4,006 results match your criteria Pediatric Critical Care Medicine[Journal]


Cardiac Arrest in the Pediatric Cardiac ICU: Is Medical Congenital Heart Disease a Predictor of Survival?

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2018 Nov 14. Epub 2018 Nov 14.

Section of Critical Care Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX.

Objectives: Children with medical cardiac disease experience poorer survival to hospital discharge after cardiopulmonary arrest compared with children with surgical cardiac disease. Limited literature exists describing epidemiology and factors associated with mortality in this heterogeneous population. We aim to evaluate the clinical characteristics and outcomes after cardiopulmonary arrest in medical cardiac patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001810DOI Listing
November 2018

Determining Interrater Reliability of the Cornell Assessment of Pediatric Delirium Screening Tool Among PICU Nurses.

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Feb 5. Epub 2019 Feb 5.

Children's Core for Biomedical Statistics, Center for Clinical and Translational Research Seattle Children's Research Institute, Seattle, WA.

Objectives: To determine the interrater reliability of the Cornell Assessment of Pediatric Delirium Screening Tool amount PICU nurses.

Design: The design was setup as a cross-sectional study and conducted over the course of a year.

Setting: This study setting was a PICU and a pediatric cardiac ICU at Seattle Children's Hospital, a tertiary freestanding university-affiliated hospital in Seattle, Washington. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001896DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Is Whole-Body CT Associated With Reduced In-Hospital Mortality in Children With Trauma? A Nationwide Study.

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Feb 5. Epub 2019 Feb 5.

Department of Health Services Research, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan.

Objectives: We aimed to investigate whether whole-body CT for children with trauma is associated with a different mortality than only selective CT.

Design: A multicenter, retrospective cohort study.

Setting: Nationwide trauma registry from 183 tertiary emergency medical centers in Japan. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001898DOI Listing
February 2019

Health-Related Quality of Life Among Survivors of Pediatric Sepsis.

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Feb 1. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

Division of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

Objectives: Mortality from pediatric sepsis has steadily declined over the past several decades; however, little is known about morbidity among survivors. We aimed to determine the prevalence of and risk factors for failure to recover to baseline health-related quality of life following community-acquired pediatric sepsis.

Design: Retrospective cohort study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001886DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Feasibility and Acceptability of Methods to Collect Follow-Up Information From Parents 12 Months After Their Child's Emergency Admission to Paediatric Intensive Care.

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Feb 1. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

Paediatric Intensive Care Unit, St Mary's Hospital, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, United Kingdom.

Objectives: To evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of different methods of collecting follow-up data from parents 12 months after their child's emergency admission to a PICU.

Design: Mixed-methods explanatory sequential design.

Setting: One regional PICU transport service and three PICUs in England. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001892DOI Listing
February 2019

Why Follow-Up Matters: Fatigue and Function After PICU Stay.

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Feb;20(2):211-212

Departments of Medicine and Pediatrics, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, IL Section of Critical Care Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of Chicago Comer Children's Hospital, Chicago, IL.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001795DOI Listing
February 2019

Return to Ambulation After Pediatric Liver Transplantation: A First "Step" in Assessing the Impact of Early Mobility.

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Feb;20(2):209-211

Department of Pediatrics, University of California-Los Angeles David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, and Center for Child Health, Behavior, and Development Seattle Children's Research Institute, Seattle, WA Department of Critical Care Medicine, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, and Safar Center for Resuscitation Research, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001837DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6366323PMC
February 2019

PICU Diaries: A Simple and Promising Family-Centered Intervention.

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Feb;20(2):208-209

Department of Critical Care Medicine; and Child Health Evaluative Sciences, Research Institute, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001838DOI Listing
February 2019

Targeted Temperature Management for Everyone: A Call for Tailoring Guidelines Based on Resource Availability.

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Feb;20(2):206-207

Departments of Critical Care Medicine and Pediatrics, UPMC Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh and University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine; and Safar Center for Resuscitation Research, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh PA Departments of Critical Care Medicine, Pediatrics, and Clinical and Translational Science Institute, UPMC Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh and University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine; Department of Critical Care Medicine Safar Center for Resuscitation Research, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh PA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001834DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6367935PMC
February 2019

Can We Prevent the Progression to Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome? Let's Start With Identifying Those "At Risk".

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Feb;20(2):204-205

Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA Department of Pediatrics and Public Health Sciences, Penn State University College of Medicine, Hershey, PA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001836DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Detecting No Signal From ABO Mismatch in the Quiet Riot of Platelet Transfusions in Critically Ill Children.

Authors:
James A Lin

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Feb;20(2):202-204

Division of Pediatric Hospital Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Mattel Children's Hospital UCLA, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, CA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001789DOI Listing
February 2019

New Kid on the Block? Is Amino-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Ready for the Big Time?

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Feb;20(2):201-202

Department of Pediatrics, Section of Critical Care Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001780DOI Listing
February 2019

The Need to Understand Brain Health and Improve Brain Outcomes for Children and Adolescents Warrants Adoption of a More Proactive Approach to Brain Monitoring.

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Feb;20(2):200-201

Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine; and Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001833DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6367937PMC
February 2019

Pediatric Rapid Response Systems Beyond Tertiary Facilities: Is There a Role for Telemedicine?

Authors:
Phoebe H Yager

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Feb;20(2):198-199

Department of Pediatrics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001801DOI Listing
February 2019

Peritoneal Dialysis in Infants After Cardiopulmonary Bypass: Is Sooner Better Than Later?

Authors:
Tara M Neumayr

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Feb;20(2):197-198

Division of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine; and Division of Pediatric Nephrology, Department of Pediatrics, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001823DOI Listing
February 2019

Noninvasive Ventilation After Pediatric Cardiac Surgery: To Flow or Not to Flow?

Authors:
Asma Razavi

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Feb;20(2):195-196

Division of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Loma Linda University Children's Hospital, Loma Linda, CA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001821DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Precision Intensive Care: A Real-Time Artificial Intelligence Strategy for the Future.

Authors:
Anthony Chang

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Feb;20(2):194-195

Chief Intelligence and Innovation Officer, Medical Director, The Sharon Disney Lund, Medical Intelligence and Innovation Institute (MI3), Children's Hospital of Orange County, Orange, CA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001883DOI Listing
February 2019

Noninvasive High Flow Versus Noninvasive Positive Pressure in Children With Severe Bronchiolitis: The Battle of the PICU Continues.

Authors:
Reinout A Bem

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Feb;20(2):192-193

Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Emma Children's Hospital, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001800DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Do We Know Where We Want to Go?

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Feb;20(2):190-191

Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Department of Pediatrics, Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001820DOI Listing
February 2019

Predicting Outcome From PICU Care: What Have We Learned in 30 Years?

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Feb;20(2):189-190

Renown Health, Internal Medicine, Pediatrics and Critical Care, University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine, Reno, Nevada Renown Health, Reno, Nevada.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001772DOI Listing
February 2019

Failure of Clinical Trials in Pediatric Respiratory Failure: Can We Blame Endotypes?

Authors:
Rainer G Gedeit

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Feb;20(2):187-188

Critical Care Section, Department of Pediatrics, Medical College of Wisconsin/Children's Hospital of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001835DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Monitoring Gas Exchange During Hypothermia for Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy.

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Feb;20(2):166-171

Department of Pediatrics, University of California at Davis, Sacramento, CA.

Objectives: Therapeutic hypothermia is standard of care in management of moderate/severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn is associated with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and is exacerbated by hypoxemia and hypercarbia. Gas exchange is assessed by arterial blood gas analysis (with/without correction for body temperature), pulse oximetry, and end-tidal CO2. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001799DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6366447PMC
February 2019
2 Reads

Outcomes of Children With Bronchiolitis Treated With High-Flow Nasal Cannula or Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation.

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Feb;20(2):128-135

All authors: Division of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, UH Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital, Cleveland, OH.

Objectives: Initial respiratory support with noninvasive positive pressure ventilation or high-flow nasal cannula may prevent the need for invasive mechanical ventilation in PICU patients with bronchiolitis. However, it is not clear whether the initial choice of respiratory support modality influences the need for subsequent invasive mechanical ventilation. The purpose of this study is to compare the rate of subsequent invasive mechanical ventilation after initial support with noninvasive positive pressure ventilation or high-flow nasal cannula in children with bronchiolitis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001798DOI Listing
February 2019
5 Reads

Evidence of Endotypes in Pediatric Acute Hypoxemic Respiratory Failure Caused by Sepsis.

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Feb;20(2):110-112

Division of Critical Care Medicine, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and Cincinnati Children's Research Foundation, Cincinnati, OH.

Objectives: Subclassification based on clinical or biologic commonalities (endotypes) is one approach to reduce heterogeneity in acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. In adults, biomarker-defined endotypes of respiratory failure have been described, with differential outcome profiles and response to therapy. To date, no studies have tested whether endotypes exist in pediatric acute hypoxemic respiratory failure, although messenger RNA expression-based endotypes have been described in pediatric sepsis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001808DOI Listing
February 2019
6 Reads

Antibiotic Prescription in Young Children With Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Associated Respiratory Failure and Associated Outcomes.

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Feb;20(2):101-109

Department of Anesthesiology, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA.

Objectives: To describe antibiotic prescribing practices during the first 2 days of mechanical ventilation among previously healthy young children with respiratory syncytial virus-associated lower respiratory tract infection and evaluate associations between the prescription of antibiotics at onset of mechanical ventilation with clinical outcomes.

Design: Retrospective cohort study.

Setting: Forty-six children's hospitals in the United States. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001839DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Rapid Cycle Deliberate Practice Versus Reflective Debriefing for Pediatric Septic Shock Training.

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Jan 30. Epub 2019 Jan 30.

Division of Critical Care, Department of Pediatrics, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA.

Objectives: Rapid cycle deliberate practice is a simulation training method that cycles between deliberate practice and directed feedback to create perfect practice; in contrast to reflective debriefing where learners are asked to reflect on their performance to create change. The aim of this study is to compare the impact of rapid cycle deliberate practice versus reflective debriefing training on resident application and retention of the pediatric sepsis algorithm.

Design: Prospective, randomized-control study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001891DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Early Protocolized Versus Usual Care Rehabilitation for Pediatric Neurocritical Care Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Jan 30. Epub 2019 Jan 30.

Department of Critical Care Medicine, UPMC Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA.

Objectives: Few feasibility, safety, and efficacy data exist regarding ICU-based rehabilitative services for children. We hypothesized that early protocolized assessment and therapy would be feasible and safe versus usual care in pediatric neurocritical care patients.

Design: Randomized controlled trial. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001881DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Hypotensive Response to IV Acetaminophen in Pediatric Cardiac Patients.

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Jan 22. Epub 2019 Jan 22.

Department of Pediatrics, The Lillie Frank Abercrombie Section of Pediatric Cardiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX.

Objectives: Acetaminophen is ubiquitously used as antipyretic/analgesic administered IV to patients undergoing surgery and to critically ill patients when enteral routes are not possible. Widely believed to be safe and free of adverse side effects, concerns have developed in adult literature regarding the association of IV acetaminophen and transient hypotension. We hypothesize that there are hemodynamic effects after IV acetaminophen in the PICU and assess the prevalence of such in a large pediatric cardiovascular ICU population using high-fidelity data. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001880DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Characteristics and Outcomes of Critical Illness in Children With Feeding and Respiratory Technology Dependence.

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Jan 22. Epub 2019 Jan 22.

Department of Pediatrics, Children's National Health System and the George Washington School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Washington, DC.

Objectives: Children with dependence on respiratory or feeding technologies are frequently admitted to the PICU, but little is known about their characteristics or outcomes. We hypothesized that they are at increased risk of critical illness-related morbidity and mortality compared with children without technology dependence.

Design: Secondary analysis of prospective, probability-sampled cohort study of children from birth to 18 years old. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001868DOI Listing
January 2019
6 Reads

Therapeutic Hypothermia After Perinatal Asphyxia in Infants With Severe, Ductal-Dependent Congenital Heart Disease.

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Jan 22. Epub 2019 Jan 22.

Department of Neonatology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.

Objectives: Patients with severe congenital heart disease and cardiac anomalies such as restrictive foramen ovale, intact atrial septum, or narrowing of ductus arteriosus are at risk for perinatal asphyxia, leading to hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. We hypothesize that therapeutic hypothermia can be applied to these patients and seek to investigate feasibility and safety of this method.

Design: A retrospective observational study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001878DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Oliguria and Acute Kidney Injury in Critically Ill Children: Implications for Diagnosis and Outcomes.

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Jan 22. Epub 2019 Jan 22.

Department of Pediatrics, Division of Nephrology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA.

Objectives: Consensus definitions for acute kidney injury are based on changes in serum creatinine and urine output. Although the creatinine criteria have been widely applied, the contribution of the urine output criteria remains poorly understood. We evaluated these criteria individually and collectively to determine their impact on the diagnosis and outcome of severe acute kidney injury. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001866DOI Listing
January 2019

The Association of Hospital Rate of Delayed Epinephrine Administration With Survival to Discharge for Pediatric Nonshockable In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Jan 21. Epub 2019 Jan 21.

Division of Critical Care Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada.

Objectives: To evaluate the variation of hospital rates of delayed epinephrine administration in pediatric patients with nonshockable in-hospital cardiac arrest, and the association of those rates with event, 24-hour, and overall survival to hospital discharge.

Design: A retrospective evaluation was performed. Delayed epinephrine was defined as greater than 5 minutes between the time the need for chest compressions was identified and epinephrine was administered. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001863DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

Reducing Exposure to Opioid and Benzodiazepine Medications for Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Patients: A Quality Improvement Project.

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Jan 21. Epub 2019 Jan 21.

Cardiac Intensive Care Unit, The Heart Institute, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH.

Objectives: To evaluate the effect of implementation of a comfort algorithm on infusion rates of opioids and benzodiazepines in postneonatal postoperative pediatric cardiac surgery patients.

Design: A quality improvement project, using statistical process control methodology.

Setting: Twenty-five-bed tertiary care pediatric cardiac ICU in an urban academic Children's hospital. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001870DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

Pediatric Pulmonary Emboli at Autopsy: An Update and Case Series Review.

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Jan 21. Epub 2019 Jan 21.

All authors: Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO.

Objectives: Identify and characterize pediatric pulmonary emboli present at autopsy.

Design: Retrospective single institution observational study with clinicopathologic correlation.

Setting: Tertiary medical center. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001842DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Positive Cumulative Fluid Balance Is Associated With Mortality in Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in the Setting of Acute Kidney Injury.

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Jan 21. Epub 2019 Jan 21.

Division of Critical Care, Department of Pediatrics, Benioff Children's Hospital, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA.

Objectives: As acute kidney injury and elevated cumulative fluid balance commonly co-occur in pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome, we aimed to identify risk factors for their development and evaluate their independent relationships with mortality. We hypothesized that acute kidney injury and elevated cumulative fluid balance would be associated with markers of inflammation and that children with elevated cumulative fluid balance and concomitant acute kidney injury would have worse outcomes than other children.

Design: Prospective observational study using the pediatric Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss, End-Stage acute kidney injury classification. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001845DOI Listing
January 2019
7 Reads

Bridging the Stressful Gap Between ICU and Home: Medical Simulation for Pediatric Patients and Their Families.

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Jan 18. Epub 2019 Jan 18.

Department of Anesthesiology, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Division of Critical Care Medicine.

Objectives: Introduce an expanding role for pediatric critical care and medical simulation to optimize the care for children with technology dependence.

Data Sources: Limited review of literature and practice for current teaching paradigms, vulnerability of the patient population, and efficacy of simulation as a medical educational tool.

Conclusions: In accordance with new care models and patient need, critical care requires parallel evolution of care practices, including new educational and care models, in order to maximally reduce risk, fear, and anxiety and to insure quality and consistent care in the community for patients and families transitioning between the ICU and home environments. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001869DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Are Pediatric Critical Personnel Satisfied With Their Lives? Prediction of Satisfaction With Life From Burnout, Posttraumatic Stress, and Posttraumatic Growth, and Comparison With Noncritical Pediatric Staff.

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Jan 18. Epub 2019 Jan 18.

Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Department of Pediatrics, 12 de Octubre University Hospital, Madrid, Spain.

Objectives: Staff in PICUs shows high burnout, posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms, and posttraumatic growth levels. However, their levels of satisfaction with life and how positive and negative posttrauma outcomes relate to each other and contribute to predict satisfaction with life remain unknown. Thus, we attempted to explore these aspects and to compare the findings with data from pediatric professionals working in noncritical units. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001861DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Development of the Pediatric Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Prediction Model for Risk-Adjusting Mortality.

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Jan 18. Epub 2019 Jan 18.

Department of Pediatrics, Inova Fairfax Hospital, Fall Church, VA.

Objectives: To develop a prognostic model for predicting mortality at time of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation initiation for children which is important for determining center-specific risk-adjusted outcomes.

Design: Multivariable logistic regression using a large national cohort of pediatric extracorporeal membrane oxygenation patients.

Setting: The ICUs of the eight tertiary care children's hospitals of the Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001882DOI Listing
January 2019
9 Reads
2.338 Impact Factor

Population Pharmacokinetics and Dosing of Milrinone After Patent Ductus Arteriosus Ligation in Preterm Infants.

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Jan 18. Epub 2019 Jan 18.

Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.

Objectives: The postoperative course of patent ductus arteriosus ligation is often complicated by postligation cardiac syndrome, occurring in 10-45% of operated infants. Milrinone might prevent profound hemodynamic instability and improve the recovery of cardiac function in this setting. The present study aimed to describe the population pharmacokinetics of milrinone in premature neonates at risk of postligation cardiac syndrome and give dosing recommendations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001879DOI Listing
January 2019
5 Reads

23.4% Hypertonic Saline and Intracranial Pressure in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Among Children: A 10-Year Retrospective Analysis.

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Jan 18. Epub 2019 Jan 18.

Department of Pediatrics, Hennepin Healthcare, Minneapolis, MN.

Objective: To explore the effect of 23.4% hypertonic saline for management of elevated intracranial pressure in children admitted to our institution for severe traumatic brain injury.

Design: Single-center, retrospective medical chart analysis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001867DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads
2.338 Impact Factor

Association of Fluid Overload With Clinical Outcomes in Critically Ill Children With Bronchiolitis. BRUCIP study.

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Jan 17. Epub 2019 Jan 17.

Paediatric Intensive Care Unit, Hospital Sant Joan de Deu, Institut Recerca, CIBERES, Barcelona, Spain.

Objectives: Increasing evidence supports the association of fluid overload with adverse outcomes in different diseases. To our knowledge, few studies have examined the impact of fluid balance on clinical outcome in severe bronchiolitis. Our aim was to determine whether fluid overload was associated with adverse clinical outcomes in critically ill children with severe bronchiolitis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001841DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Association Between Tidal Volumes Adjusted for Ideal Body Weight and Outcomes in Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Jan 11. Epub 2019 Jan 11.

Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

Objectives: The impact of tidal volume on outcomes in mechanically ventilated children with pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome remains unclear. To date, observational investigations have failed to calculate tidal volume based on standardized corrections of weight. We investigated the impact of tidal volume on mortality and probability of extubation in pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome using ideal body weight-adjusted tidal volume. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001846DOI Listing
January 2019
5 Reads

Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia: The Cardiac Arrest Where Epinephrine Is Contraindicated.

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Jan 11. Epub 2019 Jan 11.

Green Lane Paediatric and Congenital Cardiac Services, Starship Children's Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand.

Objectives: To raise awareness among pediatric intensive care specialists of catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia; an uncommon cause of polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation arrest in children and young adults where epinephrine (adrenaline), even when given according to international protocols, can be counter-productive and life-threatening. We review three cases of cardiac arrest in children, later proven to be catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia related, where delay in recognition of this condition resulted in significantly longer resuscitation efforts, more interventions, and a longer time to return of spontaneous circulation.

Design: Retrospective case series. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001847DOI Listing
January 2019
9 Reads

Comparison of International Pediatric Sepsis Consensus Conference Versus Sepsis-3 Definitions for Children Presenting With Septic Shock to a Tertiary Care Center in India: A Retrospective Study.

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Jan 11. Epub 2019 Jan 11.

All authors: Department of Pediatrics, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.

Objectives: To evaluate the proportion of children fulfilling "Sepsis-3" definition and International Pediatric Sepsis Consensus Conference definition among children diagnosed to have septic shock and compare the mortality risk between the two groups.

Design: Retrospective chart review.

Setting: PICU of a tertiary care teaching hospital from 2014 to 2017. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001864DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Extremity Arterial Thromboses in Hospitalized Children: A National Database Analysis of Prevalence and Therapeutic Interventions.

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Jan 11. Epub 2019 Jan 11.

Department of Pediatrics, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, Florida International University, Miami, FL.

Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence, demographics, predisposing conditions, therapeutic interventions, and outcomes of extremity arterial thrombosis in hospitalized children.

Design: Retrospective cohort study.

Patients: National discharge database analysis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001860DOI Listing
January 2019
2.338 Impact Factor

Online Reviewer Thank You.

Authors:

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Jan;20(1):e51-e54

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001831DOI Listing
January 2019

The authors reply.

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Jan;20(1):99

Intensive Care Unit, Sydney Children's Hospital, Randwick, NSW, Australia, and School of Women's and Children's Health, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001784DOI Listing
January 2019

Widening Evidence-Base of Risk With Hyperoxia.

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Jan;20(1):99

Paediatric Intensive Care Unit, Lady Cilento Childrens Hospital, Brisbane, QLD, Australia, and Paediatric Critical Care Research Group, Mater Research Institute, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia Respiratory Critical Care and Anaesthesia Unit, UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, London, United Kingdom, and Paediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care Units, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust, London, United Kingdom.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001770DOI Listing
January 2019
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The authors reply.

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Jan;20(1):98

Department of Neurology, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA Department of Critical Care, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA Departments of Neurology, Anesthesiology, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001787DOI Listing
January 2019

Pediatric Neurocritical Care: Off to a Good Start.

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2019 Jan;20(1):97-98

Department of Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, and Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO Department of Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, and Department of Neurosurgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001771DOI Listing
January 2019