2,681 results match your criteria Orbivirus


Complete Genome Sequence of Mobuck Virus Isolated from a Florida White-Tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus).

Microbiol Resour Announc 2019 Jan 17;8(3). Epub 2019 Jan 17.

Department of Infectious Diseases and Immunology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA.

Here, we report the complete genome sequence of mobuck virus isolated from a Florida white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in 2017. This is the second report of mobuck virus in the United States and expands the known geographic range of this novel orbivirus into Florida. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/MRA.01324-18DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6346154PMC
January 2019

Identification and characterization of epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus serotype 6 in cattle co-infected with bluetongue virus in Trinidad, West Indies.

Vet Microbiol 2019 Feb 11;229:1-6. Epub 2018 Dec 11.

School of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Medical Sciences, The University of theWest Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad, West Indies.

Epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) is an economically important virus that can cause severe clinical disease in deer and to a lesser extent cattle. This study set out to determine and characterize which EHDV serotypes were circulating in Trinidad. Serum and whole blood samples were collected monthly for six months from a cohort of cattle imported to Trinidad from the USA. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vetmic.2018.12.009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6340808PMC
February 2019
2 Reads

Quantitative RT-PCR assays for identification and typing of the Equine encephalosis virus.

Braz J Microbiol 2019 Jan 10;50(1):287-296. Epub 2018 Dec 10.

The Pirbright Institute, Ash Road, Pirbright, GU24 0NF, UK.

Equine encephalosis (EE) is an acute, arthropod-borne, noncontagious, febrile disease of equids. The clinical signs of EE are similar to milder forms of African horse sickness (AHS) and the two diseases can be easily confused. The Equine encephalosis virus (EEV) is a distinct virus species within the genus Orbivirus, family Reoviridae, with ten linear segments of dsRNA genome. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s42770-018-0034-1DOI Listing
January 2019

Skunk River virus, a novel orbivirus isolated from Aedes trivittatus in the United States.

J Gen Virol 2019 Feb 11;100(2):295-300. Epub 2019 Jan 11.

1​Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Preventive Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, USA.

The genomic organization and in vitro host range of a novel mosquito-associated orbivirus, designated Skunk River virus, is described. The virus was isolated from Aedes trivittatus collected in Iowa in the United States. Three recognized viruses were also recovered: Culex flavivirus (family Flaviviridae), Houston virus (family Mesoniviridae) and Umatilla virus (family Reoviridae). Read More

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http://www.microbiologyresearch.org/content/journal/jgv/10.1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1099/jgv.0.001219DOI Listing
February 2019
4 Reads

Reassortment of bluetongue virus vaccine serotypes in cattle.

J S Afr Vet Assoc 2018 Dec 5;89(0):e1-e7. Epub 2018 Dec 5.

Department of Veterinary Tropical Diseases, University of Pretoria.

Bluetongue is primarily a disease of sheep in South Africa, while cattle and goats are mostly subclinically infected. The viraemia of bluetongue virus in cattle lasts much longer than in sheep and the role of cattle in the epidemiology of bluetongue in South Africa is poorly understood. Bluetongue virus has a segmented double-stranded ribonucleic acid genome and reassortment of genomes is a common feature. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6295955PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.4102/jsava.v89i0.1649DOI Listing
December 2018

The Interaction of Bluetongue Virus VP6 and Genomic RNA Is Essential for Genome Packaging.

J Virol 2019 Mar 19;93(5). Epub 2019 Feb 19.

Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom

The genomes of the , including the animal pathogen bluetongue virus (BTV), are multisegmented double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). During replication, single-stranded (ss) positive-sense RNA segments are packaged into the assembling virus capsid, triggering genomic dsRNA synthesis. However, exactly how this packaging event occurs is not clear. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.02023-18DOI Listing

Isolation and Genome Phylogenetic Analysis of Arthropod-Borne Viruses, Including Akabane Virus, from Mosquitoes Collected in Hunan Province, China.

Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis 2019 Jan 11;19(1):62-72. Epub 2018 Dec 11.

1 State Key Laboratory of Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, National Institute for Viral Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, China.

This study investigated the abundance of mosquitoes and circulation of mosquito-borne arboviruses from 16 villages in 8 cities of Hunan Province, China, in July-August of 2010 and in August of 2011. In total, 16,076 mosquitoes consisting of seven species from four genera were collected by ultraviolet-light trap. Culex quinquefasciatus was the most common species, accounting for 50. Read More

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https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/vbz.2018.2267
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/vbz.2018.2267DOI Listing
January 2019
10 Reads

Amino acid starvation accelerates replication of Ibaraki virus.

Virus Res 2019 01 29;260:94-101. Epub 2018 Nov 29.

Laboratory of Veterinary Hygiene, Joint Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Yamaguchi University, 1677-1, Yoshida, Yamaguchi, 753-8515, Japan. Electronic address:

Ibaraki virus (IBAV) is a strain of epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus 2 that belongs to the genus Orbivirus of the family Reoviridae. IBAV replication is suppressed by the inhibition of autophagy, and since mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a key regulator of autophagy, we examined if mTORC1 inhibition by amino acid starvation or mTOR inhibitors (Torin 1 and rapamycin) affects IBAV replication. We found that IBAV replication is significantly enhanced after amino acid starvation of host cells, but not after treatment with mTOR inhibitors, during early stages of viral infection (0-1 hpi). Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S01681702173092
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.virusres.2018.10.008DOI Listing
January 2019
9 Reads

Multiple bluetongue virus serotypes causing death in Brazilian dwarf brocket deer (Mazama nana) in Brazil, 2015-2016.

Vet Microbiol 2018 Dec 26;227:143-147. Epub 2018 Oct 26.

Centro de Ciências Agroveterinárias, Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina, Av. Luiz de Camões, 2090, Conta Dinheiro, Lages, Santa Catarina, CEP 88.520-000, Brazil.

Bela Vista Biological Sanctuary (RBV) is a protected area of Itaipu Binacional, a hydroelectric power company located on the border of Brazil and Paraguay. A captive population of Brazilian dwarf brocket deer (Mazama nana, Cervidae, Artiodactyla) is maintained for conservation purposes. Despite the reproductive success of the animals, outbreaks of a fatal hemorrhagic disease have been registered over the years, compromising conservation efforts. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vetmic.2018.10.018DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Chuzan Virus in Yaks, Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, China.

Emerg Infect Dis 2018 Dec;24(12):2371-2373

We detected Chuzan virus (CHUV) in domestic yaks from the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, western China, indicating CHUV probably has been transmitted to yaks in recent years. Awareness for CHUV surveillance and transmission and livestock health management in these special regions should be raised to avoid outbreaks and animal loss. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2412.171414DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6256394PMC
December 2018
11 Reads
6.751 Impact Factor

The first report on serotyping of bluetongue virus in small ruminants of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province, Pakistan.

Trop Anim Health Prod 2018 Nov 7. Epub 2018 Nov 7.

University College of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Islamia University of Bahawalpur Pakistan, Bahawalpur, Pakistan.

Bluetongue virus (BTV), a member of Orbivirus genus (family Reoviridae), is a non-contagious infection of domestic and wild ruminants. The current study was designed to detect various serotypes of BTV in small ruminants of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KPK) province of Pakistan, along with their effects on hemato-biochemical parameters. A total of 408 serum samples in four districts (Mansehra, Abbottabad, Swabi, and Kohat) of KPK from small ruminants were screened based on competitive ELISA (cELISA). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11250-018-1739-8DOI Listing
November 2018
1 Read

Beta-propiolactone inactivated bivalent bluetongue virus vaccine containing Montanide ISA-71VG adjuvant induces long-term immune response in sheep against serotypes 4 and 16 even after 3 years of controlled vaccine storage.

Vet Microbiol 2018 Nov 10;226:23-30. Epub 2018 Oct 10.

Microbial Collection Laboratory, Research Institute for Biological Safety Problems, Gvardeiskiy, Kazakhstan.

In this study, we developed and evaluated the beta-propiolactone inactivated bivalent bluetongue virus (BTV) serotypes 4 and 16 vaccine delivered with Montanide™ ISA-71VG adjuvant. The safety, stability and immunological profile of the fresh and after three years of long-term storage of the vaccine formulation was analyzed. We observed after long-term storage that the vaccine emulsion was stable as indicated by unchanged pH and viscosity. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S03781135183065
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vetmic.2018.10.003DOI Listing
November 2018
8 Reads

Safety and immunogenicity of plant-produced African horse sickness virus-like particles in horses.

Vet Res 2018 Oct 11;49(1):105. Epub 2018 Oct 11.

Biopharming Research Unit, Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch, Cape Town, 7701, South Africa.

African horse sickness (AHS) is caused by multiple serotypes of the dsRNA AHSV and is a major scourge of domestic equids in Africa. While there are well established commercial live attenuated vaccines produced in South Africa, risks associated with these have encouraged attempts to develop new and safer recombinant vaccines. Previously, we reported on the immunogenicity of a plant-produced AHS serotype 5 virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine, which stimulated high titres of AHS serotype 5-specific neutralizing antibodies in guinea pigs. Read More

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https://veterinaryresearch.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.118
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13567-018-0600-4DOI Listing
October 2018
3 Reads

Seroprevalence of Bluetongue virus in small and large ruminants in Punjab province, Pakistan.

Acta Trop 2019 Jan 24;189:22-29. Epub 2018 Sep 24.

University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Lahore 54600, Pakistan. Electronic address:

Bluetongue (BT) is a vector-borne disease of immense economic importance for small and large ruminants. Despite frequent disease reports from neighboring countries, a little is known about current disease status and prevalent serotypes in Pakistan. We screened a total of 1312 healthy animals for group-specific antibodies and serotype-specific genome for BT virus through competitive ELISA and real-time PCR, respectively. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0001706X183083
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.actatropica.2018.09.020DOI Listing
January 2019
11 Reads
2.270 Impact Factor

Longitudinal monitoring of Culicoides in Belgium between 2007 and 2011: local variation in population dynamics parameters warrant cautious use of monitoring data.

Parasit Vectors 2018 Sep 17;11(1):512. Epub 2018 Sep 17.

Enzootic, vector-borne and bee diseases, Sciensano, Brussels, Belgium.

Background: Several European countries suffered important economic losses during the past decade due to the emergence of bluetongue and Schmallenberg viruses. Both are viruses of veterinary importance and are spread by Culicoides spp. This triggered many European countries to start Culicoides population monitoring. Read More

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https://parasitesandvectors.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.11
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13071-018-3082-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6142705PMC
September 2018
20 Reads

Cluster analysis of hemorrhagic disease in Missouri's white-tailed deer population: 1980-2013.

BMC Ecol 2018 09 14;18(1):35. Epub 2018 Sep 14.

Department of Math and Statistics, University of Missouri-Kansas City, 5120 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO, 64110, USA.

Background: Outbreaks of deer hemorrhagic disease (HD) have been documented in the USA for many decades. In the year 2012, there was a severe HD outbreak in Missouri with mortalities reaching approximately 6.9 per thousand. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0188-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6137738PMC
September 2018
1 Read

Molecular and serological surveillance of African horse sickness virus in eastern and central Saudi Arabia.

Rev Sci Tech 2017 Dec;36(3):889-898

African horse sickness virus (AHSV) is one of the most devastating viral diseases of the family Equidae. Infection with AHSV threatens not only the Saudi equine industry but also the equine industry worldwide. This is due to the high morbidity and mortality rates among the infected population of up to 100%. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.20506/rst.36.3.2722DOI Listing
December 2017
3 Reads

The role of climate change in a developing threat: the case of bluetongue in Europe.

Rev Sci Tech 2017 Aug;36(2):467-478

There is a solid theoretical basis for expecting climate change to have a considerable effect on the infectious diseases of humans, animals and plants. Vector-borne diseases are the most likely to be affected. It is, however, rare to observe such impacts, as diseases are also influenced by many other drivers, some of which may have stronger effects over shorter time scales than climate change. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.20506/rst.36.2.2667DOI Listing

The genome of the biting midge Culicoides sonorensis and gene expression analyses of vector competence for bluetongue virus.

BMC Genomics 2018 Aug 22;19(1):624. Epub 2018 Aug 22.

The Pirbright Institute, Ash Road, Woking, Surrey, GU24 0NF, UK.

Background: The new genomic technologies have provided novel insights into the genetics of interactions between vectors, viruses and hosts, which are leading to advances in the control of arboviruses of medical importance. However, the development of tools and resources available for vectors of non-zoonotic arboviruses remains neglected. Biting midges of the genus Culicoides transmit some of the most important arboviruses of wildlife and livestock worldwide, with a global impact on economic productivity, health and welfare. Read More

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https://bmcgenomics.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1286
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12864-018-5014-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6106943PMC
August 2018
3 Reads

Sheep breed and shearing influences attraction and blood-feeding behaviour of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) on a UK farm.

Parasit Vectors 2018 Aug 20;11(1):473. Epub 2018 Aug 20.

The Pirbright Institute, Pirbright, Surrey, UK.

Background: Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are responsible for the biological transmission of arboviruses of international importance between ruminant livestock. These arboviruses include bluetongue virus (BTV) and Schmallenberg virus (SBV), which have emerged in unprecedented outbreaks in northern Europe. The impact of breed and shearing of sheep on Culicoides: host contact rates has not been investigated in detail and has the potential to influence arbovirus transmission and control measures employed to limit spread. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13071-018-3003-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6102838PMC
August 2018
15 Reads

Culicoides species composition and abundance on Irish cattle farms: implications for arboviral disease transmission.

Parasit Vectors 2018 Aug 17;11(1):472. Epub 2018 Aug 17.

The Pirbright Institute, Ash Rd., Pirbright, Woking, Surrey, GU24 0NF, UK.

Background: Following the emergence of Schmallenberg virus (SBV) in Ireland in 2012, a sentinel herd surveillance program was established in the south of Ireland with the primary aim of investigating the species composition and abundance of Culicoides on livestock farms in the region.

Methods: Ultraviolet-light trapping for Culicoides was carried out on 10 sentinel farms. Each site was sampled fortnightly over 16 weeks (21st July to 5th November 2014). Read More

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https://parasitesandvectors.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.11
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13071-018-3010-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6098625PMC
August 2018
11 Reads

Vector competence of pre-alpine Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) for bluetongue virus serotypes 1, 4 and 8.

Parasit Vectors 2018 Aug 13;11(1):466. Epub 2018 Aug 13.

National Centre for Vector Entomology, Institute of Parasitology, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland.

Background: Bluetongue disease, caused by bluetongue virus serotype 8 (BTV-8), appeared for the first time in the northern part of Europe in 2006, and subsequently rapidly spread causing severe economic losses to the farming industry. The implicated vectors of BTV in Europe are Culicoides species within the subgenus Avaritia (C. chiopterus, C. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13071-018-3050-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6090685PMC

Colostral transmission of BTV-8 antibodies from dairy cows six years after vaccination.

Vaccine 2018 09 9;36(39):5807-5810. Epub 2018 Aug 9.

Department of Livestock Sciences, Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL), Ackerstrasse 113, Postbox 219, 5070 Frick, Switzerland. Electronic address:

Bluetongue virus (BTV) antibodies were analysed in 27 Swiss calves born in 2016 at the age of 16-19 days using competitive enzyme-linked-immunosorbent-assay (cELISA) and virus neutralization test (VNT) (animal trial permission number: 75684). Obligatory documentation proved that 15 of 27 dams were BTV-8 vaccinated once or three times in 2008-2010. The offsprings of the non-vaccinated dams were seronegative. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2018.08.015DOI Listing
September 2018
1 Read

Full genome sequence of a Sathuvachari virus strain isolated in the southwestern-most archipelago of Japan.

Virus Genes 2018 Oct 1;54(5):729-732. Epub 2018 Aug 1.

Kyushu Research Station, National Institute of Animal Health, NARO, 2702, Chuzan, Kagoshima, Kagoshima, Japan.

Two virus strains, tentatively designated as ON-6/P/05 and ON-7/E/05, were isolated from blood samples of healthy cattle in the Yaeyama Islands, located in the southwestern-most region of Japan, in 2005. Ultrastructural observations of infected baby hamster (BHK-21) cells revealed that the viruses had features consistent with those of orbivirus. As with other orbiviruses, the viral genome consists of 10 double-stranded RNA segments. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11262-018-1592-xDOI Listing
October 2018
18 Reads

Sero-epidemioloical survey on African horse sickness virus among horses in Khartoum State, Central Sudan.

BMC Vet Res 2018 Aug 1;14(1):230. Epub 2018 Aug 1.

Molecular Biology Laboratory (MBL), Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Khartoum, P.O. Box 32, Khartoum North, Sudan.

Background: African horse sickness virus (AHSV) is an infectious non contagious insect-transmitted double-stranded (ds) RNA orbivirus of the family Reoviridae. AHSV causes an often fatal hemorrhagic infection with high mortality among selected breeds of Arabian horses. This study was conducted to avail some information with regard to the prevalence and associated risk factors of AHSV among ecotype breeds of horses in central Sudan. Read More

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https://bmcvetres.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12917-
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12917-018-1554-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6090883PMC
August 2018
5 Reads

Comparative Neuropathology of Major Indian Bluetongue Virus Serotypes in a Neonatal BALB/c Mouse Model.

J Comp Pathol 2018 Jul 3;162:18-28. Epub 2018 Jul 3.

School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, The University of Nottingham, UK.

Bluetongue virus (BTV) is neurotropic in nature, especially in ruminant fetuses and in-utero infection results in abortion and congenital brain malformations. The aim of the present study was to compare the neuropathogenicity of major Indian BTV serotypes 1, 2, 10, 16 and 23 by gross and histopathological lesions and virus distribution in experimentally infected neonatal BALB/c mice. Each BTV serotype (20 μl of inoculum containing 1 × 10 tissue culture infectious dose [TCID]/ml of virus) was inoculated intracerebrally into 3-day-old mice, while a control group was inoculated with mock-infected cell culture medium. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcpa.2018.06.001DOI Listing
July 2018
11 Reads

Assessment of cross-protection induced by a bluetongue virus (BTV) serotype 8 vaccine towards other BTV serotypes in experimental conditions.

Vet Res 2018 07 16;49(1):63. Epub 2018 Jul 16.

Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Research Unit in Epidemiology and Risk Analysis Applied to Veterinary Sciences (UREAR-ULg), Fundamental and Applied Research for Animal and Health (FARAH) Center, University of Liege, Liege, Belgium.

Bluetongue disease is caused by bluetongue virus (BTV) and BTV serotype 8 (BTV8) caused great economic damage in Europe during the last decade. From 1998 to 2007, in addition to BTV8, Europe had to face the emergence of BTV1, 2, 4, 9, and 16, spreading in countries where the virus has never been detected before. These unprecedented outbreaks trigger the need to evaluate and compare the clinical, virological and serological features of the European BTV serotypes in the local epidemiological context. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13567-018-0556-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6048908PMC
July 2018
9 Reads

Prevalence and risk factors for bluetongue in the State of São Paulo, Brazil.

Vet Med Sci 2018 11 2;4(4):280-287. Epub 2018 Jul 2.

Laboratory of Bovine Viruses, Center for Animal Health Research and Development, Biological Institute, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil.

Bluetongue (BT), caused by Bluetongue virus (BTV), is a disease that affects ruminants such as cattle, sheep, goats and deer. BTV is transmitted by female midges of the genus Culicoides. In Brazil, information on the prevalence of BTV in cattle is limited, so the objective of this work was to identify BTV serotypes in cattle. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/vms3.113DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6236132PMC
November 2018
5 Reads

Identification and characterization of novel mosquito-borne (Kammavanpettai virus) and tick-borne (Wad Medani) reoviruses isolated in India.

J Gen Virol 2018 Aug 25;99(8):991-1000. Epub 2018 Jun 25.

1​Maximum Containment Laboratory, National Institute of Virology, Pune, Maharashtra, India.

In 1954, a virus named Wad Medani virus (WMV) was isolated from Hyalomma marginatum ticks from Maharashtra State, India. In 1963, another virus was isolated from Sturnia pagodarum birds in Tamil Nadu, India, and named Kammavanpettai virus (KVPTV) based on the site of its isolation. Originally these virus isolates could not be identified with conventional methods. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1099/jgv.0.001102DOI Listing
August 2018
3 Reads
3.183 Impact Factor

A possible role for domestic dogs in the spread of African horse sickness virus.

Authors:
Chris Oura

Vet Rec 2018 06;182(25):713-714

School of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of the West Indies,Trinidad and Tobago.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/vr.k2641DOI Listing
June 2018
1 Read

Physiological and immunological responses to Culicoides sonorensis blood-feeding: a murine model.

Parasit Vectors 2018 Jun 20;11(1):358. Epub 2018 Jun 20.

Arthropod-Borne Animal Diseases Research Unit, Agricultural Research Service, US Department of Agriculture, Manhattan, KS, 66502, USA.

Background: Hematophagous Culicoides spp. biting midges are of great agricultural importance as livestock, equine, and wildlife pests and as vectors of the orbiviruses bluetongue, epizootic hemorrhagic disease and African horse sickness. To obtain a blood meal, midges deposit saliva containing allergens, proteases, and anti-hemostatic factors, into the dermis to facilitate feeding. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13071-018-2935-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6011595PMC
June 2018
4 Reads

Bluetongue transmission and control in Europe: A systematic review of compartmental mathematical models.

Prev Vet Med 2018 Aug 24;156:113-125. Epub 2018 May 24.

Epidemiology Unit, Laboratory for Animal Health, French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety (ANSES), University Paris-Est, 14 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, Maisons-Alfort, 94700, France. Electronic address:

The growing frequency of bluetongue virus (BTV) incursions in Europe in recent years led to the largest BTV outbreak ever recorded in 2006/09, with a dramatic impact on the cattle and sheep industries. The complex epidemiology of this vector-borne disease of ruminants and its recent emergence need to be better understood to identify and implement efficient control strategies. Mathematical models provide useful tools for that purpose; many of them have been developed in the light of the 2006/09 outbreak. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2018.05.012DOI Listing
August 2018
2 Reads

Emergence of bluetongue virus serotype 4 in mainland France in November 2017.

Transbound Emerg Dis 2018 Oct 8;65(5):1158-1162. Epub 2018 Jun 8.

UMR 1161 ANSES/INRA/ENVA, Université Paris-Est ANSES Maisons-Alfort, Maisons-Alfort, France.

In November 2017, a 15-day-old calf located in France (Haute-Savoie department) was found positive for bluetongue virus (BTV) RNA by RT-PCR. Laboratory investigations allowed the isolation and identification of the serotype: BTV-4. The analysis of the full viral genome showed that all the 10 genome segments were closely related to BTV-4 strains involved in a large BT outbreak in the Balkan Peninsula, in Italy since 2014 and in Corsica since the end of October 2016. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tbed.12919DOI Listing
October 2018
14 Reads

Spatial distribution modelling of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) biting midges, potential vectors of African horse sickness and bluetongue viruses in Senegal.

Parasit Vectors 2018 Jun 8;11(1):341. Epub 2018 Jun 8.

CIRAD, ASTRE, Montpellier, France.

Background: In Senegal, the last epidemic of African horse sickness (AHS) occurred in 2007. The western part of the country (the Niayes area) concentrates modern farms with exotic horses of high value and was highly affected during the 2007 outbreak that has started in the area. Several studies were initiated in the Niayes area in order to better characterize Culicoides diversity, ecology and the impact of environmental and climatic data on dynamics of proven and suspected vectors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13071-018-2920-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5994048PMC
June 2018
7 Reads

CD8 T Cell Responses to an Immunodominant Epitope within the Nonstructural Protein NS1 Provide Wide Immunoprotection against Bluetongue Virus in IFNAR Mice.

J Virol 2018 08 31;92(16). Epub 2018 Jul 31.

Center for Animal Health Research, INIA-CISA, Valdeolmos, Madrid, Spain

The development of vaccines against bluetongue, a prevalent livestock disease, has been focused on surface antigens that induce strong neutralizing antibody responses. Because of their antigenic variability, these vaccines are usually serotype restricted. We now show that a single highly conserved nonstructural protein, NS1, expressed in a modified vaccinia Ankara virus (MVA) vector can provide multiserotype protection in IFNAR 129 mice against bluetongue virus (BTV) that is largely dependent on CD8 T cell responses. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.00938-18DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6069212PMC
August 2018
16 Reads

Delivering Cargo: Plant-Based Production of Bluetongue Virus Core-Like and Virus-Like Particles Containing Fluorescent Proteins.

Methods Mol Biol 2018 ;1776:319-334

Department of Biological Chemistry, John Innes Centre, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, UK.

This chapter provides a practical guide to the in planta transient production of bluetongue virus-like particles containing a fluorescent cargo protein. Bluetongue virus (BTV) particles are icosahedral, multishelled entities of a relatively large size. Heterologous expression of the four main structural proteins of BTV results in the assembly of empty virus-like particles which resemble the native virus externally, but are devoid of nucleic acid. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-7808-3_22DOI Listing
February 2019

Retrospective analysis of Bluetongue farm risk profile definition, based on biology, farm management practices and climatic data.

Prev Vet Med 2018 Jul 12;155:75-85. Epub 2018 Apr 12.

Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale della Sardegna "G. Pegreffi" - Centro di Sorveglianza Epidemiologica, Via XX Settembre n°9, 09125, Cagliari, CA, Italy.

Bluetongue (BT) is a vector-borne disease transmitted by species of Culicoides midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae). Many studies have contributed to clarifying various aspects of its aetiology, epidemiology and vector dynamic; however, BT remains a disease of epidemiological and economic importance that affects ruminants worldwide. Since 2000, the Sardinia region has been the most affected area of the Mediterranean basin. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2018.04.004DOI Listing
July 2018
2 Reads

Evaluation of the immune response afforded by a subunit vaccine candidate against bluetongue virus in mice and sheep.

Vet Microbiol 2018 Jun 5;219:40-48. Epub 2018 Apr 5.

State Key Laboratory of Veterinary Etiological Biology, Lanzhou Veterinary Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Xujiaping 1, Lanzhou, Gansu, 730046, PR China; Jiangsu Co-Innovation Center for Prevention and Control of Important Animal Infectious Diseases and Zoonoses, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou, 225009, PR China. Electronic address:

Bluetongue virus (BTV), a vector-borne pathogen, is the causative agent of bluetongue disease in ruminants. In view of the recent emergence of BTV in regions previously known to be free from the disease and/or specific serotypes or strains, optimization of the currently available vaccination strategies to control the spread of vector-borne bluetongue is crucial. The main objective of the current study was to develop a subunit vaccine candidate targeting BTV-16, a strain previously isolated in China from sheep with obvious clinical signs. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S03781135183006
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vetmic.2018.04.007DOI Listing
June 2018
15 Reads

Identification of antigenic epitopes of monoclonal antibodies against the VP2 protein of the 25 serotype of bluetongue virus.

Vet Microbiol 2018 Jun 11;219:136-143. Epub 2018 Apr 11.

College of Veterinary Medicine, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin, PR China; Northeastern Science Inspection Station, China Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Animal Pathogen Biology, PR China. Electronic address:

Serious outbreaks of bluetongue, an arbovirus of domestic and wild ruminants caused by bluetongue virus serotypes (BTV), have occurred around the world. More than 27 distinct serotypes are recognized throughout the world. A new virus, BTV-25 (Toggenburg orbivirus [TOV]), was first detected in Switzerland, and has not yet been found in China. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vetmic.2018.04.008DOI Listing
June 2018
3 Reads

Laboratory studies on the oviposition stimuli of Culicoides stellifer (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), a suspected vector of Orbiviruses in the United States.

Parasit Vectors 2018 05 16;11(1):300. Epub 2018 May 16.

Florida Medical Entomology Laboratory, University of Florida, IFAS, 200 9th St. SE, Vero Beach, FL, 32962, USA.

Background: Biting midges of the genus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) exert a significant impact on animal agriculture worldwide because they transmit bluetongue virus (BTV) and epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) to ruminants. Without effective vaccines, BTV/EHDV vector management strategies are needed, particularly in commercial white-tailed deer (WTD) facilities. However, detailed information on the ecology of midge immatures in/around cervid operations is currently lacking. Read More

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https://parasitesandvectors.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.11
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13071-018-2891-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5956791PMC
May 2018
3 Reads

Diagnostic DIVA tests accompanying the Disabled Infectious Single Animal (DISA) vaccine platform for African horse sickness.

Vaccine 2018 06 11;36(25):3584-3592. Epub 2018 May 11.

Department of Virology, Wageningen Bioveterinary Research (WBVR), Lelystad, The Netherlands.

African Horse Sickness Virus (AHSV) (Orbivirus genus, Reoviridae family) causes high mortality in naïve domestic horses with enormous economic and socio-emotional impact. There are nine AHSV serotypes showing limited cross neutralization. AHSV is transmitted by competent species of Culicoides biting midges. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2018.05.044DOI Listing
June 2018
1 Read

A correlation between capsid protein VP2 and the plaque morphology of African horse sickness virus in cell culture.

Virus Genes 2018 Aug 5;54(4):527-535. Epub 2018 May 5.

Agricultural Research Council - Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute, 100 Old Soutpan Rd, Pretoria, South Africa.

The attenuated live virus vaccine that is used in South Africa to protect against African horse sickness infection was developed more than 50 years ago. With the selection of the vaccine strains by cell culture passage, a correlation between the size of plaques formed in monolayer Vero cultures and attenuation of virus virulence in horses was found. The large plaque phenotype was used as an indication of cell culture adaptation and strongly correlated with attenuation of virulence in horses. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11262-018-1567-yDOI Listing
August 2018
9 Reads

Bluetongue Virus Antibodies in Domestic Goats: A Countrywide and Retrospective Study in the Republic of Korea.

Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis 2018 06 24;18(6):323-330. Epub 2018 Apr 24.

1 Department of Life Sciences, College of Life Sciences and Bioengineering, Incheon National University , Incheon, Republic of Korea.

Bluetongue is a re-emergent arthropod-transmitted viral disease that affects all wild and domestic ruminant species, reducing herd productivity. The epidemiology of bluetongue virus (BTV) infection is poorly defined in much of the world, including extensive portions of Asia and the Middle East. In the Republic of Korea (ROK), scarce information is available on the status of BTV infection. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/vbz.2017.2181DOI Listing
June 2018
18 Reads

Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease Virus Serotype 6 Infection in Cattle, Japan, 2015.

Emerg Infect Dis 2018 05;24(5):902-905

During October-December 2015, an epizootic hemorrhagic disease outbreak occurred in cattle in Japan. Forty-six animals displayed fever, anorexia, cessation of rumination, salivation, and dysphagia. Virologic, serologic, and pathologic investigations revealed the causative agent was epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus serotype 6. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2405.171859DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5938786PMC
May 2018
3 Reads

Molecular differentiation and species composition of genus Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in different habitats in southern China.

Vet Parasitol 2018 Apr 23;254:49-57. Epub 2018 Feb 23.

Nanchang Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Nanchang, 330038, PR China. Electronic address:

Culicoides biting midges (Diptera:Ceratopogonidae) cause a significant biting nuisance to humans, livestock, which are the biological vectors of a range of risky pathogens. Accurate illustration of vector play a key role in arthropod borne diseases surveillance. However, few studies have focused on the Culicoides, which caused bluetongue disease in 29 provinces of China since 1979. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vetpar.2018.02.035DOI Listing
April 2018
7 Reads

Epizootic haemorrhagic disease virus circulation in Tunisia.

Vet Ital 2018 Mar;54(1):87-90

RVT, 20 rue de JebelLakdhar, 1006 Tunis-La Rabta, under the tutelage of Tunis - El Manar University, Tunisia.

Epizootic haemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) was detected for the first time in Tunisia and in other Northern African countries in 2006. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether EHDV circulated in Tunisian livestock before and after the officially-reported outbreak of 2006. Thus, serum samples from cattle and dromedaries collected in different time periods (before and after 2006) and from different regions of Tunisia were screened for the presence of EHDV antibodies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12834/VetIt.973.5129.2DOI Listing
March 2018
2 Reads

Evaluating the most appropriate pooling ratio for EDTA blood samples to detect Bluetongue virus using real-time RT-PCR.

Vet Microbiol 2018 Apr 3;217:58-63. Epub 2018 Mar 3.

The Pirbright Institute, Pirbright, Woking, Surrey, United Kingdom.

The control of Bluetongue virus (BTV) presents a significant challenge to European Union (EU) member states as trade restrictions are placed on animals imported from BTV-affected countries. BTV surveillance programs are costly to maintain, thus, pooling of EDTA blood samples is used to reduce costs and increase throughput. We investigated different pooling ratios (1:2, 1:5, 1:10 and 1:20) for EDTA blood samples to detect a single BTV positive animal. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vetmic.2018.03.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5904549PMC
April 2018
4 Reads

Seroprevalence of Bluetongue Virus in small ruminants in Balochistan province, Pakistan.

Transbound Emerg Dis 2018 Oct 31;65(5):1272-1281. Epub 2018 Mar 31.

University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Lahore, Pakistan.

Bluetongue (BT), caused by bluetongue virus (BTV), is a vector-borne disease of small ruminants that has the potential to spread across international borders. Despite large populations of susceptible animals and borders with BTV endemic countries, little is known of the disease burden and prevalent serotypes in the province of Balochistan in Pakistan. We conducted a cross-sectional study to determine seroconversion and prevalent serotypes in selected districts of the province using a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA) and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tbed.12871DOI Listing
October 2018
1 Read

Prevalence and Risk Factors of Brucellosis, Chlamydiosis, and Bluetongue Among Sika Deer in Jilin Province in China.

Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis 2018 04 12;18(4):226-230. Epub 2018 Mar 12.

2 College of Chinese Medicinal Materials, Jilin Agricultural University , Changchun, People's Republic of China .

Brucellosis and chlamydiosis are important zoonotic diseases and bluetongue virus (BTV) is an arthropod-borne viral disease of ruminants. They are widely distributed around the world, cause large economic losses, and significant harmful effects on humans. However, epidemiological information relating to transmission from commercial sika deer in China is limited. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/vbz.2017.2226DOI Listing
April 2018
5 Reads

An advection-deposition-survival model to assess the risk of introduction of vector-borne diseases through the wind: Application to bluetongue outbreaks in Spain.

PLoS One 2018 22;13(3):e0194573. Epub 2018 Mar 22.

VISAVET Center and Animal Health Department, Veterinary School, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.

This work develops a methodology for estimating risk of wind-borne introduction of flying insects into a country, identifying areas and periods of high risk of vector-borne diseases incursion. This risk can be characterized by the role of suitable temperatures and wind currents in small insects' survival and movements, respectively. The model predicts the number density of introduced insects over space and time based on three processes: the advection due to wind currents, the deposition on the ground and the survival due to climatic conditions. Read More

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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0194573PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5864019PMC
July 2018
5 Reads