1,130 results match your criteria Pediatric Physical Therapy [Journal]


Frequency-Specific Microcurrent for Treatment of Longstanding Congenital Muscular Torticollis.

Pediatr Phys Ther 2019 Jan 16. Epub 2019 Jan 16.

Therapy Services (Ms Thompson), Cleveland Clinic Children's Hospital for Rehabilitation, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio; Department of Rehabilitation and Movement Sciences (Dr Kaplan), Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Newark, New Jersey.

Purpose: This case describes the first episode of care, using conservative treatment, massage, and frequency-specific microcurrent (FSM), for a 19-month-old boy with grade 8 left congenital muscular torticollis with fibrotic nodules.

Methods: Ten weeks of physical therapy provided stretching, strengthening, massage, and parent education, adding FSM in weeks 3 to 10 for this patient.

Results: Full passive cervical rotation and lateral flexion, 4/5 lateral cervical flexion strength, improved head tilt, and inability to palpate fibrotic nodules were achieved by week 8, with partial home program adherence. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000576DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Hippotherapy in Rehabilitation Care for Children With Neurological Impairments and Developmental Delays: A Case Series.

Pediatr Phys Ther 2019 01;31(1):E14-E21

Department of Developmental Rehabilitation (Ms Kraft) and Children's Minnesota Research Institute (Drs Finch and Barnes and Mss Nickel and Griffin), Children's Hospital and Clinics of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota; Hold Your Horses (Ms Weisberg), Maple Plain, Minnesota.

Purpose: This report assesses functional mobility in children with neurological impairments and documented gross motor delays, before and after receiving either hippotherapy or standard outpatient physical therapy (PT).

Summary Of Key Points: This is a case-series report using data previously collected for a discontinued randomized controlled trial, in which participants received hippotherapy or standard outpatient clinic PT for a 12-week treatment period. Results demonstrated both subjective and objective functional mobility improvements after treatment in participants receiving hippotherapy and standard outpatient PT, as determined by the Peabody Developmental Motor Scales-2, the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory, and the Goal Attainment Scaling. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000567DOI Listing
January 2019

Standing Tall: Feasibility of a Modified Ride-On Car That Encourages Standing.

Pediatr Phys Ther 2019 01;31(1):E6-E13

Social Mobility Lab (Drs Logan and Catena and Mss Hospodar, Yohn, and Govindan), College of Public Health and Human Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon; Go Baby Go Lab (Ms Sabet), College of Health Sciences, Cleveland State University, Cleveland, Ohio; Pediatric Mobility Lab and Design Studio (Dr Galloway), Department of Physical Therapy and Biomechanics and Movement Sciences Program, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of infants with Down syndrome to use a modified ride-on car with seated and standing modes.

Methods: Participants included 4 infants with Down syndrome. Families were asked to provide at least 8 minutes of modified ride-on car driving per day, at least 5 times per week throughout the 9-month intervention. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000568DOI Listing
January 2019
8 Reads

Application of the Clinical Practice Guideline for Congenital Muscular Torticollis: A Case Report.

Pediatr Phys Ther 2019 01;31(1):E1-E5

Mary Free Bed Rehabilitation Hospital (Dr Huegel), Grand Rapids, Michigan; Department of Physical Therapy (Dr Kenyon), Grand Valley State University, Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Purpose: This case report illustrates application of the Clinical Practice Guideline for Congenital Muscular Torticollis in a pediatric outpatient facility.

Descriptions: The infant was a 2-month-old baby presenting with congenital muscular torticollis. Application of each of the 16 action statements outlined in the Clinical Practice Guideline is detailed as related to the case. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000569DOI Listing
January 2019
5 Reads

Commentary on "Changes in Perceived Self-efficacy of Physical Therapist Students Following a Pediatric Experiential Learning Opportunity".

Pediatr Phys Ther 2019 01;31(1):121

University of Colorado Pediatric Residency Program, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado Physical Therapy Program, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000562DOI Listing
January 2019
8 Reads

Changes in Perceived Self-efficacy of Physical Therapist Students Following a Pediatric Experiential Learning Opportunity.

Pediatr Phys Ther 2019 01;31(1):115-120

University of Jamestown Physical Therapy Program, University of Jamestown, and Education Doctoral Program, North Dakota State University, Fargo, North Dakota.

Purpose: Physical therapists (PT) must be competent to treat patients across the lifespan, from pediatrics through geriatrics. Increasing the amount of experiential learning (EL) in pediatrics presents an opportunity for students to improve their self-efficacy in communication and patient handling. The purpose was to investigate changes in PT students' perceived self-efficacy in communication and patient handling following a structured and focused 8-week EL opportunity with a pediatric population. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000550DOI Listing
January 2019

Commentary on "Moving Toward Excellence in Pediatric Physical Therapy Education: A Scoping Review".

Pediatr Phys Ther 2019 01;31(1):114

Department of Physical Therapy, Department of Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics, University of South Alabama, Mobile, Alabama Children's Hospital of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000572DOI Listing
January 2019

Commentary on "Effects of High-Intensity Interval Training on Fitness and Health in Youth With Physical Disabilities".

Pediatr Phys Ther 2019 01;31(1):94

Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center Cincinnati, Ohio.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000573DOI Listing
January 2019

Commentary on "Adapted Dance Improves Motor Abilities and Participation in Children With Down Syndrome: A Pilot Study".

Pediatr Phys Ther 2019 01;31(1):83

Primary Children's Hospital Salt Lake City, Utah Mother of a child with Down syndrome Layton, Utah.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000571DOI Listing
January 2019

Adapted Dance Improves Motor Abilities and Participation in Children With Down Syndrome: A Pilot Study.

Pediatr Phys Ther 2019 01;31(1):76-82

Division of Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy (Ms McGuire and Drs Long and Bailes) and Division of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics (Dr Esbensen), Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio.

Purpose: This pilot study measured effects of an adapted dance program on motor abilities and participation in children with Down syndrome (DS) and explored caregivers' qualitative feedback regarding its benefits.

Methods: Children with DS participated in 20 weekly 1-hour adapted dance sessions. The Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) and Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) Dimensions D and E were administered before and after the program. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000559DOI Listing
January 2019

Commentary on "Early Treadmill Practice in Infants Born With Myelomeningocele: A Pilot Study".

Pediatr Phys Ther 2019 01;31(1):75

UPMC Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000570DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Commentary on "Progression of Ankle Plantarflexion Contractures and Functional Decline in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: Implications for Physical Therapy Management".

Pediatr Phys Ther 2019 01;31(1):67

Doctor of Physical Therapy Division Duke University School of Medicine Durham, North Carolina Department of Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy Duke University Medical Center Durham, North Carolina.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000574DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Progression of Ankle Plantarflexion Contractures and Functional Decline in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: Implications for Physical Therapy Management.

Pediatr Phys Ther 2019 01;31(1):61-66

Department of Pediatrics (Drs Kiefer and Wong), University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts; Division of Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy (Drs Kiefer, Bonarrigo, Quatman-Yates, and Fowler) and Division of Neurology (Drs Kiefer, Bonarrigo, Fowler, Horn, and Wong), Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio; Department of Pediatrics (Dr Horn), University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio; Department of Physical Therapy (Dr Quatman-Yates), The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.

Purpose: This study characterizes the progressive loss of ankle dorsiflexion range of motion in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the relationship to functional decline, and the implications for physical therapy management.

Methods: Longitudinal data for 332 boys with DMD were extracted from medical records and analyzed. Summary statistics for age, number of visits, ankle dorsiflexion measures, and North Star Ambulatory Assessment (NSAA) scores were computed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000553DOI Listing
January 2019

Commentary on "Developmental Trajectories and Reference Percentiles for the 6-Minute Walk Test for Children With Cerebral Palsy".

Pediatr Phys Ther 2019 01;31(1):60

University of South Australia Adelaide, Australia Novita Children's Services Adelaide, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000561DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Developmental Trajectories and Reference Percentiles for the 6-Minute Walk Test for Children With Cerebral Palsy.

Pediatr Phys Ther 2019 01;31(1):51-59

Department of Physical Therapy (Dr Fiss), Mercer University, Atlanta, Georgia; Department of Rehabilitation Science (Dr Jeffries), University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; Developmental Medicine (Dr Bjornson), Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, Washington; Avery Information Services Ltd (Ms Avery), Orillia, Ontario, Canada; Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence, and Impact (Dr Hanna), McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; Rehabilitation Medicine (Dr McCoy), University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.

Purpose: The purposes of this study were to document longitudinal developmental trajectories in 6-minute walk test (6MWT) distances and to develop age-specific reference percentiles for children across different Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels.

Methods: A TOTAL OF: 456 children with cerebral palsy ages 3 to 12 years of, GMFCS levels I to III participated. Children's motor function was classified on the GMFCS, and children completed the 6MWT 2 to 5 times in 2 years. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00001577-201901000-0001
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000552DOI Listing
January 2019
7 Reads

Commentary on "Effects of Instruction on Parent Competency During Infant Handling in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit".

Pediatr Phys Ther 2019 01;31(1):50

Nationwide Children's Hospital Columbus, Ohio.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000565DOI Listing
January 2019

Effects of Instruction on Parent Competency During Infant Handling in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

Pediatr Phys Ther 2019 01;31(1):43-49

Department of Rehabilitation Services (Dr Byrne), Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford, Palo Alto, California; Rocky Mountain University of Health Professions (Dr Sweeney), Provo, Utah; Roosevelt School District (Dr Schwartz), Phoenix, Arizona; University of the Pacific (Dr Umphred), Stockton, California; Stanford Children's Health (Dr Constantinou), Palo Alto, California.

Purpose: The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of 3 different methods for delivering instruction on infant handling to parents in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).

Methods: Ninety-six parents in the NICU received instruction. Parents were taught the same 3 infant-handling techniques after random assignment to the (1) direct, (2) video, or (3) written-pictorial instructional groups. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000557DOI Listing
January 2019

Commentary on "Physical Activity Levels of Children With Down Syndrome".

Pediatr Phys Ther 2019 01;31(1):42

California State University Northridge, California Blanquerna School of Health Sciences, Ramon Llull University Barcelona, Spain.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000564DOI Listing
January 2019

Commentary on "The Timed Up and Go Test in Children: Does Protocol Choice Matter? A Systemic Review".

Pediatr Phys Ther 2019 01;31(1):32

New York City Department of Education New York, New York.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000566DOI Listing
January 2019

The Timed Up and Go Test in Children: Does Protocol Choice Matter? A Systematic Review.

Pediatr Phys Ther 2019 01;31(1):22-31

Department of Rehabilitation Sciences and Physiotherapy (Drs Verbecque and Hallemans, Ms Schepens, and Mr Theré) and Multidisciplinary Motor Center Antwerp (Drs Verbecque and Hallemans), Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Antwerp, Belgium; Laboratory of Physiology and Biomechanics of Locomotion (Dr Schepens), Institute of Neuroscience, Université catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium; Rehabilitation Research Center (Dr Klingels), Biomedical Research Institute, Hasselt University, Diepenbeek, Belgium; Department of Rehabilitation Sciences (Dr Klingels), KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.

Purpose: Results on reliability and normative data for the Timed Up and Go test (TUG) in children who are developing typically are systematically reviewed.

Summary Of Key Points: Six different TUG protocols are presented for which normative data are available for ages 3 to 18 years. TUG time is consistent within and between raters and sessions and is influenced by age. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000558DOI Listing
January 2019

Commentary on "Effects of Structured Exercise Training in Individuals With Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis".

Pediatr Phys Ther 2019 01;31(1):21

Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center Cincinnati, Ohio.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000563DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Effects of Structured Exercise Training in Children and Adolescents With Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

Pediatr Phys Ther 2019 01;31(1):3-21

Program in Physical Therapy-retired (Dr Klepper), Department of Rehabilitation and Regenerative Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; University of Utah Health (Dr Mano Khan), South Jordan, Utah; Lucille Packard Children's Hospital (Dr Klotz), Palo Alto, California; Westside Dance Physical Therapy (Dr Gregorek), New York, New York; Sloane Stecker Physical Therapy (Dr Chan), New York, New York; University of Colorado School of Medicine/Children's Hospital Colorado (Dr Sawade), Aurora, Colorado.

Purpose: To examine safety and efficacy of exercise training (ET) for juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) to improve physical fitness, pain, functional capability, and quality of life.

Methods: Ovid Medline, PubMed, CINAHL, PEDro, and Web of Science were searched from 1995 to April 2018 to find English-language articles examining effects of ET in JIA, ages 4 to 21 years. Quality of evidence/strength of clinical recommendations were assessed using the Cochrane GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) system. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000555DOI Listing
January 2019
15 Reads

A New Year!

Authors:
Linda Fetters

Pediatr Phys Ther 2019 01;31(1)

Editor-in-Chief, Freeport, Maine.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000578DOI Listing
January 2019

Physical Activity Levels of Children With Down Syndrome.

Pediatr Phys Ther 2019 01;31(1):33-41

Division of Physical Therapy, Department of Orthopaedics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina.

Purpose: This systematic review of literature analyzed accelerometer use to measure physical activity (PA) in individuals 21 years and younger with Down syndrome (DS).

Summary Of Key Points: Comprehensive search strategy conducted in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Eight articles met inclusion criteria. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000556DOI Listing
January 2019

Moving Toward Excellence in Pediatric Physical Therapy Education: A Scoping Review.

Pediatr Phys Ther 2019 01;31(1):95-113

Physical Therapy Program (Dr Anderson), Midwestern University, Downers Grove, Illinois; Creighton University (Dr Furze), Omaha, Nebraska; University of Miami (Dr Moore), Coral Cables, Florida.

Purpose: The purpose of this scoping review was to identify and map current evidence that underpins excellence in pediatric physical therapy education.

Methods: An extensive review was conducted of literature published over a 27-year period regarding pediatric physical therapy/medical/allied health education.

Results: Thirty articles were reviewed and analyzed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000549DOI Listing
January 2019

Effects of High-Intensity Interval Training on Fitness and Health in Youth With Physical Disabilities.

Pediatr Phys Ther 2019 01;31(1):84-93

Center of Excellence for Rehabilitation Medicine (Drs Zwinkels, Verschuren, and Visser-Meily), Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, University Medical Center Utrecht and De Hoogstraat Rehabilitation, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands; Department of Sports (Dr Zwinkels), De Hoogstraat Rehabilitation, Utrecht, the Netherlands; Department of Rehabilitation (Drs Backx and Visser-Meily), Physical Therapy Science & Sports, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands; University of Applied Sciences (Drs de Groot and Wittink), Utrecht, the Netherlands; Child Development and Exercise Center (Drs de Groot and Takken), University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands; Netherlands Institute for Healthcare Services Research (Dr de Groot), Utrecht, the Netherlands.

Purpose: To investigate the effects of high-intensity interval training (HIT) on physical fitness and cardiometabolic health in youth with physical disabilities.

Methods: For this quasi-experimental study 70 participants were recruited from schools for special education and divided into runners and users of wheelchairs. HIT was performed for 8 weeks, twice a week, containing 30 seconds all-out exercises. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000560DOI Listing
January 2019
8 Reads

Maximizing Participation During Walking in Children With Disabilities: Is Response to Unpredictability Important?

Pediatr Phys Ther 2019 01;31(1):122-127

High Point University (Drs Gosselin, Wright, and Taylor), High Point, North Carolina; University of Otago (Drs Sole and Baxter), Dunedin, New Zealand; University of Illinois at Chicago (Dr Girolami), Chicago, Illinois.

Walking ability is one of the primary components of human motor function, and interventions aimed at improving walking ability are common in physical therapy, particularly in children. One element encountered in a participatory, or natural, environment is unpredictability, defined as the presence of an unexpected obstacle, stimulus, or alteration of the environmental conditions. Little research has assessed the influence of unpredictability on biomechanical adaptations to walking in children who are developing typically or children with motor disabilities. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00001577-201901000-0002
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000575DOI Listing
January 2019
4 Reads

Early Treadmill Practice in Infants Born With Myelomeningocele: A Pilot Study.

Pediatr Phys Ther 2019 01;31(1):68-75

Department of Kinesiology (Dr Lee), California State University Fullerton, Fullerton, California; Doctoral Program in Physical Therapy (Dr Sansom), School of Rehabilitation and Medical Sciences, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, Michigan.

Purpose: To determine the feasibility of an early treadmill training program for infants with myelomeningocele (MMC) and to measure changes in overt infant motor development and control, including mechanisms underlying the overt changes.

Methods: Ten infants with MMC were initially enrolled: 8 infants completed 12 consecutive months of training, and 2 completed 6 months of training. Training consisted primarily of home-based, parent-administered treadmill stepping practice 5 days per week, 10 minutes per day starting within 6 months postbirth. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000554DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Walking and Fitness Improvements in a Child With Diplegic Cerebral Palsy Following Motor-Assisted Elliptical Intervention.

Pediatr Phys Ther 2018 10;30(4):E1-E7

Institute for Rehabilitation Science and Engineering, Madonna Rehabilitation Hospitals, Lincoln, Nebraska.

Purpose: To quantify effects of motor-assisted elliptical (Intelligently Controlled Assistive Rehabilitation Elliptical [ICARE]) training on walking and fitness of a child with cerebral palsy (CP).

Key Points: A 12-year-old boy with walking limitations due to spastic diplegic CP (Gross Motor Function Classification System II) participated in 24 sessions of primarily moderate- to vigorous-intensity ICARE exercise. Fitness improvements were evidenced clinically across sessions by the child's capacity to train for longer periods, at faster speeds, and while overriding motor's assistance. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00001577-201810000-0001
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000541DOI Listing
October 2018
11 Reads

Commentary on "Whole-Body Vibration Training Designed to Improve Functional Impairments After Pediatric Inpatient Anticancer Therapy: A Pilot Study".

Pediatr Phys Ther 2018 10;30(4):350

Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota Minneapolis, Minnesota Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota and St Catherine University Minneapolis, Minnesota.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000542DOI Listing
October 2018
6 Reads

Whole-Body Vibration Training Designed to Improve Functional Impairments After Pediatric Inpatient Anticancer Therapy: A Pilot Study.

Pediatr Phys Ther 2018 10;30(4):341-349

Department of Molecular and Cellular Sports Medicine (Ms Rustler, Drs Streckmann and Daeggelmann, and Prof Bloch), Institute of Cardiovascular Research and Sports Medicine, German Sport University Cologne, Cologne, Germany; Pediatric Oncology/Hematology (Dr Prokop), Clinic for Children and Youth Medicine, Children's Hospital Amsterdamer Straße, Cologne, Germany; Department of Sport, Exercise and Health (Dr Streckmann), University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland; Department of Internal Medicine (Dr Baumann), Center for Integrated Oncology Cologne/Bonn, University Hospital Cologne, Cologne, Germany.

Purpose: To assess a whole-body vibration (WBV) intervention for children after cancer treatment.

Methods: Eleven children after inpatient anticancer therapy participated in a 12-week supervised WBV intervention, which consisted of one 9- to 13-minute WBV session per week, with 5 to 9 minutes' overall vibration time. Feasibility was defined as the ability to participate in WBV training without reporting adverse events. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000536DOI Listing
October 2018
1 Read

Commentary on "Stepping Activity in Children With Congenital Myotonic Dystrophy".

Pediatr Phys Ther 2018 10;30(4):340

Department of Pediatrics, University of Massachusetts Medical School Worcester, Massachusetts School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, MGH Institute of Health Professions Boston, Massachusetts.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000545DOI Listing
October 2018

Stepping Activity in Children With Congenital Myotonic Dystrophy.

Pediatr Phys Ther 2018 10;30(4):335-339

Department of Physical Therapy and Athletic Training (Dr Hayes) and Department of Neurology (Mss Dibella and Crockett and Drs Dixon, Butterfield, and Johnson), University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the physical activity levels in children with congenital myotonic dystrophy (CDM), and to examine whether patient clinical and functional characteristics correlated to physical activity.

Methods: Twenty-five children with CDM were assessed on functional measures, clinical measures, and physical activity levels.

Results: Results support that children with CDM spend the majority of their time inactive. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000537DOI Listing
October 2018

Commentary on "Adapted Motivational Interviewing to Promote Exercise in Adolescents With Congenital Heart Disease: A Pilot Trial".

Pediatr Phys Ther 2018 10;30(4):334

Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio University of Cincinnati, and Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio.

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00001577-201810000-0001
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000543DOI Listing
October 2018
1 Read

Commentary on "Physical Therapists' Use and Alteration of Standardized Assessments of Motor Function in Children".

Pediatr Phys Ther 2018 10;30(4):325

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000538DOI Listing
October 2018
1 Read

Physical Therapists' Use and Alteration of Standardized Assessments of Motor Function in Children.

Pediatr Phys Ther 2018 10;30(4):318-325

A.T. Still University (Dr Fay), Mesa, Arizona; Mercy Gilbert Medical Center (Dr Brock), Gilbert, Arizona; Honor Health Thompson Peak Medical center (Dr Peneton), Scottsdale, Arizona; Mercy Hospital-Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute (Dr Simon), Coon Rapids, Minnesota; Mountain Land Physical Therapy (Dr Splan), Murray, Utah; Emblem Healthcare (Dr Sullivan), Phoenix, Arizona; Kent Intermediate School District (Dr Weiler), Grand Rapids Michigan.

Purpose: This study presents survey responses of pediatric physical therapists' use and alteration of standardized assessments of motor function in children aged 2 to 10 years.

Methods: Electronic and paper surveys were distributed to practicing physical therapists through the APTA Academy of Pediatric Physical Therapy electronic newsletter and 2 national conferences. Data were analyzed by response frequencies, qualitative responses, and χ(2) analyses for demographic characteristics. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000532DOI Listing
October 2018
11 Reads

Commentary on "Effects of a Gaming Platform on Balance Training for Children With Cerebral Palsy".

Pediatr Phys Ther 2018 10;30(4):309

Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California.

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00001577-201810000-0000
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000539DOI Listing
October 2018
28 Reads

Commentary on "Transcranial Direct-Current Stimulation on Motor Function in Pediatric Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review".

Pediatr Phys Ther 2018 10;30(4):302

The Nisonger Center at The Ohio State University, and Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000546DOI Listing
October 2018

Physical Therapy Management of Congenital Muscular Torticollis: A 2018 Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guideline From the APTA Academy of Pediatric Physical Therapy.

Pediatr Phys Ther 2018 10;30(4):240-290

Department of Rehabilitation and Movement Sciences (Dr Kaplan), Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Newark, New Jersey; Orthotics and Prosthetics Department (Dr Coulter), Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, Georgia; Division of Biokinesiology and Physical Therapy at the Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry (Dr Sargent), University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California.

Background: Congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) is a postural deformity evident shortly after birth, typically characterized by lateral flexion/side bending of the head to one side and cervical rotation/head turning to the opposite side due to unilateral shortening of the sternocleidomastoid muscle; it may be accompanied by other neurological or musculoskeletal conditions. Infants with CMT should be referred to physical therapists to treat these postural asymmetries as soon as they are identified.

Purpose: This update of the 2013 CMT clinical practice guideline (CPG) informs clinicians and families as to whom to monitor, treat, and/or refer and when and what to treat. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00001577-201810000-0000
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000544DOI Listing
October 2018
3 Reads

New CPG for Torticollis!

Authors:
Linda Fetters

Pediatr Phys Ther 2018 10;30(4):239

Editor-in-Chief, Freeport, Maine.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000547DOI Listing
October 2018

Adapted Motivational Interviewing to Promote Exercise in Adolescents With Congenital Heart Disease: A Pilot Trial.

Pediatr Phys Ther 2018 10;30(4):326-334

The Hospital for Sick Children (Drs McKillop, Banks, Schneiderman, and McCrindle), Toronto, Ontario, Canada; University Health Network (Drs Grace and Ghisi) and Dalla Lana School of Public Health (Dr Allison), University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; York University (Dr Grace), Toronto, Ontario, Canada; KR Allison Research Consulting (Dr Allison), Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Knight Cardiovascular Institute (Dr Kovacs), Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon.

Purpose: To assess a motivational interviewing (MI) intervention to improve moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in adolescents with congenital heart disease.

Methods: Intervention participants received one-on-one telephone-based adapted MI sessions over 3 months. Outcomes were acceptability, change mechanisms (stage of change and self-efficacy), and limited efficacy (physical activity, fitness, and quality of life). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000534DOI Listing
October 2018
1 Read

Effects of a Gaming Platform on Balance Training for Children With Cerebral Palsy.

Authors:
Hsieh-Chun Hsieh

Pediatr Phys Ther 2018 10;30(4):303-308

Department of Special Education, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu City, Taiwan.

Purpose: A platform requiring multidimensional trunk movement facilitated postural balance in children with cerebral palsy.

Methods: The intervention group (n = 20) received 12 weeks of playing personal computer (PC) games using the platform, and the control group (n = 20) played the same games using a computer mouse. Outcomes were center-of-pressure sway, the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Fullerton Advanced Balance Scale (FAB), and Timed Up and Go (TUG) test scores. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000521DOI Listing
October 2018

Physical Therapist Coaching to Improve Physical Activity in Children With Brain Tumors: A Pilot Study.

Pediatr Phys Ther 2018 10;30(4):310-317

Children's Minnesota (Drs Ovans, Hooke, and Bendel and Ms Tanner), Minneapolis, Minnesota; University of Minnesota School of Nursing (Dr Hooke), Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Purpose: Children with brain tumors (BTs) experience fatigue and decreased quality of life (QOL). Physical activity (PA) is recommended during and after cancer treatment. We explored whether a fitness tracker intervention combined with tailored coaching by a physical therapist (PT) increased PA and QOL and decreased fatigue in children with BTs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000531DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

Transcranial Direct-Current Stimulation on Motor Function in Pediatric Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review.

Pediatr Phys Ther 2018 10;30(4):291-301

University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales, Australia.

Purpose: To determine effects of transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) on motor function for children with cerebral palsy.

Methods: Six electronic databases were searched using terms related to tDCS, combined with functional deficits/associated clinical measures. Results were filtered, including randomized controlled trials in English and children with cerebral palsy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000535DOI Listing
October 2018
1 Read

Use of an In-Home Body Weight Support System by a Child With Spina Bifida.

Pediatr Phys Ther 2018 07;30(3):E1-E6

Biomechanics and Movement Science Program, Department of Physical Therapy (Drs Kokkoni and Galloway) and Pediatric Mobility Lab and Design Studio (Drs Kokkoni, Stoner, and Galloway and Ms Peffley), University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware; Biological and Population Health Sciences (Dr Logan), Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon.

Purpose: To examine the feasibility of a new open-area body weight support system (BWSS) to act as both an "assistive" and a "rehabilitative" device within the home.

Intervention: A 5-year-old boy with spina bifida used the BWSS during self-selected activities for 10 weeks. Feasibility, behavioral, and clinical assessments provided a quantification of his activity in and out of the BWSS. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000516DOI Listing

Commentary on "Effects of Suit-Orthosis on Postural Adjustments During Seated Reaching Task in Children With Cerebral Palsy".

Pediatr Phys Ther 2018 07;30(3):237

Cincinnati Children's Hospital, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Cincinnati Cincinnati, Ohio Cincinnati Children's Hospital Cincinnati, Ohio.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000526DOI Listing

Effects of Suit-Orthosis on Postural Adjustments During Seated Reaching Task in Children With Cerebral Palsy.

Pediatr Phys Ther 2018 07;30(3):231-237

Department of Physiotherapy, Neuropediatrics Section, Federal University of São Carlos, Sao Carlos, SP, Brazil.

Aim: To investigate suit-orthosis effects on postural sway during anticipatory and compensatory postural adjustments (APA and CPA, respectively) in a seated reaching task performed by children with cerebral palsy (CP).

Methods: Twenty-nine children were divided according to Manual Ability Classification System (MACS) I and II-III. Participants were instructed to reach forward toward an object both in a no-suit condition and in a suit-orthosis condition. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000519DOI Listing
July 2018
2 Reads

Commentary on "Changes in Therapist Actions During a Novel Pediatric Physical Therapy Program: Successes and Challenges".

Pediatr Phys Ther 2018 07;30(3):230

University of Colorado Pediatric Residency Program University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus Aurora, Colorado Physical Therapy Program University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus Aurora, Colorado.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000520DOI Listing