4,941 results match your criteria Pediatric Clinics of North America[Journal]


Current Advances in Neonatal Care.

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 04;66(2):xvii-xviii

Harvard Medical School, Department of Neonatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, 25 Shattuck Street, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2019.01.001DOI Listing

A Deep Dive into What Is New and Needed in the Care of Preterm Newborn Care.

Authors:
Bonita F Stanton

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 04;66(2):xv-xvi

Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine at Seton Hall University, 340 Kingsland Street, Building 123, Nutley, NJ 07110, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2019.01.002DOI Listing

Neurodevelopmental Follow-up of Preterm Infants: What Is New?

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 04 1;66(2):509-523. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

Department of Pediatrics, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island, 101 Dudley Street, Providence, RI 02905-2499, USA; Department of Pediatrics, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Neonatal-Follow-up Clinic, Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island, 101 Dudley Street, Providence, RI 02905-2499, USA. Electronic address:

There is increasing evidence of ongoing changes occurring in short-term and long-term motor and language outcomes in former premature infants. As rates of moderate to severe cerebral palsy (CP) have decreased, there has been increased awareness of the impact of mild CP and of developmental coordination disorder on the preterm population. Language delays and disorders continue to be among the most common outcomes. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00313955183020
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.12.015DOI Listing
April 2019
3 Reads

Care of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Graduate after Discharge.

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 04 1;66(2):489-508. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

Special Infant Care Follow-up Program, Department of Pediatrics/Neonatology, Duke University Medical Center, Box 2739, Durham, NC 27710, USA.

Premature and critically ill term infants are often discharged from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) with ongoing medical problems, including respiratory problems; growth, nutrition and feeding problems; and neurologic injury. At discharge, they may also be dependent on technology such as supplemental oxygen, tracheostomy, mechanical ventilation, feeding tube, and monitors. Primary care physicians must have special knowledge and understanding of the medical complications of NICU graduates to coordinate post-discharge care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.12.014DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Stridor in the Newborn.

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 04 1;66(2):475-488. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Children's Hospital of The King's Daughters, Eastern Virginia Medical School, 600 Gresham Drive, Norfolk, VA 23507, USA. Electronic address:

Stridor in the newborn period may result from numerous causes, both congenital and acquired. Its presentation is diverse, and understanding the subtleties of that diversity is the key to determining the likely cause of the stridor, as well as the urgency for specialist evaluation. This article presents a framework for evaluating the quality of stridor in the newborn, as well as a review of the characteristics of stridor associated with entities commonly encountered in the neonatal airway. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.12.013DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Infant: Who Needs to Be Treated and What Approach Is Beneficial?

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 04 1;66(2):461-473. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

Innovative Research Program in Neonatal Feeding Disorders; The Neonatal and Infant Feeding Disorders Program, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH, USA; Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Center for Perinatal Research, WB 5211, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, 575 Children's Cross Roads, Columbus, OH 43215, USA; Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Department of Pediatrics, Center for Perinatal Research, WB 5211, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, 575 Children's Cross Roads, Columbus, OH 43215, USA. Electronic address:

Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and GER disease (GERD) pertaining to infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) are reviewed, based on research in this specific population. The developmental biology of the gastroesophageal junction, physiology of GER, and pathophysiology of GERD in this setting are summarized, and risk factors for GER and GERD identified. The epidemiology, economic burden, and controversies surrounding GERD in NICU infants are addressed, and an approach to GER and GERD in these patients formulated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.12.012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6400306PMC
April 2019
4 Reads

Diagnosis and Management of Infantile Hemangiomas in the Neonate.

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 04;66(2):437-459

Division of Dermatology, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, 225 East Chicago Avenue, Box 107, Chicago, IL 60611-2605, USA. Electronic address:

Infantile hemangiomas (IH) are a common benign tumor of infancy, most being uncomplicated and not requiring therapy. Some IH may require treatment; the pediatric provider must be familiar with morphology, distribution, natural history, and associations of IH. Several treatment options are available for IH: current standard of care, oral propranolol. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.12.011DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Hearing Loss in Pediatrics: What the Medical Home Needs to Know.

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 04;66(2):425-436

Department of Neonatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Rose 3, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215, USA.

Screening infants for hearing loss at birth is a standard in most states in the United States, but follow-up continues to warrant improvement. Understanding the definition of hearing loss, its etiology, appropriate intervention options, and knowledge of methods to optimize an infant's outcomes through the medical home can help to maximize speech and language skills. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.12.010DOI Listing

Intrauterine Growth Restriction: Postnatal Monitoring and Outcomes.

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 04;66(2):403-423

Department of Pediatrics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, UCLA Mattel Children's Hospital, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, 22-412 MDCC, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.

Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is an important cause of fetal, perinatal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. IUGR occurs because of multiple reasons. Neonates with IUGR experience acute problems in the perinatal and early neonatal period that can be life-threatening. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.12.009DOI Listing

Late Preterm Infants: Morbidities, Mortality, and Management Recommendations.

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 04 28;66(2):387-402. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Department of Neonatology, Indiana University School of Medicine, 699 Riley Hospital Drive, RR 208, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA. Electronic address:

Infants born between 34 weeks 0 days and 36 weeks 6 days of gestation are termed late preterm. This group accounts for the majority of premature births in the United States, with rates increasing in each of the last 3 years. This increase is significant given their large number: nearly 280,000 in 2016 alone. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.12.008DOI Listing

The Current State of Newborn Screening in the United States.

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 04;66(2):369-386

Division of Genetics, Genomics and Metabolic Disorders, Children's Hospital of Michigan, 3950 Beaubien Street, Detroit, MI 48201, USA; Department of Pediatrics, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 540 E Canfield #2375, Detroit, MI 48201, USA; Center for Molecular Medicine and Genetics and Department of Pathology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 2375 Scott Hall, 540 East Canfield, Detroit, MI 48201, USA.

Newborn screening has evolved since its introduction in 1963. The disorders that are being screened for continue to evolve as new treatments and new technologies advance. In this review, the authors discuss the current state of newborn screening in the United States, including the disorders currently being screened for and how newborn screening is performed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.12.007DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome.

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 04;66(2):353-367

Vanderbilt Center for Child Health Policy, 2525 West End Avenue, Suite 1200, Nashville, TN 37027, USA.

This review examines the continuum of care of opioid-exposed infants, including the assessment of the neonate, diagnosis of neonatal abstinence syndrome, management of the syndrome including nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic care, approach to breastfeeding, pediatric follow-up care, and integration of care of the mother-infant dyad. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.12.006DOI Listing
April 2019
8 Reads

Neonatal Thyroid Disease: Testing and Management.

Authors:
Paul B Kaplowitz

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 04 28;66(2):343-352. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Division of Endocrinology, Children's National Health System, George Washington University School of Medicine and the Health Sciences, 111 Michigan Avenue Northwest, Washington, DC 20010, USA. Electronic address:

"Thyroid dysfunction that requires prompt diagnosis and treatment often becomes evident in the newborn period because of testing that is done as part of universal newborn screening. Primary congenital hypothyroidism is the most common treatable cause of mental retardation, requiring immediate treatment to prevent abnormal brain development. However, many of the abnormal thyroid test results are less abnormal and difficult to interpret, with a need for repeat testing and careful follow-up before initiation of treatment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.12.005DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Hypoglycemia in the Newborn.

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 04 1;66(2):333-342. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

Division of Endocrinology, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address:

This article covers several aspects of the clinical management of neonatal hypoglycemia that have recently evolved, reviewing the evidence informing these recommended changes in practice. Topics covered include use of buccal dextrose gel, rationale for avoiding the traditional "mini dextrose bolus," and benefits of direct breastfeeding for the treatment of asymptomatic hypoglycemia in at-risk newborns. The reasons for increasing use of more accurate point-of-care devices for measuring neonatal glucose concentrations are discussed, as well as the implications of different published opinions regarding the determination of readiness for discharge and the most important considerations when making this determination. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.12.004DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Evaluating Newborns at Risk for Early-Onset Sepsis.

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 04 1;66(2):321-331. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

Department of Pediatrics, Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, 630 West 168th Street, PH-17, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address:

Early-onset sepsis (EOS) is an important cause of neonatal morbidity. Despite extensive study, identifying at-risk newborns remains challenging, especially if they are initially well appearing. Existing official EOS recommendations suggest a conservative approach that likely results in overtreatment of a low-risk population. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.12.003DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read
2.198 Impact Factor

Recent Recommendations and Emerging Science in Neonatal Resuscitation.

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 04 1;66(2):309-320. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, 1200 North Everett Drive, ETNP7504, Oklahoma City, OK 73104, USA.

The Neonatal Resuscitation Program, initially an expertise- and consensus-based approach, has evolved into an evidence-based algorithm. Ventilation remains the key component of successful resuscitation of neonates. Recent changes in recommendations include management of cord clamping, multiple methods to prevent hypothermia, rescinding of mandatory intubation and suction of the nonvigorous meconium-stained infant, electrocardiographic monitoring, and establishing an airway for ventilation before initiation of chest compressions. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00313955183018
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.12.002DOI Listing
April 2019
3 Reads

Fetal Surgery.

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 04;66(2):295-308

Department of Surgery, Abramson Research Center, Room 1116B, 3615 Civic Center Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA 19104-4318, USA. Electronic address:

Fetal surgery is an established but still rapidly evolving specialty, born from the rationale that destructive embryologic processes, recognized early in gestation, can be curtailed by prenatal correction. As more and more centers begin offering fetal interventions, quality of care must be verified through transparency about clinical capabilities and resources. Level designations should be assigned based on capability, as in trauma and neonatal ICU centers for excellence, and volume requirements must be set for fetal surgery certification. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.12.001DOI Listing
April 2019
3 Reads

Prenatal Genetic Testing Options.

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 04;66(2):281-293

Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine and Reproductive Genetics, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address:

All patients should be offered prenatal screening and diagnosis. Testing options depend on many factors, including patient age, family history, and patient preference. Options are rapidly changing with emerging technology. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.12.016DOI Listing
April 2019
5 Reads

Dedication to Julie Rich Ingelfinger.

Authors:
James C Chan

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 02;66(1):xxi-xxiii

Tufts University, The Barbara Bush Children's Hospital, 22 Bramhall Street, Portland, ME 04102-3175, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.10.004DOI Listing
February 2019

Dealing with the Challenges of the Good Fortune of an Abundance of New Knowledge.

Authors:
Bonita F Stanton

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 02;66(1):xvii-xviii

Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine at Seton Hall University, 340 Kingsland Street, Building 123, Nutley, NJ 07110, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.10.003DOI Listing
February 2019

Clinical Disorders of the Kidney.

Authors:
James C Chan

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 02;66(1):xix-xx

Tufts University The Barbara Bush Children's Hospital Maine Medical Center, 22 Bramhall Street, Portland, ME 04102-3175, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.10.002DOI Listing
February 2019

Lupus Nephritis.

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 02;66(1):87-99

Department of Pathology and Immunology, Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children's Hospital, 6621 Fannin Street, Suite AB195, Houston, TX 77030, USA.

Childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a subset of SLE with an onset before 18 years of age. Patients with early onset SLE tend to have a greater genetic component to their disease cause, more multisystemic involvement, and a more severe disease course, which includes greater risks for developing nephritis and end-stage kidney disease. Five- and 10-year mortality is lower than in adult-onset SLE. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.08.007DOI Listing
February 2019
14 Reads

Nephrotic Syndrome.

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 02;66(1):73-85

Division of Pediatric Nephrology, Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine and Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, 2015 Uppergate Drive Northeast, Atlanta, GA 30322-1015, USA.

Nephrotic syndrome is characterized by edema, proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia, and hyperlipidemia. Minimal change disease, the most common cause in childhood, generally responds to corticosteroids, although most patients experience disease relapses. Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis is usually resistant to corticosteroids and carries a significant risk of kidney failure, necessitating renal transplantation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.08.006DOI Listing
February 2019
7 Reads

Infection-Related Glomerulonephritis.

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 02;66(1):59-72

Division of Nephrology, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

Acute postinfectious glomerulonephritis or infection-related glomerulonephritis has been associated with several viral or bacterial infections. Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection is the prototypical cause of postinfectious glomerulonephritis and the main focus of this discussion. The clinical spectrum can vary widely, from asymptomatic microscopic hematuria incidentally detected on routine urinalysis to rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis with acute kidney injury requiring emergent dialysis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.08.005DOI Listing
February 2019
19 Reads

Pediatric Hypertension: Diagnosis, Evaluation, and Treatment.

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 02;66(1):45-57

Division of Pediatric Nephrology and Hypertension, McGovern Medical School at the University of Texas Health Science Center, 6431 Fannin Street, MSB 3-121, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Electronic address:

The etiology of hypertension in children and adolescents is varied; however, the prevalence of pediatric primary hypertension is increasing. Early identification and appropriate management of hypertension in children and adolescents is important to prevent the development of hypertensive end organ disease. The 2017 American Academy of Pediatrics Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Screening and Management of High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents provide a comprehensive reference for evaluation and management of hypertension in this age group and should be used when assessing patients with elevated blood pressure and hypertension. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00313955183013
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.09.001DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Childhood Obesity and the Metabolic Syndrome.

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 02;66(1):31-43

Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, MLC 7022, Cincinnati, OH 45229, USA.

Obesity is a leading cause of chronic kidney disease. Children with severe obesity have an increased prevalence of early kidney abnormalities and are at high risk to develop kidney failure in adulthood. The pathophysiology of obesity-related kidney disease is incompletely understood, although the postulated mechanisms of kidney injury include hyperfiltration, adipokine dysregulation, and lipotoxic injury. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00313955183012
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.08.004DOI Listing
February 2019
13 Reads

Long-Term Outcomes of Kidney Transplantation in Children.

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 02;66(1):269-280

Division of Pediatric Nephrology, Emory University School of Medicine, Children's Pediatric Institute, 2015 Uppergate Drive NE, 5th Floor, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA.

Kidney transplantation is the preferred treatment for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in children and confers improved survival, skeletal growth, heath-related quality of life, and neuropsychological development compared with dialysis. Kidney transplantation in children with ESRD results in 10-year patient survival exceeding 90%. Therefore, the long-term management of these patients is focused on maintaining quality of life and minimizing long-term side effects of immunosuppression. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.09.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6251502PMC
February 2019
18 Reads

Chronic Kidney Disease and Dietary Measures to Improve Outcomes.

Authors:
Oleh M Akchurin

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 02;66(1):247-267

Weill Cornell Medical College (Pediatric Nephrology), 525 E 68th Street, Box 176, New York, NY 10065, USA. Electronic address:

Chronic kidney disease is an ongoing deterioration of renal function that often progresses to end-stage renal disease. Management goals in children include slowing disease progression, prevention and treatment of complications, and optimizing growth, development, and quality of life. Nutritional management is critically important to achieve these goals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.09.007DOI Listing
February 2019
20 Reads

Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome.

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 02;66(1):235-246

Departments of Pediatrics & Medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine, 12631 E. 17th Avenue, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. Electronic address:

Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is the clinical triad of thrombocytopenia, anemia, and acute kidney injury. Classically associated with enterocolitis from Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, HUS is also associated with Streptococcus pneumoniae infections; genetic dysregulation of the alternative complement pathway or coagulation cascade; and, rarely, a hereditary disorder of cobalamin C metabolism. These share a common final pathway of a prothrombotic and proinflammatory state on the endothelial cell surface, with fibrin and platelet deposition. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.09.011DOI Listing
February 2019
13 Reads

Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus.

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 02;66(1):227-234

Department of Pediatric Nephrology, Columbia University Medical Center, 3959 Broadway, CHN 1115, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address:

Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) results from the inability of the late distal tubules and collecting ducts to respond to vasopressin. The lack of ability to concentrate urine results in polyuria and polydipsia. Primary and acquired forms of NDI exist in children. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.09.006DOI Listing
February 2019
15 Reads

Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuresis.

Authors:
Michael L Moritz

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 02;66(1):209-226

Pediatric Nephrology, Pediatric Dialysis, Division of Nephrology, Department of Pediatrics, UPMC Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 4401 Penn Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15224, USA. Electronic address:

The syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis (SIAD) is a common cause of hyponatremia in hospitalized children. SIAD refers to euvolemic hyponatremia due to nonphysiologic stimuli for arginine vasopressin production in the absence of renal or endocrine dysfunction. SIAD can be broadly classified as a result of tumors, pulmonary or central nervous system disorders, medications, or other causes such as infection, inflammation, and the postoperative state. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.09.005DOI Listing
February 2019
11 Reads

Hypophosphatemic Rickets.

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 02;66(1):179-207

The Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, 1001 Boulevard Décarie, Room EM1.2232, Montreal, Quebec H4A3J1, Canada.

Hypophosphatemic rickets, mostly of the X-linked dominant form caused by pathogenic variants of the PHEX gene, poses therapeutic challenges with consequences for growth and bone development and portends a high risk of fractions and poor bone healing, dental problems and nephrolithiasis/nephrocalcinosis. Conventional treatment consists of PO4 supplements and calcitriol requiring monitoring for treatment-emergent adverse effects. FGF23 measurement, where available, has implications for the differential diagnosis of hypophosphatemia syndromes and, potentially, treatment monitoring. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.09.004DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads
2.198 Impact Factor

Update on Dent Disease.

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 02;66(1):169-178

Division of Nephrology, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. Electronic address:

Dent disease is an X-linked form of chronic kidney disease characterized by hypercalciuria, low molecular weight proteinuria, nephrocalcinosis, and proximal tubular dysfunction. Clinical presentation is highly variable. Male patients may present with early-onset rickets, recurrent nephrolithiasis, or insidiously with asymptomatic proteinuria or chronic kidney disease. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.09.003DOI Listing
February 2019
11 Reads

Fanconi Syndrome.

Authors:
John W Foreman

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 02;66(1):159-167

Department of Pediatrics, Duke University School of Medicine, Erwin Road, Durham, NC 27710, USA. Electronic address:

Fanconi syndrome, also known as the DeToni, Debré, Fanconi syndrome is a global dysfunction of the proximal tubule characterized by glucosuria, phosphaturia, generalized aminoaciduria, and type II renal tubular acidosis. Often there is hypokalemia, sodium wasting, and dehydration. In children, it typically is caused by inborn errors of metabolism, principally cystinosis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.09.002DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Approach to the Child with Hematuria.

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 02;66(1):15-30

Pediatric Nephrology, Children's Hospital at Montefiore, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 3415 Bainbridge Avenue, Bronx, NY 10467, USA. Electronic address:

The causes of macroscopic and microscopic hematuria overlap; both are often caused by urinary tract infections or urethral/bladder irritation. Coexistent hypertension and proteinuria should prompt investigation for glomerular disease. The most common glomerulonephritis in children is postinfectious glomerulonephritis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.08.003DOI Listing
February 2019
16 Reads

Renal Tubular Acidosis.

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 02;66(1):135-157

Division of Nephrology, Department of Pediatrics, The Montreal Children's Hospital, McGill University Health Centre, Room B RC.6651, Montreal, Quebec H4A 3J1, Canada; Al Jalila Children's Hospital, Al Jadaf PO Box 7662, Dubai, UAE. Electronic address:

Renal tubular acidosis should be suspected in poorly thriving young children with hyperchloremic and hypokalemic normal anion gap metabolic acidosis, with/without syndromic features. Further workup is needed to determine the type of renal tubular acidosis and the presumed etiopathogenesis, which informs treatment choices and prognosis. The risk of nephrolithiasis and calcinosis is linked to the presence (proximal renal tubular acidosis, negligible stone risk) or absence (distal renal tubular acidosis, high stone risk) of urine citrate excretion. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.08.011DOI Listing
February 2019
28 Reads
2.198 Impact Factor

Bartter Syndrome and Gitelman Syndrome.

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 02;66(1):121-134

Department of Pediatrics, Inova Children's Hospital, 3300 Gallows Road, Falls Church, VA 22042, USA; Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Pediatric Specialists of Virginia, 3023 Hamaker Court, Suite 600, Fairfax, VA 22031, USA; Virginia Commonwealth School of Medicine, Richmond, VA, USA. Electronic address:

Bartter and Gitelman syndromes are conditions characterized by renal salt-wasting. Clinical presentations range from severe antenatal disease to asymptomatic with incidental diagnosis. Hypokalemic hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis is the common feature. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.08.010DOI Listing
February 2019
16 Reads

Tubulointerstitial Nephritis.

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 02;66(1):111-119

Department of Pediatrics, Division of Nephrology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 200 North Wolfe Street, Room 3055, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA.

Tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN) is a cause of acute kidney injury in children characterized histologically by an inflammatory cell infiltrate in the kidney interstitium. The most common causes of TIN in children include medications, infections, inflammatory disorders, and genetic conditions. TIN typically presents with nonoliguric acute kidney injury and may be associated with systemic symptoms, including fever, rash, and eosinophilia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.08.009DOI Listing
February 2019
22 Reads

Immunoglobulin A Nephropathy and Immunoglobulin A Vasculitis.

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 02;66(1):101-110

Department of Pediatrics, Medical University of South Carolina, 96 Jonathan Lucas Street, 428 CSB, MSC 608, Charleston, SC 29425, USA. Electronic address:

Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis and immunoglobulin A nephropathy are common glomerulopathies in the pediatric population that deserve special attention. In some cases the primary care provider can follow the patient but others need more intensive management. Delaying this treatment can lead to worse morbidity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.08.008DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Urinary Tract Infections.

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 02;66(1):1-13

Nephrology Section, Nationwide Children's Hospital, 700 Children's Drive, Columbus, OH 43205, USA; Department of Pediatrics, Ohio State University School of Medicine, 700 Children's Drive, Columbus, OH 43210, USA; Center for Clinical and Translational Research, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, 700 Children's Drive, W308, Columbus, OH 43205, USA. Electronic address:

Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the second most common bacterial infection in children and is considered a public health threat given the mounting rates of antibiotic-resistance among uropathogens. This article highlights recent encouraging developments in UTI research. Further work is necessary to translate the discoveries into accessible, cost-effective technologies that will aid clinicians in real-time decision-making. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.08.002DOI Listing
February 2019
5 Reads

Pediatric Emergency Medicine.

Authors:
Prashant Mahajan

Pediatr Clin North Am 2018 12;65(6):xvii-xix

Department of Emergency Medicine, Pediatric Emergency Medicine, CS Mott Children's Hospital of Michigan, 1540 East Hospital Drive, Room 2-737, SPC 4260, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-4260, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.09.009DOI Listing
December 2018

The Changing Role of Emergency Medicine.

Authors:
Bonita F Stanton

Pediatr Clin North Am 2018 12;65(6):xv-xvi

Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine at Seton Hall University, 340 Kingsland Street, Building 123, Nutley, NJ 07110, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.09.010DOI Listing
December 2018

Quality Improvement Methodologies: Principles and Applications in the Pediatric Emergency Department.

Pediatr Clin North Am 2018 12;65(6):1283-1296

Department of Pediatrics, Division of Emergency Medicine and Emergency Department, Seattle Children's Hospital, University of Washington School of Medicine, MB.7.520, PO Box 5371, Seattle, WA 98145-5005, USA.

The origins of quality improvement in health care trace back to industry. Lessons learned from the "flow production" system of the Ford Model-T assembly line in Michigan and the Toyota Production System led to direct applications of Lean and Six Sigma to improve health care systems. Emergency medicine is well suited as a testing and proving ground for quality improvement methodologies because of high patient volume and rapid turnover. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.07.011DOI Listing
December 2018
11 Reads

Quality Improvement and Safety in Pediatric Emergency Medicine.

Pediatr Clin North Am 2018 12;65(6):1269-1281

Department of Pediatrics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, 3401 Civic Center Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA 19146, USA.

Pediatric emergency medicine quality work continues to focus on the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine's 6 domains of quality, with a need for specific emphasis on equity and patient centeredness. Adopting the principles of high-reliability organizations, pediatric emergency departments should become increasing transparent with benchmarking and collaboration across institutions in order to develop an infrastructure for quality and safety to improve the care of pediatric patients in the emergency department. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.07.010DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Pediatric Urgent Care-New and Evolving Paradigms of Acute Care.

Pediatr Clin North Am 2018 12;65(6):1257-1268

PM Pediatrics Management Group, One Hollow Lane, Suite 301, Lake Success, NY 11042, USA.

Parents of pediatric patients seek appropriate high-quality care in a timely, cost-effective, and convenient manner. Pediatric urgent care offers a new and evolving delivery model that serves a growing demand by complementing services provided by the medical home and by pediatric emergency departments. Pediatric urgent care services are used by both nonprofit and for-profit sectors and include hospital and satellite clinics, free-standing clinics, retail-based clinics, and telemedicine services. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.07.014DOI Listing
December 2018

The Impact of the Evolving Health Care System on Pediatric Emergency Care.

Authors:
Lalit Bajaj

Pediatr Clin North Am 2018 12;65(6):1247-1256

Clinical Effectiveness, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Children's Hospital Colorado, 13123 East 16th Avenue B400, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. Electronic address:

This article discusses the implications of health care reform on the pediatric emergency department (ED). The author briefly discusses the health care costs and outcomes in the United States in comparison to other developed nations. The article discusses the impact of the Affordable Care Act and insurance expansion on the pediatric ED. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.07.007DOI Listing
December 2018
11 Reads
2.198 Impact Factor

Recent Advances in Technology and Its Applications to Pediatric Emergency Care.

Pediatr Clin North Am 2018 12;65(6):1229-1246

Department of Biomedical and Health Informatics, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Roberts Center, 2716 South Street, 15th Floor, Philadelphia, PA 19146, USA.

Advances in technology are continuously transforming medical care, including pediatric emergency medicine. The increasing adoption of point-of-care ultrasound examination can improve timely diagnoses without radiation and aids the performance of common procedures. The recent dramatic increase in electronic health record adoption offers an opportunity for enhanced clinical decision-making support. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.07.013DOI Listing
December 2018
16 Reads

Advances in Medical Education and Implications for the Pediatric Emergency Department.

Pediatr Clin North Am 2018 12;65(6):1221-1227

Departments of Emergency Medicine and Pediatrics, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, SPC 5303, Taubman Center, B1 - 354, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-5303, USA.

The learning environment of the pediatric emergency department is composed of many layers that provide opportunity for intervention to improve the education of residents and medical students. Creating an intentional plan of targeted interventions at the levels of learner, teacher, and department can create a culture where education is highly regarded. This article briefly defines the learning environment and explores strategies for improving clinical teaching at these various levels through improved teacher-learner relationships, entrustment, and the implementation of teaching strategies that can be easily incorporated into the busy and time-stretched work of the pediatric emergency department. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.07.008DOI Listing
December 2018

Pediatric Disaster Preparedness.

Pediatr Clin North Am 2018 12;65(6):1205-1220

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Michigan Health System, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.

Children can be victims of mass casualty or illness, but their needs, with respect to their care and recovery are substantially different from adults. Emergency or urgent care physicians must be prepared to evaluate and manage child victims presenting to their facility in numbers or acuity that could significantly overwhelm normal operations. This article presents the general approach to pediatric disaster preparation in the United States, the expectations of emergency department providers, and different methods of disaster triage, and introduces the most likely types of mass illness (some of which are bioweapons or chemical agents) and their management. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.07.015DOI Listing
December 2018

Indications and Interpretation of Common Laboratory Assays in the Emergency Department.

Authors:
Andrea T Cruz

Pediatr Clin North Am 2018 12;65(6):1191-1204

Department of Pediatrics, Sections of Emergency Medicine and Infectious Diseases, Baylor College of Medicine, 6621 Fannin Street, Suite A2210, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Electronic address:

Laboratory assays are commonly used to help clinicians more accurately gauge the risk a child has for a certain condition. This article reviews commonly obtained laboratory tests (complete blood cell counts, metabolic panels, blood gases, and urine assays) and discusses the data supporting obtaining these tests and reasons for spuriously positive or negative results. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.07.005DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read