22,747 results match your criteria Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder


Shared genetic basis between reproductive behaviors and anxiety-related disorders.

Mol Psychiatry 2022 Jun 24. Epub 2022 Jun 24.

Department of Psychiatry, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu, Japan.

Reproductive behaviors are associated with risks for psychiatric disorders. Reproductive phenotypes are moderately heritable and have genetic overlaps with risks for psychiatric disorders. However, the genetic and causal relationships between anxiety-related disorders or specific anxiety disorders and reproductive phenotypes remain unknown. Read More

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Orthorexia nervosa and eating disorder behaviors: A systematic review of the literature.

Appetite 2022 Jun 21:106134. Epub 2022 Jun 21.

University of South Alabama, Department of Psychology, Mobile, AL, 36688, USA.

Background: Orthorexia nervosa (ON) involves obsessive thoughts about healthy eating and distress related to this obsession. There is still dispute over whether ON should be considered on the obsessive-compulsive spectrum, the eating disorder (ED) spectrum, or as its own disorder. Based on current research, orthorexic behaviors seem to be closely related to eating disorder behaviors. Read More

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Efficacy of group cognitive-behavioral therapy in adolescents with obsessive compulsive disorder: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Braz J Psychiatry 2022 Jun 23. Epub 2022 Jun 23.

Departamento de Clínica Médica (neurociências), Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil.

Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of group cognitive-behavioral therapy (GCBT) for the treatment of adolescents with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD).

Methods: This review was registered in PROSPERO under number CRD42020158475. Five databases (PubMed, Virtual Health Library, Web of Science, Scopus, and PsycINFO) were searched. Read More

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Comparing the effects of a herbal drug based on Echium Amoenum with fluvoxamine in the treatment of adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Curr Drug Discov Technol 2022 Jun 24. Epub 2022 Jun 24.

Department of Persian Medicine, School of Persian and Complementary Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.

Background: Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a severe and debilitating neuropsychiatric condition. Although selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants, and cognitive-behavioral therapy are the first-line medication and treatment for OCD, an estimated 30% of patients are treatment-resistant, and complete functional recovery is rare. Natural products as adjuvant or alternative therapies should be examined to find safer and more effective ways to manage OCD. Read More

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[Characterization, epidemiology and trends of eating disorders].

Nutr Hosp 2022 Jun 22. Epub 2022 Jun 22.

Departamento de Biomedicina, Biotecnología y Salud Pública. Facultad de Enfermería y Fisioterapia. Universidad de Cádiz.

Background: Eating disorders are a group of conditions in which negative beliefs about food, body shape, and body weight together with behaviors such as restricted food intake, binge eating, excessive exercise, self-induced vomiting, and use of laxatives. They can become serious, affect quality of life, and lead to multiple physical and even psychiatric complications with a fatal outcome. The purpose of this chapter is to describe the characteristics, epidemiology, and trends of eating disorders with updated information based on the most recent publications. Read More

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Life-threatening obsessive-compulsive disorder precipitated by the COVID-19 pandemic in an adolescent.

BJPsych Bull 2022 Jun 24:1-7. Epub 2022 Jun 24.

Central and North West London NHS Foundation Trust, UK.

The COVID-19 pandemic starting in 2020 has had massive mental health consequences worldwide. It has caused generalised fear and anxiety about catching, spreading and suffering from the virus. This article describes a fictionalised patient's presentation of life-threatening obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) associated with fears of catching COVID-19. Read More

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Forming a Doctor-Patient Alliance During COVID-19 to Enhance Treatment Outcomes for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

Authors:
Dorothy E Stubbe

Focus (Am Psychiatr Publ) 2021 Oct 5;19(4):451-454. Epub 2021 Nov 5.

Child Study Center, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.

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October 2021

What Have We Learned About the Genetics of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders in Recent Years?

Focus (Am Psychiatr Publ) 2021 Oct 5;19(4):384-391. Epub 2021 Nov 5.

Department of Biomedicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark (Mattheisen); Department of Psychiatry, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and New Jersey Medical School, Rutgers University, Newark (M. Pato, C. Pato); Department of Cell Biology, SUNY Downstate Health Sciences University, Brooklyn, New York (Knowles).

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a complex, multifactorial disorder with onset in either childhood or early adulthood. Lifetime prevalence has been estimated to be around 2%-3%. groups OCD together with closely related disorders-body dysmorphic disorder, trichotillomania (hair-pulling disorder), hoarding disorder, and excoriation disorder (skin-picking disorder)-as obsessive-compulsive and related disorders (OCRDs). Read More

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October 2021

Pharmacological and Psychotherapeutic Interventions for Management of Obsessive-compulsive Disorder in Adults: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-analysis.

Focus (Am Psychiatr Publ) 2021 Oct 5;19(4):457-467. Epub 2021 Nov 5.

Division of Psychiatry, University College London, London, UK (P Skapinakis, Prof G Lewis); Department of Psychiatry, University of Ioannina School of Medicine, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece (P Skapinakis); School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK (D M Caldwell, Prof W Hollingworth, P Bryden, N J Welton, H Baxter, D Kessler); Department of Postgraduate Medicine, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, UK, and Highly Specialised Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Body Dysmorphic Disorder Services, Hertfordshire Partnership University NHS Foundation Trust, Hertfordshire, UK (N A Fineberg); Department of Psychology, University of Bath, Bath, UK (Prof P Salkovskis); and Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, University of York, York, UK (Prof R Churchill).

Reprinted under Creative Commons CC-BY license. Read More

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October 2021

Diagnosis and Treatment of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders.

Authors:
Michele T Pato

Focus (Am Psychiatr Publ) 2021 Oct 5;19(4):383. Epub 2021 Nov 5.

Department of Psychiatry, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and New Jersey Medical School, Rutgers University, Newark.

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October 2021

Impact of COVID-19 on People With Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

Authors:
Eric A Storch

Focus (Am Psychiatr Publ) 2021 Oct 5;19(4):444-445. Epub 2021 Nov 5.

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston.

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October 2021

Hoarding Disorder: Development in Conceptualization, Intervention, and Evaluation.

Focus (Am Psychiatr Publ) 2021 Oct 5;19(4):392-404. Epub 2021 Nov 5.

School of Social Work, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada (Bratiotis, Lin);School of Social Work, Boston University, Boston (Muroff).

Hoarding disorder is characterized by difficulty parting with possessions because of strong urges to save the items. Difficulty discarding often includes items others consider to be of little value and results in accumulation of a large number of possessions that clutter the home. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) with exposure and response prevention and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor medications traditionally used to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder are generally not efficacious for people with hoarding problems. Read More

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October 2021

Trichotillomania and Skin-Picking Disorder: An Update.

Focus (Am Psychiatr Publ) 2021 Oct 5;19(4):405-412. Epub 2021 Nov 5.

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, University of Chicago, Chicago (Grant); Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, and Southern Health NHS Foundation Trust, both in Southampton, United Kingdom (Chamberlain).

Trichotillomania (hair pulling disorder) and skin-picking (excoriation) disorder are common neuropsychiatric disorders (each with a point prevalence of around 2%) but are underrecognized by professionals. Affected individuals repeatedly pull out their own hair or pick at their skin, and these symptoms not only have a negative impact on these individuals because of the time they occupy but can also lead to considerable physical disfigurement, with concomitant loss of self-esteem and avoidance of social activities and intimate relationships. The behaviors may also have serious physical consequences. Read More

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October 2021

Compulsively Moral: OCD, Ethics, and the Law.

Focus (Am Psychiatr Publ) 2021 Oct 5;19(4):446-450. Epub 2021 Nov 5.

Department of Psychiatry, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, New York (Marks); Academy for Medicine and the Humanities, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York City (Appel).

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October 2021

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: 2021 Update.

Focus (Am Psychiatr Publ) 2021 Oct 5;19(4):430-443. Epub 2021 Nov 5.

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles (Van Noppen); private practice, Los Angeles (Sassano-Higgins, Appasani); OCD and Anxiety Psychological Services, Calgary, Alberta, Canada (Sapp).

In this update of a previous review, the authors discuss cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) with exposure and response prevention for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). This efficacious modality avoids side effects common to psychotropic medication and reduces risk of relapse once treatment has ended. Psychotherapy involves identification and ranking of stimuli that provoke obsessions, exposure to these stimuli while preventing compulsions, and cognitive restructuring. Read More

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October 2021

Efficacy and Safety of Deep Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Prospective Multicenter Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Trial.

Focus (Am Psychiatr Publ) 2022 Jan 25;20(1):152-159. Epub 2022 Jan 25.

The School of Psychological Science, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel (Carmi); the Department of Life Sciences and the Zlotowski Center for Neuroscience, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel (Carmi, Barnea-Ygael, Roth, Zangen); Advanced Mental Health Care, Inc., Palm Beach, Fla. (Tendler); the Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles (Bystritsky); the Spectrum Neuroscience and Treatment Center, New York (Hollander); the Temerty Centre for Therapeutic Brain Intervention and the Campbell Family Research Institute, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, and the Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Ontario (Blumberger, Daskalakis); the Department of Psychiatry, University of Florida, Gainesville (Ward); the Department of Psychiatry, Northwell Health, New York (Lapidus); the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health System, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York (Goodman); the Lindner Center of HOPE, Mason, Ohio (Casuto); the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati (Casuto); the Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Diego, La Jolla (Feifel); the Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel (Zohar).

(Appeared originally in American Journal of Psychiatry 2019; 176:931-938) Reprinted with permission from American Psychiatric Association Publishing. Read More

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January 2022

Deep Brain Stimulation for Intractable Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Treatment-Resistant Depression.

Focus (Am Psychiatr Publ) 2022 Jan 25;20(1):55-63. Epub 2022 Jan 25.

Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital-Harvard Medical School, Boston.

In deep brain stimulation (DBS), a neurostimulation device is implanted to generate electrical fields in targeted deep brain regions in order to affect circuits associated with neuropsychiatric illness for potential therapeutic benefit. The development of DBS has followed a decades-long history of psychiatric neurosurgery, with advances in pacemakers and spinal neurostimulation devices allowing for the use of DBS in the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders. Currently, deep brain stimulation for psychiatric illness has been approved by the U. Read More

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January 2022

A Randomized Trial Directly Comparing Ventral Capsule and Anteromedial Subthalamic Nucleus Stimulation in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Clinical and Imaging Evidence for Dissociable Effects.

Focus (Am Psychiatr Publ) 2022 Jan 25;20(1):160-169. Epub 2022 Jan 25.

Department of Clinical and Movement Neurosciences (HT, HA, TF, PL, MJ, LZ, MH, EMJ), University College London Queen Square Institute of Neurology, London; The National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery (HT, HA, TF, PL, LZ, MH, EMJ), London; Highly Specialised Service for OCD and BDD (England) (LMD), SW London and St George's NHS Trust, London; Departments of Psychology (AMA-S, TWR) and Psychiatry (BJS), Behavioural and Clinical Neuroscience Institute, University of Cambridge, Cambridge; Highly Specialised Service for OCD and BDD (England) (NAF), Hertfordshire Partnership University NHS Foundation Trust, Welwyn Garden City; Centre for Clinical & Health Research Services (NAF), School of Life and Medical Sciences, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield; Division of Neuroscience (KM), School of Medicine, University of Dundee, Dundee; and Advanced Interventions Service (KM), NHS Tayside, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee, United Kingdom.

(Appeared originally in Biological Psychiatry 2019; 85:726-734) Reprinted under Creative Commons CC-BY license. Read More

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January 2022

Psychiatric Applications of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation.

Focus (Am Psychiatr Publ) 2022 Jan 25;20(1):8-18. Epub 2022 Jan 25.

Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles (Marder); Division of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston (Barbour, Ferber); Curated Mental Health, New York City (Idowu, Itzkoff); Yale Stress Center, New Haven, Connecticut (Idowu); Department of Psychiatry, Mount Sinai Hospital, New York City (Itzkoff).

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is an increasingly popular noninvasive brain stimulation modality. In TMS, a pulsed magnetic field is used to noninvasively stimulate a targeted brain region. Repeated stimulation produces lasting changes in brain activity via mechanisms of synaptic plasticity similar to long-term potentiation. Read More

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January 2022

Ultrasound as a Neurotherapeutic: A Circuit- and System-Based Interrogation.

Focus (Am Psychiatr Publ) 2022 Jan 25;20(1):32-35. Epub 2022 Jan 25.

UCLA-Caltech Medical Scientist Training Program (Spivak), Department of Neurosurgery, David Geffen School of Medicine (Spivak, Bari), and Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior (Spivak, Kuhn), University of California, Los Angeles; School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe (Tyler).

Focused ultrasound is a novel brain stimulation modality that combines the noninvasiveness of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and the precision of deep brain stimulation. In this review, the authors examine low-intensity focused ultrasound for brain mapping and neuromodulation. They also discuss high-intensity focused ultrasound, which is used for incisionless surgeries, such as capsulotomies for obsessive-compulsive disorder. Read More

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January 2022

Transcranial Electrical Stimulation for Psychiatric Disorders in Adults: A Primer.

Focus (Am Psychiatr Publ) 2022 Jan 25;20(1):19-31. Epub 2022 Jan 25.

Department of Psychology, Graduate Center, and Department of Psychology, Hunter College, City University of New York, New York City (Cho, Dennis-Tiwary); Department and Institute of Psychiatry and Service of Interdisciplinary Neuromodulation, Faculty of Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil (Razza, Borrione, Brunoni, Sudbrack-Oliveira); Department of Biomedical Engineering, City College of New York, City University of New York, New York City (Bikson); Department of Neurology, Grossman School of Medicine, New York University, New York City (Charvet); Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of São Paulo, and University Hospital, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil (Brunoni).

Transcranial electrical stimulation (tES) comprises noninvasive neuromodulation techniques that deliver low-amplitude electrical currents to targeted brain regions with the goal of modifying neural activities. Expanding evidence from the past decade, specifically using transcranial direct current simulation and transcranial alternating current stimulation, presents promising applications of tES as a treatment for psychiatric disorders. In this review, the authors discuss the basic technical aspects and mechanisms of action of tES in the context of clinical research and practice and review available evidence for its clinical use, efficacy, and safety. Read More

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January 2022

Telephone-Administered Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Body Dysmorphic Disorder: Case Series.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2022 Jun 16;19(12). Epub 2022 Jun 16.

Department of Psychology, Clinical Psychology with Focus on Psychotherapy Research, University of Zurich, Binzmühlestrasse 14, 8050 Zurich, Switzerland.

Cognitive behavioral therapy is an effective treatment for body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), but many patients do not receive appropriate treatment due to several treatment barriers and psychosocial care structures. Low-threshold interventions, including those from the field of e-mental health, could improve access to psychotherapy. In addition to internet-administered therapy, telephone-administered therapy may reduce treatment barriers, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. Read More

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Binge-like Prenatal Ethanol Exposure Causes Impaired Cellular Differentiation in the Embryonic Forebrain and Synaptic and Behavioral Defects in Adult Mice.

Brain Sci 2022 Jun 17;12(6). Epub 2022 Jun 17.

Center for Dementia Research, Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg, NY 10962, USA.

An embryo's in-utero exposure to ethanol due to a mother's alcohol drinking results in a range of deficits in the child that are collectively termed fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs). Prenatal ethanol exposure is one of the leading causes of preventable intellectual disability. Its neurobehavioral underpinnings warrant systematic research. Read More

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Microstates imbalance is associated with a functional dysregulation of the resting-state networks in obsessive-compulsive disorder: a high-density electrical neuroimaging study using the TESS method.

Cereb Cortex 2022 Jun 24. Epub 2022 Jun 24.

Unité de Recherche Clinique Pierre Deniker, Centre Hospitalier Henri Laborit, 86021 Poitiers, France.

The dysfunctional patterns of microstates dynamics in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) remain uncertain. Using high-density electrical neuroimaging (EEG) at rest, we explored microstates deterioration in OCD and whether abnormal microstates patterns are associated with a dysregulation of the resting-state networks interplay. We used EEG microstates analyses, TESS method for sources reconstruction, and General Linear Models to test for the effect of disease severity on neural responses. Read More

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The relationship between symptoms of obsessive compulsive disorder and depression during therapy: A random intercept cross-lagged panel model.

J Behav Ther Exp Psychiatry 2022 Sep 4;76:101748. Epub 2022 Jun 4.

South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, UK; The Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, UK. Electronic address:

Background And Objectives: We know little about how symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder and depression interact during psychological therapy. Although some previous research suggests that reductions in the severity of depression are driven by reductions in OCD, support for this conclusion is limited due to the exclusion of individuals with severe depression and limitations of the statistical approaches used.

Methods: This study re-examined the interaction between symptoms of OCD and depression during therapy in a sample of 137 adults with a primary diagnosis of OCD and a full range of depression severity. Read More

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September 2022

Mental contamination among people in China: A replication of a moral manipulation experiment.

J Behav Ther Exp Psychiatry 2022 Sep 4;76:101741. Epub 2022 Jun 4.

School of Psychology, Beijing Normal University, China. Electronic address:

Background And Objectives: Mental contamination can be evoked by thoughts, images, and memories without having physically contacted any contaminants. Although several experiments have investigated the mechanism of mental contamination, none has been conducted in the Chinese socio-cultural context. Considering the potential cultural-sensitivity of mental contamination we replicated Elliott and Radomsky's experiment (2009) to examine whether an imagined immoral act would prompt mental contamination among female university students in China. Read More

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September 2022

Association of Clinical and Demographic Characteristics With Response to Electroconvulsive Therapy in Mania.

JAMA Netw Open 2022 Jun 1;5(6):e2218330. Epub 2022 Jun 1.

University Health Care Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.

Importance: Knowledge of the effectiveness of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in the treatment of manic episodes is based on clinical experience, but empirical evidence is scarce. Moreover, prognostic factors associated with response to ECT in patients with mania are poorly understood.

Objective: To investigate the response to ECT in patients with manic episodes. Read More

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Abnormal white-matter rich-club organization in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Hum Brain Mapp 2022 Jun 23. Epub 2022 Jun 23.

Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, Maastricht University, Maastricht, Netherlands.

Rich-club organization is key to efficient global neuronal signaling and integration of information. Alterations interfere with higher-order cognitive processes, and are common to several psychiatric and neurological conditions. A few studies examining the structural connectome in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) suggest lower efficiency of information transfer across the brain. Read More

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Development of a scale to assess obsessive-compulsive tendencies among Japanese university students.

Heliyon 2022 Jun 10;8(6):e09646. Epub 2022 Jun 10.

Faculty of Human-Environment Studies, Kyushu University, 744, Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka, 819-0395, Japan.

Obsessive-compulsive (OC) tendencies refer to obsessions and compulsions in a nonclinical group, which are risk factors for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). OC tendencies and OC symptoms are mainly assessed using five factors: ordering, obsessions, cleaning, hoarding, and checking. However, since hoarding is now classified as an independent diagnosis in the DSM-V, this factor was not included and was instead replaced by indecisiveness. Read More

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