2,188 results match your criteria Nursing Administration Quarterly [Journal]


Engaging Stakeholders to Co-design an Academic Practice Strategic Plan in an Integrated Health System: The Key Roles of the Nurse Executive and Planning Team.

Nurs Adm Q 2019 Apr/Jun;43(2):186-192

Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Sinai Health System, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (Dr Jeffs); Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing and Institute of Health, Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (Dr Jeffs); Sinai Health System, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (Ms Merkley); King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre (Gen Org), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia (Ms Sinno); Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (Dr Thomson); College of Nurses of Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (Ms Peladeau); and Collaborative Strategy, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada (Mr Richardson).

As key members of the executive team, nurse executives play an integral role in the planning process and operationalization of strategic imperatives to ensure the overall success of the organization. Nurse executives are leading organizations through transition periods that require transformational leadership. Leaders must design a shared vision and set strategic priorities; empower others to lead; ensure access to resources needed for safe care delivery; and inspire people to meet the demands of the future. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00006216-201904000-0001
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000340DOI Listing
March 2019
3 Reads

Engaging Clinical Nurses in Research: Nurses' Experiences Delivering a Communication Intervention in a Behavioral Oncology Clinical Trial.

Nurs Adm Q 2019 Apr/Jun;43(2):175-185

Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, Georgia (Ms Landon); Indiana University School of Nursing, Indianapolis (Dr Crane); Riley Hospital for Children at IU Health, Indianapolis, Indiana (Ms Nance); Children's Mercy Hospital, Kansas City, Missouri (Dr Stegenga); University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing, Birmingham, and Aflac Cancer and Blood Disorders Center Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, Georgia (Ms Cherven); Greehey Children's Cancer Research Institute, University of Texas Health at San Antonio (Dr Perez Prado); Riley Hospital for Children at IU Health, Indianapolis, Indiana (Ms Butrum); University of Minnesota School of Nursing, Minneapolis (Dr Beacham); and Indiana University School of Nursing, Indianapolis (Dr Haase).

Despite the recognized need for clinical nurses to engage in the conduct of research, little is known about their research experiences. This article describes the experiences of nurses who delivered the communication intervention in a behavioral oncology clinical trial for parents of adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer. A qualitative thematic analysis was conducted of nurse interveners' (NIs') reflections on their experiences delivering the communication intervention. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000341DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6404753PMC

Authentic Nurse Leadership Conceptual Framework: Nurses' Perception of Authentic Nurse Leader Attributes.

Nurs Adm Q 2019 Apr/Jun;43(2):164-174

Department: Nursing Administration, Mather Hospital Northwell Health, Port Jefferson, New York.

Today's nurse leaders are challenged to successfully implement and sustain healthy work environments and promote staff engagement. Authentic leaders possess inner core values that are consistent with the nursing profession. Authentic nurse leaders are able to create a healthy work environment that leads to engaged nurses. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000344DOI Listing

Nursing's Leadership Role in Advancing Professional Practice/Work Environments as Part of the Quadruple Aim.

Nurs Adm Q 2019 Apr/Jun;43(2):157-163

Arizona State University, College of Nursing and Health Innovation, Yuma (Dr Bowles); Center for the Advancement of Healthcare Professionals, AMN Healthcare and Adjunct Faculty, Texas Tech, University Health Sciences Center School of Nursing, Lubbock (Dr Batcheller); Jeff Adams, LLC, Belmont, Massachusetts (Dr Adams); Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center, Richmond (Dr Zimmermann); and Emory Healthcare, Atlanta, Georgia (Dr Pappas).

Development of healthy professional practice/work environments (PPWEs) for nursing practice is critical to optimizing patient safety and workforce satisfaction while limiting turnover. Healthy PPWEs are linked with improved outcomes for patients, the workforce, and organizations. Nurses constitute the greatest professional segment of the US health care workforce and influence PPWEs, patient experience, health care quality, and cost per capita, all aspects of the quadruple aim. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000342DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

An Integrative Review of Nurse-to-Nurse Incivility, Hostility, and Workplace Violence: A GPS for Nurse Leaders.

Nurs Adm Q 2019 Apr/Jun;43(2):138-156

Academy of Evidence-Based Practice, Kaiser Permanente Southern California Patient Care Services, Regional Nursing Research Program, Pasadena (Dr Crawford); Gonzaga University, Foley Center Library, Spokane, Washington (Ms Chu); California State University, Los Angeles, Chin Family Institute for Nursing, Los Angeles (Dr Judson); University of California, Los Angeles, School of Nursing, Los Angeles (Dr Cuenca); School of Nursing, California State University, Long Beach (Dr Jadalla); Kaiser Permanente Woodland Hills Medical Center, Medical-Surgical/Oncology Unit, Woodland Hills, California (Ms Tze-Polo); Kaiser Permanente Southern California Patient Care Services, Regional Nursing Research Program, Kaiser Permanente, Pasadena (Dr Kawar); Health Science/Medical Library, Southern California Permanente Medical Group, Downey (Ms Runnels); and Kaiser Permanente Panorama City Medical Center, Nursing Administration, Panorama City, California (Mr Garvida Jr).

Bullying, lateral violence, and incivility are real phenomena in the nursing workplace and remain widespread across all care settings. The American Nurses Association recommends zero tolerance for any form of violence from any source and adopting evidence-based strategies to mitigate incivility and bullying. This integrative review examined the evidence regarding nurse-to-nurse incivility, bullying, and workplace violence for 4 nurse populations-student, new graduate, experienced, and academic faculty. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000338DOI Listing
March 2019
8 Reads

Addressing Unconscious Bias: A Nurse Leader's Role.

Authors:
Sabita Persaud

Nurs Adm Q 2019 Apr/Jun;43(2):130-137

School of Nursing, Notre Dame of Maryland University, Baltimore.

The nurse leader is ethically responsible for creating diverse and inclusive spaces for both nurses and those we care for. The leader must openly acknowledge and address the negative influence of bias and prejudice within health care organizations. This requires both an awareness of the influence of unconscious bias within the organization and appropriate actions to mitigate its impact. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000348DOI Listing
March 2019
3 Reads

Mastering Your Distinctive Strengths as an Introverted Nurse Leader.

Nurs Adm Q 2019 Apr/Jun;43(2):123-129

Notre Dame of Maryland University, School of Nursing, Baltimore (Dr Wisser); and Houston Baptist University School of Nursing and Allied Health, Houston, Texas (Dr Massey).

This article contrasts the nursing leadership styles of introverts and extraverts and examines what each brings to the nurse leader role. While introverts and extraverts bring unique strengths, it may appear to introverts that extraverts garner the preponderance of attention in meetings and committee work. Strategies for the self-identified introvert nurse leader to successfully lead in an extraversion-centric workplace are described. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000343DOI Listing

Why Nurse Leaders Derail: Preventing and Rebounding From Leadership Failure.

Nurs Adm Q 2019 Apr/Jun;43(2):113-122

MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, Massachusetts (Dr Bellack); and Director of Strategic Initiatives, Organization for Associate Degree Nursing, Pensacola, Florida (Ms Dickow).

To be successful, nurse leaders must be able to develop and articulate a vision for their areas of responsibility, build strong relationships with those they lead, and execute strategies and actions to achieve shared goals. Emotional intelligence and mastering self, interpersonal, and team relationships, while understanding organizational culture and systems, are critical components of successful leadership. Nurse leaders must be aware of their own strengths and weaknesses, be able to manage their emotions, exhibit social awareness of others' emotions, and successfully manage their relationships with others within their sphere of influence. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000345DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Integration of Authentic Leadership Lens for Building High Performing Interprofessional Collaborative Practice Teams.

Nurs Adm Q 2019 Apr/Jun;43(2):101-112

Office of Clinical and Global Partnerships, The University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing (Dr Shirey); Center for Nursing Excellence, The University of Alabama at Birmingham Hospital (Dr White-Williams); Family, Community, and Health Systems, The University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing (Dr White-Williams); and Department of Health Care Organization and Policy, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Public Health (Dr Hites).

Interprofessional collaborative practice (IPCP) models facilitate collaboration and teamwork across the health care continuum. Success of high performing IPCP teams is dependent on compassionate, authentic leaders who invest in helping their teams thrive amidst complexity. This article presents the integration of an authentic leadership lens for building high performing IPCP teams. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000339DOI Listing

Guest Editorial.

Nurs Adm Q 2019 Apr/Jun;43(2):99-100

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00006216-201904000-0000
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000347DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

From the Editor.

Authors:

Nurs Adm Q 2019 Apr/Jun;43(2):97-98

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000346DOI Listing

From Brainstorming to Strategic Plan: The Framework for the Society for the Advancement of Disaster Nursing: A Work in Progress.

Nurs Adm Q 2019 Jan/Mar;43(1):84-93

Saint Louis University, School of Nursing, St Louis, Missouri (Dr Langan); The University of Tennessee Knoxville, College of Nursing (Dr Lavin); Veterans Emergency Management Evaluation Center, US Department of Veterans Affairs, North Hills, California (Ms Griffin and Dr Dobalian); Johns Hopkins School of Nursing, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland (Dr Veenema); and Division of Health Systems Management and Policy, School of Public Health, The University of Memphis, Memphis, Tennessee (Dr Dobalian).

Professional health care societies play a critical role in promoting excellence in patient care, educating and certifying their members on evidence-based practices, and pursuing relevant research agendas to advance the science in the field. Disaster nursing is a subspecialty of professional nursing characterized by a unique knowledge base and set of skills and abilities not used in normal daily health care activities. A disaster or large-scale public health emergency creates a sudden, unanticipated surge of patients with health care needs that far exceeds the capacity of the health care system. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000335DOI Listing
March 2019
3 Reads

Follow the Leader: Changing the Game of Hierarchy in Health Care.

Nurs Adm Q 2019 Jan/Mar;43(1):76-83

School of Nursing, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock.

Almost every formal organization has a multilayered hierarchy. The role of the leader has been discussed in the literature for decades. Less well understood, and certainly less well documented, is the role of the follower. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000289DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

A Concept Analysis of Organizational Health and Communication.

Nurs Adm Q 2019 Jan/Mar;43(1):68-75

College of Nursing, The University of Arizona, Tucson.

Concepts of communication and organizational health were analyzed using the parameters set forth by Walker and Avant, including conceptual selection; clarification; synthesis; attribute exploration and identification; and review of corresponding events. Concept synthesis was initiated through exploration of medical and social science journals, and current literature regarding communication and organizational health was scrutinized to aid conceptual clarification. Concept analysis was informed by using the search engines CINAHL, PubMed, and PsycINFO, with inclusion criteria of "hospital," "communication," and "organizational health. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000331DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Beyond a Single Country's Borders: Trade in Services Uncovered Through Bibliometrics.

Nurs Adm Q 2019 Jan/Mar;43(1):58-67

National Council of State Boards of Nursing, Chicago, Illinois (Dr Benton); and Stephanie L. Ferguson & Associates, LLC, Amherst, Virginia, and Bing Stanford in Washington Program, Stanford University, Washington (Dr Ferguson).

We live and work in an increasingly connected global environment where actions in one part of the world can have consequences for all of us. This article examines, through the use of bibliometric analysis, the extent to which nursing scholars are engaged in the policy debate surrounding trade in services. Results demonstrate that, in comparison to medical colleagues, the nursing profession is more regionally orientated, focused on more operational-based themes and orientated to Mode 4: Mobility of the Profession. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000333DOI Listing
March 2019
13 Reads

The CNO US Healthcare Immersion Program, Part 2: Expanding the Footprint of Professional Nursing.

Nurs Adm Q 2019 Jan/Mar;43(1):50-57

PreferUS Healthcare, Shanghai China (Dr Cato); Yuma Regional Medical Center, Arizona (Dr Bowles); Banner-University Medical Center Phoenix, Arizona (Ms Carmack); Yinchuan Guolong Hospital, Xingqing District, Ningxia Province, China (Ms Liu); and Student-Doctor of Nursing Practice, Arizona State University, Oregon City, Oregon (Ms McFadden).

As global leaders, US nurses will have an increasingly recognized role and responsibility in shaping health care in all countries. They should be at the forefront of changing and improving health systems to achieve universal health. Currently, a major health care reform is underway that requires a shift in the professional nursing footprint of China's nurse leaders. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00006216-201901000-0001
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000336DOI Listing
March 2019
11 Reads

The CNO US Healthcare Immersion Program, Part 1: A Transformational Leadership Model.

Nurs Adm Q 2019 Jan/Mar;43(1):40-49

PreferUS Healthcare, Overland Park, Kansas (Dr Cato); Banner-University Medical Center Phoenix, Arizona (Ms Walker); Yuma Regional Medical Center, Arizona (Ms Aders); Yinchuan Guolong Hospital, Xingqing District, Ningxia Province, China (Ms Liu); and Student-Doctor of Nursing Practice, Arizona State University, Oregon City, Oregon (Ms McFadden).

As a result of recent global health events, US health care leaders are strengthening international relationships to share best practices, health research, and support of workforce capacity. The Institute for Healthcare Improvement, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, the American Nurses Credentialing Center, and the Joint Commission International have all committed to expanding their vision and mission to improve health and health care globally. To support excellence in international health care delivery, the authors embarked on a Chief Nursing Officer (CNO) US Healthcare Immersion Program. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000337DOI Listing
March 2019
15 Reads

Connecting Communities: The Development of an International Partnership.

Nurs Adm Q 2019 Jan/Mar;43(1):32-39

Tanner Health System School of Nursing, University of West Georgia, Carrollton (Dr Caramanica); WellStar School of Nursing, Kennesaw State University, Kennesaw, Georgia (Ms Emerson); Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Muscat-Al Khough, Oman (Ms Al-Harthy and Dr Al Awaisi); and College of Nursing, Augusta University, Augusta, Georgia (Dr Hooks).

Addressing health inequities and the social determinants of health for all people of the world is a primary goal of the World Health Organization. This article describes how a "Connecting Communities educational program" enabled nurse leaders from academic institutions from different sides of the globe to develop a reciprocal relationship of mutual interest around the topics of the nursing role in population health and care delivery. Grant funding resulted in the sharing of knowledge, expertise, and experiences directed toward encouraging the development of nurses as global citizens, with a broader view on what influences health and well-being. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000330DOI Listing
March 2019
10 Reads

Current Data of Foreign-Educated Nurses in Italy and the Recognition of Their Professional Qualifications.

Nurs Adm Q 2019 Jan/Mar;43(1):26-31

Health Professions Research and Development Unit, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, San Donato Milanese, Italy (Dr Caruso); Centre of Excellence for Nursing Scholarship, OPI Rome, Italy (Drs Rocco and Stievano); CGFNS International, Inc, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (Dr Shaffer); and Nursing and Health Policy, International Council of Nurses, Geneva, Switzerland (Dr Stievano).

Up-to-date data on foreign-educated nurses (FENs) in Italy and the recognition of their professional qualifications are pivotal to boost international discussion, and to improve the engagement and involvement of multistakeholders in the nursing profession. Currently, FENs in Italy represent roughly 6% of the total number of registered nurses. FENs are predominantly females between 35 and 54 years old. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000325DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Nursing Leadership in Guam.

Nurs Adm Q 2019 Jan/Mar;43(1):19-25

School of Nursing and Health Sciences, University of Guam, Mangilao.

Guam, an unincorporated territory of the United States, is one of the ten (10) US Affiliated Pacific Islands. The geographic location in the western Pacific Ocean, as well as the ties to the US position Guam as a strategic hub between the continental US, Asia, and the Pacific region. Health disparities in Guam and the Micronesian region are significant, and the non-communicable disease crisis is worsening, threatening the existing poor health infrastructure on the islands. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000332DOI Listing

The Role of Nurses in Advancing the Objectives of the Global Compacts for Migration and on Refugees.

Nurs Adm Q 2019 Jan/Mar;43(1):10-18

CGFNS International, Inc, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (Dr Shaffer, Ms Farrell, and Mr Álvarez); and CGFNS Alliance for Ethical International Recruitment Practices, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (Dr Bakhshi).

Nurses and other health care professionals are in a unique position to shift the paradigm around migration debates. As caregivers and advocates for patients and other providers, nurses are crucial to the health and well-being of individuals, families, and communities. This is especially true for migrants, including increasingly vulnerable refugee populations around the world. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000328DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Future Proofing: The Nursing Now Campaign.

Authors:
Elizabeth Adams

Nurs Adm Q 2019 Jan/Mar;43(1):5-9

Curtin University, Bentley, Australia; and University College Dublin, Dublin City University, and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Ireland.

In many Western democracies, nursing consumes a comparatively large proportion of the health service budget and delivers the highest proportion of direct patient care. Therefore, identifying and representing the contribution of nurses to clinical effectiveness as well as the wider social benefit to populations and the economy is crucial. Predictive models on health and social care requirements for the next quarter of a century report a staggering shift in population age, multimorbidity, and complexity of need. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000334DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Guest Editorial.

Authors:
Rhonda Anderson

Nurs Adm Q 2019 Jan/Mar;43(1)

RMA Consulting, Scottsdale, AZ.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000324DOI Listing

Guest Editorial.

Nurs Adm Q 2019 Jan/Mar;43(1)

President and Chief Executive Officer CGFNS International, Inc Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000323DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

From the Editor.

Authors:

Nurs Adm Q 2019 Jan/Mar;43(1):1-2

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000329DOI Listing

International Nursing: Caring in Nursing Leadership-A Meta-ethnography From the Nurse Leader's Perspective.

Nurs Adm Q 2018 Oct/Dec;42(4):E1-E19

Faculty of Nursing and Health Sciences, Nord University, Bodø, Norway (Ms Solbakken and Drs Bergdahl, Rudolfsson, and Bondas); Department of Health Sciences, Division of Nursing, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden (Dr Rudolfsson).

To explore and derive new conceptual understanding of nurse leaders' experiences and perceptions of caring in nursing.

Research Question: What is caring in nursing leadership from the nurse leaders' perspectives? There is a paucity of theoretical studies of caring in nursing leadership. Noblit and Hares interpretative meta-ethnography was chosen because of its interpretative potential for theory development. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000314DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6155347PMC
January 2019
14 Reads

International Nursing: Needs Assessment for Training in Disaster Preparedness for Hospital Nurses: A Modified Delphi Study.

Nurs Adm Q 2018 Oct/Dec;42(4):373-383

Center for Disaster Relief, Training, and Research, Yonsei University Severance Hospital, Seoul, South Korea (Dr Noh); College of Nursing, Yonsei University, Seoul, South Korea (Drs Oh, Kim, and Jang); Department of Emergency Medicine, College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul, South Korea (Dr Chung); and Red Cross College of Nursing, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, South Korea (Dr Lee).

Despite high awareness of the need, opportunities for nurses to gain disaster experience or training are limited. In Korea, most disaster training is done in an undergraduate curriculum where there is very limited practice, and the educational topics are mostly focused on the field aspect of disaster events. The purpose of this study was to determine the need for such training for hospital nurses and to determine appropriate and relevant components of the training contents. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000309DOI Listing
January 2019
17 Reads

Implementation and Dissemination of a Department of Veterans Affairs Oral Care Initiative to Prevent Hospital-Acquired Pneumonia Among Nonventilated Patients.

Nurs Adm Q 2018 Oct/Dec;42(4):363-372

Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Salem, Virginia (Drs Munro, Farooqi, and Vasudeva), Atlas Research, Contractor Support for the Department of Veterans Affairs Diffusion of Excellence Initiative, Washington, District of Columbia (Mss Haile-Mariam, Greenwell, and Demirci); and Prometheus Federal Services, Contractor Support for the Department of Veterans Affairs Diffusion of Excellence Initiative, Chantilly, Virginia (Ms Demirci).

Implementation and dissemination of an oral care initiative enhanced the safety and well-being of Veterans at the Salem VA Medical Center by reducing the risk of non-ventilator-associated hospital-acquired pneumonia (NV-HAP). The incidence rate of non-ventilator-associated hospital-acquired pneumonia decreased from 105 cases to 8.3 cases per 1000 patient-days (by 92%) in the initial VA pilot, yielding an estimated cost avoidance of $2. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000308DOI Listing
January 2019
39 Reads

Nursing Partnerships in Research and Quality Improvement Within a Large Integrated Health Care System.

Nurs Adm Q 2018 Oct/Dec;42(4):357-362

Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland (Dr Jang); Institute for Nursing Excellence, University of California, San Francisco Medical Center (Dr Jang); National Patient Care Services, Innovation and Leadership, Kaiser Permanente, Oakland, California (Dr Weberg); Kaiser Permanente School of Medicine; and National Patient Care Services, National Nursing Research and Policy, Kaiser Permanente, Oakland, California (Dr Dower).

Within a large integrated health care system that includes local, regional, and national medical centers and offices, quality and patient safety teams, and research institutes, more than 58 000 nurses are employed, with the vast majority providing point-of-care service to patients and members. A small but increasingly important number of nurses are involved in quality improvement and research teams to improve patient care. Within this environment, a number of developments point to a growing need for nursing leadership in systems-level and delivery science policies and research. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000318DOI Listing
January 2019
7 Reads

Systems Addressing Frail Elders (SAFE) Care: Description of Successful Partnerships Across Hospitals.

Nurs Adm Q 2018 Oct/Dec;42(4):350-356

Cedars-Sinai Health System, Los Angeles, California (Mss Ansryan and Haus and Drs Aronow, Coleman, and Bolton); Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (Dr Ward); Huntington Memorial Hospital, Pasadena, California (Ms Sanchez-Rico); and Torrance Memorial Medical Center, Torrance, California (Mss Berwald and LeQuire).

Systems Addressing Frail Elders (SAFE) Care is an interprofessional team-based program, which was developed and evaluated in a cluster randomized controlled trial. Results of this trial included reduced length of stay and complications for patients. This article describes a successful partnership across 4 Magnet hospitals in the dissemination of the model. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000317DOI Listing
January 2019

The Medicare Patient-Centered Partnership With Observation Units.

Nurs Adm Q 2018 Oct/Dec;42(4):343-349

Emory University Nell Hodgson School of Nursing, Atlanta, Georgia.

With a goal of increasing transparency regarding the utilization of Observation Units (OUs) in relation to Medicare policies, a 2012-2014 retrospective analysis was performed on 108 009 de-identified records of patients admitted from emergency departments to OUs within an urban health system. A cost-benefit analysis of OUs from the patient-centered perspective provided the theoretical patient cost. Using a query search, data regarding encounter type, length of stay, insurance carrier, origin, disposition, and age were collected. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000313DOI Listing
January 2019
31 Reads

Growing a Robust Academic Practice Partnership in an Academic Health System.

Nurs Adm Q 2018 Oct/Dec;42(4):331-342

Emory University Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Atlanta, Georgia (Drs Kelly, Abraham, Muirhead, and Shapiro); Atlanta VA Health Care System, Decatur, Georgia (Drs Kelly, Abraham, and Muirhead); and Professional Nursing Practice and Development, Emory Healthcare, Atlanta, Georgia (Dr Toney).

Schools of nursing located within academic health centers have embraced expanded opportunities to lead in this era of rapid change and considerable uncertainty in US health care. These schools bear a unique responsibility to work with their clinical nursing partners to advance the care of patients, improve the health of communities and populations, and help steward the nation's health care resources. This article describes how the Emory University Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing has formed and sustained academic-practice partnerships in response to these imperatives. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000319DOI Listing
January 2019
6 Reads

Leveraging Graduate Academic-Practice Partnerships to Transform Health System Outcomes.

Nurs Adm Q 2018 Oct/Dec;42(4):324-330

Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia.

Academic and clinical site partnerships are not new. However, many of these have not resulted in graduates of nursing education programs who are prepared to fulfill their full potential as newly employed professionals. This article describes an education program for Doctorate of Nursing Practice (DNP) students in which the students, under the close supervision of academic faculty, utilize their statistical analyses and complex system coursework to study and address "wicked" problems faced by health care organizations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000311DOI Listing
January 2019
25 Reads

Start Together, Stay Together: Nurse Residencies of the Future.

Nurs Adm Q 2018 Oct/Dec;42(4):318-323

Emory Healthcare, Atlanta, Georgia (Dr Bernard); and Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (Dr Martyn).

Consumerism and globalism are driving the demand for new business and education models. Nurse executives in all work environments are facing the need to innovate and implement new service models in a nimble and rapid manner. This article highlights the current and future state of nursing education and clinical practice integration through the lens of an academic-practice partnership, by demonstrating the benefit of a unified approach to nurse residencies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000310DOI Listing
January 2019
19 Reads

Funding Academic and Clinical Nurse Strategies Through Joint Fund-raising Initiatives and Grateful Patient Engagement.

Authors:
Amy Dorrill

Nurs Adm Q 2018 Oct/Dec;42(4):311-317

Emory University Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Atlanta, Georgia.

The Manatt report recommends a multipronged revenue portfolio to support academic health center (AHC) nursing: tuition, clinical practice, and external support. Most AHC nursing enterprises rely only on the first two-student tuition and patient billing. Philanthropy is not generally viewed as a viable revenue stream, especially for clinical nursing operations, but it should be. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000316DOI Listing
January 2019
6 Reads

Creating New Models of Care Through Academic-Clinical Partnership.

Nurs Adm Q 2018 Oct/Dec;42(4):305-310

Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (Dr Clevenger); and Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (Dr Cellar).

There are many documented instances of academic nurses creating faculty practice opportunities to support their faculty and students. Fewer articles have been published about the value of these shared models to clinical partners. Advanced practice nurses from the academic and clinical departments at Emory University and Emory Healthcare codesigned a new model of care that addresses the health system's need to achieve better experiences and health outcomes for patients living with dementia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000320DOI Listing
January 2019
15 Reads

Advancing a Culture of Clinical Nursing Research Through Collaborative Partnership Between Practice and Academia.

Nurs Adm Q 2018 Oct/Dec;42(4):299-304

Nursing Innovation and Research, Emory Healthcare, Peachtree Center, Atlanta, Georgia (Dr Gullatte); and Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (Dr Corwin).

Engaging in clinical inquiry is a natural foundation for a nurse's critical thinking strategy and application to practice. Transforming clinical inquiry into a formal research question designed to improve patient care and/or the practice environment can, however, sometimes seem overwhelming to clinical nurses. It may even be seen as out of scope for their daily practice. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000312DOI Listing
January 2019
14 Reads

Perspectives on a System Partnership: Academia and Practice at Emory University.

Nurs Adm Q 2018 Oct/Dec;42(4):297-298

Dean and Professor, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (Dr McCauley); and Chief Nurse Executive, Emory Healthcare, Coordinator of the Health System Leadership Track, DNP Program (Dr Pappas).

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000315DOI Listing
April 2019
14 Reads

A CGEAN Perspective: Partnerships in Nursing and in Health Care.

Nurs Adm Q 2018 Oct/Dec;42(4):296

Past President, CGEAN.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000321DOI Listing
September 2018
14 Reads

Guest Editorial.

Nurs Adm Q 2018 Oct/Dec;42(4):294-295

Professor and Asst Dean Technology Management, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia Senior Vice President Nursing, Chief Nursing Executive, Professor and holder of the James Klinenberg, MD, and Lynn Klinenberg-Linkin Endowed Chair in Nursing, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000322DOI Listing
April 2019
11 Reads

From the Editor.

Authors:

Nurs Adm Q 2018 Oct/Dec;42(4):293

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000307DOI Listing

International Nursing: Job Satisfaction Among Critical Care Nurses in a Governmental Hospital in Saudi Arabia.

Nurs Adm Q 2018 Jul/Sep;42(3):E1-E9

University of Tabuk, Saudi Arabia (Mr Mari and Drs Gonzales and Almatari); King Hussein Cancer Center, Amman, Jordan (Dr Alloubani); Faculty of Nursing, University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan (Mr Alzaatreh); School of Nursing, Saint Louis University, Baguio City, Philippines (Dr Abunab).

Job satisfaction improves the outcome of health care services. Nurses' job satisfaction should receive more attention in Saudi Arabia, and worldwide. This study was undertaken to measure factors that affect job satisfaction among critical care nurses at King Khalid Hospital in Saudi Arabia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000304DOI Listing
October 2018
6 Reads

Role of the Chief Nurse Officer in Ensuring Person- and Family-Centered Care.

Nurs Adm Q 2018 Jul/Sep;42(3):284-290

School of Nursing, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (Dr Barnsteiner); and School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis (Dr Disch).

Person- and family-centered care (PFCC) is a philosophy that has been espoused for decades and yet is rarely embedded in health care organizations. Difficulties dispelling the numerous myths about what PFCC is, as well as daunting challenges to designing and implementing it, have hindered progress. The chief nurse officer is well-positioned to assume organizational leadership in successfully navigating this effort. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00006216-201807000-0001
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000294DOI Listing
October 2018
13 Reads

The Impact of Nurse Engagement on Quality, Safety, and the Experience of Care: What Nurse Leaders Should Know.

Nurs Adm Q 2018 Jul/Sep;42(3):278-283

Press Ganey, South Bend, Indiana (Ms Dempsey and Dr Assi); and Clinical Excellence Solutions, South Bend, Indiana (Dr Assi).

To lead others in achieving exemplary outcomes, nurse leaders need to understand the vital and interdependent connection between quality, safety, the patient and RN experience of care, and RN engagement. The triple aim of improving population health, enhancing patient experience, and reducing cost cannot be accomplished without a robust and engaged workforce that finds joy and meaning in its work. This is especially true for the nursing workforce. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00006216-201807000-0001
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000305DOI Listing
October 2018
8 Reads

Self-organizing Development Teams for Innovative Nursing Care.

Authors:
Terese Bondas

Nurs Adm Q 2018 Jul/Sep;42(3):269-277

Faculty of Nursing and Health Sciences, Nord University, Bodö, Norway.

The purpose of this study was to describe the participation of nurses and nurse leaders in self-organizing teams formed to develop innovative nursing care. The theoretical perspective combines Bondas' caritative theory on nursing leadership with Waterman's and Dolan's work on ad hoc organizations. Seven self-organizing teams participated in a 2-year action research project. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00006216-201807000-0001
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000286DOI Listing
October 2018
5 Reads

Transitioning Nurse Handoff to the Bedside: Engaging Staff and Patients.

Nurs Adm Q 2018 Jul/Sep;42(3):261-268

West Florida Hospital, Pensacola (Dr White-Trevino); and Adult Health Department, University of South Alabama College of Nursing, Mobile (Dr Dearmon).

The emergency department is a complex environment in which reliable communication is vital for safe patient care. Communication during nurse shift report can be risky without an effective report process in practice. Reliability improves with the use of a standardized, patient-centered nurse handoff process. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00006216-201807000-0001
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000298DOI Listing
October 2018
71 Reads

Caring Cards: Preventing Patient Harm Through the Heart of Nursing.

Nurs Adm Q 2018 Jul/Sep;42(3):254-260

Swedish Hospital Cherry Hill, Seattle, Washington.

The use of "Caring Cards" is a unique innovation, which builds on reliable Lean processes. It adds the way we emotionally care for people to a Lean methodology. This article describes how the foundational constructs of nursing theory are paired with aspects of universal fall precautions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000299DOI Listing
October 2018

Leveraging Technology to Increase Patient and Family Engagement and Improve Outcomes.

Nurs Adm Q 2018 Jul/Sep;42(3):246-253

GetWellNetwork, Bethesda, Maryland.

Engaging persons in their health care influences the quality of care and improves patient safety, health outcomes, and the patient experience. Emerging technology is enabling patients to be more fully engaged in their care. At the same time, the rapid emergence of these solutions is impacting nursing professional practice, workflows, and care delivery models across the continuum. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00006216-201807000-0001
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000301DOI Listing
October 2018
8 Reads

Engaging Employees in Well-Being: Moving From the Triple Aim to the Quadruple Aim.

Nurs Adm Q 2018 Jul/Sep;42(3):231-245

Anne Arundel Medical Center, Annapolis, Maryland (Mss Jacobs, McGovern, and Heinmiller and Dr Drenkard); and GetWellNetwork, Inc, Bethesda, Maryland (Dr Drenkard).

Anne Arundel Medical Center has been on a 3-year journey to improve employee well-being with the assumption that employee well-being and employee engagement are interconnected. Improvements in employee well-being will result in increased employee engagement and will be a pivotal driver to assist the health system meet its goals. Historically, Anne Arundel Medical Center successfully differentiated itself in the market by being the region's high-quality, low-cost provider of health services delivered through intense collaboration with patients and families. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00006216-201807000-0000
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000303DOI Listing
October 2018
7 Reads

Engagement in Nursing: One Organization's Success.

Nurs Adm Q 2018 Jul/Sep;42(3):223-230

UCLA Health, Santa Monica, California (Mr Bailey); and UCLA School of Nursing, Los Angeles, California (Dr Cardin).

Engagement in health care has gained in importance over time. It has become increasingly important in the work that nurses do to optimize patient involvement in the management of their health care activities. Nurse leaders are being called upon to build and sustain cultures of engagement for their employees and ultimately for patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000296DOI Listing
October 2018
1 Read