1,211 results match your criteria Pacemakers and Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators


MRI for patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices: simplifying complexity with a 'one-stop' service model.

BMJ Qual Saf 2019 Feb 13. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

Department of Cardiac Imaging, Barts Heart Centre, Barts Health NHS Trust, London, UK.

Background: Patients with cardiac pacemakers and defibrillators are disadvantaged because of poor access to MRI scans, leading to late and misdiagnosis particularly for cancer and neurological disease. New technology allied to tested protocols now allows safe MRI scanning of such patients; however, logistical barriers persist.

Aim: To deliver a streamlined sustainable service that provides timely MRI scans to patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjqs-2018-009079DOI Listing
February 2019

Contemporary management of cardiac implantable electronic device infection.

Heart 2019 Feb 12. Epub 2019 Feb 12.

Department of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, Arizona, USA.

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http://heart.bmj.com/lookup/doi/10.1136/heartjnl-2017-312146
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/heartjnl-2017-312146DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Nursing Management for Patients Postoperative Cardiac Implantable Electronic Device Placement.

Authors:
Leanne H Fowler

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2019 Mar 22;31(1):65-76. Epub 2018 Dec 22.

LSU Health New Orleans School of Nursing, 1900 Gravier Street, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA. Electronic address:

As cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) continue to evolve and patients continue to live longer, the use of these devices increases. CIEDs include permanent pacemakers, implanted cardioverter-defibrillators, and cardiac resynchronization therapy devices. Over the last 2 decades, the functionality of these devices has increased and can be complex. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnc.2018.11.007DOI Listing

Driving with Cardiac Devices in Australia. Does a review of recent evidence prompt a change in guidelines?

Intern Med J 2019 Feb 6. Epub 2019 Feb 6.

Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine, Monash University.

Australian Driving Guidelines for patients with pacemakers and implanted cardioverter defibrillators are in line with many around the world, with some minor differences. Some aspects of these guidelines lack contemporary evidence in key decision making areas and make broad recommendations regarding groups with heterogeneous populations. Additionally, more recent studies suggest lower rates of adverse events in some patients with these devices than previously thought. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14243DOI Listing
February 2019

Outcomes in Patients with Left Ventricular Assist Devices, Pacemakers, and Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators Undergoing Single Balloon Enteroscopy.

South Med J 2019 Feb;112(2):130-134

From the Departments of Digestive Diseases and Nutrition, Internal Medicine, and Evidence-Based Medicine and Research Outcomes, University of South Florida, Tampa.

Objectives: Obscure overt gastrointestinal bleeding can be challenging to evaluate in patients with electronic cardiac devices such as continuous flow left ventricular assist devices (LVADs), pacemakers (PPMs), and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). Limited data exist on the utility and safety of single balloon enteroscopy (SBE) in patients with cardiac devices. We aimed to evaluate the safety, efficacy, diagnostic, and therapeutic outcomes of the aforementioned devices in patients undergoing SBE. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000938DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Sex Differences in Acute Complications of Cardiac Implantable Electronic Devices: Implications for Patient Safety.

J Am Heart Assoc 2019 Jan;8(2):e010869

3 Health Performance & Policy Research Unit Basil Hetzel Institute for Translational Research Woodville South South Australia.

Background To date, limited population-level studies have examined the impact of sex on the acute complications of cardiac implantable electronic devices ( CIED) , including permanent pacemakers, implantable cardioverter defibrillators, and cardiac resynchronization therapy devices. Methods and Results We studied all patients aged >18 years from 2010 to 2015 who were a resident of Australia or New Zealand, undergoing a new permanent pacemaker, implantable cardioverter defibrillator, or cardiac resynchronization therapy implant. Standardized variables were collected including patient demographic characteristics, primary and secondary diagnoses, procedures performed and discharge status. Read More

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https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/JAHA.118.010869
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/JAHA.118.010869DOI Listing
January 2019
5 Reads
2.882 Impact Factor

Clinical impact of cardiovascular magnetic resonance with optimized myocardial scar detection in patients with cardiac implantable devices.

Int J Cardiol 2019 Mar 4;279:72-78. Epub 2019 Jan 4.

Department of Cardiovascular Imaging, Barts Heart Centre, St Bartholomew's Hospital, London, UK; Institutes for Cardiovascular Science, University College London, London, UK. Electronic address:

Background: Myocardial scar assessment using late gadolinium enhancement Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (LGE CMR) is commonly indicated for patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs), however metal artifact can degrade images. We evaluated the clinical impact of LGE CMR incorporating a device-dependent metal artifact reduction strategy in patients with CIEDs.

Methods: 136 CMR studies were performed in 133 consecutive patients (age 56 ± 19 years, 69% male) with CIEDs (22% implantable loop recorders [ILRs], 40% permanent pacemakers [PPMs], 38% implantable cardioverter defibrillators [ICDs]; 42% non-MRI conditional) over 2 years, without complication. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijcard.2019.01.005DOI Listing

The necessity of implantable cardioverter defibrillators in patients with Kearns-Sayre syndrome - systematic review of the articles.

Int J Cardiol 2019 Mar 27;279:105-111. Epub 2018 Dec 27.

Department of Pathophysiology, Oita University, 1397-1, Yamane, Hidaka, Saitama 350-1298, Japan.

The most common cardiac feature of Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS) is atrioventricular block (AVB), and pacemaker implantations (PMIs) are recommended for KSS patients with advanced AVB. However, some KSS patients develop fatal arrhythmias such as polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (PMVT) and ventricular fibrillation (VF) and die suddenly even after PMIs. We report a patient with KSS who developed PMVT, VF, and QT prolongation, and was treated with mexiletine and successfully managed with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S01675273183556
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijcard.2018.12.064DOI Listing
March 2019
6 Reads

New atrial fibrillation diagnosed by 30-day rhythm monitoring.

Am Heart J 2018 Nov 12;209:29-35. Epub 2018 Nov 12.

Division of Cardiovascular Disease, Department of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL. Electronic address:

Background: Recent studies of patients with pacemakers and implantable cardioverter/defibrillators have shown that subclinical atrial fibrillation (AF) is common and is associated with thromboembolic risk. We sought to evaluate the frequency, characteristics, and impact of new AF diagnosed by ambulatory 30-day rhythm monitoring.

Methods: The 30-day rhythm monitoring data from January 2010 to August 2015 at our institution were reviewed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ahj.2018.11.003DOI Listing
November 2018
2 Reads

Adherence to European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy recommendations of endoscopists performing small bowel capsule endoscopy in Italy.

Dig Liver Dis 2018 Dec 10. Epub 2018 Dec 10.

Division of Oncological Gastroenterology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico di Aviano (CRO) IRCCS, Aviano, Italy.

Background: The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) has recently issued a technical review focused on small bowel capsule endoscopy (SBCE).

Aim: To compare SBCE current practice in Italy to ESGE technical recommendations.

Material And Methods: A dedicated per-centre semi-quantitative questionnaire was prepared by a group of SBCE experts. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dld.2018.11.031DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) infections are expensive and associated with prolonged hospitalisation: UK Retrospective Observational Study.

PLoS One 2019 2;14(1):e0206611. Epub 2019 Jan 2.

Manchester Heart Centre, Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, Manchester, United Kingdom.

Background: There are limited reports outlining the financial cost of treating cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) infection outside the United States. This study aimed to determine the average treatment cost of CIED infection in a large UK tertiary referral centre and compared costs of different treatment pathways that are recognised in the management of CIED infection (early versus delayed re-implantation).

Methods: We retrospectively analysed cost and length of stay (LOS) data for consecutive patients undergoing infected CIED extraction with cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT-D [with defibrillator], CRT-P [with pacemaker]), implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) and permanent pacemakers (PPMs). Read More

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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0206611PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6314621PMC
January 2019
1 Read

Use of Administrative Data to Monitor Cardiac Implantable Electronic Device Complications.

Can J Cardiol 2019 Jan 13;35(1):100-103. Epub 2018 Nov 13.

Division of Cardiology, QEII Health Sciences Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.

Cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) are increasingly used in the Canadian population, because of expanding indications and an aging population. Device-related complications are a source of morbidity and mortality. There is currently no comprehensive monitoring strategy of CIED-related complications in Canada. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cjca.2018.10.018DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

The Australian and New Zealand Cardiac Implantable Electronic Device Survey: Calendar Year 2017.

Heart Lung Circ 2018 Dec 11. Epub 2018 Dec 11.

Christchurch Hospital, Christchurch, New Zealand.

Background: A cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) survey was undertaken in Australia and New Zealand for calendar year 2017 and involved pacemakers (PMs) and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs).

Results And Conclusions: For 2017, there were 17,971 (15,203 in 2013) new PMs sold in Australia and 1,811 (1,641 in 2013) implanted in New Zealand. The number of new PM implants per million population was 745 for Australia (652 in 2013) and 384 for New Zealand (367 in 2013). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hlc.2018.11.018DOI Listing
December 2018

Use of the Metal Deletion Technique for Radiotherapy Planning in Patients with Cardiac Implantable Devices.

Klin Onkol 2018 ;31(6):434-438

Background: The number of cancer patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices receiving radiotherapy is increasing. Irradiation of such patients can cause malfunctions in pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators. In this respect, it is necessary to make a proper irradiation plan for such cancer patients to minimize the dose received by both cardiac devices and pacing leads. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14735/amko2018434DOI Listing
January 2018
1 Read

Health-Related Quality of Life and Psychological Adjustment of Children and Adolescents with Pacemakers and Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators: A Systematic Review.

Pediatr Cardiol 2019 Jan 11;40(1):1-16. Epub 2018 Dec 11.

Department of Cardiology, Pediatric Heart Centre, University Children's Hospital Zurich, Steinwiesstr. 75, 8032, Zurich, Switzerland.

The absence of cardiac symptoms, the improved exercise tolerance and the increased life expectancy are the advantages of a successful cardiac device therapy. Nevertheless, the fact of a lifelong device dependency, the inherent possibility of device malfunction and the progression of the underlying heart disease may impact the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and the psychological adjustment of these individuals. To date, an overview of findings on these topics is lacking. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00246-018-2038-xDOI Listing
January 2019

Evaluation of the safety of users of active implantable medical devices (AIMD) in the working environment in terms of exposure to electromagnetic fields - Practical approach to the requirements of European Directive 2013/35/EU.

Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2018 12 5;31(6):795-808. Epub 2018 Nov 5.

Central Institute for Labour Protection - National Research Institute, Warszawa, Poland (Laboratory of Electromagnetic Hazards).

Objectives: Electromagnetic fields (EMF) may cause malfunctions in electronic devices, in particular in active implantable medical devices (AIMD), along with discomfort or health hazards to users. The use of AIMD by workers is increasing (especially cardiac pacemakers, implantable cardioverter defibrillators and wearable insulin infusion pumps). Electromagnetic fields may be much stronger in the working environment than applied in basic immunity tests of AIMD (based on EN 60601- 1-2:2015 and EN 50527-1:2016). Read More

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http://www.journalssystem.com/ijomeh/AN-EVALUATION-OF-THE-SA
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http://dx.doi.org/10.13075/ijomeh.1896.00783DOI Listing
December 2018
15 Reads

Electrical Stun Gun and Modern Implantable Cardiac Stimulators.

Health Phys 2019 Jan;116(1):18-26

Italian National Institute of Health, Rome, Italy.

The aim of the study is to investigate systematically the possible interactions between two types of stun guns and last-generation pacemakers and implantable defibrillators. Experimental measurements were performed on pacemakers and implantable defibrillators from five leading manufacturers, considering the effect of stun gun dart positioning, sensing modality, stun gun shock duration, and defibrillation energy level. More than 300 measurements were collected. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HP.0000000000000942DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

Contribution of Cardiac Implantable Electronic Devices to Thrombus Formation in Patients With Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension.

JACC Clin Electrophysiol 2018 Nov 26;4(11):1431-1436. Epub 2018 Sep 26.

Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California. Electronic address:

Objectives: This study aimed to identify the prevalence of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) and to describe the associated disease burden.

Background: CTEPH is a debilitating disease, now potentially curable with pulmonary thromboendarterectomy (PTE). The contribution of CIEDs to thrombosis in this patient population has not been previously studied. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacep.2018.08.013DOI Listing
November 2018
7 Reads

Influence and safety of electronic apex locators in patients with cardiovascular implantable electronic devices: a systematic review.

Libyan J Med 2019 Dec;14(1):1547071

a College of Dentistry , Taibah University , Madinah Al Munawwarah , Saudi Arabia.

The widespread use of cardiovascular implantable electronic devices has increased concerns regarding using electronic apex locators in patients with these devices. This systematic review investigated the effects and safety of using electronic apex locators in patients with cardiovascular implantable electronic devices.

Methods: An electronic search in the Cochrane Library, PubMed (MEDLINE), ScienceDirect, and Scientific Electronic Library Online (Scielo) databases for relevant articles published between December 2000 and December 2018 was performed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19932820.2018.1547071DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6249593PMC
December 2019
10 Reads

Shock to the heart: cardiac implantable devices' bad name in adults with tetralogy of Fallot.

Heart 2018 Nov 19. Epub 2018 Nov 19.

Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/heartjnl-2018-314235DOI Listing
November 2018
8 Reads

Remote Monitoring of Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators, Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy and Permanent Pacemakers: A Health Technology Assessment.

Authors:

Ont Health Technol Assess Ser 2018 24;18(7):1-199. Epub 2018 Oct 24.

Background: Under usual care, people with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD), cardiac resynchronization therapy with or without a defibrillator (CRT-D and CRT-P, respectively), or a permanent pacemaker have follow-up in-person clinic visits. Remote monitoring of these devices allows the transfer of the information stored in the device so that it can be accessed by the clinic personnel via a secured website.

Methods: We completed a health technology assessment, which included an evaluation of clinical benefits and harms, value for money, and patient preferences for remote monitoring of ICDs, CRTs, and permanent pacemakers plus clinic visits compared with clinic visits alone. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6235077PMC
January 2019
10 Reads

Cardiac and Vascular Injuries Sustained During Transvenous Lead Extraction.

Card Electrophysiol Clin 2018 12 5;10(4):651-657. Epub 2018 Oct 5.

University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, 1295 Northwest 14 Street, Suite H, Miami, FL 33125, USA.

The rise in indications for cardiac implantable electronic devices has necessitated the development of tools for removal of the electrodes that connect the heart to these externally located pacemakers and defibrillators. After implant of a cardiac electrode, variable but progressive fibrous adhesion occurs. Removal of these adhesions can cause devastating complications with high risk of mortality if not treated surgically in a highly expeditious and appropriate manner. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S18779182183008
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ccep.2018.08.003DOI Listing
December 2018
7 Reads

Cardiac implantable electronic devices in adults with tetralogy of Fallot.

Heart 2018 Oct 30. Epub 2018 Oct 30.

Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Mayo Clinic Rochester, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.

Background: Tachyarrhythmias and bradyarrhythmias affect 20%-50% of adult patients with tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) and some of these patients will require cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIED) such as pacemaker and/or internal cardioverter defibrillator.

Methods: The Mayo Adult Congenital Heart Disease database was queried for patients with repaired TOF and history of CIED implantation, 1990-2017. The study objectives were: (1) determine the occurrence of device-related complications defined as lead failure, lead recall, device infection and lead thrombus; and (2) determine the occurrence and risk factors for defibrillator shock. Read More

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http://heart.bmj.com/lookup/doi/10.1136/heartjnl-2018-314072
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/heartjnl-2018-314072DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads
5.595 Impact Factor

[Troubleshooting in Patients with Implanted Pacemaker and ICD].

Dtsch Med Wochenschr 2018 Nov 30;143(22):1608-1616. Epub 2018 Oct 30.

Because of the growing number of implanted cardiac pacemakers and defibrillators and the ever-increasing complexity of these devices a fundamental knowledge of device malfunctions is of utmost importance even for the non-cardiology physician. Apart from hardware problems such as device infection, lead fracture or dislocation, basic knowledge of the pacemaker sensing and pacing algorithms is also necessary in order to judge the stimulation behavior in different clinical settings. With this respect, there are specific problems for antibradycardia and resynchronizing pacemakers as well as implantable defibrillators. Read More

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http://www.thieme-connect.de/DOI/DOI?10.1055/a-0560-3180
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/a-0560-3180DOI Listing
November 2018
14 Reads

Nanostim-leadless pacemaker.

Herzschrittmacherther Elektrophysiol 2018 Dec 19;29(4):327-333. Epub 2018 Oct 19.

Abteilung für Kardiologie/Elektrophysiologie, Kerckhoff-Klinik GmbH, Benekestr. 2-8, 61231, Bad Nauheim, Germany.

Nanostim™ (St. Jude Medical Inc., Saint Paul, MN, USA; now Abbott Medical Inc. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00399-018-0598-3
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00399-018-0598-3DOI Listing
December 2018
6 Reads

Early-BYRD: alternative early pacing and defibrillation lead replacement avoiding venous puncture.

J Cardiothorac Surg 2018 Oct 3;13(1):102. Epub 2018 Oct 3.

Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93053, Regensburg, Germany.

Background: In cases of lead failure after implantation of pacemakers (PM) or implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) early lead replacement may be challenging. Puncture of the subclavian vein bears possible complications such as pneumothorax, hematothorax, and damage of leads to be left in place. To avoid venous puncture PM or ICD leads were replaced using a flexible polypropylene sheath (Byrd-sheath). Read More

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https://cardiothoracicsurgery.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13019-018-0795-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6169062PMC
October 2018
2 Reads

Individual programming of current multiprogrammable pacemakers : Still unsatisfactory?

Herz 2018 Sep 25. Epub 2018 Sep 25.

Department of Cardiology, Vivantes Klinikum im Friedrichshain und Am Urban, Berlin, Germany.

Background: Pacemaker (PM) technology has developed tremendously in recent decades. We evaluated the extent of individual programming in current PMs.

Methods: Over a 7-month period in 2016, all deceased persons taken to the Rostock crematorium were prospectively screened for cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) and these were interrogated in situ. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00059-018-4753-8DOI Listing
September 2018
12 Reads

Treatment planning and dental technology for patients with implanted cardiac devices.

Authors:
Amber D Riley

Gen Dent 2018 Sep-Oct;66(5):56-60

Implantable cardiac devices are increasingly common in the dental patient population. These devices include cardiac pacemakers, implantable cardioverters-defibrillators, and combination designs. To safely follow through with treatment, the clinician first must identify the patient's underlying medical condition warranting the device and consider the condition as well as the device in determining diagnosis, drug selection, appointment length, follow-up, and outcome expectations. Read More

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February 2019
3 Reads

Soft Tissue and Skin Reinforcement with Acellular Dermal Matrix to Protect Implanted Cardioverters/Defibrillators and Pacemakers.

Plast Reconstr Surg Glob Open 2018 Jul 13;6(7):e1866. Epub 2018 Jul 13.

Division of Cardiology, Scripps Clinic, La Jolla, Calif.

Cardiac pacemakers and implantable cardioverters/defibrillators are often placed in older patients with thin skin and scanty subcutaneous tissue. These devices and cardiac leads are at risk for progressive skin erosion and exposure leading to infection. To prevent this severe complication, we developed a reinforcing insertion of acellular dermal matrix. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/GOX.0000000000001866DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6110691PMC
July 2018
1 Read

[Management of patients with pacemakers or implantable cardioverter defibrillator undergoing radiotherapy].

Cancer Radiother 2018 Oct 25;22(6-7):515-521. Epub 2018 Aug 25.

Service de radiothérapie, hôpital européen Georges-Pompidou, 20, rue Leblanc, 75908 Paris cedex 15, France.

An increasing number of patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices benefit from radiotherapy, warranting specific collaborative management between both radiation oncologists and cardiologists. Interactions between electromagnetic fields, secondary particles and cardiac implantable electronic devices may result in transient and reversible malfunctions with significant consequences depending on the underlying cardiac pathology and the level of patient's cardiac implantable electronic devices dependency. Numerous international guidelines on patients' management have been proposed and all agree on a total cumulated dose limit at the battery of 5Gy and on the need for an initial as well as repeated evaluation over time, up to 6months after the last radiation. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S12783218183026
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canrad.2018.06.017DOI Listing
October 2018
8 Reads

Assessment of the Safety Risk of Dermatoscope Magnets in Patients With Cardiovascular Implanted Electronic Devices.

JAMA Dermatol 2018 Oct;154(10):1204-1207

Dermatology Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Hauppauge, New York.

Importance: Cardiovascular implanted electronic devices (CIEDs) are susceptible to electromagnetic interference. Dermatologists regularly use devices containing magnets, including dermatoscopes and their attachments, which could pose a hazard to patients with CIEDs.

Objective: To investigate the safety risk of magnets in dermatoscopes to patients with CIEDs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamadermatol.2018.2531DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6233742PMC
October 2018
13 Reads

Interrupted versus uninterrupted novel oral anticoagulant peri-implantation of cardiac device: A single-center randomized prospective pilot trial.

Pacing Clin Electrophysiol 2018 11 19;41(11):1476-1480. Epub 2018 Sep 19.

Campus Bio-Medico, Unit of Cardiology, University of Rome, Rome, Italy.

Background: Many patients requiring cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) implantation are on long-term oral anticoagulant therapy. While continuation of warfarin has been shown to be safe and reduce bleeding complications compared to interruption of warfarin therapy and heparin bridging, it is not known which novel oral anticoagulants (NOAC) regimen (interrupted vs uninterrupted) is better in this setting.

Methods: One-hundred and one patients were randomized to receive CIED implantation with either interrupted or uninterrupted/continuous NOAC therapy before surgery. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/pace.13482
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/pace.13482DOI Listing
November 2018
12 Reads

Cardiolaminopathies from bench to bedside: challenges in clinical decision-making with focus on arrhythmia-related outcomes.

Nucleus 2018 ;9(1):442-459

c CNR Institute of Molecular Genetics , Unit of Bologna , Bologna , Italy.

Lamin A/C gene mutations can be associated with cardiac diseases, usually referred to as 'cardiolaminopathies' characterized by arrhythmic disorders and/or left ventricular or biventricular dysfunction up to an overt picture of heart failure. The phenotypic cardiac manifestations of laminopathies are frequently mixed in complex clinical patterns and specifically may include bradyarrhythmias (sinus node disease or atrioventricular blocks), atrial arrhythmias (atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, atrial standstill), ventricular tachyarrhythmias and heart failure of variable degrees of severity. Family history, physical examination, laboratory findings (specifically serum creatine phosphokinase values) and ECG findings are often important 'red flags' in diagnosing a 'cardiolaminopathy'. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19491034.2018.1506680DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6244733PMC
January 2018
4 Reads

Cardiac resynchronization therapy pacemakers versus defibrillators in older non-ischemic cardiomyopathy patients.

Indian Pacing Electrophysiol J 2019 Jan - Feb;19(1):4-6. Epub 2018 Aug 16.

Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. Electronic address:

Introduction: With the recent publication of the negative DANISH trial, the mortality benefit of the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) has been put in question in patients with non-ischemic cardiomyopathy (NICM). Because a majority of patients in DANISH receive cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) devices, we investigated in the present study the survival of recipients of CRT pacemakers (CRT-P) versus CRT ICDs (CRT-D) in a cohort of older (≥75 years) NICM patients at our institution.

Methods: A total of 135 NICM patients with CRT device were identified (42 with CRT-P and 93 with CRT-D) and were followed to the endpoint of all-cause mortality. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ipej.2018.08.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6354212PMC
August 2018
12 Reads

Finger-to-Heart(F2H): Authentication for Wireless Implantable Medical Devices.

IEEE J Biomed Health Inform 2018 Aug 10. Epub 2018 Aug 10.

Any proposal to provide security for Implantable Medical Devices (IMDs), such as cardiac pacemakers and defibrillators, has to achieve a trade-off between security and accessibility for doctors to gain access to an IMD, especially in an emergency scenario. In this paper, we propose a Finger-to-Heart (F2H) IMD authentication scheme to address this trade-off between security and accessibility. This scheme utilizes a patient's fingerprint to perform authentication for gaining access to the IMD. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/JBHI.2018.2864796DOI Listing
August 2018
16 Reads

[Leadless pacemakers and subcutaneously implantable cardioverter defibrillators].

Internist (Berl) 2018 10;59(10):999-1010

Klinik für Kardiologie und Internistische Intensivmedizin, Städtische Kliniken Bielefeld, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Teutoburger Str. 50, 33604, Bielefeld, Deutschland.

Although pacemakers and implantable defibrillators have become the standard treatment of bradycardic and tachycardic arrhythmias, long-term complications caused by the transvenously inserted pacing and defibrillation leads, such as electrode fracture, lead infection and tricuspid valve insufficiency are not uncommonly observed. Therefore, leadless pacemakers and purely subcutaneously implantable cardioverter defibrillators (S-ICDs) have been developed in recent years, which are implanted without transvenous electrodes with the aim to reduce long-term complications with these devices; however, currently available leadless pacemakers are limited to single chamber stimulation and S‑ICDs are limited to pure defibrillation without antibradycardic, antitachycardic pacing or cardiac resynchronization capabilities. Thus, these devices cannot yet be used as multichamber pacemakers or defibrillators even though in these circumstances a higher complication rate is to be expected due to the multiple number of transvenous leads. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00108-018-0476-4DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

Candidacy for a Subcutaneous Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator in Patients with Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy.

Int Heart J 2018 Sep 11;59(5):951-958. Epub 2018 Aug 11.

Heart Rhythm Center, Tokyo Medical and Dental University.

In patients requiring an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), the combined use of a prior pacemaker and a subcutaneous ICD (S-ICD) could be an alternative treatment option to implantation of new leads or upgrading of pacemakers to an ICD if vascular access is limited. Here, we assessed the prevalence of S-ICD's eligibility according to surface electrogram screening in those receiving cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). S-ICD's eligibility was assessed in patients with a CRT pacemaker or a CRT defibrillator using the S-ICD template screening tool. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1536/ihj.17-550DOI Listing
September 2018
6 Reads

Long-term monitoring to detect atrial fibrillation with the indwelling implantable cardiac monitors.

Authors:
Tommaso Sanna

Int J Stroke 2018 Dec 9;13(9):893-904. Epub 2018 Aug 9.

Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy.

An increasing number of detection tools are available and several detection strategies have been described to pursue the diagnosis of atrial fibrillation to prevent ischemic stroke. Monitoring tools include standard electrocardiography, snapshot single-lead recordings with professional or personal devices (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1747493018790023DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

External electrical cardioversion in patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices: Is it safe and is immediate device interrogation necessary?

Pacing Clin Electrophysiol 2018 10 28;41(10):1336-1340. Epub 2018 Aug 28.

Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht (CARIM), Maastricht University Medical Center (MUMC+), Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Background: Atrial tachyarrhythmias are common in patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs). Restoration of sinus rhythm by external electrical cardioversion (eECV) is frequently used to alleviate symptoms and to ensure optimal device function.

Objectives: To evaluate the safety of eECV in patients with contemporary CIEDs and to assess the need for immediate device interrogation after eECV. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/pace.13467DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

Predicted longevity of contemporary cardiac implantable electronic devices: A call for industry-wide "standardized" reporting.

Heart Rhythm 2018 Dec 29;15(12):1756-1763. Epub 2018 Jul 29.

Centre for Heart Rhythm Disorders (CHRD), South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI), The University of Adelaide and Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, Australia. Electronic address:

Background: Battery longevity is an important factor that may influence the selection of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs). However, there remains a lack of industry-wide standardized reporting of predicted CIED longevity to facilitate informed decision-making for implanting physicians and payers.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare the predicted longevity of current generation CIEDs using best-matched CIEDs settings to assess differences between brands and models. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hrthm.2018.07.029DOI Listing
December 2018
6 Reads
5.080 Impact Factor

Advances in cardiac implantable electronic device infection prevention: should we push the envelope?

Future Cardiol 2018 09 31;14(5):359-366. Epub 2018 Jul 31.

Section of Cardiac Pacing & Electrophysiology, Robert & Suzanne Tomsich Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Heart & Vascular Institute, Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Avenue/J2-2, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA.

Cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) including pacemakers, implantable cardioverter defibrillators and loop recorders have become widespread adjuncts in the care of patients with cardiovascular disease. CIEDs provide increased diagnostic yield, better quality of life and improved longevity. While there are obvious benefits with these devices, the mere fact that these therapies involve implantation of a foreign device within the body leads to certain risks. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fca-2018-0039DOI Listing
September 2018

[Cardiac arrhythmias and their non-pharmacological treatment in the valvular heart diseases].

Authors:
Jacek Lelakowski

Pol Merkur Lekarski 2018 Jun;44(264):267-271

Department of Electrocardiology, Institute of Cardiology, Jagiellonian University, Medical College, John Paul II Hospital.

Cardiac arrhythmias most often arise in the mechanism of disorders of impulse formation (automaticity, triggered activity), disorders of impulse conduction (reentry, block) or a combination of both. Atrial fibrillation (AF) most often occurs in the course of mitral stenosis and/or mitral regurgitation, rarely in the defects of the aortic valve. Ventricular arrhythmias may be associated with the most valvular heart diseases. Read More

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June 2018
2 Reads

Is ventricular sensing always right, when it is left?

Clin Cardiol 2018 Sep 21;41(9):1238-1245. Epub 2018 Sep 21.

Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Bologna, Bologna, Italy.

Background: Ventricular sensing in transvenous cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) occurs conventionally from the right ventricular (RV) channel, though it evolved from epicardial sensing both in pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs).

Hypothesis: The objective of this study was to observe the reliability of left ventricular (LV) sensing by transvenous leads placed in coronary veins.

Methods: LV leads were used for sensing and arrhythmia detection in clinical situations where placement of an RV lead across the tricuspid valve was either not preferred or not feasible, or RV signal was unsuitable for arrhythmia detection, or in the event of sensing failure of an RV lead under advisory in cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator (CRTD) recipients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/clc.23033DOI Listing
September 2018
5 Reads

An update on cardiac implantable electronic devices for the general physician.

J R Coll Physicians Edinb 2018 Jun;48(2):141-147

Department of Cardiology, Northumbria Specialist Care Emergency Hospital, Northumbria Way, Northumberland NE23 6NZ, UK,

Cardiac electronic device implantation is a common and important intervention for patients with tachy-and bradyarrhythmia. An increasing number of patients are receiving more complex devices such as cardiac resynchronisation therapy or devices with a defibrillation function. Over the last 5 years, two new models of cardiac device have emerged, subcutaneous defibrillators and leadless pacemakers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4997/JRCPE.2018.208DOI Listing
June 2018
11 Reads

Significance of leukocytosis prior to cardiac device implantation.

Pacing Clin Electrophysiol 2018 09 29;41(9):1197-1200. Epub 2018 Jul 29.

Knight Cardiovascular Institute, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA.

Introduction: Infection remains a dreaded complication after cardiac implanted electronic device (CIED) placement. The prognostic value of the preoperative white blood cell (WBC) count, in the absence of other signs of infection, at time of CIED placement as a predictor of postoperative infection, has not been previously examined.

Methods: The study population included 1,247 consecutive device implantations over a 4-year period that met inclusion criteria. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/pace.13443DOI Listing
September 2018
6 Reads

Intermittent anticoagulation guided by continuous atrial fibrillation burden monitoring using dual-chamber pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators: Results from the Tailored Anticoagulation for Non-Continuous Atrial Fibrillation (TACTIC-AF) pilot study.

Heart Rhythm 2018 Nov 6;15(11):1601-1607. Epub 2018 Jul 6.

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address:

Background: Chronic anticoagulation is recommended for atrial fibrillation (AF) patients with thromboembolic risk factors regardless of AF duration/frequency. Continuous rhythm assessment with pacemakers (PMs)/implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) and use of direct-acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs) may allow anticoagulation only around AF episodes, reducing bleeding without increasing thromboembolic risk.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility/safety of intermittent DOAC use guided by continuous remote AF monitoring via dual-chamber PMs or ICDs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hrthm.2018.06.027DOI Listing
November 2018
14 Reads

Arrhythmia care in Africa.

J Interv Card Electrophysiol 2018 Jun 22. Epub 2018 Jun 22.

Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Electrophysiology and Pacing Service, Mayo Clinic, 4500 San Pablo Ave, Jacksonville, FL, 32224, USA.

Data on cardiovascular disease, including arrhythmias, in Africa is limited. However, the burden of cardiovascular disease appears to be on the rise. Recent global data suggests an increase in atrial fibrillation rates despite declining rates of rheumatic heart disease. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10840-018-0398-zDOI Listing
June 2018
3 Reads

Cardiac Implantable Electronic Device Interrogation at Forensic Autopsy: An Underestimated Resource?

Circulation 2018 Jun;137(25):2730-2740

Charité-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Corporate Member of Freie Universität Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, and Berlin Institute of Health, Department of Cardiology (P.L., A.S.P., M.H., P.A., L.-H.B., B.P., W.H., F.B.)

Background: Postmortem interrogations of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs), recommended at autopsy in suspected cases of sudden cardiac death, are rarely performed, and data on systematic postmortem CIED analysis in the forensic pathology are missing. The aim of the study was to determine whether nonselective postmortem CIED interrogations and data analysis are useful to the forensic pathologist to determine the cause, mechanism, and time of death and to detect potential CIED-related safety issues.

Methods: From February 2012 to April 2017, all autopsy subjects in the department of forensic medicine at the University Hospital Charité who had a CIED underwent device removal and interrogation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.117.032367DOI Listing
June 2018
6 Reads