574 results match your criteria Particle and Fibre Toxicology [Journal]


Silver nanoparticles promote procoagulant activity of red blood cells: a potential risk of thrombosis in susceptible population.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2019 Feb 14;16(1). Epub 2019 Feb 14.

College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-742, South Korea.

Background: Silver nanoparticles (AgNP) are widely used in medical practices owing to their distinct antibacterial, antiviral and anticancer activities. However, with increasing use of AgNP, concerns over its potential toxicity are also escalating. Here, we demonstrated the potential thrombotic effect of AgNP which was mediated by the procoagulant activity of red blood cells (RBCs). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-019-0292-6DOI Listing
February 2019

In vitro detection of in vitro secondary mechanisms of genotoxicity induced by engineered nanomaterials.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2019 Feb 13;16(1). Epub 2019 Feb 13.

In Vitro Toxicology Group, Institute of Life Science, Swansea Univeristy Medical School, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea, SA2 8PP, Wales, UK.

Background: It is well established that toxicological evaluation of engineered nanomaterials (NMs) is vital to ensure the health and safety of those exposed to them. Further, there is a distinct need for the development of advanced physiologically relevant in vitro techniques for NM hazard prediction due to the limited predictive power of current in vitro models and the unsustainability of conducting nano-safety evaluations in vivo. Thus, the purpose of this study was to develop alternative in vitro approaches to assess the potential of NMs to induce genotoxicity by secondary mechanisms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-019-0291-7DOI Listing
February 2019

In utero exposure to ultrafine particles promotes placental stress-induced programming of renin-angiotensin system-related elements in the offspring results in altered blood pressure in adult mice.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2019 01 28;16(1). Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Departamento de Toxicología, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Ciudad de México, México.

Background: Exposure to particulate matter (PM) is associated with an adverse intrauterine environment, which can promote adult cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Ultrafine particles (UFP) (small size and large surface area/mass ratio) are systemically distributed, induce inflammation and oxidative stress, and have been associated with vascular endothelial dysfunction and arterial vasoconstriction, increasing hypertension risk. Placental stress and alterations in methylation of promoter regions of renin-angiotensin system (RAS)-related elements could be involved in UFP exposure-related programming of hypertension. Read More

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https://particleandfibretoxicology.biomedcentral.com/article
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-019-0289-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6350404PMC
January 2019
5 Reads

Correlation of regional deposition dosage for inhaled nanoparticles in human and rat olfactory.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2019 01 25;16(1). Epub 2019 Jan 25.

School of Engineering - Mechanical and Automotive, RMIT University, Bundoora, VIC, Australia.

Background: Nose-to-brain transport of airborne ultrafine particles (UFPs) via the olfactory pathway has been verified as a possible route for particle translocation into the brain. The exact relationship between increased airborne toxicant exposure and neurological deterioration in the human central nervous system, is still unclear. However, the nasal olfactory is undoubtedly a critical junction where the time course and toxicant dose dependency might be inferred. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-019-0290-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6346518PMC
January 2019
3 Reads

Repeated gestational exposure to diesel engine exhaust affects the fetal olfactory system and alters olfactory-based behavior in rabbit offspring.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2019 01 17;16(1). Epub 2019 Jan 17.

NeuroBiologie de l'Olfaction, INRA, Université Paris-Saclay, 78350, Jouy-en-Josas, France.

Background: Airborne pollution, especially from diesel exhaust (DE), is known to have a negative effect on the central nervous system in exposed human populations. However, the consequences of gestational exposure to DE on the fetal brain remain poorly explored, with various effects depending on the conditions of exposure, as well as little information on early developmental stages. We investigated the short-term effects of indirect DE exposure throughout gestation on the developing brain using a rabbit model. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0288-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6335688PMC
January 2019
3 Reads

The potential of omics approaches to elucidate mechanisms of biodiesel-induced pulmonary toxicity.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2019 01 8;16(1). Epub 2019 Jan 8.

Department of Analytical, Environmental and Forensic Sciences, MRC-PHE Centre for Environment & Health, School of Population Health and Environmental Sciences, Franklin-Wilkins Building, King's College London, London, SE1 9NH, UK.

Background: Combustion of biodiesels in place of fossil diesel (FD) has been proposed as a method of reducing transport-related toxic emissions in Europe. While biodiesel exhaust (BDE) contains fewer hydrocarbons, total particulates and carbon monoxide than FD exhaust (FDE), its high nitrogen oxide and ultrafine particle content may still promote pulmonary pathophysiologies.

Main Body: Using a complement of in vitro and in vivo studies, this review documents progress in our understanding of pulmonary responses to BDE exposure. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0284-yDOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Multi-walled carbon nanotube oxidation dependent keratinocyte cytotoxicity and skin inflammation.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2019 01 8;16(1). Epub 2019 Jan 8.

Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, New York, USA.

Background: The effects of carbon nanotubes on skin toxicity have not been extensively studied; however, our lab has previously shown that a carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) exacerbates the 2, 4-dinitrofluorobenzene induced contact hypersensitivity response in mice. Here we examine the role of carboxylation in MWCNT skin toxicity.

Results: MWCNTs were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy, zetasizer, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to fully characterize the physical properties. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0285-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6323751PMC
January 2019
2 Reads

Lobar evenness of deposition/retention in rat lungs of inhaled silver nanoparticles: an approach for reducing animal use while maximizing endpoints.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2019 01 7;16(1). Epub 2019 Jan 7.

HCTm CO.,LTD, Seoicheon-ro 578 beon-gil, Majang-myeon, Icheon, 17383, South Korea.

Background: Information on particle deposition, retention and clearance are important for the evaluation of the risk of inhaled nanomaterials to human health. Recent revised OECD inhalation toxicity test guidelines require to evaluate the lung burden of nanomaterials after rodent subacute and subchronic inhalation exposure (OECD 412, OECD 413). These revised test guidelines require additional post-exposure observation (PEO) periods that include lung burden measurements that can inform on lung clearance behavior and translocation. Read More

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https://particleandfibretoxicology.biomedcentral.com/article
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0286-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6322301PMC
January 2019
6 Reads
7.113 Impact Factor

Limited developmental neurotoxicity from neonatal inhalation exposure to diesel exhaust particles in C57BL/6 mice.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2019 01 7;16(1). Epub 2019 Jan 7.

Department of Environmental Medicine, Box EHSC, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, 14642, USA.

Background: Recent epidemiological studies indicate early-life exposure to pollution particulate is associated with adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes. The need is arising to evaluate the risks conferred by individual components and sources of air pollution to provide a framework for the regulation of the most relevant components for public health protection. Previous studies in rodent models have shown diesel particulate matter has neurotoxic potential and could be a health concern for neurodevelopment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0287-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6322252PMC
January 2019
2 Reads

All that is silver is not toxic: silver ion and particle kinetics reveals the role of silver ion aging and dosimetry on the toxicity of silver nanoparticles.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2018 12 5;15(1):47. Epub 2018 Dec 5.

Health Effects and Exposure Science, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, 99352, USA.

Background: When suspended in cell culture medium, nano-objects composed of soluble metals such as silver can dissolve resulting in ion formation, altered particle properties (e.g. mass, morphology, etc. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0283-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6282353PMC
December 2018
1 Read

Inhaled nanomaterials and the respiratory microbiome: clinical, immunological and toxicological perspectives.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2018 11 20;15(1):46. Epub 2018 Nov 20.

Translational Respiratory Research Laboratory, Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, Level 12, Clinical Sciences Building, 11 Mandalay Road, Singapore, 308232, Singapore.

Our development and usage of engineered nanomaterials has grown exponentially despite concerns about their unfavourable cardiorespiratory consequence, one that parallels ambient ultrafine particle exposure from vehicle emissions. Most research in the field has so far focused on airway inflammation in response to nanoparticle inhalation, however, little is known about nanoparticle-microbiome interaction in the human airway and the environment. Emerging evidence illustrates that the airway, even in its healthy state, is not sterile. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0282-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6245551PMC
November 2018
7 Reads

Graphene quantum dots in alveolar macrophage: uptake-exocytosis, accumulation in nuclei, nuclear responses and DNA cleavage.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2018 11 13;15(1):45. Epub 2018 Nov 13.

Stockbridge School of Agriculture, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, 01003, USA.

Background: Given the tremendous potential for graphene quantum dots (QDs) in biomedical applications, a thorough understanding of the interaction of these materials with macrophages is essential because macrophages are one of the most important barriers against exogenous particles. Although the cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of graphene QDs were reported in previous studies, the interaction between nuclei and the internalized graphene QDs is not well understood. We thus systematically studied the nuclear uptake and related nuclear response associated with aminated graphene QDs (AG-QDs) exposure. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0279-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6234698PMC
November 2018

Group II innate lymphoid cells and microvascular dysfunction from pulmonary titanium dioxide nanoparticle exposure.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2018 11 9;15(1):43. Epub 2018 Nov 9.

Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, West Virginia University School of Medicine, 64 Medical Center Drive, Robert C. Byrd Health Sciences Center - West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, 26505-9229, USA.

Background: The cardiovascular effects of pulmonary exposure to engineered nanomaterials (ENM) are poorly understood, and the reproductive consequences are even less understood. Inflammation remains the most frequently explored mechanism of ENM toxicity. However, the key mediators and steps between lung exposure and uterine health remain to be fully defined. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0280-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6230229PMC
November 2018
9 Reads

Chronic pulmonary exposure to traffic-related fine particulate matter causes brain impairment in adult rats.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2018 11 9;15(1):44. Epub 2018 Nov 9.

School of Respiratory Therapy, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan.

Background: Effects of air pollution on neurotoxicity and behavioral alterations have been reported. The objective of this study was to investigate the pathophysiology caused by particulate matter (PM) in the brain. We examined the effects of traffic-related particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of < 1 μm (PM), high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA)-filtered air, and clean air on the brain structure, behavioral changes, brainwaves, and bioreactivity of the brain (cortex, cerebellum, and hippocampus), olfactory bulb, and serum after 3 and 6 months of whole-body exposure in 6-month-old Sprague Dawley rats. Read More

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https://particleandfibretoxicology.biomedcentral.com/article
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0281-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6234801PMC
November 2018
11 Reads
7.113 Impact Factor

In vitro nanoparticle dosimetry for adherent growing cell monolayers covering bottom and lateral walls.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2018 10 30;15(1):42. Epub 2018 Oct 30.

Department of Food Safety, German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, Max-Dohrn-Str. 8-10, 10589, Berlin, Germany.

Background: Even though a continuously high number of in vitro studies on nanoparticles are being published, the issue of correct dose matter is often not sufficiently taken into account. Due to their size, the diffusion of nanoparticles is slower, as compared to soluble chemicals, and they sediment slowly. Therefore, the administered dose of particles in in vitro experiments is not necessarily the same (effective) dose that comes into contact with the cellular system. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0278-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6208118PMC
October 2018

Usefulness of myeloperoxidase as a biomarker for the ranking of pulmonary toxicity of nanomaterials.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2018 10 23;15(1):41. Epub 2018 Oct 23.

Institute of Industrial Ecological Sciences, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, 807-8555, Japan.

Background: In order to examine whether myeloperoxidase (MPO) can be a useful marker for evaluating the pulmonary toxicity of nanomaterials, we analyzed MPO protein in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) samples obtained from previous examinations of a rat model. In those examinations we performed intratracheal instillation exposures (dose: 0.2-1. Read More

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https://particleandfibretoxicology.biomedcentral.com/article
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0277-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6199695PMC
October 2018
10 Reads

Genotoxic and epigenotoxic effects in mice exposed to concentrated ambient fine particulate matter (PM) from São Paulo city, Brazil.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2018 10 19;15(1):40. Epub 2018 Oct 19.

Departamento de Análises Clínicas e Toxicológicas, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 580, Bloco 13 B, São Paulo, CEP 05508-000, Brazil.

Background: The Metropolitan Area of São Paulo has a unique composition of atmospheric pollutants, and positive correlations between exposure and the risk of diseases and mortality have been observed. Here we assessed the effects of ambient fine particulate matter (PM) on genotoxic and global DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation changes, as well as the activities of antioxidant enzymes, in tissues of AJ mice exposed whole body to ambient air enriched in PM, which was concentrated in a chamber near an avenue of intense traffic in São Paulo City, Brazil.

Results: Mice exposed to concentrated ambient PM (1 h daily, 3 months) were compared to in situ ambient air exposed mice as the study control. Read More

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https://particleandfibretoxicology.biomedcentral.com/article
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0276-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6194750PMC
October 2018
8 Reads

Neuroinflammation is induced by tongue-instilled ZnO nanoparticles via the Ca-dependent NF-κB and MAPK pathways.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2018 10 19;15(1):39. Epub 2018 Oct 19.

Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, 510515, China.

Background: The extensive biological applications of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) in stomatology have created serious concerns about their biotoxicity. In our previous study, ZnO NPs were confirmed to transfer to the central nervous system (CNS) via the taste nerve pathway and cause neurodegeneration after 30 days of tongue instillation. However, the potential adverse effects on the brain caused by tongue-instilled ZnO NPs are not fully known. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0274-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6194560PMC
October 2018
2 Reads

Short-term effects of fine particulate matter and ozone on the cardiac conduction system in patients undergoing cardiac catheterization.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2018 10 11;15(1):38. Epub 2018 Oct 11.

Institute of Epidemiology, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Ingolstädter Landstr. 1, P.O. Box 11 29, D-85764, Neuherberg, Germany.

Background: Air pollution-induced changes in cardiac electrophysiological properties could be a pathway linking air pollution and cardiovascular events. The evidence of air pollution effects on the cardiac conduction system is incomplete yet. We investigated short-term effects of particulate matter ≤ 2. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0275-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6180522PMC
October 2018

Grouping of nanomaterials to read-across hazard endpoints: from data collection to assessment of the grouping hypothesis by application of chemoinformatic techniques.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2018 09 24;15(1):37. Epub 2018 Sep 24.

European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Ispra, Varese, Italy.

Background: An increasing number of manufactured nanomaterials (NMs) are being used in industrial products and need to be registered under the REACH legislation. The hazard characterisation of all these forms is not only technically challenging but resource and time demanding. The use of non-testing strategies like read-across is deemed essential to assure the assessment of all NMs in due time and at lower cost. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0273-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6154922PMC
September 2018
2 Reads

Maternal inhalation of carbon black nanoparticles induces neurodevelopmental changes in mouse offspring.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2018 09 10;15(1):36. Epub 2018 Sep 10.

National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Lersø Parkallé 105, DK-2100, Copenhagen Ø, Denmark.

Background: Engineered nanoparticles are smaller than 100 nm and designed to improve or creating even new physico-chemical properties. Consequently, toxicological properties of materials may change as size reaches the nm size-range. We examined outcomes related to the central nervous system in the offspring following maternal inhalation exposure to nanosized carbon black particles (Printex 90). Read More

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https://particleandfibretoxicology.biomedcentral.com/article
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0272-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6131790PMC
September 2018
14 Reads

Differential effects of diesel exhaust particles on T cell differentiation and autoimmune disease.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2018 08 24;15(1):35. Epub 2018 Aug 24.

Department of Surgery, Division of Transplantation, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 600 Highland Avenue MC7375, Madison, WI, 53792, USA.

Background: Exposure to particulate matter (PM) has been associated with increased incidence and severity of autoimmune disease. Diesel PM is primarily composed of an elemental carbon core and adsorbed organic compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and contributes up to 40% of atmospheric PM. The organic fraction (OF) of PM excludes all metals and inorganics and retains most organic compounds, such as PAHs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0271-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6109291PMC
August 2018
5 Reads

Cardiovascular and inflammatory mechanisms in healthy humans exposed to air pollution in the vicinity of a steel mill.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2018 08 10;15(1):34. Epub 2018 Aug 10.

Environmental Health Science and Research Bureau, Environmental and Radiation Health Sciences Directorate, HECSB, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada.

Background: There is a paucity of mechanistic information that is central to the understanding of the adverse health effects of source emission exposures. To identify source emission-related effects, blood and saliva samples from healthy volunteers who spent five days near a steel plant (Bayview site, with and without a mask that filtered many criteria pollutants) and at a well-removed College site were tested for oxidative stress, inflammation and endothelial dysfunction markers.

Methods: Biomarker analyses were done using multiplexed protein-array, HPLC-Fluorescence, EIA and ELISA methods. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0270-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6086065PMC
August 2018
3 Reads

Effects of differently shaped TiONPs (nanospheres, nanorods and nanowires) on the in vitro model (Caco-2/HT29) of the intestinal barrier.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2018 08 7;15(1):33. Epub 2018 Aug 7.

Grup de Mutagènesi, Departament de Genètica i de Microbiologia, Facultat de Biociències, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Edifici Cn, Campus de Bellaterra, 08193, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Barcelona, Spain.

Background: The biological effects of nanoparticles depend on several characteristics such as size and shape that must be taken into account in any type of assessment. The increased use of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiONPs) for industrial applications, and specifically as a food additive, demands a deep assessment of their potential risk for humans, including their abilities to cross biological barriers.

Methods: We have investigated the interaction of three differently shaped TiONPs (nanospheres, nanorods and nanowires) in an in vitro model of the intestinal barrier, where the coculture of Caco-2/HT29 cells confers inherent intestinal epithelium characteristics to the model (i. Read More

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https://particleandfibretoxicology.biomedcentral.com/article
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0269-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6081908PMC
August 2018
7 Reads

Calcium-dependent cyto- and genotoxicity of nickel metal and nickel oxide nanoparticles in human lung cells.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2018 07 17;15(1):32. Epub 2018 Jul 17.

Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Background: Genotoxicity is an important toxicological endpoint due to the link to diseases such as cancer. Therefore, an increased understanding regarding genotoxicity and underlying mechanisms is needed for assessing the risk with exposure to nanoparticles (NPs). The aim of this study was to perform an in-depth investigation regarding the genotoxicity of well-characterized Ni and NiO NPs in human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells and to discern possible mechanisms. Read More

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https://particleandfibretoxicology.biomedcentral.com/article
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0268-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6050732PMC
July 2018
13 Reads

Phosphonate coating of SiO nanoparticles abrogates inflammatory effects and local changes of the lipid composition in the rat lung: a complementary bioimaging study.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2018 07 16;15(1):31. Epub 2018 Jul 16.

IBE R&D Institute for Lung Health gGmbH, Mendelstraße 11, 48149, Münster, Germany.

Background: The well-known inflammatory and fibrogenic changes of the lung upon crystalline silica are accompanied by early changes of the phospholipid composition (PLC) as detected in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Amorphous silica nanoparticles (NPs) evoke transient lung inflammation, but their effect on PLC is unknown. Here, we compared effects of unmodified and phosphonated amorphous silica NP and describe, for the first time, local changes of the PLC with innovative bioimaging tools. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0267-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6048815PMC
July 2018
14 Reads
7.113 Impact Factor

The effects of facemasks on airway inflammation and endothelial dysfunction in healthy young adults: a double-blind, randomized, controlled crossover study.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2018 07 4;15(1):30. Epub 2018 Jul 4.

BIC-EAST and SKL-ESPC, College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering and Centre for Environment and Health, Peking University, 5 Yiheyuan Road, Beijing, 100871, China.

Background: Facemasks are increasingly worn during air pollution episodes in China, but their protective effects are poorly understood. We aimed to evaluate the filtration efficiencies of N95 facemasks and the cardiopulmonary benefits associated with wearing facemasks during episodes of pollution.

Results: We measured the filtration efficiencies of particles in ambient air of six types of N95 facemasks with a manikin headform. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0266-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6032602PMC
July 2018
19 Reads

Silica nanoparticles induce neurodegeneration-like changes in behavior, neuropathology, and affect synapse through MAPK activation.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2018 07 3;15(1):28. Epub 2018 Jul 3.

Laboratory of Neurodegenerative Diseases, School of Biomedical Sciences, LKS Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, SAR, China.

Background: Silica nanoparticles (SiO-NPs) are naturally enriched and broadly utilized in the manufacturing industry. While previous studies have demonstrated toxicity in neuronal cell lines after SiO-NPs exposure, the role of SiO-NPs in neurodegeneration is largely unknown. Here, we evaluated the effects of SiO-NPs-exposure on behavior, neuropathology, and synapse in young adult mice and primary cortical neuron cultures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0263-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6029039PMC
July 2018
9 Reads

Ingested engineered nanomaterials: state of science in nanotoxicity testing and future research needs.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2018 07 3;15(1):29. Epub 2018 Jul 3.

Biomedical Engineering & Biotechnology Program, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA, 01854, USA.

Background: Engineered nanomaterials (ENM) are used extensively in food products to fulfill a number of roles, including enhancement of color and texture, for nutritional fortification, enhanced bioavailability, improved barrier properties of packaging, and enhanced food preservation. Safety assessment of ingested engineered nanomaterials (iENM) has gained interest in the nanotoxicology community in recent years. A variety of test systems and approaches have been used for such evaluations, with in vitro monoculture cell models being the most common test systems, owing to their low cost and ease-of-use. Read More

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https://particleandfibretoxicology.biomedcentral.com/article
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0265-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6029122PMC
July 2018
21 Reads

Ambient fine particulate matter exposure induces reversible cardiac dysfunction and fibrosis in juvenile and older female mice.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2018 06 25;15(1):27. Epub 2018 Jun 25.

College of Environment and Resource, Research Center of Environment and Health, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi, 030006, People's Republic of China.

Background: Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in the advanced world, and age is an important determinant of cardiac function. The purpose of the study is to determine whether the PM-induced cardiac dysfunction is age-dependent and whether the adverse effects can be restored after PM exposure withdrawal.

Methods: Female C57BL/6 mice at different ages (4-week-old, 4-month-old, and 10-month-old) received oropharyngeal aspiration of 3 mg/kg b. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0264-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6019275PMC
June 2018
4 Reads

Developmental basis for intestinal barrier against the toxicity of graphene oxide.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2018 06 22;15(1):26. Epub 2018 Jun 22.

Key Laboratory of Environmental Medicine Engineering in Ministry of Education, Medical School, Southeast University, Nanjing, 210009, China.

Background: Intestinal barrier is crucial for animals against translocation of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) into secondary targeted organs. However, the molecular mechanisms for the role of intestinal barrier against ENMs toxicity are still largely unclear. The intestine of Caenorhabditis elegans is a powerful in vivo experimental system for the study on intestinal function. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0262-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6013870PMC
June 2018
12 Reads

Predicting the in vivo pulmonary toxicity induced by acute exposure to poorly soluble nanomaterials by using advanced in vitro methods.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2018 06 4;15(1):25. Epub 2018 Jun 4.

Institut National de l'Environnement Industriel et des Risques (INERIS), (DRC/VIVA/TOXI), Parc Technologique ALATA - BP 2, F-60550, Verneuil-en-Halatte, France.

Background: Animal models remain at that time a reference tool to predict potential pulmonary adverse effects of nanomaterials in humans. However, in a context of reduction of the number of animals used in experimentation, there is a need for reliable alternatives. In vitro models using lung cells represent relevant alternatives to assess potential nanomaterial acute toxicity by inhalation, particularly since advanced in vitro methods and models have been developed. Read More

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https://particleandfibretoxicology.biomedcentral.com/article
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0260-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5987386PMC
June 2018
8 Reads

Cerium dioxide nanoparticles exacerbate house dust mite induced type II airway inflammation.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2018 05 23;15(1):24. Epub 2018 May 23.

Toxicology Department, Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Public Health England, Harwell Campus, Chilton, OX110RQ, UK.

Background: Nanomaterial inhalation represents a potential hazard for respiratory conditions such as asthma. Cerium dioxide nanoparticles (CeONPs) have the ability to modify disease outcome but have not been investigated for their effect on models of asthma and inflammatory lung disease. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of CeONPs in a house dust mite (HDM) induced murine model of asthma. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0261-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5966909PMC
May 2018
3 Reads

An updated review of the genotoxicity of respirable crystalline silica.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2018 05 21;15(1):23. Epub 2018 May 21.

Kirkland Consulting, Tadcaster, UK.

Human exposure to (certain forms of) crystalline silica (CS) potentially results in adverse effects on human health. Since 1997 IARC has classified CS as a Group 1 carcinogen [1], which was confirmed in a later review in 2012 [2]. The genotoxic potential and mode of genotoxic action of CS was not conclusive in either of the IARC reviews, although a proposal for mode of actions was made in an extensive review of the genotoxicity of CS by Borm, Tran and Donaldson in 2011 [3]. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0259-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5963024PMC
May 2018
2 Reads

Association of pulmonary, cardiovascular, and hematologic metrics with carbon nanotube and nanofiber exposure among U.S. workers: a cross-sectional study.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2018 05 16;15(1):22. Epub 2018 May 16.

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Division of Surveillance, Hazard Evaluations, and Field Studies, 1090 Tusculum Ave MS-R15, Cincinnati, OH, 45226, USA.

Background: Commercial use of carbon nanotubes and nanofibers (CNT/F) in composites and electronics is increasing; however, little is known about health effects among workers. We conducted a cross-sectional study among 108 workers at 12 U.S. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0258-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5956815PMC
May 2018
5 Reads

Lipophilic components of diesel exhaust particles induce pro-inflammatory responses in human endothelial cells through AhR dependent pathway(s).

Part Fibre Toxicol 2018 05 11;15(1):21. Epub 2018 May 11.

Department of Air Pollution and Noise, Domain of Infection Control, Environment and Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, PO Box 4404, Nydalen, N-0403, Oslo, Norway.

Background: Exposure to traffic-derived particulate matter (PM), such as diesel exhaust particles (DEP), is a leading environmental cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and may contribute to endothelial dysfunction and development of atherosclerosis. It is still debated how DEP and other inhaled PM can contribute to CVD. However, organic chemicals (OC) adhered to the particle surface, are considered central to many of the biological effects. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0257-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5948689PMC
May 2018
10 Reads

Radical containing combustion derived particulate matter enhance pulmonary Th17 inflammation via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2018 05 3;15(1):20. Epub 2018 May 3.

Department of Pediatrics, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN, 38103, USA.

Background: Pollutant particles containing environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) are formed during many combustion processes (e.g. thermal remediation of hazardous wastes, diesel/gasoline combustion, wood smoke, cigarette smoke, etc. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0255-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5934866PMC
May 2018
5 Reads

Multi-cellular human bronchial models exposed to diesel exhaust particles: assessment of inflammation, oxidative stress and macrophage polarization.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2018 05 2;15(1):19. Epub 2018 May 2.

Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Box 210, SE-171 77, Stockholm, Sweden.

Background: Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) are a major component of outdoor air pollution. DEP mediated pulmonary effects are plausibly linked to inflammatory and oxidative stress response in which macrophages (MQ), epithelial cells and their cell-cell interaction plays a crucial role. Therefore, in this study we aimed at studying the cellular crosstalk between airway epithelial cells with MQ and MQ polarization following exposure to aerosolized DEP by assessing inflammation, oxidative stress, and MQ polarization response markers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0256-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5930819PMC
May 2018
4 Reads

Prenatal and early-life diesel exhaust exposure causes autism-like behavioral changes in mice.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2018 04 20;15(1):18. Epub 2018 Apr 20.

Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.

Background: Escalating prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in recent decades has triggered increasing efforts in understanding roles played by environmental risk factors as a way to address this widespread public health concern. Several epidemiological studies show associations between developmental exposure to traffic-related air pollution and increased ASD risk. In rodent models, a limited number of studies have shown that developmental exposure to ambient ultrafine particulates or diesel exhaust (DE) can result in behavioral phenotypes consistent with mild ASD. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0254-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5910592PMC
April 2018
3 Reads

Exposure to concentrated ambient PM alters the composition of gut microbiota in a murine model.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2018 04 17;15(1):17. Epub 2018 Apr 17.

Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Fudan University, 130 Dong'an Rd, Shanghai, 200032, China.

Background: Exposure to ambient fine particulate matter (PM) correlates with abnormal glucose homeostasis, but the underlying biological mechanism has not been fully understood. The gut microbiota is an emerging crucial player in the homeostatic regulation of glucose metabolism. Few studies have investigated its role in the PM exposure-induced abnormalities in glucose homeostasis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0252-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5905147PMC
April 2018
3 Reads
7.110 Impact Factor

Carbon black suppresses the osteogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells: the role of mitochondria.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2018 04 12;15(1):16. Epub 2018 Apr 12.

State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine (SKLRM) & Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Ministry of Education, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, 211100, Jiangsu, China.

Background: The rapid increase in carbon black poses threats to human health. We evaluated the effect of CB (Printex 90) on the osteogenesis of bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Mitochondria play an important role in the osteogenesis of MSCs and are potential targets of nanomaterials, so we studied the role of mitochondria in the CB Printex 90-induced effects on osteogenesis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0253-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5897950PMC
April 2018
4 Reads

Detection of titanium particles in human liver and spleen and possible health implications.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2018 04 11;15(1):15. Epub 2018 Apr 11.

RIKILT, Wageningen University & Research, Wageningen, The Netherlands.

Background: Titanium dioxide (TiO) is produced at high volumes and applied in many consumer and food products. Recent toxicokinetic modelling indicated the potential of TiO to accumulate in human liver and spleen upon daily oral exposure, which is not routinely investigated in chronic animal studies. A health risk from nanosized TiO particle consumption could not be excluded then. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0251-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5896156PMC
April 2018
3 Reads

Carbon load in airway macrophages as a biomarker of exposure to particulate air pollution; a longitudinal study of an international Panel.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2018 03 14;15(1):14. Epub 2018 Mar 14.

Centre for Environment and Health, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, O&N 1, box 706, 3000, Leuven, Belgium.

Background: Carbon load in airway macrophages (AM) has been proposed as an internal marker to assess long-term exposure to combustion-derived pollutant particles. However, it is not known how this biomarker is affected by changes in exposure. We studied the clearance kinetics of black carbon (BC) in AM, obtained by sputum induction, in a one-year panel study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0250-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5853150PMC
March 2018
5 Reads

Early-life exposure to three size-fractionated ultrafine and fine atmospheric particulates in Beijing exacerbates asthma development in mature mice.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2018 03 14;15(1):13. Epub 2018 Mar 14.

CAS Key Laboratory for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety & CAS Center for Excellence in Nanoscience & Beijing Key Laboratory of Ambient Particles Health Effects and Prevention Techniques, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology of China and University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190, China.

Background: Epidemiological studies have suggested that elevated levels of air pollution contribute to an increased incidence or severity of asthma. Although late-onset adult asthma seems to be more attributable to environmental risk factors, limited data is available on the impact of early-life exposure to size-fractionated ambient particulate matter (PM) on asthma in adults. We aimed to determine the effect on the development and exacerbation of asthma in the adult after the mice were exposed as juveniles to three size-fractionated ambient particulates collected from Beijing. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0249-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5851307PMC
March 2018
5 Reads

Vasomotor function in rat arteries after ex vivo and intragastric exposure to food-grade titanium dioxide and vegetable carbon particles.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2018 02 26;15(1):12. Epub 2018 Feb 26.

Department of Public Health, Section of Environmental Health, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade 5A, Building 5B, 2nd Floor, DK-1014, Copenhagen K, Denmark.

Background: Humans are continuously exposed to particles in the gastrointestinal tract. Exposure may occur directly through ingestion of particles via food or indirectly by removal of inhaled material from the airways by the mucociliary clearance system. We examined the effects of food-grade particle exposure on vasomotor function and systemic oxidative stress in an ex vivo study and intragastrically exposed rats. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0248-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5828140PMC
February 2018
7 Reads

Concentration-dependent systemic response after inhalation of nano-sized zinc oxide particles in human volunteers.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2018 02 12;15(1). Epub 2018 Feb 12.

Institute for Prevention and Occupational Medicine of the German Social Accident Insurance, Institute of the Ruhr-Universität Bochum (IPA), Bürkle-de-la-Camp-Platz 1, 44789, Bochum, Germany.

Background: Inhalation of high concentrations of zinc oxide particles (ZnO) may cause metal fume fever. In an earlier human inhalation study, no effects were observed after exposure to ZnO concentrations of 0.5 mg/m. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0246-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5808398PMC
February 2018
12 Reads

Editorial: dose-dependent ZnO particle-induced acute phase response in humans warrants re-evaluation of occupational exposure limits for metal oxides.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2018 02 12;15(1). Epub 2018 Feb 12.

National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands.

Epidemiological studies link inhalation of particles to increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Inhaled particles may induce cardiovascular disease by several different mechanisms including translocation of particles to systemic circulation, activation of airway sensory nerves resulting in autonomic imbalance and particle-induced pulmonary inflammation and acute phase response.The acute phase response is the systemic response to acute and chronic inflammatory states caused by for example bacterial infection, virus infection, trauma and infarction. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0247-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5808423PMC
February 2018
2 Reads

Differences in MWCNT- and SWCNT-induced DNA methylation alterations in association with the nuclear deposition.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2018 02 9;15(1):11. Epub 2018 Feb 9.

Laboratory of Toxicology, Unit of Environment and Health, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, KU Leuven, 3000, Leuven, Belgium.

Background: Subtle DNA methylation alterations mediated by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exposure might contribute to pathogenesis and disease susceptibility. It is known that both multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) interact with nucleus. Such, nuclear-CNT interaction may affect the DNA methylation effects. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0244-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5807760PMC
February 2018
13 Reads

Pulmonary exposure to carbonaceous nanomaterials and sperm quality.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2018 01 31;15(1):10. Epub 2018 Jan 31.

Section for Veterinary Reproduction and Obstetrics, Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Dyrlægvej 68, DK-1870, Frederiksberg C, Denmark.

Background: Semen quality parameters are potentially affected by nanomaterials in several ways: Inhaled nanosized particles are potent inducers of pulmonary inflammation, leading to the release of inflammatory mediators. Small amounts of particles may translocate from the lungs into the lung capillaries, enter the systemic circulation and ultimately reach the testes. Both the inflammatory response and the particles may induce oxidative stress which can directly affect spermatogenesis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0242-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5793436PMC
January 2018
6 Reads

The crystal structure of titanium dioxide nanoparticles influences immune activity in vitro and in vivo.

Part Fibre Toxicol 2018 01 30;15(1). Epub 2018 Jan 30.

Centre for Health Protection, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), PO Box 1, 3720, BA, Bilthoven, The Netherlands.

Background: The use of engineered nanoparticles (NP) is widespread and still increasing. There is a great need to assess their safety. Newly engineered NP enter the market in a large variety; therefore safety evaluation should preferably be in a high-throughput fashion. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12989-018-0245-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5791356PMC
January 2018
7 Reads