891 results match your criteria Oral and maxillofacial surgery clinics of North America[Journal]


Extra-Long Nasal Wall-Directed Dental Implants for Maxillary Complete Arch Immediate Function: A Pilot Study.

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2019 May;31(2):349-356

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Utah, School of Dentistry, 530 Wakara Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84108, USA.

Immediate loading of maxillary denture prostheses in the context of severe bone atrophy is complicated by posterior implant placement, sometimes requiring a complex surgical approach as zygomatic or pterygoid implants. To overcome this complexity, the authors developed an extra-long (20-24 mm) 24-degree angulated platform. It was tested on 33 patients, with 24 patients immediately loaded (72. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2019.01.004DOI Listing

Guided Bone Regeneration in Alveolar Bone Reconstruction.

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2019 May;31(2):331-338

Department of Periodontology, Universitat Internacional de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain.

Guided bone regeneration is an effective alternative for the reconstruction of atrophic ridges. Adequate flap management together with immobilization of the barrier membrane and graft are crucial to ensure successful regenerative radiographic and clinical outcomes. Moreover, tension-free flap closure should be accomplished to guarantee to maximize the effectiveness of guided bone regeneration. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2019.01.003DOI Listing
May 2019
1 Read

Quad Zygoma: Technique and Realities.

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2019 May;31(2):285-297

Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Trillium Health Partners, University of Toronto, Private Practice, Toronto, Canada. Electronic address:

Four zygomatic implants may be used in patients with severe maxillary atrophy for rehabilitation with a fixed or removable prosthesis. Immediate loading is also typically performed, providing patients with a less invasive and more efficient solution for rehabilitation. Options for immediate loading are presented. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.12.006DOI Listing
May 2019
1 Read

Complex Dental Implant Cases: Algorithms, Subjectivity, and Patient Cases Along the Complexity Continuum.

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2019 May;31(2):219-249

Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Utah, School of Dentistry, 530 South Wakara Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84108, USA.

Algorithms for predictable outcomes, or checklists in health care, have been widely supported due to their highly effective outcomes. This article shares "algorithmic roadmaps" to restore single-tooth, partially edentulous, and fully edentulous complex dental implant cases in the patient population. A review of the current literature is presented to provide systematic assessments followed by criteria in a checklist format that allows the surgeon and restorative dentist to determine whether a removable or fixed implant prosthesis is the best patient option. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.12.003DOI Listing

Implant Therapy in Alveolar Cleft Sites.

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2019 May;31(2):207-217

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114, USA.

Dental implant therapy in the non-cleft patient is familiar to most oral and maxillofacial surgeons. Understanding the differences in surgical treatment planning in the cleft patient versus the non-cleft patient is the key to highly functional and esthetic long-term outcomes. CBCT and computer-assisted planning, as well as improved technology in grafting and implant materials, result in excellent outcomes. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S10423699183010
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.12.002DOI Listing
May 2019
2 Reads

Bone Augmentation Techniques for Horizontal and Vertical Alveolar Ridge Deficiency in Oral Implantology.

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2019 May;31(2):163-191

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Rambam Medical Care Center, Haifa, Israel; Ruth and Bruce Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel; Rambam Health Care Campus, 8 Ha'Aliyah Street, PO Box 9602, Haifa 3109601, Israel.

Bone deficiency is the major obstacle in implant dentistry. Guided bone regeneration (GBR) with particulate bone and barrier membranes has been the primary surgical technique used to regenerate alveolar bone for dental implant therapy. This procedure has been used in implant dentistry for more than 30 years and continues to be developed and refined for more predictable surgical outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2019.01.005DOI Listing
May 2019
1 Read

Surgical Algorithm for Alveolar Bone Augmentation in Implant Dentistry.

Authors:
Len Tolstunov

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2019 May 11;31(2):155-161. Epub 2019 Mar 11.

Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Private Practice, San Francisco, CA, USA; Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of the Pacific, School of Dentistry, San Francisco, CA, USA; Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of California San Francisco, School of Dentistry, San Francisco, CA, USA. Electronic address:

Replacement of failing and ailing natural teeth with dental implants has become a mainstream treatment option since the discovery of osseointegration by P.-I. Brånemark in the 1960s. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2019.01.001DOI Listing
May 2019
1 Read

Orthoalveolar Form: The Future State of Alveolar Tissue Engineering.

Authors:
Ole T Jensen

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2019 May 11;31(2):xiii. Epub 2019 Mar 11.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Utah, School of Dentistry, 530 Wakara Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84108, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2019.02.001DOI Listing

Le Fort I Distraction Osteogenesis of Edentulous Maxillae Combined with Simultaneous Sinus Floor Grafting to Obtain Orthoalveolar Form for Emergence Profile Dental Implant Restorations: Report of Three Patient Treatments Followed for 12 Years.

Authors:
Ole T Jensen

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2019 May 11;31(2):339-348. Epub 2019 Mar 11.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Utah, School of Dentistry, 530 Wakara Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84108, USA. Electronic address:

Three edentulous maxillary patients were treated with 9- to 15-mm advances of the maxilla by Le Fort I distraction osteogenesis combined with simultaneous sinus floor autograft placement. The patients were subsequently treated with 8 implants placed in the molar, bicuspid, and canine regions for complete arch ceramo-metal fixed restorations. Anterior emergence profile esthetics was obtained in 2 patients who had high smile lines. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.12.009DOI Listing

Titanium Mesh Grafting Combined with Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2 for Alveolar Reconstruction.

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2019 May 7;31(2):309-315. Epub 2019 Mar 7.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Loma Linda University School of Dentistry, 11092 Anderson Street, Loma Linda, CA 92350, USA.

There are several methods of regenerating the maxillary and mandibular ridge to achieve orthoalveolar form with bone grafting procedures, including block onlay grafting and guided bone regeneration. Traditionally, guided bone regeneration has focused on creating a space for bone regeneration to occur. The use of a formed titanium mesh to regenerate alveolar defects was popularized in the 1980s. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.12.007DOI Listing

Managing the Posterior Maxilla with Implants Using Bone Grafting to Enhance Implant Sites.

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2019 May 7;31(2):299-308. Epub 2019 Mar 7.

Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Residency Program, Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Dental Anesthesiology, The Ohio State University College of Dentistry, Room 2131, Postle Hall, 305 West 12th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210, USA.

The edentulous posterior maxilla poses challenges to reconstruction. Posterior forces are great, yet bone quality and quantity are diminished. There is frequent loss of bone resulting from ridge resorption as well as sinus pneumatization. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2019.01.002DOI Listing

Managing Bone Grafts for the Mandible.

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2019 May 7;31(2):317-330. Epub 2019 Mar 7.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Alabama at Birmingham, School of Dentistry, 1919 7th Avenue South SDB 419, Birmingham, AL 35294-0007, USA.

Bone grafting has become an integral part of implant dentistry. To achieve a predictable long-term outcome for osseointegrated implants, a sufficient volume and quality of alveolar bone must be present at implant recipient sites. Resorption of the alveolar ridge and postsurgical or post-traumatic defects of the residual alveolar bone can prevent ideal placement of a dental implant. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.12.008DOI Listing

Maxillofacial Reconstruction Using Vascularized Fibula Free Flaps and Endosseous Implants.

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2019 May 5;31(2):259-284. Epub 2019 Mar 5.

Division of Head and Neck Oncology and Microvascular Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery/Head and Neck Surgery, Louisiana State University Health Science Center, 1501 Kings Highway, Shreveport, LA 71103, USA.

Maxillofacial subunit reconstruction using vascularized fibula free flap and endosseous implants is a complex and exciting topic. Use of this technique has profoundly improved patients' function, form, and quality of life. This article outlines the goals and requirements of reconstruction and patient selection. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.12.005DOI Listing
May 2019
1 Read

Single-Implant Treatment.

Authors:
Michael S Block

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2019 May 2;31(2):251-258. Epub 2019 Mar 2.

Private Practice, 110 Veterans Memorial Boulevard, #112, Metairie, LA 70005, USA. Electronic address:

The replacement of one tooth using one implant involves a set of unique criteria for long-term success. Successful therapy should be based on long-term function and health of the adjacent tissues. Sections of this article examine these critical criteria that when working together can result in successful long-term tooth replacement. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.12.004DOI Listing
May 2019
1 Read

Biomimetic Enhancement of Bone Graft Reconstruction.

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2019 May 2;31(2):193-205. Epub 2019 Mar 2.

UCLA School of Dentistry, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, CHS Room 53-076, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1668, USA.

With aging populations and increasing oral rehabilitation, use of dental implants for oral reconstruction is increasing. Adequate hard/soft tissue are required to support use of titanium implants. Bone augmentation is sometimes a necessary procedure to supplement existing alveolar bone. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S10423699183010
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.12.001DOI Listing
May 2019
10 Reads

Radiation Oncology for Head and Neck Cancer: Current Standards and Future Changes.

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2019 Feb 25;31(1):31-38. Epub 2018 Oct 25.

Department of Oral Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Florida College of Medicine, PO Box 100416, Gainesville, FL 32610-0416, USA.

Treatment of head and neck cancer with curative intent consists of surgery and/or radiotherapy (RT) sometimes combined with adjuvant chemotherapy depending on the tumor site, extent, and histology. Herein, the authors review the role of RT in the management of head and neck mucosal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The authors focus on the outcomes of definitive RT and, depending on the primary site, postoperative RT. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.08.003DOI Listing
February 2019
28 Reads

Oral Cavity Cancer.

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2019 Feb 25;31(1):13-29. Epub 2018 Oct 25.

Division of Head and Neck Surgery, Head and Neck Oncologic Surgery and Microvascular Reconstruction Fellowship, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Florida College of Medicine - Jacksonville, University of Florida - Jacksonville, 653-1 West 8th Street 2nd FL/LRC, Jacksonville, FL 32209, USA. Electronic address:

Management of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma has become increasingly driven by emerging evidence as a result of the improved quality of clinical research associating clinicopathologic risk factors with oncologic and survival outcomes. Multiple significant recent changes to treatment guidelines and staging algorithms for oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma reflect evolving understanding of tumor biology and the need for adequately extensive treatment of aggressive disease. This article provides clinicians with a synopsis of the most contemporary management strategies for oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma, framed within the context of historical treatment philosophies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.08.002DOI Listing
February 2019
13 Reads

Gene Therapy in Head and Neck Cancer.

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2019 Feb 25;31(1):117-124. Epub 2018 Oct 25.

Head and Neck Division, Department of Solid Tumor Oncology, Levine Cancer Institute, 1021 Morehead Medical Drive, Suite 3200, Charlotte, NC 28204, USA. Electronic address:

Although overall cancer death rates are decreasing, comparative improvements in head and neck squamous cell cancer are modest. Although new advances targeting immune checkpoints may soon improve these numbers, additional research for new therapeutic options is vital. One potential treatment avenue is the use of gene therapy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.08.006DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

The Head and Neck Cancer Patient: Neoplasm Management.

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2019 Feb;31(1):xi-xii

Division of Surgical Oncology, Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center, Suite 450, 2946 E Banner Gateway Drive, Gilbert, AZ 85234, USA; Department of Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.10.001DOI Listing
February 2019

Immunotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer.

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2019 Feb;31(1):85-100

Earle A. Chiles Research Institute, Robert W. Franz Cancer Center, Providence Portland Medical Center, Providence Cancer Institute, 4805 Northeast Glisan Street, Suite 2N35, Portland, OR 97213, USA; Head and Neck Institute, 1849 NW Kearney, Suite 300, Portland, Oregon 97209, USA. Electronic address:

The immune system has a vital role in the development, establishment, and progression of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Immune evasion of cancer cells leads to progression of HNSCC. An understanding of this mechanism provides the basis for improved therapies and outcomes for patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.09.002DOI Listing
February 2019
16 Reads

Management of the Neck in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Background, Classification, and Current Philosophy.

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2019 Feb;31(1):69-84

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.

Nodal metastasis is the single most prognostic determinant in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Since its inception more than a century ago, the management of the neck has led to decreased surgical morbidity, with continued preservation of oncologic safety for OSCC. Nodal metastasis is the single most prognostic determinant in patients with OSCC. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.09.004DOI Listing
February 2019
20 Reads

Soft Tissue Reconstruction for Head and Neck Ablative Defects.

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2019 Feb;31(1):39-68

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery/Head and Neck Surgery, Louisiana State University Health Science Center, 1501 Kings Highway, Shreveport, LA 71103, USA.

Soft tissue reconstruction of head and neck ablative defects is a broad, challenging, and subjective topic. The authors outline goals to keep in mind when deciding on a primary reconstructive option for defects created by oncologic resection. Factors considered in local, regional, and distant flap selection are discussed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.08.004DOI Listing
February 2019
32 Reads

Current Concepts in Chemotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer.

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2019 Feb;31(1):145-154

Medicine, Division of Hematology and Oncology, Translational Research, The University of Arizona Cancer Center, 1515 North Campbell Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85724, USA. Electronic address:

This article highlights the evidence-based data to support systemic treatment options for patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The discovery of the human papillomavirus epidemic in HNSCC and its favorable prognosis has led to a major focus of research. Patients are stratified into clinical or pathologic risk categories and enrolled in trials comparing standard treatment paradigms with deintensification, in low-risk disease, or to intensification, in intermediate-risk or high-risk disease. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.09.003DOI Listing
February 2019
11 Reads

Salivary Gland Malignancies.

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2019 Feb;31(1):125-144

Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Parkland Memorial Hospital, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Mail Code 9109, Dallas, TX 75390, USA.

Salivary gland tumors are rare pathologic entities that are derived from major and minor salivary gland tissue located throughout the head and neck region. These tumors are distinctly heterogenous, comprising numerous cell types, especially those deemed malignant. The incidence of malignant salivary gland tumors is widely distributed in both adult and pediatric patient populations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.08.007DOI Listing
February 2019
17 Reads

Contemporary Osseous Reconstruction of the Mandible and the Maxilla.

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2019 Feb;31(1):101-116

Thyroid, Head and Neck Cancer Foundation, 10 Union Square East, Suite 5B, New York, NY 10003, USA; Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Mount Sinai Beth Israel, 10 Union Square East, Suite 5B, New York, NY 10003, USA; Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, 1 Gustave L. Levy Place, New York, NY 10029-6574, USA.

Cancers of the oral cavity and paranasal sinuses often require ablative surgery with adjuvant therapy in most cases. Large, postablative defects of the mandible and the maxilla present several challenges to the reconstructive surgeon. Functional and cosmetically satisfactory restoration requires a thorough understanding of the underlying disease process, a firm grasp of the nuances of head and neck anatomy, and an ability to plan and execute a reconstruction with the most suitable tissue for each particular patient. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.08.005DOI Listing
February 2019
17 Reads

The Treatment of Laryngeal Cancer.

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2019 Feb;31(1):1-11

Division of Surgical Oncology, Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center, 2946 East Banner Gateway Drive, Suite 450, Gilbert, AZ 85234, USA. Electronic address:

Successful management of laryngeal cancer depends on careful pretreatment evaluation of patient and disease factors to arrive at accurate staging, leading to appropriate treatment selection for patients with this highly impacting disease. Surgical modalities, including transoral laser microsurgery, open partial laryngectomy, and total laryngectomy, offer options, alone or in combination with radiation and chemotherapy. Treatment strategy for laryngeal cancer should strive for cure while maintaining the best quality of life possible for the patient. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.09.001DOI Listing
February 2019
24 Reads

Getting It Right from the Start.

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2018 Nov;30(4):ix-x

Division of Surgical Oncology, Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center, 2946 E Banner Gateway Drive, Suite 450, Gilbert, AZ 85234, USA; Department of Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson, Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.08.001DOI Listing
November 2018

Psychosocial Effects of Head and Neck Cancer.

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2018 Nov;30(4):499-512

Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Department of Oncology and Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Jewish General Hospital, 3755 Cote Suite Catherine Road, Pavilion E Room E-872, Montreal, Quebec H3T 1E2, Canada. Electronic address:

Head and neck cancer is known to be both physically and psychologically challenging. The present review summarizes the literature on the psychosocial effects of head and neck cancer by distinguishing features in the preoperative and postoperative periods. It outlines the importance of an integrated collaborative care approach in clinics as well as areas worthy of further program development. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.06.010DOI Listing
November 2018
14 Reads

Maxillofacial Prosthetics.

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2018 Nov;30(4):487-497

Department of Prosthodontics, Indiana University School of Dentistry, 1121 West Michigan Street, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA.

The treatment of head and neck cancers requires a team approach. Maxillofacial prosthetics and oncologic dentistry are involved in many phases of the treatment. After the cancer ablation surgery, if surgical reconstruction cannot not completely restore the surgical defect site, maxillofacial prostheses plays an important role to rehabilitate the patient's mastication, swallowing, and speech. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.06.009DOI Listing
November 2018
12 Reads

Head and Neck Cancer Research and Support Foundations.

Authors:
Joshua E Lubek

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2018 Nov;30(4):459-469

Oral-Head and Neck Surgery/Microvascular Surgery, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Maryland, 650 West Baltimore Street, Suite 1401, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. Electronic address:

Ongoing genetic and epigenetic research involving DNA methylation, salivary biomarkers, wild-type p53 tumor suppressor gene proteins, and HPV oncogenes are being directed at identification and treatment of dysplastic and malignant squamous cell mucosal lesions. Research is being conducted to improve immunotherapy drug response rates by increasing the amount of inflammation within the tumor microenvironment. Ongoing research is focused on the application of the antidiabetic drug metformin for the prevention and management of oral squamous cell dysplastic lesions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.06.007DOI Listing
November 2018
10 Reads

Framework for Speech-Language Pathology Services in Patients with Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancers.

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2018 Nov;30(4):397-410

Department of Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Electronic address:

This article provides a framework speech-language pathology services to optimize functional outcomes of patients with oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers. Key principles include (1) a proactive rehabilitation model that minimizes intervals of disuse or inactivity of speech and swallowing systems, (2) standardized evaluation paradigms that combine objective instrumental assessments with patient-reported outcome measures, and (3) systematic methods for surveillance and intensive rehabilitation for late dysphagia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.07.001DOI Listing
November 2018
3 Reads

Physical Rehabilitation and Occupational Therapy.

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2018 Nov 31;30(4):471-486. Epub 2018 Aug 31.

Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alberta, Cross Cancer Institute, 2-50 Corbett Hall, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G4, Canada.

Head and neck cancer and associated treatments can have debilitating effects on patient physical function and quality of life. The American Cancer Society's Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guidelines recommend that all patients receive an assessment after their treatment to address complications that may impact long-term recovery and function. Evidence supports the role of physical activity, exercise, physical therapy, and occupational therapy to decrease symptom burden after treatment and improve strength, endurance, and function. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.06.008DOI Listing
November 2018
14 Reads

Nutrition and Perioperative Care for the Patient with Head and Neck Cancer.

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2018 Nov 31;30(4):411-420. Epub 2018 Aug 31.

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, UC Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA, USA. Electronic address:

Recovery after major head and neck cancer surgery is a complex process. In addition to perioperative sequelae such as pain, wound infections, venous thromboembolism (VTE), and pneumonia, these patients frequently suffer from malnutrition. We provide a contemporary evidence-based approach to common aspects of perioperative care to guide the clinician in the optimal management of patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.06.003DOI Listing
November 2018
4 Reads

Multidisciplinary Team Planning for Patients with Head and Neck Cancer.

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2018 Nov 31;30(4):435-444. Epub 2018 Aug 31.

Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Unit 1445, Houston, TX 77030, USA.

The multidisciplinary team planning conference is critical in the evaluation and management of patients with head and neck cancer. The management is complex and dictates the care of a multidisciplinary team for optimal results. First, the head and neck multidisciplinary team ensures the complete evaluation of patients before beginning treatment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.06.005DOI Listing
November 2018
16 Reads

Oral Assessment and Management of the Patient with Head and Neck Cancer.

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2018 Nov 31;30(4):445-458. Epub 2018 Aug 31.

Division of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, City of Hope, 1500 East Duarte Road, Duarte, CA 91010, USA.

Patients undergoing treatment of head and neck cancer risk developing significant acute and chronic changes that affect the hard and soft tissue of the oral cavity and the head and neck region. This article discusses considerations and recommendations for patients before, during, and after treatment of head and neck cancer. The objective of these recommendations is to maintain oral health, compensate for treatment- and disease-associated morbidities, and improve quality of life. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.06.006DOI Listing
November 2018
33 Reads

Imaging of Patients with Head and Neck Cancer: From Staging to Surveillance.

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2018 Nov 22;30(4):421-433. Epub 2018 Aug 22.

Division of Neuroradiology, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, 600 North Wolfe Street Phipps B100, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA.

In this review, the authors summarize the latest imaging methods and recommendations for each of the various steps in managing patients with head and neck cancer, from staging of disease to posttreatment surveillance. Because staging of head and neck cancers is different for various subsites of the head and neck, imaging is discussed separately for each. A separate discussion of imaging of perineural spread, occult primary tumors, and lymph nodes is followed by a discussion of paradigms for surveillance imaging in the posttreatment neck. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.06.004DOI Listing
November 2018
2 Reads

Epidemiology and Demographics of the Head and Neck Cancer Population.

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2018 Nov 3;30(4):381-395. Epub 2018 Aug 3.

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine, 550 Peachtree Street. MOT 1135, Atlanta, GA 30308, USA. Electronic address:

Head and neck malignancies comprise a heterogeneous group of malignancies that cause significant morbidity to those affected. These malignancies are associated with specific risk factors and exposures, some of which impact prognosis. The most common risk factors for developing head and neck cancers are tobacco and alcohol use. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.06.001DOI Listing
November 2018
38 Reads

Current Controversies in the Management of Temporomandibular Disorders.

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2018 Aug 5;30(3):xiii. Epub 2018 Jul 5.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Virginia Commonwealth University, School of Dentistry, 521 North 11th Street, Richmond, VA 23298-0566, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.05.005DOI Listing
August 2018
2 Reads

Introduction.

Authors:
Rui P Fernandes

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2018 Aug 5;30(3):xi. Epub 2018 Jul 5.

Division of Head and Neck Surgery, Departments of OMFS, Neurosurgery, Orthopedic Surgery, University of Florida College of Medicine Jacksonville, 653-1 West 8th Street, Jacksonville, FL 32209, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.06.002DOI Listing
August 2018
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Surgical Management of Idiopathic Condylar Resorption: Orthognathic Surgery Versus Temporomandibular Total Joint Replacement.

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2018 Aug 5;30(3):355-367. Epub 2018 Jul 5.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Boston University, Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine, 100 East Newton Street, Suite G-407, Boston, MA 02118, USA. Electronic address:

Young females with retruded and hyperdivergent mandibles, class II openbite malocclusions, and steep occlusal planes with or without TMJ symptoms are at higher risk for Idiopathic Condylar Resorption (ICR). Such patients undergoing orthodontic and /or surgical treatment should be informed of possible relapse due to ICR. Orthognathic Surgery with Total joint replacement or Orthognathic surgery alone may both be acceptable options for management of the facial deformity and the malocclusion that ensues from ICR. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S10423699183004
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.05.004DOI Listing
August 2018
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Costochondral Graft Versus Total Alloplastic Joint for Temporomandibular Joint Reconstruction.

Authors:
Louis G Mercuri

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2018 Aug 5;30(3):335-342. Epub 2018 Jul 5.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Rush University Medical Center, 1611 W Harrison Street, Chicago, IL 60612, USA; TMJ Concepts, 2233 Knoll Drive, Ventura, CA 93003, USA. Electronic address:

Presently, there are 2 options for the replacement of the temporomandibular joint for end-stage pathology: autogenous bone grafting or alloplastic joint replacement. This article presents evidence-based advantages and disadvantages for each of these management options to assist both surgeons and their patients in making that choice. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S10423699183004
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.05.003DOI Listing
August 2018
4 Reads

Surgical Versus Nonsurgical Management of Degenerative Joint Disease.

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2018 Aug 5;30(3):291-297. Epub 2018 Jul 5.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Dentistry, Wood Building Room 311C, 520 North 12th Street, Richmond, VA 23298, USA. Electronic address:

As knowledge of the complexity of myofascial pain and its interaction with temporomandibular joint disorders has increased, the use of surgical procedures to treat degenerative joint disease has decreased. The focus has moved from a "surgery-first" approach toward a more cautious one that involves nonsurgical treatment as the primary modality, then minimally invasive treatments, followed by open surgical modalities, when indicated. This article examines the current literature regarding the effectiveness of nonsurgical and surgical treatments for the management of degenerative joint disease. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.04.005DOI Listing
August 2018
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The Use of Botulinum Toxin for the Treatment of Myofascial Pain in the Masticatory Muscles.

Authors:
Daniel M Laskin

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2018 Aug 5;30(3):287-289. Epub 2018 Jul 5.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Dentistry, 521 North 11th Street, Richmond, VA 23298-0566, USA. Electronic address:

Although the use of botulinum toxin has been recommended for the management of myofascial pain and dysfunction, the precise mechanism of its action remains undetermined and studies on its effectiveness are equivocal. Moreover, even if such treatment may temporarily relieve the symptoms, it does not address the cause of the problem. Also, its use is not free of potential complications. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.04.004DOI Listing
August 2018
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The Efficacy of Pharmacologic Treatment of Temporomandibular Disorders.

Authors:
Gary M Heir

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2018 Aug 5;30(3):279-285. Epub 2018 Jul 5.

Department of Diagnostic Sciences, Center for Temporomandiublar Disorders and Orofacial Pain, Rutgers School of Dental Medicine, Room D880, 110 Bergen Street, Newark, NJ 07101, USA. Electronic address:

This is not a pharmacopeia offering directions for choosing the proper pain medication for treating temporomandibular disorders. Rather, the appropriate decision depends on proper diagnosis, an understanding of the pain mechanisms involved, and the different targets for analgesic action. This article discusses these issues and evaluates the various drugs involved. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.05.001DOI Listing
August 2018
3 Reads

Discectomy Versus Disc Preservation for Internal Derangement of the Temporomandibular Joint.

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2018 Aug 7;30(3):329-333. Epub 2018 Jun 7.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Virginia Commonwealth University, 520 North 12th Street, Wood Building, Room 311C, Richmond, VA 23298, USA. Electronic address:

Anterior disc displacement with or without reduction is a common finding in symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals. When symptomatic and associated with dysfunction it requires an intervention. Once nonsurgical management fails and the patient does not respond to minimally invasive procedures, open surgical treatment is indicated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.05.002DOI Listing

Combined or Staged Temporomandibular Joint and Orthognathic Surgery for Patients with Internal Derangement and Dentofacial Deformities.

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2018 Aug 1;30(3):351-354. Epub 2018 Jun 1.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Warren Suite 1201, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114, USA.

Patients with internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint and dentofacial deformities need appropriate evaluation for both conditions. Correct diagnosis of internal derangement is vital in determining the correct orthognathic surgery plan, and it is particularly important to differentiate between myofascial dysfunction and intra-articular joint problems. Depending on the stage of internal derangement, patients may need treatment for temporomandibular dysfunction symptomatically, staged, or concurrently with orthognathic surgery. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.04.010DOI Listing
August 2018
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The Role of Stress in the Etiology of Oral Parafunction and Myofascial Pain.

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2018 Aug 1;30(3):369-379. Epub 2018 Jun 1.

Department of Neuroscience, Reproductive Sciences and Oral Sciences, Section of Orthodontics, University of Naples Federico II, Via Pansini 5-80131-Naples, Italy.

Oral parafunction during waking comprises possible behaviors that can be measured with a comprehensive checklist or behavioral monitoring. Multiple studies lead to largely consistent findings: stressful states can trigger parafunctional episodes that contribute to myofascial pain. However, this simple causal pathway coexists with at least 3 other pathways: anxiety and stress are potent direct contributors to pain, pain results in maladaptive behaviors such as parafunction, and parafunction may be a coping response to potential threat coupled with hypervigilance and somatosensory amplification. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.04.011DOI Listing
August 2018
4 Reads

Malocclusion as a Cause for Temporomandibular Disorders and Orthodontics as a Treatment.

Authors:
Bhavna Shroff

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2018 Aug 1;30(3):299-302. Epub 2018 Jun 1.

Department of Orthodontics, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Dentistry, 520 North 12th Street, Suite111, Richmond, VA 23298, USA. Electronic address:

This article explores the long-standing controversy between orthodontics and temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). It reviews the history of this controversy and presents a discussion of the current literature concerning the potential role of malocclusion in the onset of TMDs. It also explores the potential role of orthodontic treatment as a possible cure for TMDs and concludes, based on the most current evidence-based literature, that there is no relationship. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.04.006DOI Listing
August 2018
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Arthroscopy Versus Arthrocentesis for Treating Internal Derangements of the Temporomandibular Joint.

Authors:
Daniel M Laskin

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2018 Aug 1;30(3):325-328. Epub 2018 Jun 1.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Dentistry, 521 North 11th Street, Richmond, VA 23298-0566, USA. Electronic address:

The introduction of arthroscopy of the temporomandibular joint represented a major change in the management of internal derangements and to the realization that re-establishing joint mobility by arthroscopic lysis and lavage was as effective as surgically restoring disc position. It was subsequently shown that such treatment could be done without joint visualization. This raised the question of whether the inability to visualize the joint and perform other surgical manipulations limited its usefulness. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.04.008DOI Listing
August 2018
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Orthognathic Surgery as a Treatment for Temporomandibular Disorders.

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2018 Aug 1;30(3):303-323. Epub 2018 Jun 1.

Division of Facial Pain, Department of Orthodontics, University of Florida College of Dentistry, PO Box 100444, Gainesville, FL 32610-0444, USA.

Well-controlled clinical trials supporting orthognathic surgery as the primary management for temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are lacking. Most published studies lack an adequate experimental design to minimize biases. Studies that did minimize some biases do support an overall reduction in the frequency of TMD signs and symptoms in some Class III and Class II patients who had orthognathic surgery. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2018.04.007DOI Listing
August 2018
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