.320 Impact Factor

Accuracy of chest X-Ray measurements of pediatric esophageal coins.

Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol 2018 Oct 10;113:1-3. Epub 2018 Jul 10.

Department of Otolaryngology, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

Objective: To determine the accuracy of chest x-ray measurements in children using ingested radiopaque foreign bodies of known size.

Methods: A database of foreign body ingestions at a tertiary care children's hospital was queried from 2013 to 2016 for children who had ingested a US coin, had a pre-operative chest x-ray and documentation of coin type at the time of endoscopic removal. Four blinded research subjects measured the coin diameter on chest x-ray using iSite PACS software and based on the measurement, predicted the coin type. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S01655876183032
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijporl.2018.07.011DOI Listing
October 2018
3 Reads

Características y resultados de la ingestión de cuerpos extraños en niños.

Arch Argent Pediatr 2018 Aug;116(4):256-261

Unidad de Investigación en Nutrición, Hospital de Pediatría, Centro Médico Nacional Siglo XXI, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social. Ciudad de México.

Introduction: Foreign body (FB) ingestion is a common home accident during childhood; a timely management by the specialists may help prevent complications in the short and long term.

Objective: To describe the characteristics and complications of FB ingestion located in the gastrointestinal tract in the pediatric population.

Material And Methods: Two phases, retrospective, and prospective study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5546/aap.2018.eng.256DOI Listing
August 2018
9 Reads

Safety-pin Induced Hemopericardium and Cardiac Tamponade in an Infant.

Indian Pediatr 2018 06;55(6):521-522

Department of Pediatrics, SAT Hospital, Government Medical College Thiruvananthapuram, India.

Background: Safety-pin ingestion causing cardiovascular complications are very rare with high risk for mortality.

Case Characteristics: A 10-month-old child who presented with persistent irritability and intermittent fever of 1 month duration. The child had tachypnea and mild subcostal retractions. Read More

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June 2018
1 Read

Ileocecal junction perforation caused by a sewing needle in incarcerated inguinal hernia: An unusual case report.

Medicine (Baltimore) 2018 Jun;97(22):e10787

Department of Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Northwest Women's and Children's Hospital, Xi'an, Shaanxi Province, P.R. China.

Introduction: This case study is concerning the meticulous observation of the moving process and track of 2 ingested needles using interval x-ray radiography, trying to localize the foreign bodies and reduce unnecessary exploration of digestive tract.

Case Presentation: An unusual case of a 1-year, 9-month-old female baby, with incarcerated hernia perforation caused by sewing needles with sharp ends, was reported herein. The patient had swallowed 2 sewing needles. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000010787DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6393046PMC
June 2018
2 Reads

Serious complications after button battery ingestion in children.

Eur J Pediatr 2018 Jul 2;177(7):1063-1070. Epub 2018 May 2.

Emma Children's Hospital, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Serious and fatal complications after button battery ingestion are increasing worldwide. The aim of this study is to describe serious complications after battery ingestion in children in the Netherlands.All pediatric gastroenterologists in the Netherlands performing upper endoscopies were asked to report all serious complications after battery ingestion in children (0-18 years) between 2008 and 2016 retrospectively. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00431-018-3154-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5997112PMC
July 2018
8 Reads

Foreign Body Ingestion in Children.

Authors:
Ji Hyuk Lee

Clin Endosc 2018 Mar 30;51(2):129-136. Epub 2018 Mar 30.

Department of Pediatrics, Chungbuk National University College of Medicine, Cheongju, Korea.

Foreign body (FB) ingestion in children is common and most children are observed to be between 6 months and 3 years of age. Although most FBs in the gastrointestinal tract pass spontaneously without complications, endoscopic or surgical removal may be required in a few children. Thus, FB ingestion presents a significant clinical difficulty in pediatric gastroenterological practice. Read More

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http://e-ce.org/journal/view.php?doi=10.5946/ce.2018.039
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5946/ce.2018.039DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5903088PMC
March 2018
3 Reads

Fidget Spinner Ingestions in Children-A Problem that Spun Out of Nowhere.

J Pediatr 2018 06 20;197:275-279. Epub 2018 Mar 20.

Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX.

The Consumer Product Safety Risk Management System's injury and potential injury database records 13 cases of fidget spinner ingestion since 2016. In addition to a database query, we report 3 additional cases of fidget spinner ingestion to describe patient presentations and subsequent management strategies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2018.01.064DOI Listing
June 2018
3 Reads

Trends of Magnet Ingestion in Children, an Ironic Attraction.

J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 2018 05;66(5):e116-e121

Minnesota Gastroenterology, P.A., Minneapolis, MN.

Background And Objectives: Ingestion of rare earth magnets is a serious ongoing hazard for pediatric patients. Our study aims to investigate whether 2012 Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) policy action, in coordination with efforts from consumer and physician advocacy groups, decreased the incidence of magnet ingestions in children in the United States since 2012.

Methods: Data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) was used to evaluate trends in emergency department (ED) encounters with pediatric patients (<18 years) who presented with suspected magnet ingestions (SMI) from 2010 to 2015. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MPG.0000000000001830DOI Listing
May 2018
8 Reads

Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Children: A Tertiary United Kingdom Children's Hospital Experience.

Children (Basel) 2017 Nov 3;4(11). Epub 2017 Nov 3.

Department of Paediatric Surgery, Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, Derby Road, Nottingham NG7 2UH, UK.

The aim of this study was to review the aetiology, presentation and management of these patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) at a tertiary children's unit in the United Kingdom. This was a retrospective single-institution study on children (<16 years) who presented with acute UGIB over a period of 5 years using known International Classification of Diseases (ICD) codes. A total of 32 children (17 males, 15 females) were identified with a total median age at presentation of 5. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/children4110095DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5704129PMC
November 2017
13 Reads

Two Cases of Colonoscopic Retrieval of a Foreign Body in Children: A Button Battery and an Open Safety Pin.

Pediatr Gastroenterol Hepatol Nutr 2017 Sep 26;20(3):204-209. Epub 2017 Sep 26.

Department of Pediatrics, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Ingestion of foreign body in children is a relatively common problem among paediatric population. The foreign bodies mostly pass spontaneously through the gastrointestinal tract. However, complications can occur according to its anatomical location, the characteristics of the foreign body, and delays in management. Read More

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https://synapse.koreamed.org/DOIx.php?id=10.5223/pghn.2017.2
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5223/pghn.2017.20.3.204DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5636938PMC
September 2017
14 Reads

Trauma hazards in children: An update for the busy clinician.

J Paediatr Child Health 2017 Nov 30;53(11):1096-1100. Epub 2017 Jun 30.

Douglas Cohen Department of Paediatric Surgery, Children's Hospital at Westmead, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Trauma and injury continue to be common in children and remain an important cause of mortality and morbidity. Legislation mandating the use of helmets for all cyclists appears to have been effective in reducing the incidence and severity of head and facial injuries, with no clear evidence of a reduction in cycling usage or activity. Straddle injuries, whilst uncommon and generally minor, require careful clinical assessment as they may be associated with urethral trauma. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jpc.13603DOI Listing
November 2017
10 Reads

Delayed diagnosis of esophageal foreign body: A case report.

Int J Surg Case Rep 2017 29;36:179-181. Epub 2017 May 29.

Department of Pediatrics C, Children Hospital of Tunis, Faculty of Medicine of Tunis, Tunis El Manar University, Tunisia. Electronic address:

Introduction: Foreign body (FB) ingestion, a common and serious problem in children, can present with a wide variety of symptoms. This paper describes and discusses the case of an esophageal foreign body (EFB), in which the patient presented with primarily respiratory clinical signs causing delayed diagnosis.

Presentation Of Case: A six month old boy presented with three months history of harsh cough, stridor and pulmonary congestion. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijscr.2017.05.028DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5466546PMC
May 2017
12 Reads

Emergency Management of the Ingested Magnet: An Algorithmic Approach.

Pediatr Emerg Care 2017 May 1. Epub 2017 May 1.

From the *Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota, Masonic Children's Hospital, Minneapolis, MN; †Department of Pediatrics, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH; and ‡University of Minnesota School of Medicine; §Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN.

Introduction: Accidental ingestion of foreign bodies is an increasing problem in the pediatric population. Symptoms are often nonspecific and may lead to a missed diagnosis because the ingestion event often goes unwitnessed.

Case: We present a case of a missed diagnosis of a multiple magnet ingestion event in a pediatric patient leading to operative management. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEC.0000000000001168DOI Listing
May 2017
10 Reads

Appendiceal foreign body in an infant.

Medicine (Baltimore) 2017 Apr;96(17):e6717

Department of Pediatrics, Chonbuk National University Medical School and Hospital, Research Institute of Clinical Medicine of Chonbuk National University - Biomedical Research Institute of Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju, Korea.

Rationale For This Case Report: Many children are hospitalized because of foreign body ingestion. In such circumstances, the gastroenterologist must consider the timing of ingestion; the size, type, and location of the object ingested; and the patient's symptoms. But appendiceal foreign body in infant is very rare. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000006717DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5413249PMC
April 2017
12 Reads

Adolescent with prolonged toxidrome.

Clin Toxicol (Phila) 2017 Jun 13;55(5):364-365. Epub 2017 Feb 13.

a Oklahoma Center for Poison and Drug Information, University of Oklahoma College of Pharmacy , Oklahoma City , OK , USA.

A 13-year-old female was presented to the emergency department following an intentional ingestion. The patient developed significant toxicity including multiple, discreet tonic-clonic seizures. Despite appropriate resuscitation and antidotal management, the patient's symptoms persisted for more than 36 hours post-ingestion. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15563650.2017.1287912DOI Listing
June 2017
39 Reads

Movement Disorder Associated With Foreign Body Ingestion.

Pediatrics 2017 Apr 15;139(4). Epub 2017 Mar 15.

Department of Pediatrics, Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children, Metairie, Louisiana.

We present a case of recurrent bouts of irritability with arching, head extension, and lethargy in a previously healthy 10-month-old girl admitted to the PICU for acute onset of a movement disorder. The patient's vital signs and physical examination were unremarkable but recurrent bouts of abnormal movements persisted for the first 10 hours of admission in the PICU. Possible diagnoses, such as meningitis, status epilepticus, space occupying lesions, and toxic ingestions, were ruled out because of negative cerebrospinal fluid analysis, normal EEG, and negative results of other ancillary tests. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2016-1967DOI Listing
April 2017
6 Reads

After the Recall: Reexamining Multiple Magnet Ingestion at a Large Pediatric Hospital.

J Pediatr 2017 07 10;186:78-81. Epub 2017 Mar 10.

Department of Pediatrics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; Division of General Pediatrics, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada.

Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of a mandatory product recall on the frequency of multiple mini-magnet ingestion at a large tertiary pediatric hospital, and to examine the morbidity and mortality associated with these ingestions.

Study Design: In this retrospective chart review, we searched our institution's electronic patient record for patients aged <18 years who had been diagnosed with ingested magnetic foreign bodies between 2002 and 2015, a period that included the mandatory product recall. We compared the frequency and character of ingestions before and after the recall. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.02.002DOI Listing
July 2017
6 Reads

Atypical Presentation of Multiple Foreign Body Ingestion.

APSP J Case Rep 2017 Jan-Feb;8(1). Epub 2017 Jan 5.

Anesthesiology Department, Bahcelievler State Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey.

Foreign body ingestion is very common in childhood especially under 3 year of age. Pica syndrome is characterized by an appetite for substances that are largely non-nutritive. We present a 3-year old girl who presented to ER with symptoms and signs of intestinal obstruction. Read More

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http://www.apspjcaserep.com/ojs/index.php/ajcr/article/view/
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http://dx.doi.org/10.21699/ajcr.v8i1.525DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5253615PMC
January 2017
5 Reads

Endoscopic retrieval of gastric trichophytobezoar: Case report of a 12-year-old girl with trichophagia.

Medicine (Baltimore) 2017 Jan;96(3):e5969

aDepartment of Pediatrics, Tianjin Nankai Hospital bNankai Clinical School, Tianjin Medical University cDepartment of Endoscopy, Tianjin Nankai Hospital, Nankai, Tianjin, China.

Rationale: Trichophytobezoars, which are composed of hair and plant fibers, are usually located in the stomach. They are often associated with trichophagia and trichotillomania. The most commonly reported methods of trichophytobezoar treatment are open surgery and laparoscopic retrieval; there are few reports of endoscopic removal of trichophytobezoars. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000005969DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5279109PMC
January 2017
10 Reads

An unusual foreign body within the appendix.

Med J Malaysia 2016 10;71(5):298-299

Aristotle University of Thessaloniki G.H Papageorgiou, 2nd Department of Pediatric Surgery, Greece.

Ingestion of foreign bodies consist a quite common problem in the pediatric age group. Usually most of them traverse the gastrointestinal tract without complications and only in rare cases they get trapped within the appendix. This case report describes the ingestion of the tip of a mercury thermometer by a six-year-old girl. Read More

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October 2016
7 Reads

[An unusual finding of two coins together in the esophagus of pediatric patients. Report of two cases].

Rev Gastroenterol Peru 2016 Oct-Dec;36(4):373-375

Servicio de Pediatría, Hospital Regional de Lambayeque. Chiclayo, Perú.

The ingestion of foreign bodies (EB) is a frequent complaint in the Pediatric Emergency Services. Studies report that in children occurs 80% of the EC, most frequently between 6 months and 3 years old and the second held because of urgent endoscopy in pediatrics. In 80-90% of cases the CE spontaneously passes through the upper gastrointestinal tract, however occasionally staying in the esophagus and should be removed to avoid dangerous complications such as obstruction or perforation of the upper digestive tract bleeding, ulcers, or fistulas. Read More

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May 2017
7 Reads

An unusual complication of endotracheal intubation: ingestion of a bulb in a premature neonate.

Turk J Pediatr 2016 ;58(1):119-120

Division of Neonatology, Pamukkale University Faculty of Medicine, Denizli, Turkey.

Endotracheal intubation is a common daily procedure used for sustaining life in premature and term neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit. This procedure can be associated with some iatrogenic complications. One of these complications is ingesting a laryngoscope light bulb, and it is an extremely rare complication in neonates. Read More

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June 2017
4 Reads

Role of Sonography for Evaluation of Gastrointestinal Foreign Bodies.

J Ultrasound Med 2016 Dec;35(12):2723-2732

Department of Radiology, Saitama Children's Medical Center, Saitama, Japan.

Foreign body ingestion is frequently encountered in children. The locations of the foreign bodies and the period during which they have been present in the thorax and abdomen are important for determining the method and timing of treatment. Although plain radiography and computed tomography are primarily used for assessment of foreign bodies, sonography without radiation is also useful for diagnosis of foreign bodies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.7863/ultra.16.01042DOI Listing
December 2016
7 Reads

Magnetic Foreign Body Ingestions.

Pediatr Emerg Care 2016 Oct;32(10):698-702

*Assistant Professor (Alfonzo), Department of Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine, New York Presbyterian Hospital-Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY; and †Professor (Baum), Department of Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine, Yale New Haven Hospital-Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT.

Magnets are inherently attractive to young children, but present a risk when ingested. If consumed alone, small, smooth magnetic foreign bodies are likely to pass without significant event; however, ingestion of multiple magnets may have catastrophic consequences, including bowel perforation, obstruction, peritonitis, and death. Increasing reports of morbidity and mortality in recent years from the US National Electronic Injury Surveillance System has led to numerous safety statements from the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as well as several product recalls from the Consumer Product Safety Commission. Read More

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https://insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00006565-201610000-000
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEC.0000000000000927DOI Listing
October 2016
7 Reads

Factors Associated with Removal of Impactted Fishbone in Children, Suspected Ingestion.

Pediatr Gastroenterol Hepatol Nutr 2016 Sep 29;19(3):168-174. Epub 2016 Sep 29.

Department of Pediatrics, Gyeongsang National University Hospital, Jinju, Korea.; Institute of Health Science, Gyeongsang National University Hospital, Jinju, Korea.

Purpose: The management and clinical course in pediatric patients who had ingested foreign body were investigated retrospectively to evaluate the frequency and factor associated with successful removal of fishbone foreign body.

Methods: Based on the medical records of patients younger than 15 years old who visited emergency room because of foreign body ingestion from January 1999 to December 2012, the authors reviewed clinical characteristics including type of ingested foreign bodies, time to visits, managements and complications.

Results: Fishbone (50. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5223/pghn.2016.19.3.168DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5061658PMC
September 2016
10 Reads

Paediatric Gastrointestinal Endoscopy: European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition and European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Guidelines.

J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 2017 01;64(1):133-153

*International Academy for Paediatric Endoscopy Training, Sheffield Children's Hospital, Weston Bank, Sheffield, UK †Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Catholic University, Rome, Italy ‡Gedyt Endoscopy Center, Buenos Aires, Argentina §Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Centro Hospitalar de São João, Porto, Portugal ||Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Emma Children's Hospital, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands ¶Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, University Children's Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland #Department of Gastroenterology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam, The Netherlands **Department of Gastroenterology, Nuovo Regina Margherita Hospital, Rome, Italy ††Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Alder Hey Children's Hospital, Liverpool, UK ‡‡Department of Pediatric Surgery and Intensive Care, Erasmus MC, Sophia Children's Hospital, Rotterdam, The Netherlands §§Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Robert-Debré Hospital, Paris, France ||||Digestive Endoscopy and Surgery Unit, Bambino Gesù Children Hospital-IRCCS, Rome, Italy ¶¶Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, University Children's Hospital Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia ##Pediatric Gastroenterology, UZ Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium ***Department of Gastroenterology, Motol University Hospital, Prague, Czech Republic †††Department of Pediatrics, University of Messina, Messina, Italy ‡‡‡IV Medical Department, Rudolfstiftung Hospital, Vienna, Austria §§§Department of General Pediatrics, Children's Hospital Freiburg University, Freiburg, Germany ||||||Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine III, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria ¶¶¶Department of Gastroenterology, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, UK ###Department for Pediatric Nephrology and Gastroenterology, Medical University of Vienna, Austria ****GI Endoscopy Unit, OUS, Rikshospitalet University Hospital, Oslo, Norway ††††Gastroenterology and Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Ospedale Nuovo Robbiani di Soresina, Soresina, Italy.

This guideline refers to infants, children, and adolescents ages 0 to 18 years. The areas covered include indications for diagnostic and therapeutic esophagogastroduodenoscopy and ileocolonoscopy; endoscopy for foreign body ingestion; corrosive ingestion and stricture/stenosis endoscopic management; upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding; endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography; and endoscopic ultrasonography. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy and endoscopy specific to inflammatory bowel disease has been dealt with in other guidelines and are therefore not mentioned in this guideline. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MPG.0000000000001408DOI Listing
January 2017
29 Reads

Pediatric gastrointestinal endoscopy: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) and European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) Guideline Executive summary.

Endoscopy 2017 Jan 12;49(1):83-91. Epub 2016 Sep 12.

Gastroenterology and Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Ospedale Nuovo Robbiani di Soresina, Italy.

This Executive summary of the Guideline on pediatric gastrointestinal endoscopy from the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) and the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) refers to infants, children, and adolescents aged 0 - 18 years. The areas covered include: indications for diagnostic and therapeutic esophagogastroduodenoscopy and ileocolonoscopy; endoscopy for foreign body ingestion; endoscopic management of corrosive ingestion and stricture/stenosis; upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding; endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, and endoscopic ultrasonography. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy and endoscopy specific to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have been dealt with in other Guidelines and are therefore not mentioned in this Guideline. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0042-111002DOI Listing
January 2017
29 Reads

Bronchial Compression and Tracheosophageal Fistula Secondary to Prolonged Esophageal Foreign Body.

Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol 2016 Dec 7;125(12):1030-1033. Epub 2016 Sep 7.

Department of Surgery, Division of Pediatric Surgery, University of Iowa Healthcare, Iowa City, Iowa, USA.

Introduction: Foreign body ingestion is a common pediatric problem that can have a delayed presentation, as presented herein.

Case Report: We present the case of a 15-year-old female who developed bronchial compression and an acquired tracheoesophageal fistula secondary to a longstanding esophageal foreign body.

Discussion: There are several challenges in diagnosis and management of this unusual situation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003489416668194DOI Listing
December 2016
16 Reads

A computed tomography phantom study of foam earplugs: Uncommon but potentially hazardous foreign body ingestion in children.

Medicine (Baltimore) 2016 Aug;95(35):e4701

aDepartment of Diagnostic Radiology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital bDepartment of Physical Education, Health and Recreation, National Chiayi University, Chiayi, Taiwan cChang Gung University College of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan dDepartment of Pediatrics eDepartment of Pediatric Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chiayi fGraduate Institute of Clinical Medical Sciences, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan.

Ingestion of a foreign body is common among children. However, ingestion of foam earplugs (FEPs) has not been reported previously. A 7-month-old female infant presented with small bowel obstruction, which was finally proved to be a case of FEP ingestion. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000004701DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5008585PMC
August 2016
1 Read

Foreign-body ingestion in Egyptian children: a 10-year experience of endoscopic intervention in a tertiary hospital.

Minerva Pediatr 2016 Jul 21. Epub 2016 Jul 21.

Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt -

Background: There was a lack of data about foreign body (FB) ingestion among Middle-East children. We conducted a retrospective analysis of FB ingestion among Egyptian children and determined the predictors that affect the occurrence of complications.

Methods: This retrospective study was carried out on 1546 patients' ≤ 13 years old, presented with FB ingestion and were in need of endoscopic removal of FB. Read More

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July 2016
2 Reads

Endoscopic removal of impacted oesophageal foreign body: A case report and a review of literature.

Afr J Paediatr Surg 2016 Jan-Mar;13(1):41-3

Department of Paediatrics, Federal Medical Centre, Lokoja, Nigeria.

Foreign body (FB) impaction in the oesophagus is fairly common in paediatric Gastroenterology practice. This study aims to describe a case of an unusually impacted button lithium battery, in the mid-oesophagus of a 7-year-old child that was confirmed, and removed during oesophagogastroduodenoscopy. A 7-year-old male child, presented at the Emergency Paediatric Unit of our hospital with a history of ingestion of a button-like metallic object. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0189-6725.181706DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4955460PMC
July 2017
10 Reads

[Recommendations for the prevention of foreign body aspiration].

An Pediatr (Barc) 2017 Jan 24;86(1):50.e1-50.e6. Epub 2016 May 24.

Servicio de Urgencias de Pediatría, Hospital Universitario Cruces, Bilbao, España.

The aspiration of a foreign body remains a common paediatric problem, with serious consequences that can produce both acute and chronic disease. Aspiration usually causes a medical emergency that requires a prompt diagnosis and an urgent therapeutic approach as it may result in the death of the child or severe brain injury. It typically involves organic foreign bodies (mainly food or nuts) aspirated by children under 5 years old, and usually at home. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anpedi.2016.04.013DOI Listing
January 2017
8 Reads

Pediatric Ingestions: Emergency Department Management.

Pediatr Emerg Med Pract 2016 Apr 1;13(4):1-24; quiz 20. Epub 2016 Apr 1.

Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, USC Keck School of Medicine, Division of Emergency and Transport Medicine, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA.

Pediatric ingestions present a common challenge for emergency clinicians. Each year, more than 50,000 children aged less than 5 years present to emergency departments with concern for unintentional medication exposure, and nearly half of all calls to poison centers are for children aged less than 6 years. Ingestion of magnetic objects and button batteries has also become an increasing source of morbidity and mortality. Read More

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April 2016
13 Reads

Foreign Body Ingestion in Children: Should Button Batteries in the Stomach Be Urgently Removed?

Pediatr Gastroenterol Hepatol Nutr 2016 Mar 22;19(1):20-8. Epub 2016 Mar 22.

Department of Pediatrics, Korea University Guro Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Purpose: Foreign body (FB) ingestion is common in children, and button battery (BB) ingestion has been increasing in recent years. This study was to identify factors related to outcomes of FB ingestion, particularly BBs in the stomach. We evaluated whether the current recommendations are appropriate and aimed to suggest indications for endoscopic removal of BB in the stomach in young children. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5223/pghn.2016.19.1.20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4821979PMC
March 2016
8 Reads

Abdominal emergencies in pediatrics.

Radiologia 2016 May 31;58 Suppl 2:80-91. Epub 2016 Mar 31.

Servicio de Radiología, Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Madrid, España.

Abdominal symptoms are among the most common reasons for pediatric emergency department visits, and abdominal pain is the most frequently reported symptom. Thorough history taking and physical examination can often reach the correct diagnosis. Knowing the abdominal conditions that are most common in each age group can help radiologists narrow the differential diagnosis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rx.2016.02.003DOI Listing
May 2016
14 Reads

Pneumopericardium due to ingestion of button battery.

Ann Pediatr Cardiol 2016 Jan-Apr;9(1):94-5

Department of Pediatrics, Dr. S. N. Medical College, Jodhpur, Rajasthan, India.

Mostly ingested button batteries passed through the gastrointestinal tract without any adverse effects. But button battery can lead to hazardous complications including tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF), especially when the battery is impacted in the esophagus. Urgent esophagoscopic removal of the battery is essential in all cases. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0974-2069.171387DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4782482PMC
March 2016
3 Reads

Intramural esophageal foreign body in a child.

Int J Pediatr Adolesc Med 2016 Mar 24;3(1):34-37. Epub 2015 Dec 24.

Pediatric Gastroenterology Department, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Saudi Arabia.

Foreign body ingestion is a common problem in the pediatric population. The majority of cases occur between 6 months and 3 years of age. Major complications, including bowel perforation and obstruction, have been reported. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpam.2015.11.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6372402PMC
March 2016
1 Read

Foreign body ingestion in children.

Turk Pediatri Ars 2015 Dec 1;50(4):234-40. Epub 2015 Dec 1.

Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Süleyman Demirel University Faculty of Medicine, Isparta, Turkey.

Aim: Foreign bodies ingested by the oral route enter into the gastrointestinal tract and are considered a significant health problem in the childhood. In this study, we evaluated the pediatric patients who presented to our hospital with the complaint of ingestion of foreign body.

Material And Methods: The hospital records of all children who presented to our clinic because of ingestion of foreign body between January 2008 and January 2015 were examined retrospectively. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5152/TurkPediatriArs.2015.3164DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4743866PMC
December 2015
6 Reads
3 Citations

A Case of 2-Year-Old Child with Entero-Enteric Fistula Following Ingestion of 25 Magnets.

Acta Medica (Hradec Kralove) 2016;59(4):140-142

Department of Surgery, Split University Hospital and University of Split, School of Medicine, Split, Croatia.

Introduction: Magnet ingestion usually does not cause serious complications, but in case of multiple magnet ingestion or ingestion of magnet with other metal it could cause intestinal obstruction, fistula formation or even perforation.

Case Report: We report case of intestinal obstruction and fistula formation following ingestion of 25 magnets in a 2-year-old girl. Intraoperatively omega shaped intestinal loop with fistula caused by two magnetic balls was found. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14712/18059694.2017.42DOI Listing
June 2017
12 Reads

Button Battery Ingestion in Children: A Paradigm for Management of Severe Pediatric Foreign Body Ingestions.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2016 Jan;26(1):99-118

Department of Pediatrics, Digestive Health Institute, Children's Hospital Colorado, University of Colorado, 13123 E 16th Ave, B290, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. Electronic address:

Gastrointestinal injuries secondary to button battery ingestions in children have emerged as a dangerous and difficult management problem for pediatricians. Implementation of a multidisciplinary team approach, with rapid and coordinated care, is paramount to minimize the risk of negative outcomes. In addition to providing a comprehensive review of the topic, this article outlines the authors' referral center's experience with patients with severe battery ingestion, highlighting the complications, outcomes, and important lessons learned from their care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2015.08.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5425245PMC
January 2016
3 Reads