1,290 results match your criteria Pediatrics Febrile Seizures


Developmental outcomes following vaccine-proximate febrile seizures in children.

Neurology 2020 Jul 1. Epub 2020 Jul 1.

From the National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance (L.D., N.W., K.M.), Children's Hospital Education Research Institute (B.B.), and Kids Neuroscience Centre (B.B.), The Children's Hospital at Westmead; University of Sydney Children's Hospital Westmead Clinical School (L.D., N.W., K.M., B.B.); Discipline of Paediatrics (M.G.), School of Medicine, Women's and Children's Hospital, University of Adelaide; Department of Paediatrics (N.C.), University of Melbourne, Royal Children's Hospital; Murdoch Children's Research Institute (N.C., J.B.), Parkville; Infection and Immunity (J.B.), Monash Children's Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Monash Centre for Health Care Research and Implementation, Monash University, Clayton; Wesfarmer's Centre of Vaccines and Infectious Disease (P.R.), Telethon Kids Institute, West Perth; and School of Paediatrics and Child Health (P.R.), University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.

Objective: To compare the developmental and behavioral outcomes of children experiencing an initial vaccine-proximate (VP) febrile seizure (FS) to those having a non-VP-FS (NVP-FS) and controls who have not had a seizure.

Methods: In this prospective multicenter cohort study, children with their first FS before 30 months of age between May 2013 and April 2016 were recruited from 4 Australian pediatric hospitals and classified as having VP-FS or NVP-FS. Similar-aged children with no seizure history were recruited as controls. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000009876DOI Listing

Copy number variation in genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus.

Eur J Paediatr Neurol 2020 Jun 20. Epub 2020 Jun 20.

Department of Pediatrics, Montreal Children's Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Department of Neurology & Neurosurgery, Montreal Children's Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Electronic address:

Aim: Genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) is a familial epilepsy syndrome in which affected individuals may have a variety of epilepsy phenotypes, the most common being febrile seizures (FS) and febrile seizures plus (FS+). We investigated the possible contribution of copy number variation to GEFS+.

Method: We searched our epilepsy research database for patients in GEFS + families who underwent chromosomal microarray analysis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejpn.2020.05.005DOI Listing

Zinc deficiency and febrile seizure: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Turk J Pediatr 2020 ;62(3):347-358

Department of Eye Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.

Background And Objectives: Zinc has been reported to be low in children with febrile seizure compared to febrile cases without seizures, but results are inconsistent. A meta-analysis was performed to systematically evaluate the serum level of zinc in febrile children aged between 6-72 months with or without seizures.

Material And Methods: A systematic search of databases was performed from January 2000 to January 2019. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.24953/turkjped.2020.03.001DOI Listing
January 2020

Human Herpesvirus 6 Associated Encephalitis with Fulminant Brain Edema in a Previously Healthy Child.

Cureus 2020 May 7;12(5):e8018. Epub 2020 May 7.

Pediatric Neurology, Hospital Nacional De Niños "Dr. Carlos Sáenz Herrera", San José, CRI.

Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) is an important cause of roseola and febrile seizures in children. However, it is also a rare cause of encephalitis, most common in immunosuppressed children. We describe a case of HHV-6 encephalitis with fulminant brain edema in a previously healthy child. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.7759/cureus.8018DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7279708PMC

Thiamylal anaesthetic therapy for febrile refractory status epilepticus in children.

Seizure 2020 May 14;80:12-17. Epub 2020 May 14.

Department of Pediatrics, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Japan. Electronic address:

Purpose: To evaluate barbiturate anaesthetic therapy using thiamylal for febrile refractory status epilepticus (fRSE) in children.

Methods: This was a review of a prospectively-collected database between April 2012-March 2016 for fRSE cases treated with thiamylal anaesthetic therapy in a single paediatric hospital in Japan. The sample comprised 23 children (median age, 23 months) with fRSE that underwent thiamylal anaesthetic therapy for convulsive seizures lasting longer than 60 min, sustained after intravenous administration of benzodiazepine and non-benzodiazepine anticonvulsants. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.seizure.2020.03.012DOI Listing

Transient cortical diffusion restriction in children immediately after prolonged febrile seizures.

Eur J Paediatr Neurol 2020 May 19. Epub 2020 May 19.

Department of Pediatrics, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan.

Aim: Little is known about acute febrile status epilepticus-induced injury of extrahippocampal structures. To clarify the presence and clinical significance of acute extrahippocampal injuries, we performed diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in children immediately after prolonged febrile seizure (PFS).

Method: We performed a retrospective cohort study in children younger than 6 years old who visited one of two hospitals due to PFSs between January 2013 and October 2018. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejpn.2020.05.004DOI Listing

Genetic Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy Associated with RANBP2: Clinical and Therapeutic Implications in Pediatrics.

Mult Scler Relat Disord 2020 May 15;43:102194. Epub 2020 May 15.

Division of Neurology, Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, United States; Department of Neurology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA. Electronic address:

Genetic (also known as familial) acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE1) is a rare disease presenting with encephalopathy often following preceding viral febrile illness in patients with a genetic predisposition resulting from a missense mutation in the gene encoding RAN Binding Protein 2 (RANBP2). The acute episode is characterized by deterioration in consciousness, often with focal neurologic deficits and seizures. Additionally, symmetric multifocal brain lesions are seen in the bilateral thalami as well as other characteristic regions, involving both gray and white matter. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.msard.2020.102194DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7228726PMC

Kawasaki disease presented with status epilepticus and diffusion MRI abnormalities in the subcortical white matter.

Turk J Pediatr 2020 ;62(2):315-319

Department of Pediatrics, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Kawasaki, Kanagawa, Japan.

Background: Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute, self-limited vasculitis of unknown etiology that occurs predominantly in infants and young children. Encephalitis/encephalopathy is an extremely rare complication of KD.

Case: A previously healthy 8-month-old Japanese boy had a prolonged seizure after febrile illness for one day. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.24953/turkjped.2020.02.020DOI Listing
January 2020

Clinical Features of Complex Febrile Seizure Caused by Primary Human Herpesvirus 6B Infection.

Pediatr Neurol 2020 Mar 28. Epub 2020 Mar 28.

Department of Pediatrics, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Toyoake, Japan.

Background: It is well known that febrile seizures are commonly occur in children with exanthem subitum. In this study, we compared the clinical features and backgrounds of patients with complex febrile seizures with and without primary human herpesvirus 6B infection.

Methods: Sixty-two patients were enrolled after experiencing their first febrile seizure. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pediatrneurol.2020.03.015DOI Listing

Comparison of Clinical Characteristics Between Febrile and Afebrile Seizures Associated With Acute Gastroenteritis in Childhood.

Front Pediatr 2020 16;8:167. Epub 2020 Apr 16.

Division of Pediatric Emergency, Department of Pediatrics, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

Acute gastroenteritis (AGE) accompanied by seizures is not a rare scenario in childhood. We investigated the clinical features of children with febrile or afebrile seizures during AGE and aimed to identify the impact of fever in this situation-related seizure. We retrospectively reviewed the medical charts of children admitted due to seizures associated with mild AGE between January 2008 and December 2017. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fped.2020.00167DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7176810PMC

Pathogenic variants in gene identified by clinical whole-genome sequencing.

Cold Spring Harb Mol Case Stud 2020 Jun 12;6(3). Epub 2020 Jun 12.

Center for Pediatric Genomic Medicine, Children's Mercy Hospital, Kansas City, Missouri 64108, USA.

Status epilepticus is not rare in critically ill intensive care unit patients, but its diagnosis is often delayed or missed. The mortality for convulsive status epilepticus is dependent on the underlying aetiologies and the age of the patients and thus varies from study to study. In this context, effective molecular diagnosis in a pediatric patient with a genetically heterogeneous phenotype is essential. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/mcs.a003970DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7304362PMC

Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis type 2: an Australian case series.

J Paediatr Child Health 2020 Apr 24. Epub 2020 Apr 24.

Genetic Metabolic Disorders Service, The Sydney Children's Hospitals Network, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Aim: Late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis type 2 (CLN2) disease is a rare neurodegenerative disorder presenting in children aged 2-4 years with seizures and loss of motor and language skills, followed by blindness and death in late childhood. Initial presenting features are similar to a range of common epilepsies. We aim to highlight typical clinical and radiological features that may prompt diagnosis of CLN2 disease in early disease stages. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jpc.14890DOI Listing

Safety of in-utero antiretroviral exposure: neurologic outcomes in children who are HIV-exposed but uninfected.

AIDS 2020 Jul;34(9):1377-1387

Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.

Objective: To evaluate whether there is an increased risk of neurologic diagnoses in children who are HIV-exposed but uninfected (CHEU) exposed in utero to specific antiretroviral medications.

Design: Prospective cohort study of CHEU enrolled from 2007 to 2017.

Methods: We evaluated children for neurologic case status, including microcephaly, febrile seizures, seizure disorders, ophthalmologic disorders, and other neurologic disorders. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/QAD.0000000000002550DOI Listing

Dramatic Improvement in Seizures With Phenytoin Treatment in an Individual With Refractory Epilepsy and a SCN1B Variant.

Pediatr Neurol 2020 Jul 19;108:121-122. Epub 2020 Mar 19.

Division of Pediatric Neurology, Department of Pediatrics, Michigan Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pediatrneurol.2020.03.012DOI Listing

The state of vaccine safety science: systematic reviews of the evidence.

Lancet Infect Dis 2020 May 9;20(5):e80-e89. Epub 2020 Apr 9.

Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA; Institute of Vaccine Safety, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA; Department of Health, Behavior & Society, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA. Electronic address:

This Review updates the scientific evidence assessing possible causal associations of adverse events following immunisation (AEFI) compiled in the 2012 report from the Institute of Medicine and the 2014 report from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. For 12 of 46 AEFI examined, a causal relationship has been established with at least one vaccine currently routinely recommended to the general USA population: anaphylaxis, arthralgia or arthritis (mild, acute, and transient, not chronic), deltoid bursitis (when vaccine is administered improperly), disseminated varicella infection (in immune deficient individuals for whom the varicella vaccine is contraindicated), encephalitis, febrile seizures, Guillain-Barré syndrome, hepatitis (in immune deficient individuals for whom the varicella vaccine is contraindicated), herpes zoster, immune thrombocytopenic purpura, meningitis, and syncope. Other than mild acute and transient arthralgia or arthritis, which is very common in adult women after rubella vaccine, these adverse reactions are rare or very rare. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(20)30130-4DOI Listing

Case-control association study of rare nonsynonymous variants of SCN1A and KCNQ2 in acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion.

J Neurol Sci 2020 Jul 2;414:116808. Epub 2020 Apr 2.

Department of Developmental Medical Sciences, School of International Health, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan.

Purpose: Acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD) is characterized by prolonged febrile seizures at onset and subsequent damage to the cerebral cortex of infants and children. The pathogenesis is suspected to be excitotoxicity leading to neuronal death. SCN1A and KCNQ2 are causative genes of genetic epilepsy including Dravet syndrome and Ohtahara syndrome. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jns.2020.116808DOI Listing

Evaluation of the Quality of Life in Epileptic Children of Shiraz, Southern Iran.

Iran J Child Neurol 2020 ;14(2):59-68

Department of Pediatrics, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

Objectives: People suffering from chronic diseases like epilepsy are highly prone to debilitating changes in factors that affect the quality of life (QOL) such as physical capacity, self-esteem, relationships with others and fulfillment of their daily life activities. This study attempted to evaluate QOL in children with epilepsy in Shiraz, Southern Iran.

Materials & Methods: Epileptic patients admitted at the epilepsy clinic of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences with no first time episode of seizures in the previous six months and no febrile-seizure were included in the study. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7085129PMC
January 2020

Antiepileptic Hypersensitivity Syndrome to Phenobarbital: A Case Report.

Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2019 Oct 23;18(5):567-571. Epub 2019 Oct 23.

Department of Pediatrics, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran.

Phenobarbital is still one of the most commonly used medical treatments for different types of seizures. It has numerous different side-effects. Antiepileptic hypersensitivity syndrome (AHS) is a rare and potentially life-threatening adverse reaction to aromatic anticonvulsants such as phenobarbital. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18502/ijaai.v18i5.1926DOI Listing
October 2019

Characterization of Pediatric Seizures in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.

Children (Basel) 2020 04 1;7(4). Epub 2020 Apr 1.

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd, Dallas, TX 75390, USA.

Saipan is a United States (US) territory Western Pacific island where little recent data exists regarding epidemiology, clinical presentation, and standard of care for pediatric seizures. This paper characterizes these features in Saipan's pediatric population with comparisons to mainland US. This is a retrospective chart review of all pediatric patients with a history of seizures at the island's only hospital and major private neurology clinic over a 10-year period. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/children7040026DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7230238PMC

Novel and de novo point and large microdeletion mutation in PRRT2-related epilepsy.

Brain Behav 2020 May 31;10(5):e01597. Epub 2020 Mar 31.

Department of Pediatrics, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan, China.

Background: Point and copy number variant mutations in the PRRT2 gene have been identified in a variety of paroxysmal disorders and different types of epilepsy. In this study, we analyzed the phenotypes and PRRT2-related mutations in Chinese epilepsy children.

Methods: A total of 492 children with epilepsy were analyzed by whole exome sequencing (WES) and low-coverage massively parallel CNV sequencing (CNV-seq) to find the single nucleotide variants and copy number variations (CNVs). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/brb3.1597DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7218244PMC

Influenza a H1N1 associated acute glomerulonephritis in an adolescent.

IDCases 2020 15;19:e00659. Epub 2019 Oct 15.

Department of Pediatrics, Thriasio General Hospital, Athens, Greece.

Influenza virus primarily affects the respiratory system. It rarely causes extrapulmonary complications, with otitis media and febrile seizures being the most common in children. Acute glomerulonephritis as a complication of H1N1 influenza virus infection has been described only sporadically. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.idcr.2019.e00659DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7093738PMC
October 2019

Clinical findings in patients with febrile seizure after 5 years of age: A retrospective study.

Brain Dev 2020 Jun 19;42(6):449-456. Epub 2020 Mar 19.

Department of Pediatrics, Osaka Medical College, Osaka, Japan.

Objective: Febrile seizures (FSs) typically occur in infants and children between 6 and 60 months of age. Rarely, FS can occur in late childhood (late FS [LFS]; >5 years of age); however, the clinical features of LFS remain unclear. We aimed to clarify the clinical features of LFS. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.braindev.2020.02.009DOI Listing

Febrile seizures in children: a condensed update.

Hong Kong Med J 2019 12;25(6):499-500

Private Practice.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12809/hkmj198189DOI Listing
December 2019

Timeliness of signal detection for adverse events following influenza vaccination in young children: a simulation case study.

BMJ Open 2020 03 1;10(2):e031851. Epub 2020 Mar 1.

Wesfarmers Centre of Vaccines and Infectious Diseases, Telethon Kids Institute, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.

Objectives: To determine how soon after commencement of the seasonal influenza vaccination programme, the AusVaxSafety active vaccine safety surveillance system, currently in use across Australia, would have detected a safety signal had it been operating in 2010 when there was an unprecedented number of febrile seizures in young children associated with one specific influenza vaccine brand, Fluvax (CSL Biotherapies).

Design: Simulation study.

Setting: Western Australian vaccine influenza coverage and adverse event surveillance data. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2019-031851DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7050305PMC

Status of 25-hydroxy vitamin D level in simple febrile seizures and its correlation with recurrence of seizures.

Avicenna J Med 2020 Jan-Mar;10(1):6-9. Epub 2020 Jan 23.

Department of Medicine, Vikas hospital private Limited Najafgarh, New Delhi, India.

Background: Febrile seizures are associated with a lot of modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors. Extensive research is currently going on to discover more and more risk factors of febrile seizures, so that they can be modified to decrease their incidence and recurrence.

Aims And Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the status of 25-hydroxy vitamin D in children presented with simple febrile seizures and to find its correlation with recurrence of seizures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/ajm.ajm_57_19DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7014999PMC
January 2020

Vitamin B6 in acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion.

Brain Dev 2020 May 24;42(5):402-407. Epub 2020 Feb 24.

Department of Child Neurology, Okayama University Hospital, Okayama, Japan; Department of Child Neurology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama, Japan.

Background: The initial presentation of acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD) is indistinguishable from that of complex febrile seizures (FS), which poses a great diagnostic challenge for clinicians. Excitotoxicity is speculated to be the pathogenesis of AESD. Vitamin B6 (VB6) is essential for the biosynthesis of gamma-aminobutyric acid, an inhibitory neurotransmitter. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.braindev.2020.02.002DOI Listing

Organic Lesions in the Brain MRI of Children with Febrile Seizure.

Curr Med Imaging 2020 Feb 25. Epub 2020 Feb 25.

Department of Medicine, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences, Khorramabad. Iran.

Objective: Seizure is the most common neurological disorders in children, where, 4-10% cases experience at least one seizure before the age of 16. The most frequent causes of seizures in children are fever, epilepsy, infection and brain damage. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of organic lesions in MRI of children with seizure unrelated to fever. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1573405616666200226103615DOI Listing
February 2020

Changing Landscape of Dravet Syndrome Management: An Overview.

Authors:
Debopam Samanta

Neuropediatrics 2020 04 20;51(2):135-145. Epub 2020 Feb 20.

Child Neurology Section, Department of Pediatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas, United States.

Dravet syndrome (DS), previously known as severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy, is a severe developmental and epileptic encephalopathy caused by loss-of-function mutations in one copy of (haploinsufficiency), located on chromosome 2q24, with decreased function of Nav1.1 sodium channels in GABAergic inhibitory interneurons. Pharmacoresistant seizures in DS start in the infancy in the form of hemiclonic febrile status epilepticus. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0040-1701694DOI Listing

Novel mutation of SCN9A gene causing generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus in a Chinese family.

Neurol Sci 2020 Feb 15. Epub 2020 Feb 15.

Department of Pediatrics, The First Affiliated Hospital of USTC, Division of Life Sciences and Medicine, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, 230001, Anhui, China.

Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) is a complex familial epilepsy syndrome. It is mainly caused by mutations in SCN1A gene, encoding type 1 voltage-gated sodium channel α-subunit (NaV1.1), and GABRA1 gene, encoding the α1 subunit of the γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA) receptor, while seldom related with SCN9A gene, encoding the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10072-020-04284-xDOI Listing
February 2020

PCDH19-Related Epilepsy Syndrome: A Comprehensive Clinical Review.

Authors:
Debopam Samanta

Pediatr Neurol 2020 04 30;105:3-9. Epub 2019 Nov 30.

Child Neurology Section, Department of Pediatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas. Electronic address:

PCDH19-related epilepsy is a distinct childhood-onset epilepsy syndrome characterized by brief clusters of febrile and afebrile seizures with onset primarily before the age of three years, cognitive impairment, autistic traits, and behavioral abnormalities. PCDH19 gene is located in Xq22 and produces nonclustered delta protocadherin. This disorder primarily manifests in heterozygote females due to random X chromosome inactivation leading to somatic mosaicism and abnormal cellular interference between cells with and without delta-protocadherin. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pediatrneurol.2019.10.009DOI Listing

Epileptic encephalopathy with features of rapid-onset dystonia Parkinsonism and alternating hemiplegia of childhood: a novel combination phenotype associated with ATP1A3 mutation.

Epileptic Disord 2020 Feb;22(1):103-109

Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center.

Mutations in ATP1A3 have been found to cause rapid-onset dystonia Parkinsonism, alternating hemiplegia of childhood, epileptic encephalopathy and other syndromes. We report a four-year, nine-month-old boy with episodes of frequent and recurrent status epilepticus, who first began having generalized tonic-clonic seizures at four months of age. Development was normal until the age of four months, and markedly slowed down after the onset of seizures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1684/epd.2020.1127DOI Listing
February 2020

Short-term neurodevelopmental outcomes of focal febrile seizures.

Brain Dev 2020 Apr 1;42(4):342-347. Epub 2020 Feb 1.

Department of Pediatrics, National Hospital Organization Beppu Medical Center, 1473 Oaza-Uchikamado, Beppu, Oita 874-0011, Japan. Electronic address:

Objective: The effect of complex febrile seizures (FS), specifically focal FS, on long-term neurodevelopmental outcome is not well known. The aim of this study was to assess the association between complex FS and neurodevelopmental outcome.

Methods: A single-center, retrospective, cohort study was performed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.braindev.2020.01.005DOI Listing

Variation in Prehospital Protocols for Pediatric Seizure Within the United States.

Pediatr Emerg Care 2020 Feb 1. Epub 2020 Feb 1.

Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, UPMC Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA.

Objective: The objective of this study was to compare statewide prehospital protocols for the management of pediatric seizures.

Methods: We performed a descriptive analysis comparing statewide protocols for emergency medical services management of pediatric seizures within the United States, excluding states for which no statewide protocol/model was available. We compared antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), routes and doses of administration, and differences in febrile seizure management. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEC.0000000000002029DOI Listing
February 2020

Thyroid Storm in a Toddler Presenting as a Febrile Seizure.

Pediatrics 2020 02;145(2)

Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Department of Pediatrics and.

Although simple febrile seizures are relatively common and benign in toddlers, it is important to rule out any underlying critical disease that necessitates further intervention and treatment. Thyroid storm, the extreme manifestation of hyperthyroidism, is relatively rare and not often considered in the differential diagnosis of a febrile seizure despite its high mortality rate. Here, we report 1 of the youngest patients with thyroid storm, who initially presented with a febrile seizure. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2019-1920DOI Listing
February 2020

Predictors of recurrent febrile seizures during the same febrile illness in children with febrile seizures.

J Neurol Sci 2020 Apr 13;411:116682. Epub 2020 Jan 13.

Division of Neurology, Saitama Children's Medical Center, Saitama, Japan.

Febrile seizures (FS) are common in childhood. Of children who experience an FS, 14-24% experience recurrence within 24 h, during the same febrile illness (RFS). The aim of this pilot study was to identify the predictors of RFS among children who experience FS. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jns.2020.116682DOI Listing

Increased levels of NLRP3 in children with febrile seizures.

Brain Dev 2020 Apr 11;42(4):336-341. Epub 2020 Jan 11.

Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, No. 1838 Guangzhou dadao bei Road, Guangzhou, Guangdong, 510515, China. Electronic address:

Objective: Febrile seizures (FS) are the most common convulsions in childhood. Interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) is proposed to play an important role in the development of FS, from in vitro data and data from peripheral blood samples. IL-1β secretion is needed for activation of the NLR family, pyrin-domain containing 3(NLRP3) inflammasome. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.braindev.2019.12.013DOI Listing

Relationship between Sedative Antihistamines and the Duration of Febrile Seizures.

Neuropediatrics 2020 04 14;51(2):154-159. Epub 2020 Jan 14.

Department of Pediatrics, Tokyo Medical University, Nishi-shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan.

Some studies have shown that sedative antihistamines prolong febrile seizure duration. Although the collective evidence is still mixed, the Japanese Society of Child Neurology released guidelines in 2015 that contraindicated the use of sedative antihistamines in patients with febrile seizure. Focused on addressing limitations of previous studies, we conducted a cross-sectional study to evaluate the relationship between febrile seizure duration and the use of sedative antihistamines. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0040-1701226DOI Listing
April 2020
1.104 Impact Factor

SCN1A-related phenotypes: Epilepsy and beyond.

Epilepsia 2019 12;60 Suppl 3:S17-S24

Reference Centre for Rare Epilepsies, Department of Paediatric Neurology, Necker Enfants Malades Hospital, Imagine Institute U1163, Paris Descartes University, Paris, France.

SCN1A, encoding the alpha 1 subunit of the sodium channel, is associated with several epilepsy syndromes and a range of other diseases. SCN1A represents the archetypal channelopathy associated with a wide phenotypic spectrum of epilepsies ranging from genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+), to developmental and epileptic encephalopathies (DEEs). SCN1A disorders also result in other diseases such as hemiplegic migraine and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/epi.16386DOI Listing
December 2019

Change in the strategy for prophylactic diazepam use for febrile seizures and the impact on seizure recurrence within 24 h.

Seizure 2020 Feb 23;75:70-74. Epub 2019 Dec 23.

Department of Pediatrics, National Hospital Organization Beppu Medical Center, 1473 Oaza-Uchikamado, Beppu, Oita 874-0011, Japan. Electronic address:

Purpose: To investigate the association between reduced prophylactic diazepam usage and short-term recurrence of febrile seizures (FSs) after the FS practice guideline was updated in Japan.

Method: In this single-center, retrospective study, children (6-60 months of age) with FS who were transported to our center by ambulance from January 2011 through December 2018 were included. Rectal administration of diazepam (0. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.seizure.2019.12.021DOI Listing
February 2020

Three Cases of Hemiconvulsion-Hemiplegia-Epilepsy Syndrome With Focal Cortical Dysplasia Type IIId.

Front Neurol 2019 20;10:1233. Epub 2019 Nov 20.

Epilepsy Center, Seirei-Hamamatsu General Hospital, Shizuoka, Japan.

Hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome (HHES) is a subset of acute encephalopathy characterized by infantile-onset with acute hemiconvulsive febrile status and subsequent unilateral cerebral atrophy and hemiparesis. In the chronic phase, patients with HHES develop epilepsy, typically displayed as intractable focal seizures. The patients are often intractable with antiepileptic drugs and need surgical treatment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fneur.2019.01233DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6879674PMC
November 2019

Serum and cerebrospinal fluid cytokines in children with acute encephalopathy.

Brain Dev 2020 Feb 29;42(2):185-191. Epub 2019 Nov 29.

Department of Pediatrics, Jichi Medical University School of Medicine, Japan.

Background: The pathogenesis of acute encephalopathy (AE) remains unclear, and a biomarker has not been identified.

Methods: Levels of 49 cytokines and chemokines, including osteopontin (OPN), were measured in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of children with AE (n = 17) or febrile convulsion (FC; n = 8; control group). The AE group included acute necrotizing encephalopathy (n = 1), acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD; n = 3), clinically mild encephalitis/encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion (MERS; n = 4), and unclassified acute encephalopathy (UCAE; n = 9) that does not meet the criteria of syndrome classification. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.braindev.2019.11.002DOI Listing
February 2020

Dilated Virchow-Robin spaces in children with seizures. A possible correlation?

Med Hypotheses 2020 Mar 11;136:109481. Epub 2019 Nov 11.

Department of Pediatrics - Child Neurology Division - "Sapienza", University of Rome, Italy.

Hypothesis: Virchow-Robin spaces (VRS) are perivascular spaces in the brain and can normally be visualized in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Dilated VRS (dVRS) are defined on the basis of their shape, and can rarely be observed in healthy subjects, or found in various diseases. A judgement of their role may derive from the appearance of the adjacent cerebral tissue and from the clinical context. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mehy.2019.109481DOI Listing

SCN1A Variants in vaccine-related febrile seizures: A prospective study.

Ann Neurol 2020 02 12;87(2):281-288. Epub 2019 Dec 12.

Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Austin Hospital, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia.

Objective: Febrile seizures may follow vaccination. Common variants in the sodium channel gene, SCN1A, are associated with febrile seizures, and rare pathogenic variants in SCN1A cause the severe developmental and epileptic encephalopathy Dravet syndrome. Following vaccination, febrile seizures may raise the specter of poor outcome and inappropriately implicate vaccination as the cause. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ana.25650DOI Listing
February 2020

Granzyme A Participates in the Pathogenesis of Infection-Associated Acute Encephalopathy.

J Child Neurol 2020 Mar 11;35(3):208-214. Epub 2019 Nov 11.

Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Tokyo Medical University, Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan.

Objective: The present study aimed to determine whether granzymes are implicated in the pathogenesis of infection-associated acute encephalopathy (AE).

Methods: We investigated granzyme and cytokine levels in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with acute encephalopathy or complex febrile seizures (cFS). A total of 24 acute encephalopathy patients and 22 complex febrile seizures patients were included in the present study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0883073819886217DOI Listing

Dexamethasone Attenuates Hyperexcitability Provoked by Experimental Febrile Status Epilepticus.

eNeuro 2019 Nov/Dec;6(6). Epub 2019 Nov 15.

Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of California-Irvine, Irvine, California 92697

The role of neuroinflammation in the mechanisms of epilepsy development is important because inflammatory mediators provide tractable targets for intervention. Inflammation is intrinsically involved in the generation of childhood febrile seizures (FSs), and prolonged FS [febrile status epilepticus (FSE)] precedes a large proportion of adult cases of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). As TLE is often refractory to therapy and is associated with serious cognitive and emotional problems, we investigated whether its development can be prevented using anti-inflammatory strategies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1523/ENEURO.0430-19.2019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6860985PMC

CHD2-related epilepsy: novel mutations and new phenotypes.

Dev Med Child Neurol 2020 05 1;62(5):647-653. Epub 2019 Nov 1.

Department of Pediatrics, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing, China.

The aim of this report was to refine the genotypes and phenotypes of chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 2 (CHD2)-related epilepsy. Seventeen patients with CHD2 mutations were enrolled. CHD2 mutations were identified by application of next-generation sequencing of epilepsy or whole exome sequencing. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dmcn.14367DOI Listing

Seasonal distribution of febrile seizure and the relationship with respiratory and enteric viruses in Korean children based on nationwide registry data.

Seizure 2019 Dec 18;73:9-13. Epub 2019 Oct 18.

Department of Pediatrics, Chung-Ang University Hospital, 102, Heukseok-ro, Dongjak-gu, Seoul, South Korea. Electronic address:

Purpose: The seasonal distribution patterns of febrile seizures and of respiratory and enteric viral pathogens are similar. In this study, we analyzed trends in febrile seizures and viral infection in Korean children, using big data from the Korean Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service (HIRA).

Methods: We analyzed children younger than 6 years who visited the hospital and were diagnosed with febrile seizures from 2009 to 2016, using medical records in the HIRA database. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.seizure.2019.10.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7111037PMC
December 2019
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Pathogenic Cav3.2 channel mutation in a child with primary generalized epilepsy.

Mol Brain 2019 10 24;12(1):86. Epub 2019 Oct 24.

Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Alberta Children's Hospital Research Institute, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Dr. NW, Calgary, AB, T2N 4N1, Canada.

Two paternally-inherited missense variants in CACNA1H were identified and characterized in a 6-year-old child with generalized epilepsy. Febrile and unprovoked seizures were present in this child. Both variants were expressed in cis or isolation using human recombinant Cav3. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13041-019-0509-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6814130PMC
October 2019

Risk-Stratification of Children Presenting to Ambulatory Paediatrics with First-Onset Seizures: Should We Order an Urgent CT Brain?

J Trop Pediatr 2020 Jun;66(3):299-314

Division of Radiodiagnosis, Department of Medical Imaging and Clinical Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University and Tygerberg Hospital, Francie van Zijl Drive, Tygerberg, Cape Town, South Africa.

Introduction: A computed tomography (CT) brain scan is an often-utilised emergency department imaging modality to detect emergent intra-cranial pathology in a child with a first seizure. Identifying children at low risk of having a clinically significant intra-cranial abnormality could prevent unnecessary radiation exposure and contrast/sedation-related risks.

Objectives: To identify clinical variables which could predict clinically significant CT brain abnormalities and use recursive partitioning analysis to define a low-risk group of children in whom emergent CT brain can be deferred. Read More

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https://academic.oup.com/tropej/advance-article/doi/10.1093/
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tropej/fmz071DOI Listing
June 2020
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