54 results match your criteria Oral Frictional Hyperkeratosis


Unusual Clinical Presentation of Giant Extragenital Condyloma.

Acta Dermatovenerol Croat 2020 Dec;28(7):240-241

Andrija Jovic, MD, Clinical Center of Nis, Clinic of Dermatovenereology , Bulevar Zorana Djindjica 48, Nis, Serbia;

Dear editor, Condylomata accuminatum (CA) is a human papillomavirus (HPV) related sexually transmitted infection (STI), clinically characterized by solitary or even clustered dark red or pink lesions solely affecting the anogenital area (1). CA involving the extragenital, non-mucosal skin has been sporadically reported (2-4). Diagnosis of CA is usually straightforward when the lesions are located on the anogenital area. Read More

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December 2020

Lichenoid morphology could be an early feature of oral proliferative verrucous leukoplakia.

J Oral Pathol Med 2021 Feb 8;50(2):229-235. Epub 2021 Jan 8.

Faculty of Dentistry, Oral & Craniofacial Sciences, King's College London, WHO Collaborating Centre for Oral Cancer, London, UK.

Background: Recognition and differentiation of early forms of proliferative verrucous leukoplakia (PVL) could be a challenge to both clinicians and pathologists.

Objective: To report on a retrospective study that was carried out on 51 cases of PVL that were initially diagnosed as frictional keratosis, oral leukoplakia or oral lichen planus. A secondary objective is to report on the outcome of malignant transformation during follow-up. Read More

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February 2021

The use of Velscope to assess cellular changes occuring in oral premalignancy.

J Oral Biol Craniofac Res 2020 Apr-Jun;10(2):99-103. Epub 2020 Mar 14.

Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dr. D.Y. Patil Vidyapeeth, Pune, India.

Objectives: To improve visualization of suspicious lesions of the oral mucosa and to assess the accuracy of Velscope in assessing cellular changes occurring in oral premalignancy for early diagnosis.

Materials And Methods: In this prospective, randomized in-vivo clinical study a total of 250 patients who gave history of chewing tobacco were screened. The selection of the site of biopsy was taken based on the area of loss of fluorescence identified by the Velscope within the lesion. Read More

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Benign Alveolar Ridge Keratosis: Clinical and Histopathologic Analysis of 167 Cases.

Head Neck Pathol 2020 Dec 16;14(4):915-922. Epub 2020 Mar 16.

Department of Oral Medicine, Infection and Immunity, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, 188 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA, 02215, USA.

Benign alveolar ridge keratosis (BARK), the intraoral counterpart of cutaneous lichen simplex chronicus, is a reactive hyperkeratosis caused by trauma or friction that presents as a poorly demarcated white papule or plaque on the keratinized mucosa of the retromolar pad or alveolar ridge mucosa (often edentulous). This is a clinical and histopathologic analysis of BARK including evaluation of p53 expression in selected cases. One hundred and sixty-seven cases of BARK were identified from 2016 to 2017 and 112 (67. Read More

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December 2020

Loricrin expression and its implication in oral submucous fibrosis, hyperkeratosis and normal mucosa with association to habits - An immunohistochemical study.

J Oral Biol Craniofac Res 2019 Jul-Sep;9(3):226-231. Epub 2019 May 20.

Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, Ragas Dental College and Hospital, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India.

Objective: The coarse fibres of areca nut and the continuous friction from occluding teeth are major causes of mechanical stress to the oral mucosa in conditions like oral submucous fibrosis and frictional keratosis. The continuous micro trauma provided in areca nut chewers, creates an environment where the keratinocytes exhibit alteration. Loricrin, is expressed abundantly in keratinizing epithelium in response to mechanical stress. Read More

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Oral Epithelial Dysplasia and Premalignancy.

Authors:
Sook-Bin Woo

Head Neck Pathol 2019 Sep 18;13(3):423-439. Epub 2019 Mar 18.

Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Boston, MA, USA.

Leukoplakia and erythroplakia are two entities under the moniker of "oral potentially malignant disorders" that are highly associated with the presence of oral epithelial dysplasia (OED) at first biopsy, while lesions of submucous fibrosis develop OED after being present for years. Importantly, traumatic/frictional keratoses are often mistaken clinically for leukoplakia and it is important for the pathologist to recognize and report them as such. The features of OED have been well-described and other architectural features will be discussed here, in particular verrucous and papillary architecture, bulky epithelial proliferation and epithelial atrophy. Read More

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September 2019

Frictional Keratosis, Contact Keratosis and Smokeless Tobacco Keratosis: Features of Reactive White Lesions of the Oral Mucosa.

Authors:
Susan Müller

Head Neck Pathol 2019 Mar 22;13(1):16-24. Epub 2019 Jan 22.

Atlanta Oral Pathology, Emory Decatur Hospital, Emory University School of Medicine, 2701 N. Decatur Road, Decatur, GA, 30033, USA.

White lesions of the oral cavity are quite common and can have a variety of etiologies, both benign and malignant. Although the vast majority of publications focus on leukoplakia and other potentially malignant lesions, most oral lesions that appear white are benign. This review will focus exclusively on reactive white oral lesions. Read More

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Prevalence and Distribution of Oral Mucosal Lesions by Sex and Age Categories: A Retrospective Study of Patients Attending Lebanese School of Dentistry.

Int J Dent 2018 17;2018:4030134. Epub 2018 May 17.

Faculty of Pharmacy, Lebanese University, Beirut, Lebanon.

Background: Prevalence and distribution of oral mucosal lesions in a sample of Lebanese population attending the School of Dentistry of Lebanese University is necessary to evaluate their oral health situation.

Objectives: The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence and distribution of oral mucosal lesions of patients attending the School of Dentistry.

Methods: A descriptive study was carried out by retrospectively examining a total of 231 medical and clinical examination record files of patients, attending the School of Dentistry Lebanese University for multidisciplinary dental treatments. Read More

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Oral epithelial dysplasia, atypical verrucous lesions and oral potentially malignant disorders: focus on histopathology.

Authors:
Susan Müller

Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol 2018 06 1;125(6):591-602. Epub 2018 Mar 1.

Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta Oral Pathology, Decatur, GA, USA. Electronic address:

The term oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMDs) describes a recognizable group of mucosal diseases that have a risk of progressing to squamous cell carcinoma. Oral leukoplakia, the most common OPMD, has a 1% prevalence and reported malignant transformation rates of 2% to 5%. Other OPMDs include erythroplakia, erythroleukoplakia, submucous fibrosis, lesions of reverse smokers, and inherited genetic disorders, such as Fanconi anemia. Read More

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Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy for the diagnosis of oral lichen planus.

Clin Exp Dermatol 2018 Jul 13;43(5):546-552. Epub 2018 Feb 13.

Department of Dermatology, Davis Medical Center, University of California-Davis, Sacramento, CA, USA.

Background: Lichen planus (LP) is a T-cell mediated autoimmune disorder of unknown aetiology that affects the skin, nails, oral and genital mucous membranes. Conventionally, oral LP (OLP) is diagnosed through clinical assessment and histopathological confirmation by oral biopsy.

Aim: To explore the use of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) to detect fluorescence lifetime changes between lesional OLP and perilesional normal mucosa. Read More

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White oral mucosal lesions among the Yemeni population and their relation to local oral habits.

J Investig Clin Dent 2018 May 26;9(2):e12305. Epub 2017 Nov 26.

Department of Oral Medicine, Sana'a University, Sana'a, Yemen.

Aims: The aim of the present study was to assess the prevalence and risk factors of white oral mucosal lesions among Yemeni adults; in particular, those who chew khat and tobacco.

Methods: The present cross-sectional study included 1052 dental patients aged 15 years and older. A detailed oral examination was performed by a single examiner in accordance with standard international criteria. Read More

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Prevalence and distribution of oral mucosal non-malignant lesions in the western Sicilian population.

Minerva Stomatol 2016 Aug;65(4):191-206

Department of Surgical, Oncological and Stomatological Disciplines, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy -

Backgroung: The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of oral mucosal non-malignant lesions in the Sicilian population. In addition, we evaluated the association between each oral lesion and its risk factors.

Methods: This study analyzed a total of 2539 consecutive patients, attending the Department of Surgical, Oncological and Stomatological Disciplines of Palermo University, who were examined for the presence of various oral lesions during the period from January 2012 and February 2015. Read More

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Clinicopathologic Correlation of White, Non scrapable Oral Mucosal Surface Lesions: A Study of 100 Cases.

J Clin Diagn Res 2016 Feb 1;10(2):ZC38-41. Epub 2016 Feb 1.

Director, Dentomax Dental & Maxillofacial Solutions , Hyderabad, Telangana, India .

Introduction: White, non scrapable lesions are commonly seen in the oral cavity. Based on their history and clinical appearance, most of these lesions can be easily diagnosed, but sometimes diagnosis may go wrong. In order to arrive to a confirmative diagnosis, histopathological assessment is needed in many cases, if not all. Read More

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February 2016

Squamous Cell Carcinoma as the Most Common Lesion of the Tongue in Iranians: a 22-Year Retrospective Study.

Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 2016 ;17(3):1415-9

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran E-mail :

The tongue has been globally considered as an indicator of general health for millennia. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and distribution of tongue lesions in an Iranian population. In this retrospective study, data from 6,435 oral biopsy reports over a 22-year period (1992-2014) were retrieved from archives of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology Department, Shahid Beheshti Dental School, Tehran, Iran. Read More

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January 2017

White lesions in the oral cavity: clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment.

Semin Cutan Med Surg 2015 Dec;34(4):161-70

Departments of Orofacial Sciences, Radiation Oncology, and Pathology, and the Helen Diller Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California, USA.

White lesions in the oral cavity are common and have multiple etiologies, some of which are also associated with dermatological disease. While most intraoral white lesions are benign, some are premalignant and/or malignant at the time of clinical presentation, making it extremely important to accurately identify and appropriately manage these lesions. Due to their similar clinical appearances, it may be difficult sometimes to differentiate benign white lesions from their premalignant/malignant counterparts. Read More

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December 2015

Oral leukoplakia, the ongoing discussion on definition and terminology.

Med Oral Patol Oral Cir Bucal 2015 Nov 1;20(6):e685-92. Epub 2015 Nov 1.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Oral Pathology, VU University Medical Center, P.O. Box 7057, 1007 MB Amsterdam, The Netherlands,

In the past decades several definitions of oral leukoplakia have been proposed, the last one, being authorized by the World Health Organization (WHO), dating from 2005. In the present treatise an adjustment of that definition and the 1978 WHO definition is suggested, being : "A predominantly white patch or plaque that cannot be characterized clinically or pathologically as any other disorder; oral leukoplakia carries an increased risk of cancer development either in or close to the area of the leukoplakia or elsewhere in the oral cavity or the head-and-neck region". Furthermore, the use of strict diagnostic criteria is recommended for predominantly white lesions for which a causative factor has been identified, e. Read More

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November 2015

Prevalence and distribution of oral mucosal lesions in a geriatric Indian population.

Can Geriatr J 2015 Mar 31;18(1):11-4. Epub 2015 Mar 31.

Jodhpur Dental College, Jodhpur National University, Jodhpur (Raj), India.

Background: Oral health is important to individuals of all age groups. Previous epidemiologic studies of the oral health status of the general population in India provided very little information about oral mucosal lesions in the elderly. Hence, the purpose of the present study was to determine the prevalence of the oral lesions in a geriatric Indian population. Read More

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Oral mucosal lesions in older people: relation to salivary secretion, systemic diseases and medications.

Oral Dis 2015 Sep 6;21(6):721-9. Epub 2015 Apr 6.

Section of Oral Medicine, Clinical Oral Physiology, Oral Pathology and Anatomy, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Objectives: To determine the prevalence of oral mucosal lesions in a sample of older Danish people and to investigate their associations with age, gender, systemic diseases, medications, xerostomia and salivary secretion.

Methods: A total of 668 community-dwelling individuals aged 65-95 years underwent a clinical examination, measurements of unstimulated and stimulated whole and labial salivary flow rates and an interview regarding xerostomia, general health, medication, tobacco and alcohol habits.

Results: Seventy-five per cent of all participants and 70% of the non-medicated ones had one or more oral mucosal lesions. Read More

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September 2015

Prevalence and the relationship of oral mucosal lesions in tobacco users and denture wearers in the North Indian population.

J Family Community Med 2013 Sep;20(3):187-91

Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Jodhpur Dental College, Jodhpur National University, Jodhpur, Rajasthan, India.

Aim: The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence and the relationship of oral mucosal lesions in tobacco users and denture wearers in a North Indian population.

Materials And Methods: The study comprised 3,749 patients attending the Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Jodhpur Dental College General Hospital between September 2008 and December 2012, for the treatment of dental problems other than oral mucosal lesions. The ages ranged from 28 years to 83 years, with a mean age of 49. Read More

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September 2013

Prevalence of potentially malignant oral mucosal lesions among tobacco users in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 2014 ;15(2):757-62

Department of Oral Medicine, King Abdulaziz University (KAU), Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia(KSA) E-mail :

Smoking is recognized as a health problem worldwide and there is an established tobacco epidemic in Saudi Arabia as in many other countries, with tobacco users at increased risk of developing many diseases. This cross sectional study was conducted to assess the prevalence of oral mucosal, potentially malignant or malignant, lesions associated with tobacco use among a stratified cluster sample of adults in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. A sample size of 599 was collected and each participant underwent clinical conventional oral examination and filled a questionnaire providing information on demographics, tobacco use and other relevant habits. Read More

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November 2014

Prevalence of oral mucosal lesions in dental patients with tobacco smoking, chewing, and mixed habits: A cross-sectional study in South India.

J Family Community Med 2013 May;20(2):130-5

Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Subharti Dental College and Hospital, Subharti University, Meerut, Uttar Pradesh, India.

Background: A variety of oral mucosal lesions and conditions are associated with the habit of smoking and chewing tobacco, and many of these carry a potential risk for the development of cancer. There have been no studies that report the prevalence of habits and associated oral changes in the population in Dharwad region, of Karnataka, south India.

Materials And Methods: A hospital-based, cross-sectional study was carried out at SDM Dental College (Dharwad, Karnataka). Read More

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White lesions in the oral cavity: a clinicopathological study from a tertiary care dermatology centre in kerala, India.

Indian J Dermatol 2013 Jul;58(4):269-74

Department of Dermatology, Sree Gokulam Medical College, Venjaramoodu, Kerala, India.

Context: White lesions in the oral cavity may be benign, pre-malignant or malignant. There are no signs and symptoms which can reliably predict whether a leukoplakia will undergo malignant change or not. Many systemic conditions appear initially in the oral cavity and prompt diagnosis and management can help in minimizing disease progression and organ destruction. Read More

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Breastfeeding keratosis: this frictional keratosis of newborns may mimic thrush.

Pediatrics 2013 Sep 5;132(3):e775-8. Epub 2013 Aug 5.

Department of General Practice and Dental Public Health, University of Texas School of Dentistry at Houston, Houston, TX, USA.

We report the first example, to our knowledge, of a frictional keratosis from exuberant sucking in a breastfeeding infant. A 2-month-old girl was referred for evaluation of a well-demarcated, nonsloughing white keratotic plaque of the lower lip mucosa, just inside the vermilion border. The plaque had a slightly irregular surface, had no surrounding erythema, and was the only such plaque in the mouth. Read More

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September 2013

Alveolar ridge keratosis--a retrospective clinicopathological study.

Head Face Med 2013 Apr 16;9:12. Epub 2013 Apr 16.

Background: Alveolar ridge keratosis (ARK) is a distinct, benign clinicopathological entity, characterized by a hyperkeratotic plaque or patch that occurs on the alveolar edentulous ridge or on the retromolar trigone, considered to be caused by chronic frictional trauma. The aim of this retrospective study is to present the clinicopathological features of 23 consecutive cases of ARK.

Material And Methods: The 23 biopsy samples of ARK were selected and pathological features were revised (keratosis, acanthosis, surface architecture, and inflammation). Read More

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Oral frictional hyperkeratosis (morsicatio buccarum): an entity to be considered in the differential diagnosis of white oral mucosal lesions.

Skinmed 2012 Mar-Apr;10(2):114-5

Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Biology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA.

A 55-year-old man presented with desquamating lesions on his bilateral buccal mucosa intermittently for approximately 3 years. The alteration in texture within his mouth created an uncomfortable sensation and, at times, the lesions spontaneously peeled away requiring him to spit repeatedly. The patient denied any history of trauma, cheek biting, or use of tobacco products. Read More

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