98 results match your criteria Nutrition Today [Journal]


Choline: The Underconsumed and Underappreciated Essential Nutrient.

Nutr Today 2018 Nov-Dec;53(6):240-253. Epub 2018 Nov 13.

is the principal and CEO at the Think Healthy Group, Inc, and is a adjunct professor in the Department of Nutrition and Food Studies at George Mason University.

Choline has been recognized as an essential nutrient by the Food and Nutrition Board of the National Academies of Medicine since 1998. Its metabolites have structural, metabolic, and regulatory roles within the body. Humans can endogenously produce small amounts of choline via the hepatic phosphatidylethanolamine -methyltransferase pathway. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NT.0000000000000302DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6259877PMC
November 2018
4 Reads

Using the Dietary Supplement Label Database to Identify Potentially Harmful Dietary Supplement Ingredients.

Nutr Today 2018 Sep-Oct;53(5):229-233

Professor at the Uniformed Services University and Director of the Consortium for Health and Military Performance (CHAMP).

Over half of young adults, athletes, and Military Service Members self-report using at least one dietary supplement (DS) 1 or more times per week. DS may be consumed to improve health, provide more energy, increase muscle strength, and/or enhance performance. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has raised concerns regarding adulteration, safety, and adverse events associated with DS marketed for brain health and bodybuilding. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NT.0000000000000295DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6372126PMC
September 2019

What Is the Evidence Base for a Potassium Requirement?

Nutr Today 2018 Sep-Oct;53(5):184-195. Epub 2018 Sep 19.

is a distinguished professor in the Department of Nutrition Science, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana.

Increased intake of potassium should be promoted to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke and to protect against bone loss, but confidence in recommended intakes depends on the strength of the evidence. All public health recommendations are considerably higher than current average intakes. Evidence on which current potassium intake recommendations for the United States, Europe, and globally have limitations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NT.0000000000000298DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6181280PMC
September 2018
3 Reads

The Chinese Children and Families Cohort Study: The Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Ultraviolet Radiation Data Collection.

Nutr Today 2018 May-Jun;53(3):104-114. Epub 2018 May 23.

is the Director of Population Studies, in the Office of Disease Prevention in the Office of the Director of the National Institutes of Health and the principal investigator of the Chinese Children and Families Cohort Study (CFCS) Pilot Study 2.

This article reports the study design, methodological issues and early results of a pilot study testing methods for collecting nutrition, physical activity, and ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure data in a groundbreaking study in China. Epidemiological studies suggest that exposures across the entire life course, including in utero, early childhood, and adolescence, may be important in the etiology of adult cancers and other chronic diseases. The Chinese Children and Families Cohort Study intends to follow-up subjects from the 1993 to 1995 Community Intervention Program of folic acid supplementation for the prevention of neural tube defects. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NT.0000000000000275DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5999376PMC
May 2018
10 Reads

Food Consumption Patterns and Micronutrient Density of Complementary Foods Consumed by Infants Fed Commercially Prepared Baby Foods.

Nutr Today 2018 Mar 22;53(2):68-78. Epub 2018 Mar 22.

is head, Nutrition Science for Baby Food, Nestlé Infant Nutrition, Global R&D, where she leads the Feeding Infants and Toddlers Studies globally. She received her bachelor of science degree from Cornell University and master of public health and doctor of public health degrees from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Nutrition is critically important in the first 1000 days, and while most American babies are fed commercial baby foods, there is little or no evidence from nationally representative data to understand the implications of such consumption. We used 24-hour dietary recall data for 505 infants from The Feeding Infants and Toddlers Study to describe food consumption patterns and micronutrient density of complementary foods consumed by infants fed commercially prepared baby food fruit, vegetables, and dinners and compared with those eaten by nonconsumers of these products. Results show that consumers were significantly more likely to report eating all vegetables (excluding white potatoes, 71% vs 51%), deep yellow vegetables (42% vs 18%), and fruits (79% vs 65%) and were less likely to report eating white potatoes (10% vs 24%), dark green vegetables (4% vs 20%), and sweets (23% vs 47%) than were nonconsumers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NT.0000000000000265DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5902138PMC
March 2018
5 Reads

High-Quality Carbohydrates and Physical Performance: Expert Panel Report.

Authors:
Mitch Kanter

Nutr Today 2018 Jan 21;53(1):35-39. Epub 2017 Oct 21.

is the chief science officer with FoodMinds, a division of Padilla, in Chicago IL. He leads nutrition research and scientific projects and programming for FoodMinds clients. He also leads the FoodMinds Global Expert Bench , a group of nutrition scientists and technical communications experts from around the world who provide strategic counsel to FoodMinds clients on various international projects. During his 25-plus years in the food industry, he has served in various technical leadership roles for a number of multinational companies.

While all experts agreed that protein needs for performance are likely greater than believed in past generations, particularly for strength training athletes, and that dietary fat could sustain an active person through lower-intensity training bouts, current research still points to carbohydrate as an indispensable energy source for high-intensity performance. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NT.0000000000000238DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5794245PMC
January 2018
2 Reads

Mediterranean Diet and Prevention of Chronic Diseases.

Nutr Today 2017 Sep 15;52(5):208-222. Epub 2017 Aug 15.

is professor in the Department of Nutritional Sciences and The University of Arizona Cancer Center and co-director of The University of Arizona Mediterranean Diet and Health Study Abroad Program. Dr Romagnolo is a collaborator on various research projects related to nutritional prevention of cancer epigenetics. He is a coeditor of a volume entitled "Mediterranean Diet: Dietary Guidelines and Impact on Health and Disease," which was published as the proceedings of the 2015 Research Frontiers in Nutritional Sciences Conference Series held at The University of Arizona with the grant support of the US Department of Agriculture and is composed of chapter contributions by speakers.

A large body of research data suggests that traditional dietary habits and lifestyle unique to the Mediterranean region (Mediterranean diet, MD) lower the incidence of chronic diseases and improve longevity. These data contrast with troubling statistics in the United States and other high income countries pointing to an increase in the incidence of chronic diseases and the projected explosion in cost of medical care associated with an aging population. In 2013, the MD was inscribed by UNESCO in the "Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NT.0000000000000228DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5625964PMC
September 2017
2 Reads

Sugar Price Supports and Taxation: A Public Health Policy Paradox.

Nutr Today 2017 May 15;52(3):143-150. Epub 2017 May 15.

earned a BS in Nutrition Science, with minors in biology and chemistry, from Purdue University in 2016. Dilk is currently earning her Master's in Public Health Nutrition at the George Washington University.

Domestic US sugar production has been protected by government policy for the past 82 years, resulting in elevated domestic prices and an estimated annual (2013) $1.4 billion dollar "tax" on consumers. These elevated prices and the simultaneous federal support for domestic corn production have ensured a strong market for high-fructose corn syrup. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NT.0000000000000217DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5464749PMC
May 2017
7 Reads

Role of Commodity Boards in Advancing the Understanding of the Health Benefits of Whole Foods: California Dried Plums.

Authors:
Phyllis E Bowen

Nutr Today 2017 Jan 25;52(1):19-25. Epub 2017 Jan 25.

is professor emerita of the Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition of the University of Illinois at Chicago. She was a member of the faculty of the Department of Nutrition and Dietetics (now Kinesiology and Nutrition) for 30 years and her areas of research concentration have been the human metabolism of carotenoids and oxidative stress.

Food and agriculture commodity boards have become important funders of nutrition research. There are benefits and cautions (biases toward health benefits, failure to publish negative results, and aggressive promotion of single studies) for this activity. The California Dried Plum Board, along with other commodity boards, have developed independent Scientific Nutrition Advisory Panels to guide and evaluate the research they fund. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NT.0000000000000187DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5287432PMC
January 2017
2 Reads

The Gut Microbiome and Its Role in Obesity.

Authors:
Cindy D Davis

Nutr Today 2016 Jul-Aug;51(4):167-174

Office of Dietary Supplements, National Institutes of Health, 6100 Executive Blvd, Suite 3B01, Bethesda, MD 20892-75173, , ,

The human body is host to a vast number of microbes, including bacterial, fungal and protozoal microoganisms, which together constitute our microbiota. Evidence is emerging that the intestinal microbiome is intrinsically linked with overall health, including obesity risk. Obesity and obesity-related metabolic disorders are characterized by specific alterations in the composition and function of the human gut microbiome. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5082693PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NT.0000000000000167DOI Listing
November 2016
10 Reads

The Hospital Community Benefit Program: Implications for Food and Nutrition Professionals.

Nutr Today 2016 Jul-Aug;51(4):191-193

2016 MD Graduate, University of Toledo College of Medicine, 3000 Arlington Avenue, Toledo OH 43614, cell - 919-656-2053.

This article briefly explains the food and nutrition implications of the new standards, tax penalties and reporting requirements for non-profit hospitals and healthcare systems to maintain a tax-exempt or charitable status under section 501(c)(3) of the Federal Internal Revenue Code set forth in The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (P.L. 111-148, Sec. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5068564PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NT.0000000000000165DOI Listing
October 2016
10 Reads

Pistachios for Health: What Do We Know About This Multifaceted Nut?

Nutr Today 2016 May 19;51(3):133-138. Epub 2016 May 19.

is a PhD student at the Rovira i Virgili University. He is from the Human Nutrition Unit, Hospital Universitari de Sant Joan de Reus, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, IISPV (Institut d'Investigació Sanitària Pere Virgili), Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Reus, and CIBERobn (Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición), Institute of Health Carlos III, Madrid, Spain.

Human beings have known about pistachio nuts since 6000 bc. Since then, pistachios have been systematically incorporated into the diet of various cultures. They are nutrient-dense nuts with a healthy nutritional profile that contains fiber, unsaturated fatty acids and antioxidant compounds. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NT.0000000000000160DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4890834PMC
May 2016
33 Reads

Defining "Protein" Foods.

Nutr Today 2016 May 19;51(3):117-120. Epub 2016 May 19.

is a PhD student in the Nutrition Program at the University of Minnesota, St Paul.

Changing the name of the "protein foods" group on the US Department of Agriculture's visual food guide, MyPlate, back to the "meat & beans" group would provide important clarification regarding US Department of Agriculture recommendations for a balanced diet. Previous iterations of the food guide named the protein group after its constituent foods (ie, the "meat & beans" group on the 2005 MyPyramid), and the reasons for renaming the entire group with MyPlate are unclear. The exclusion of dairy foods from the "protein foods" group of the 2010 MyPlate illustrates the shortcomings of this group's name. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NT.0000000000000157DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4890830PMC
May 2016
5 Reads

Raw Milk Consumption: Risks and Benefits.

Authors:
John A Lucey

Nutr Today 2015 Jul 27;50(4):189-193. Epub 2015 Jun 27.

is a professor of food science at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and director of the Wisconsin Center for Dairy Research, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison. His research is on the chemistry and technology of dairy products and on the properties of food proteins. He has published around more than 100 peer-reviewed articles and more than 21 book chapters. He received a BS in Food Science and a PhD in Food Chemistry, both from University College Cork (Ireland).

There continues to be considerable public debate on the possible benefits regarding the growing popularity of the consumption of raw milk. However, there are significant concerns by regulatory, or public health, organizations like the Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention because of risk of contracting milkborne illnesses if the raw milk is contaminated with human pathogens. This review describes why pasteurization of milk was introduced more than 100 years ago, how pasteurization helped to reduce the incidence of illnesses associated with raw milk consumption, and the prevalence of pathogens in raw milk. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NT.0000000000000108DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4890836PMC
July 2015
6 Reads

Body Mass Index: Obesity, BMI, and Health: A Critical Review.

Authors:
Frank Q Nuttall

Nutr Today 2015 May 7;50(3):117-128. Epub 2015 Apr 7.

is a full professor at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, and chief of the Endocrine, Metabolic and Nutrition Section at the Minneapolis VA Medical Center, Minnesota. His PhD degree is in biochemistry. He has more than 250 scientific publications in peer-reviewed journals, and he is the winner of numerous prestigious academic and scientific awards, including the 2014 Physician/Clinician Award of the American Diabetes Association.

The body mass index (BMI) is the metric currently in use for defining anthropometric height/weight characteristics in adults and for classifying (categorizing) them into groups. The common interpretation is that it represents an index of an individual's fatness. It also is widely used as a risk factor for the development of or the prevalence of several health issues. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NT.0000000000000092DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4890841PMC
May 2015
8 Reads

Historical Overview of Transitional Feeding Recommendations and Vegetable Feeding Practices for Infants and Young Children.

Nutr Today 2016 Jan 28;51(1):7-13. Epub 2016 Jan 28.

is physician-in-chief of Massachusetts General Hospital for Children; chair of the Department of Pediatrics, Massachusetts General Hospital; and Charles Wilder Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School.

Although recommendations for introducing solid foods to infants and young children have changed significantly since the beginning of the 20th century, vegetable consumption recommendations have always been an important part of the child-feeding repertoire. In 1958, the first report of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Committee on Nutrition stated that developmental maturity of the gut and neuromuscular system, growth rate, and activity level were good indicators for determining when to introduce solid foods to infants than age. All 7 editions of the AAP use an evidence-based model for recommendations concerning the complementary feeding of infants and young children. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NT.0000000000000137DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4770272PMC
January 2016
3 Reads

Is Vitamin D Inadequacy in Early Life an Instance of the "Barker Hypothesis"?

Authors:
Robert P Heaney

Nutr Today 2016 Jan 23;51(1):14-17. Epub 2016 Feb 23.

is university professor emeritus at Creighton University in Omaha, Nebraska.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NT.0000000000000138DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4764019PMC
January 2016
3 Reads

Use of Highly Fortified Products among US Adults.

Nutr Today 2015 Nov-Dec;50(6):294-300

Natural Marketing Institute, Harleysville, PA., 19438.

It is complicated to ascertain the composition and prevalence of the use of highly fortified food and supplement products (HFPs) because HFP foods and HFP supplements have different labeling requirements. However, HFPs (energy bars, energy drinks, sports drinks, protein bars, energy shots, and fortified foods/beverages) are popular in the United States. A web-based survey balanced to reflect US census data was used to describe their use in a sample of 2,355 US adults >18 yr in 2011 and trends in their use from 2005. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NT.0000000000000129DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4724870PMC
January 2016
11 Reads

Systematic Review of Pears and Health.

Nutr Today 2015 Nov 23;50(6):301-305. Epub 2015 Nov 23.

is a Food Science graduate at the University of Minnesota, St Paul, and completed this review as part of an undergraduate research project.

Fruit consumption is universally promoted, yet consumption of fruit remains low in the United States. We conducted a systematic review on pear consumption and health outcomes searching both PubMed and Agricola from 1970 to present. The genus L. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NT.0000000000000112DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4657810PMC
November 2015
7 Reads

Perceptions of a Healthy Diet: Insights From a 3-Country Survey.

Nutr Today 2015 Nov 23;50(6):282-287. Epub 2015 Nov 23.

is a nutritional epidemiologist and director of Career Development and Outreach at the Office of Dietary Supplements, Office of Disease Prevention at the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. Dr Bailey is also an adjunct professor in the Department of Nutrition Science at Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana.

Limited data exist on consumer beliefs and practices on the role of omega-3 fatty acid and vitamin D dietary supplements and health. For this reason, the Global Health and Nutrition Alliance conducted an online survey in 3 countries (n = 3030; United States = 1022, Germany = 1002, United Kingdom = 1006) of a convenience sample of adults (aged 18-66 years) who represented the age, gender, and geographic composition within each country. More than half of the sample (52%) believed they consume all the key nutrients needed for optimal nutrition through food sources alone; fewer women (48%) than men (57%), and fewer middle-aged adults (48%) than younger (18-34 years [56%]) and older (≥55 years [54%]) adults agreed an optimal diet could be achieved through diet alone. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NT.0000000000000119DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4657811PMC
November 2015
2 Reads

Desire Resistance and Desire Reduction in Public Health Approaches to Obesity.

Nutr Today 2015 Sep-Oct;50(5):258-262

Nutrition Obesity Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NT.0000000000000116DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4651457PMC
November 2015
4 Reads

Food Based Complementary Feeding Strategies for Breastfed Infants: What's the Evidence that it Matters?

Authors:
Nancy F Krebs

Nutr Today 2014 Nov-Dec;49(6):271-277

Section of Nutrition, Department of Pediatrics University of Colorado School of Medicine Aurora, CO 80045.

The period of complementary feeding represents a major portion of the 1000 day critical window and thus impacts a period of substantial and dynamic infant development. This review highlights and synthesizes findings of several recent studies conducted to evaluate food based strategies on outcomes related to micronutrient status, growth and neurocognitive development. Particular emphasis is placed on interventions using meat or fortified products to impact iron and zinc intakes, due to the dependence of breastfed infants on complementary food choices to meet requirements for these two critical micronutrients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NT.0000000000000064DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4636122PMC
November 2015
1 Read

Commentary on Making Sense of the Science of Sodium.

Nutr Today 2015 Mar;50(2):66-71

is associate professor at the Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of California, San Diego.

Sodium reduction is an important component of a healthy dietary pattern to reduce cardiovascular disease risk. Numerous authoritative scientific bodies and professional health organizations have issued population sodium intake recommendations, all of which are at least 1000 mg/d lower than the current average American sodium intake of nearly 3500 mg/d. Recent research has called these recommendations into question, but a number of methodological issues may account for the inconsistency of results in observational studies examining the relationship between sodium intake and health outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NT.0000000000000086DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4420255PMC
March 2015
4 Reads

Evidence-Based Approach to Fiber Supplements and Clinically Meaningful Health Benefits, Part 2: What to Look for and How to Recommend an Effective Fiber Therapy.

Nutr Today 2015 Mar;50(2):90-97

is a clinical scientist, Procter & Gamble, Mason, Ohio, where he has worked for 18 years. After serving in the US Army (509th Airborne, 221st Military Police), Dr McRorie completed an associate of arts degree in nursing and worked 14 years as an emergency department/intensive care unit RN at teaching hospitals that included Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore and Children's Hospital National Medical Center in Washington, DC. He went on to complete a bachelor of science degree at the University of Maryland, followed by a dual PhD in neuroscience and physiology at Michigan State University, where he was also a physiology instructor for the medical school. Dr McRorie was previously the director of clinical affairs at Ethicon Endo-Surgery, a Johnson & Johnson company. His research interests include neurogastroenterology and motility, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and the physical effects of fiber supplements on metabolic syndrome, cholesterol lowering, improved glycemic control, constipation, diarrhea, and irritable bowel syndrome. He is a fellow of the American College of Gastroenterology, the American Gastroenterological Association and the American College of Nutrition, and a member of the American Diabetes Association.

Dietary fiber that is intrinsic and intact in fiber-rich foods (eg, fruits, vegetables, legumes, whole grains) is widely recognized to have beneficial effects on health when consumed at recommended levels (25 g/d for adult women, 38 g/d for adult men). Most (90%) of the US population does not consume this level of dietary fiber, averaging only 15 g/d. In an attempt to bridge this "fiber gap," many consumers are turning to fiber supplements, which are typically isolated from a single source. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NT.0000000000000089DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4415970PMC
March 2015
6 Reads

Evidence-Based Approach to Fiber Supplements and Clinically Meaningful Health Benefits, Part 1: What to Look for and How to Recommend an Effective Fiber Therapy.

Nutr Today 2015 Mar;50(2):82-89

is a clinical scientist, Procter & Gamble, Mason, Ohio, where he has worked for 18 years. After serving in the US Army (509th Airborne, 221st Military Police), Dr McRorie completed an associate of arts degree in nursing and worked 14 years as an emergency department/intensive care unit RN at teaching hospitals that included Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore and Children's Hospital National Medical Center in Washington, DC. He went on to complete a bachelor of science degree at the University of Maryland, followed by a dual PhD in neuroscience and physiology at Michigan State University, where he was also a physiology instructor for the medical school. Dr McRorie was previously the director of clinical affairs at Ethicon Endo-Surgery, a Johnson & Johnson company. His research interests include neurogastroenterology and motility, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and the physical effects of fiber supplements on metabolic syndrome, cholesterol lowering, improved glycemic control, constipation, diarrhea, and irritable bowel syndrome. He is a fellow of the American College of Gastroenterology, the American Gastroenterological Association and the American College of Nutrition, and a member of the American Diabetes Association.

Dietary fiber that is intrinsic and intact in fiber-rich foods (eg, fruits, vegetables, legumes, whole grains) is widely recognized to have beneficial effects on health when consumed at recommended levels (25 g/d for adult women, 38 g/d for adult men). Most (90%) of the US population does not consume this level of dietary fiber, averaging only 15 g/d. In an attempt to bridge this "fiber gap," many consumers are turning to fiber supplements, which are typically isolated from a single source. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NT.0000000000000082DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4415962PMC
March 2015
2 Reads

Making Sense of the Science of Sodium.

Authors:
Robert P Heaney

Nutr Today 2015 Mar;50(2):63-66

is university professor emeritus at Creighton University, Omaha, Nebraska. He is an endocrinologist with a primary focus on quantitative nutritional physiology and on the formulation of nutritional policy.

Despite the Institute of Medicine's commitment to base its nutrient intake recommendations in evidence, the 2004/2005 Dietary Reference Intakes for sodium were not supported by evidence, as the subsequent 2013 Institute of Medicine review admitted. In this review, I suggest an approach to setting nutrient intake requirements based in physiology. Briefly, the requirement of a given nutrient can best be said to be the intake that calls for the least adaptation or compensation by the intact organism. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NT.0000000000000084DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4420256PMC
March 2015
1 Read

Stevia, Nature's Zero-Calorie Sustainable Sweetener: A New Player in the Fight Against Obesity.

Authors:
Margaret Ashwell

Nutr Today 2015 May 14;50(3):129-134. Epub 2015 May 14.

is an independent scientific consultant with Ashwell Associates, Hertfordshire, United Kingdom. She is a visiting research fellow at Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, United Kingdom. She has been a member of the Global Stevia Institute since 2011. She has worked previously as a research scientist for the Medical Research Council, as principal of the Good Housekeeping Institute, and as Science Director of the British Nutrition Foundation.

Stevia is a plant native to South America that has been used as a sweetener for hundreds of years. Today, zero-calorie stevia, as high-purity stevia leaf extract, is being used globally to reduce energy and added sugar content in foods and beverages. This article introduces stevia, explaining its sustainable production, metabolism in the body, safety assessment, and use in foods and drinks to assist with energy reduction. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NT.0000000000000094DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4890837PMC
May 2015
10 Reads

Mushrooms-Biologically Distinct and Nutritionally Unique: Exploring a "Third Food Kingdom"

Nutr Today 2014 Nov;49(6):301-307

is a consultant to the Food, Nutrition and Agriculture Industries, Los Altos, California. She coordinates nutrition research programs for agriculture commodity boards.

Mushrooms are fungi, biologically distinct from plant- and animal-derived foods (fruits, vegetables, grains, dairy, protein [meat, fish, poultry, legumes, nuts, and seeds]) that comprise the US Department of Agriculture food patterns operationalized by consumer-focused messages. Although mushrooms provide nutrients found in these food groups, they also have a unique nutrient profile. Classified into food grouping systems by their use as a vegetable, mushrooms' increasing use in main entrées in plant-based diets is growing, supporting consumers' efforts to follow dietary guidance recommendations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NT.0000000000000063DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4244211PMC
November 2014
2 Reads

Can Low-Income Americans Afford a Healthy Diet?

Nutr Today 2010 Nov;44(6):246-249

Nutritional Sciences Program and the Center for Obesity Research, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195.

Many nutritional professionals believe that all Americans, regardless of income, have access to a nutritious diet of whole grains, lean meats, and fresh vegetables and fruit. In reality, food prices pose a significant barrier for many consumers who are trying to balance good nutrition with affordability. The Thrifty Food Plan (TFP), commonly cited as a model of a healthy low-cost diet, achieves cost goals by relaxing some nutrition constraints and by disregarding the usual eating habits of the American population. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NT.0b013e3181c29f79DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2847733PMC
November 2010
11 Reads

Choline: Dietary Requirements and Role in Brain Development.

Nutr Today 2007 ;42(4):181-186

Choline is needed for the maintenance of the structural integrity and signaling functions of cell membranes, for neurotransmission, and for transport of lipids and as a source of methyl groups. Choline can be made de novo in the body, but some individuals must also obtain choline in the diet to prevent deficiency symptoms. A number of environmental and genetic factors influence dietary requirements for choline, and average intakes in the population vary widely. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.NT.0000286155.55343.faDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2518394PMC
January 2007
7 Reads
9 Citations

Insulin and Amino Acids Are Critical Regulators of Neonatal Muscle Growth.

Authors:
Teresa A Davis

Nutr Today 2008 ;43(4):143-149

Teresa A. Davis, Ph.D., is a Professor of Pediatrics in the USDA/ARS Children's Nutrition Research Center at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston Texas. Her research focuses on the nutritional and hormonal regulation of protein metabolism and growth.

Newborn humans and animals grow at very rapid rates because they use the protein that they eat very efficiency to increase body protein mass. This high efficiency of protein deposition in neonates is largely due to their ability to markedly increase the amount of protein synthesized in their muscles when they eat. This enhanced stimulation of muscle protein synthesis after eating is mediated by the rise in the hormone, insulin, and the rise in amino acids, which are the building blocks of protein. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.NT.0000303337.37556.17DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2666879PMC
January 2008
2 Reads

Print-to-Practice: Designing Tailored Print Materials to Improve Cancer Survivors' Dietary and Exercise Practices in the FRESH START Trial.

Nutr Today 2007 May;42(3):131-138

Tenured professor with appointments in the School of Nursing and the Department of Surgery at Duke University Medical Center. She also was recognized as a Komen Professor of Survivorship for her research aimed at improving the lifestyle behaviors of cancer survivors.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.NT.0000277790.03666.95DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2600553PMC
May 2007
1 Read

Comparison of 1989 RDAs and DRIs for Water-Soluble Vitamins.

Nutr Today 2004 Mar;39(2):88-93

Alison L. Eldridge, is the Manager of Nutrition Sciences at the General Mills, Inc., Bell Institute of Health and Nutrition, Minneapolis, Minn.

This report is the second in a series to compare the 1989 Recommended Dietary Allowances with new Dietary Reference Intakes. The report focuses on water-soluble vitamin C, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B6, folate, vitamin B12, pantothenic acid, biotin, and choline. Read More

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March 2004
1 Read

Maternal Zinc Deficiency and Maternal and Child Health in Peru: The 2000 Avanelle Kirksey Lecture, Purdue University.

Nutr Today 2004 Mar;39(2):78-87

Laura E. Caulfield, PhD, is an Associate Professor, Center for Human Nutrition, Bloomberg School of Public Health, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md. She conducts epidemiologic research on maternal nutrition and maternal infant health in diverse populations.

This article summarizes the findings of several research projects on maternal zinc deficiency in Peru. Read More

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March 2004
1 Read

Beyond Calcium: The Protective Attributes of Dairy Products and Their Constituents.

Authors:
Lori Hoolihan

Nutr Today 2004 Mar;39(2):69-77

Lori Hoolihan, PhD, RD, is a Nutrition Research Specialist at the Dairy Council of California in Irvine.

Functional foods are gaining in popularity as consumers are living longer and are seeking to reduce disease and optimize their health through diet. Dairy products and their components are one category of foods under investigation for their functional attributes. Recent research suggests the health benefits of consuming dairy foods may extend well beyond bone health to enhancing the immune system, reducing risks of some chronic diseases, and regulating body weight. Read More

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March 2004
3 Reads

Going Against the Grain: Flaws in the Zone Diet.

Nutr Today 2004 Mar;39(2):65-68

Samuel N. Cheuvront, PhD, RD, is a Research Physiologist at the US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine in Natick, Mass.

The Zone Diet is an eating plan claiming to maintain an “ideal” hormone balance and improve health through the manipulation of dietary carbohydrate and protein. Although popular, the diet’s health claims are based on dubious information and misinterpreted scientific facts, and it ultimately remains unsubstantiated. Read More

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March 2004
9 Reads

Why All the Fuss About Portion Size?: Designing the New American Plate.

Nutr Today 2004 Mar;39(2):59-64

Jeffery R. Prince, PhD received a BA from Bowdoin College and an MA and PhD from the University of Virginia. He taught at Northwestern University before moving into public health education and communications. He is currently Vice President for Education and Communications at the American Institute for Cancer Research.

In attempting to respond to current public concerns about nutrition when creating its health education program, the New American Plate, the American Institute for Cancer Research found it necessary to emphasize the importance of portion size. Justifiable concern about overweight and obesity and as yet unproved ideas about weight management were causing people to distort the shape of their diet. The focus of the new education program was reduction of cancer risk through a predominantly plant-based diet. Read More

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March 2004
3 Reads

Plant Biotechnology Can Enhance Food Security and Nutrition in the Developing World Part 1.

Nutr Today 2004 Mar;39(2):52-58

Maureen Mackey, PhD, RD, is responsible for communicating with the nutritional and medical communities about crop biotechnology and its potential to improve food security and nutrition.; Jill Montgomery, MA, is the Regional Director of Government & Public Affairs for Monsanto Company in the Asia Pacific region. Before joining Monsanto in 1996, she worked for several years at the World Bank in Washington, DC.

The world’s demand for food production will increase markedly in the coming years. Meeting this demand will require that we employ all manner of approaches, including the use of biotechnology, to produce results that cannot be achieved using traditional methods. This 2-part article reviews ongoing experiences in developing countries where crop biotechnology is being used to enhance the availability and/or nutritional value of local crops. Read More

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March 2004
3 Reads

Research Designs for Assessing the USDA’s Food Assistance and Nutrition Programs Outcomes, Part 2: Impact Evaluation of Demonstrations.

Nutr Today 2004 Jan;39(1):40-45

Biing-Hwan Lin, PhD, is an agricultural economist with the Economic Research Service, USDA, Washington, DC.; David Smallwood, PhD, is the Deputy Director for Food Assistance Research with the Food and Rural Economics Division, Economic Research Service, US Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC.; William Hamilton, PhD, was a Vice President with Abt Associates, Inc.; he is now retired.; Peter H. Rossi, PhD, is an Emeritus Professor with the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

This is the second part of a 2-part article that summarizes a review of research designs for assessing the impact of the USDA’s food assistance and nutrition programs on nutrition and health. The first part focused on the research designs for evaluating ongoing national programs. Here, the random experiment and 3 quasi-experimental designs that can be used to evaluate the impacts of demonstration projects are reviewed. Read More

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January 2004
3 Reads

The Importance of Breakfast Consumption to Nutrition of Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults.

Nutr Today 2004 Jan;39(1):30-39

Theresa A. Nicklas, DrPH, LN, is Professor of Pediatrics at the USDA/ARS Children’s Nutrition Research Center at Baylor College of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics. Her areas of expertise are cardiovascular health and nutritional epidemiology, child nutrition, and health promotion and chronic disease prevention.; Carol O’Neil, PhD, MPH, RD, is an Associate Professor and the Didactic Program Director at the Louisiana State University. Her research interests include food allergy, food security, and diet and health of low-income populations.; Leann Myers, PhD, is Associate Professor of Biostatistics at the Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine and the coauthor of more than 20 articles on nutrition.

Breakfast consumption has been identified as an important factor in nutrition, especially during growth stages. This article discusses data from nearly 2,500 children, adolescents, and young adults in Louisiana and considers the impact of breakfast consumption on their nutritional well-being. Read More

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January 2004
79 Reads

Healthy Eating: Defining the Nutrient Quality of Foods.

Nutr Today 2004 Jan;39(1):26-29

Carolyn J. Lackey, PhD, RD, LDN, is Professor and Food and Nutrition Specialist, North Carolina Cooperative Extension, North Carolina State University. Dr Lackey develops community food and nutrition programs and conducts research in food behavior change.; Kathryn M. Kolasa, PhD, RD, LDN, is Professor and Section Head, Nutrition Services and Patient Education, Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University. Her research interests are in medical nutrition education and consumer nutrition education.

Today, many initiatives to promote healthy eating and physical activity focus on changing policy and the environment to improve the health, not only of motivated or high-risk individuals but also the entire population. The escalating rates of overweight/obesity and incidence of diet-related diseases/health conditions will require many interventions to influence change. Those wishing to affect policy and environmental changes are often faced with defining foods and beverages that meet criteria defined as “healthy. Read More

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January 2004
3 Reads

Food in American History, Part 6—Beef (Part 1): Reconstruction and Growth Into the 20th Century (1865–1910).

Nutr Today 2004 Jan;39(1):18-25

Louis E. Grivetti, PhD, received his PhD in geography from the University of California, Davis, in 1976. He and his students conduct research on human dietary patterns, using historic and contemporary perspectives, especially in African, Asian, and Mediterranean societies, and American ethnic populations. Currently, Dr Grivetti is Professor of Nutrition, Department of Nutrition, University of California, Davis.; Jan L. Corlett, PhD, received her PhD in Geography from the University of California at Davis in 1999. She has conducted research among Hmong refugees living in California and has studied the roles of ethnic gardens in maintaining Hmong cultural traditions. Currently, Dr Corlett is a program evaluator at the University of California, Davis.; Bertram M. Gordon, PhD, received his PhD in History from Rutgers University in 1969. He specializes in 20th-century French history and serves on the Editorial Board of French Historical Studies and the International Editorial Advisory Board of Modern and Contemporary France. In addition to writing extensively on France in World War II, he has written on the intersections of food and tourism and has studied the history of popular foods, such as hamburgers and pizza. Dr Gordon is Professor of History and Acting Provost & Dean of Faculty at Mills College, Oakland, Calif.; Cassius T. Lockett, PhD, received his PhD in nutrition science from the University of California, Davis, in 1999. He has conducted research on edible wild plants used during drought in West Africa and the nutritional consequences of human food-related behavior. Currently, Dr Locket is an Epidemic Intelligence Officer, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He is attached to the Epidemiology Services Division, Bureau of Epidemiology, Michigan Department of Community Health.

This sixth installment of Food in American History series considers 1865 through 1910, covering America’s reconstruction and growth after the Civil War, with beef as the central food theme. Part 1 follows the rise of the hamburger as an icon in American culture. Read More

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January 2004
2 Reads

Becoming Proactive With the Whole-Grains Message.

Nutr Today 2004 Jan;39(1):10-17

Julie Miller Jones, PhD, CNS, LD, is a professor of nutrition at the College of St. Catherine in St. Paul, Minn, and an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Minnesota. Professor Jones is a past president of the American Association of Cereal Chemists (AACC). She is current chair of the Nutrition Division of the Institute Food Technologists and worked actively on the Dietary Fiber Definition for the AACC/ International Life Sciences Institute. She is actively working with others to form a consortium to increase the intake of whole-grain foods.; Marla Reicks, PhD, RD, is an Associate Professor, Department of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Minnesota, St. Paul.; Judi Adams, MS, RD, is President, Wheat Foods Council, Parker, Colo.; Gary Fulcher, PhD, is a Professor, Department of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Minnesota, St. Paul.; Len Marquart, PhD, is a Senior Scientist, General Mills Inc., Bell Institute of Health & Nutrition, Minneapolis, Minn.

Whole-grain foods have always been considered a healthy part of the diet. Only recently have epidemiologic and other data shown that whole grains have a role in preventing cardiovascular disease, diabetes, some types of cancer, and even obesity. What nearly all consumers and most health professionals fail to realize is that whole grains deliver as many if not more phytochemicals and antioxidants than do fruits and vegetables. Read More

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January 2004
5 Reads

Pandemic Obesity: What Is the Solution?

Nutr Today 2004 Jan;39(1):6-9

James E. Tillotson, PhD, MBA, is currently Professor of Food Policy and International Business at Tufts University. Before returning to the academic world, Dr Tillotson worked in industry, holding various research and development positions in the food and chemical sectors.

“What is the practical solution to the obesity problem?” is the perceptive question I was recently asked by Linda Hirsh, Field Producer for the Peter Jennings’ Show. She was preparing a television show on the American obesity problem for fall viewing on ABC. This column looks at whether there is a practical solution yet, and, if there is, what is it? Here goes! Read More

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January 2004
4 Reads

Provisional Recommended Soy Protein and Isoflavone Intakes for Healthy Adults: Rationale.

Nutr Today 2003 May-Jun;38(3):100-109

Health professionals and consumers are seeking guidance regarding appropriate soy intake levels. Several different types of evidence that support of our recommendation that adults should consume 15 g (range 10-25 g) soy protein and 50 mg isoflavones (range 30-100 mg)/day are presented. Read More

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June 2003
4 Reads

Do Nuts Have a Place in a Healthful Diet?

Authors:
Ann M. Coulston

Nutr Today 2003 May-Jun;38(3):95-99

A wealth of nutrition information has been published during the past decade on the healthful nature of nuts. As nut consumption increases, cardiovascular disease risk decreases. This cardioprotective effect of nut consumption is beyond what would be predicted from the fatty acid profile alone. Read More

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June 2003
2 Reads

Fast-Casual Dining: Our Next Eating Passion?

Nutr Today 2003 May-Jun;38(3):91-94

Americans have a new speedy-eating passion: fast-casual dining! Does this mean that now we can forget about McDonald's, Burger King, KFC, and the other fast-food restaurants that nutritionists have been railing against? Are they yesterday's news? Read More

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June 2003
9 Reads

Dairy Foods: Are They Politically Correct?

Authors:
Barbara J. Moore

Nutr Today 2003 May-Jun;38(3):82-90

This article considers the scientific evidence on the prevalence and management of verified lactose intolerance and the growing misperception that dairy foods should be avoided because ethnic populations cannot tolerate them. Healthcare professionals, in particular, must understand why eliminating dairy foods is rarely necessary and is generally undesirable. The genetically programmed ability to digest the milk sugar lactose normally declines throughout childhood in all ethnic groups. Read More

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June 2003
4 Reads

Can Chinese Children Drink Milk?

Nutr Today 2003 May-Jun;38(3):77-81

A controlled milk-intervention trial in Chinese schoolchildren showed that participants were able to consume 330 mL of milk every school day for 2 years. Read More

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June 2003
5 Reads