11 results match your criteria Oral Frictional Hyperkeratosis

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Benign Alveolar Ridge Keratosis: Clinical and Histopathologic Analysis of 167 Cases.

Head Neck Pathol 2020 Mar 16. Epub 2020 Mar 16.

Department of Oral Medicine, Infection and Immunity, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, 188 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA, 02215, USA.

Benign alveolar ridge keratosis (BARK), the intraoral counterpart of cutaneous lichen simplex chronicus, is a reactive hyperkeratosis caused by trauma or friction that presents as a poorly demarcated white papule or plaque on the keratinized mucosa of the retromolar pad or alveolar ridge mucosa (often edentulous). This is a clinical and histopathologic analysis of BARK including evaluation of p53 expression in selected cases. One hundred and sixty-seven cases of BARK were identified from 2016 to 2017 and 112 (67. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12105-020-01151-1DOI Listing

Loricrin expression and its implication in oral submucous fibrosis, hyperkeratosis and normal mucosa with association to habits - An immunohistochemical study.

J Oral Biol Craniofac Res 2019 Jul-Sep;9(3):226-231. Epub 2019 May 20.

Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, Ragas Dental College and Hospital, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India.

Objective: The coarse fibres of areca nut and the continuous friction from occluding teeth are major causes of mechanical stress to the oral mucosa in conditions like oral submucous fibrosis and frictional keratosis. The continuous micro trauma provided in areca nut chewers, creates an environment where the keratinocytes exhibit alteration. Loricrin, is expressed abundantly in keratinizing epithelium in response to mechanical stress. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jobcr.2019.05.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6536888PMC
May 2019
24 Reads

Oral Epithelial Dysplasia and Premalignancy.

Authors:
Sook-Bin Woo

Head Neck Pathol 2019 Sep 18;13(3):423-439. Epub 2019 Mar 18.

Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Boston, MA, USA.

Leukoplakia and erythroplakia are two entities under the moniker of "oral potentially malignant disorders" that are highly associated with the presence of oral epithelial dysplasia (OED) at first biopsy, while lesions of submucous fibrosis develop OED after being present for years. Importantly, traumatic/frictional keratoses are often mistaken clinically for leukoplakia and it is important for the pathologist to recognize and report them as such. The features of OED have been well-described and other architectural features will be discussed here, in particular verrucous and papillary architecture, bulky epithelial proliferation and epithelial atrophy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12105-019-01020-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6684678PMC
September 2019
28 Reads

Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy for the diagnosis of oral lichen planus.

Clin Exp Dermatol 2018 Jul 13;43(5):546-552. Epub 2018 Feb 13.

Department of Dermatology, Davis Medical Center, University of California-Davis, Sacramento, CA, USA.

Background: Lichen planus (LP) is a T-cell mediated autoimmune disorder of unknown aetiology that affects the skin, nails, oral and genital mucous membranes. Conventionally, oral LP (OLP) is diagnosed through clinical assessment and histopathological confirmation by oral biopsy.

Aim: To explore the use of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) to detect fluorescence lifetime changes between lesional OLP and perilesional normal mucosa. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ced.13404DOI Listing
July 2018
19 Reads

Clinicopathologic Correlation of White, Non scrapable Oral Mucosal Surface Lesions: A Study of 100 Cases.

J Clin Diagn Res 2016 Feb 1;10(2):ZC38-41. Epub 2016 Feb 1.

Director, Dentomax Dental & Maxillofacial Solutions , Hyderabad, Telangana, India .

Introduction: White, non scrapable lesions are commonly seen in the oral cavity. Based on their history and clinical appearance, most of these lesions can be easily diagnosed, but sometimes diagnosis may go wrong. In order to arrive to a confirmative diagnosis, histopathological assessment is needed in many cases, if not all. Read More

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http://jcdr.net/article_fulltext.asp?issn=0973-709x&year
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7860/JCDR/2016/16950.7226DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4800649PMC
February 2016
24 Reads

White lesions in the oral cavity: clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment.

Semin Cutan Med Surg 2015 Dec;34(4):161-70

Departments of Orofacial Sciences, Radiation Oncology, and Pathology, and the Helen Diller Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California, USA.

White lesions in the oral cavity are common and have multiple etiologies, some of which are also associated with dermatological disease. While most intraoral white lesions are benign, some are premalignant and/or malignant at the time of clinical presentation, making it extremely important to accurately identify and appropriately manage these lesions. Due to their similar clinical appearances, it may be difficult sometimes to differentiate benign white lesions from their premalignant/malignant counterparts. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/j.sder.2015.0180DOI Listing
December 2015
73 Reads

Oral pathology quiz #82. Case number 2. Frictional hyperkeratosis.

Authors:

J N J Dent Assoc 2014 ;85(1):16, 20

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June 2014
13 Reads

Oral frictional hyperkeratosis (morsicatio buccarum): an entity to be considered in the differential diagnosis of white oral mucosal lesions.

Skinmed 2012 Mar-Apr;10(2):114-5

Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Biology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA.

A 55-year-old man presented with desquamating lesions on his bilateral buccal mucosa intermittently for approximately 3 years. The alteration in texture within his mouth created an uncomfortable sensation and, at times, the lesions spontaneously peeled away requiring him to spit repeatedly. The patient denied any history of trauma, cheek biting, or use of tobacco products. Read More

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May 2012
69 Reads

Oral Pathology Quiz #74. Case number 3. Frictional hyperkeratosis.

Authors:

J N J Dent Assoc 2012 ;83(1):13, 16

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April 2012
51 Reads

Prevalence of oral lesions among Saudi dental patients.

Ann Saudi Med 2009 Sep-Oct;29(5):365-8

Department of Maxillofacial Surgery and Diagnostic Sciences, College of Dentistry, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

Background And Objectives: Few studies have been conducted in the Saudi population on oral mucosal lesions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the type and extent of oral lesions in a study among dental patients at a college of dentistry in Saudi Arabia.

Patients And Methods: Over a 3-year period, 2552 dental outpatients were interviewed and investigated clinically for the presence of oral mucosal conditions. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3290046PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0256-4947.55166DOI Listing
November 2009
13 Reads
18 Citations
0.705 Impact Factor

Morsicatio mucosae oris--a chronic oral frictional keratosis, not a leukoplakia.

J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2009 Jan;67(1):140-6

Department of Oral Medicine, Infection, and Immunity, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

Purpose: Morsicatio mucosae oris (MMO) presents as white papules and plaques that may resemble leukoplakia, and are often biopsied. The objective of this study is to document the clinical features and histopathology of MMO and to reevaluate the prevalence of dysplasia and/or cancer when this frictional keratosis is removed from the category of leukoplakia.

Materials And Methods: Cases that were submitted to a single laboratory with a provisional diagnosis of "leukoplakia," "hyperkeratosis," or "white lesion" were evaluated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joms.2008.08.040DOI Listing
January 2009
13 Reads
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