6,793 results match your criteria North Carolina Medical Journal [Journal]


Aid in Dying in North Carolina.

N C Med J 2019 Mar-Apr;80(2):128

fellow in advanced heart failure and transplantation, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.2.128DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

2018 Child Health Report Card.

Authors:
Michelle Ries

N C Med J 2019 Mar-Apr;80(2):122-123

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.2.122DOI Listing

Spotlight on the Safety Net: El Futuro.

N C Med J 2019 Mar-Apr;80(2):120-121

managing editor, North Carolina Medical Journal, North Carolina Institute of Medicine, Morrisville, North Carolina

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.2.120DOI Listing

Maternal Health Care Challenges Confronting Arab Muslim Refugee Women in Triad North Carolina.

N C Med J 2019 Mar-Apr;80(2):116-119

professor, Family Medicine and Women in Medicine and Science, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

Arab Muslim refugee women represent a new underserved population in North Carolina with many health needs and challenges. Barriers in language, economic and social status, culture, and health all play a role in this population's successful assimilation. Without support, fear and isolation may impede them from becoming active in society. Read More

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http://www.ncmedicaljournal.com/lookup/doi/10.18043/ncm.80.2
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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.2.116DOI Listing
March 2019
4 Reads

Immigrant and Refugee Explanatory Models of Chronic Disease: Provider "Learning Up" for Culturally Responsive Care.

N C Med J 2019 Mar-Apr;80(2):113-115

associate professor, Department of Public Health Education, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, North Carolina

Immigrant and refugee populations in North Carolina bring with them traditionally based explanatory models (EMs) of disease that influence health care interactions. Providers who encounter these models are often challenged with how best to leverage them for prevention outreach and care. Participation in "learning up" opportunities increases provider awareness and capacity for cultural responsiveness when dealing with immigrant and refugee clients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.2.113DOI Listing

The Health and Well-being of North Carolina's Farmworkers: The Importance of Inclusion, Accessible Services and Personal Connection.

N C Med J 2019 Mar-Apr;80(2):107-112

medical director, North Carolina Farmworker Health Program, Office of Rural Health, Raleigh, North Carolina.

Farmworkers contribute significantly to North Carolina's communities and economy; however, they incur significant occupational risks with limited workplace protections. Many barriers complicate their access to health care services. Recommendations include increased number of outreach workers, extended clinic hours, strengthening workplace protections, and inclusion of farmworkers in community needs assessments. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.2.107DOI Listing

The Echo in the Room: Barriers to Health Care for Immigrants and Refugees in North Carolina and Interpreter Solutions.

Authors:
Cynthia Mejia

N C Med J 2019 Mar-Apr;80(2):104-106

training coordinator, University of North Carolina Greensboro Center for New North Carolinians, Greensboro, North Carolina

Medical providers need to be able to provide interpretation and translation services so that limited English proficiency patients can experience the same level of care as their English-speaking counterparts, in accordance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act. Professionally trained interpreters can mitigate negative health impacts encountered with ad hoc interpreters. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.2.104DOI Listing

Human Trafficking of Immigrants and Refugees in North Carolina.

Authors:
Maura Nsonwu

N C Med J 2019 Mar-Apr;80(2):101-103

professor, Department of Social Work, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina

North Carolina is home to refugee and immigrant groups who are vulnerable to becoming victims of human trafficking. Culturally relevant training and education is necessary to appropriately serve foreign-born victims of sex or labor trafficking. Health care professionals can be instrumental in identifying victims and providing coordinated and collaborative care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.2.101DOI Listing

The Impact of Family Separation on Immigrant and Refugee Families.

Authors:
Shruti Simha

N C Med J 2019 Mar-Apr;80(2):95-96

pediatrician, Tim and Carolynn Rice Center for Child and Adolescent Health, Cone Health, Greensboro, North Carolina; adjunct faculty, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.2.95DOI Listing

Community Engagement and Equitable Policy: Promoting Resilience and Stability for Children in Immigrant Families in North Carolina.

N C Med J 2019 Mar-Apr;80(2):94-100

associate professor of pediatrics, University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville, Greenville, South Carolina; pediatrician, Prisma Health Children's Hospital-Upstate, Columbia, South Carolina; adjunct assistant professor of pediatrics, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Immigrant families in North Carolina, despite multidimensional challenges in the context of national, state, and local policies, enrich our communities. Over the last 18 months, a small group of North Carolina Pediatric Society (NCPS) physicians with concerns about the health and emotional well-being of children in immigrant families have come together to address the challenges facing this vulnerable population. Our goal, as the newly formed NCPS Committee on Immigration, is to advance policy to support immigrant families in obtaining equitable health, educational, and economic opportunities in our state. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.2.94DOI Listing

My Life Journey: One Man's Path from Ethiopia to North Carolina.

Authors:
Taye Gonfa

N C Med J 2019 Mar-Apr;80(2):91

PGY-3, Cone Family Medicine Residency Program, Greensboro, North Carolina

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.2.91DOI Listing

Connecting Newly Arrived Refugees to Health Care in North Carolina.

N C Med J 2019 Mar-Apr;80(2):89-93

state refugee health coordinator, North Carolina Division of Public Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Raleigh, North Carolina

The domestic refugee screening is a valuable tool to link newly arrived refugees to the US health care system and can assist in providing a continuum of care from overseas to arrival. Beyond initial refugee screening, accessing general medical, dental, and mental health services can be significantly challenging. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.2.89DOI Listing

Immigrant and Refugee Health in North Carolina.

N C Med J 2019 Mar-Apr;80(2):84-88

director, University of North Carolina at Greensboro Center for New North Carolinians, Greensboro, North Carolina; board member, Association of Refugee and Immigrant Service Professionals, Greensboro, North Carolina

The demographic composition of North Carolina has changed dramatically in the past three decades. Because of trends in immigration and refugee resettlement, our state is more diverse than ever before. Immigrants and refugees in North Carolina face unique challenges within the health care system, as well as increasing political and social pressures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.2.84DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

"Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me."

Authors:
Peter J Morris

N C Med J 2019 Mar-Apr;80(2):83

Editor in Chief.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.2.83DOI Listing

Trends and Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Diabetic Retinopathy Among Adults with Diagnosed Diabetes in North Carolina, 2000-2015.

N C Med J 2019 Mar-Apr;80(2):76-82

social research specialist, Department of Public Health, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina.

There is limited information available in North Carolina on the current burden of, and racial disparities in, diabetic retinopathy (DR), a major complication associated with diabetes mellitus (DM). This study aims to describe the overall trend of, and racial/ethnic disparities in, DR among adults with DM in North Carolina. Data were from 13 waves (2000, 2002-2010, 2012, 2013, and 2015) of the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.2.76DOI Listing

Examining the Association Between Screen Time, Beverage and Snack Consumption, and Weight Status Among Eastern North Carolina Youth.

N C Med J 2019 Mar-Apr;80(2):69-75

teaching associate professor, Department of Public Health, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina.

With the rise in technology use for the adolescent population, screen time may be related to unhealthy eating habits and contribute to adolescent obesity. Since 2007, an adolescent wellness program, Motivating Adolescents to Choose Health (MATCH), has been implemented in select North Carolina middle schools. Using MATCH study data from fall 2015 in 26 North Carolina middle schools, we examined the cross-sectional associations between screen time, unhealthy beverage and snack consumption, and BMI z-score with linear regression models controlling for physical activity, school, sex, weight category, and race. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.2.69DOI Listing

MAHEC Distributes Opioid Awareness Flyer to 171 Schools Across Western North Carolina.

N C Med J 2019 Jan-Feb;80(1):63-65

Davidson impact fellow, Asheville, North Carolina

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.1.63DOI Listing
February 2019

Early Check: A North Carolina Research Partnership.

N C Med J 2019 Jan-Feb;80(1):59-61

director, Center for Newborn Screening, Ethics and Disability Studies, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina.

Newborn screening programs rely on understanding the benefits and harms of screening, but the rarity of conditions hampers generation of high-quality data. The Early Check study, a partnership between North Carolina nonprofit, academic, and state organizations, is filling this gap by screening for conditions not included in standard newborn screening. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.1.59DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

SCID: A Pediatric Emergency.

N C Med J 2019 Jan-Feb;80(1):55-56

J. Buren Sidbury professor of Pediatrics and professor of Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.1.55DOI Listing
January 2019

Lessons Learned from Newborn Screening in Pilot Studies.

N C Med J 2019 Jan-Feb;80(1):54-58

laboratory scientist, Center for Newborn Screening, Ethics, and Disability Studies, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina.

This commentary discusses the importance of conducting newborn screening pilot studies in North Carolina and the lessons learned from performing three pilots for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I), and X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.1.54DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

The Role of Technology in Newborn Screening.

N C Med J 2019 Jan-Feb;80(1):49-53

professor emeritus of pediatrics, Medical Genetics Division, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina

This commentary traces the expansion of newborn screening for inherited metabolic disorders during the past 55 years, from the first simple test for phenylketonuria to the current panel of over 35 conditions. Emphasis is placed on the role played by technology and the contributions made by researchers in North Carolina. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.1.49DOI Listing
January 2019

Recognizing 50 Years of Innovative Newborn Screening in North Carolina.

N C Med J 2019 Jan-Feb;80(1):45-48

laboratory improvement consultant, Newborn Screening Unit, North Carolina State Laboratory of Public Health, Raleigh, North Carolina.

Newborn screening is a critical, preventive health program for early identification of disorders in newborns. Early detection, diagnosis, and treatment of certain genetic or metabolic disorders can significantly reduce death, disease, and associated disabilities. North Carolina has been instrumental in the development of innovative technologies used in newborn screening programs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.1.45DOI Listing
January 2019

Newborn Screening Policy Decisions: Adding Conditions.

Authors:
Scott M Shone

N C Med J 2019 Jan-Feb;80(1):42-44

senior research public health analyst; laboratory services director, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina

Policy decisions about mandated newborn screening should be based on scientific evidence and incorporate expert opinion. At the national level, a systematic evidence review evaluates the benefit of screening for disorders that may be added to the Recommended Uniform Screening Panel, and ultimately considered by individual newborn screening programs. Recent changes in state laws, including in North Carolina, are intended to streamline the decision-making process for newborn screening policy changes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.1.42DOI Listing
January 2019

The Role of the Genetic Counselor in Newborn Screening.

Authors:
Gail Marcus

N C Med J 2019 Jan-Feb;80(1):39-40

state public health genetic counselor, Genetics and Newborn Screening Unit, North Carolina Division of Public Health, North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, Raleigh, North Carolina

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.1.39DOI Listing
January 2019

Newborn Screening Follow-up.

N C Med J 2019 Jan-Feb;80(1):37-41

cystic fibrosis newborn screening follow-up coordinator, North Carolina Division of Public Health, Raleigh, North Carolina.

Newborn screening identifies infants at increased risk for 50 metabolic conditions that are treatable with early detection. Follow-up links the laboratory result with physician action. Timeliness is essential to ensure affected babies receive treatment and enjoy a healthy and productive life. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.1.37DOI Listing
January 2019
9 Reads

What is Newborn Screening?

Authors:
Cynthia M Powell

N C Med J 2019 Jan-Feb;80(1):32-36

professor of Pediatrics and Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

Newborn screening is a system that provides early identification and treatment of infants with disorders prior to permanent disability or death. A successful newborn screening program requires skilled effort, understanding, and collaboration by many individuals, from those collecting the blood spots to the child's primary care provider and family. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.1.32DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

The Future of Newborn Screening: Why and How Partnerships Will Be Needed for Success.

N C Med J 2019 Jan-Feb;80(1):28-31

director, North Carolina State Laboratory of Public Health, Division of Public Health, North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, Raleigh, North Carolina.

Newborn screening in North Carolina has been highly successful, identifying newborns with health conditions for which time-sensitive treatments must be provided to reduce morbidity and mortality. This issue of the describes the history of newborn screening in the state, the nature of the system that must be in place for newborn screening to work as planned, and the leadership exemplified by North Carolina, both historically and now. Here we highlight some of the major challenges that newborn screening will almost surely face in the coming years. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.1.28DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Probability is Personal.

Authors:
Peter J Morris

N C Med J 2019 Jan-Feb;80(1):27

Editor in Chief.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.1.27DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Opinions and Practices of Lung Cancer Screening by Physician Specialty.

N C Med J 2019 Jan-Feb;80(1):19-26

professor, Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary Disease and Critical Care Medicine; Member, Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

In response to the National Lung Screening Trial, numerous professional organizations published guidelines recommending annual lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) for high-risk patients. Prior studies found that physician attitudes and knowledge about lung cancer screening directly impacts the number of screening exams ordered. In 2015, we surveyed 34 pulmonologists and 186 primary care providers (PCPs) to evaluate opinions and practices of lung cancer screening in a large academic medical center. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.1.19DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Predictors of 30-Day Return Following an Emergency Department Visit for Older Adults.

N C Med J 2019 Jan-Feb;80(1):12-18

professor, Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Older adults who are discharged following emergency department evaluation are at increased risk for functional decline and health care utilization, and are likely to benefit from close follow-up and additional care services. Understanding factors associated with a return emergency department visit within 30 days among older fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries discharged to the community may assist in identifying patients at greatest need for interventions. Predictors from Medicare data and public sources were evaluated in a retrospective data analysis of North and South Carolina residents (2011-2012) aged ≥ 65 years using Cox regression proportion hazards ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for time-to-30-day return events. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.1.12DOI Listing
January 2019

Public Awareness of HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis in Durham, North Carolina: Results of a Community Survey.

N C Med J 2019 Jan-Feb;80(1):7-11

associate professor, Division of Infectious Diseases, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina

Adoption of HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) remains limited among populations at greatest risk for HIV acquisition. This study aims to assess awareness of PrEP among individuals in Durham, North Carolina, which has one of the highest rates of HIV diagnoses in the state. In 2015-2016, we administered a survey including questions to assess PrEP awareness to individuals at multiple venues throughout Durham, North Carolina. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.1.7DOI Listing
January 2019
9 Reads

The Rural Health Action Plan: An Update from the NCIOM.

N C Med J 2018 Nov-Dec;79(6):404-406

associate director, North Carolina Institute of Medicine, Morrisville, North Carolina.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.6.404DOI Listing
November 2018

Philanthropy Profile: Focus on Philanthropy: Empowering Rural Communities.

Authors:
Adam Linker

N C Med J 2018 Nov-Dec;79(6):402-403

program officer, Kate B. Reynolds Charitable Trust, Winston-Salem, North Carolina

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.6.402DOI Listing
November 2018

Running the Numbers: Health Insurance Coverage in North Carolina: The Rural-Urban Uninsured Gap.

N C Med J 2018 Nov-Dec;79(6):397-401

director, North Carolina Rural Health Research Program, Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, Chapel Hill, North Carolina; professor, Department of Health Policy and Management, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.6.397DOI Listing
November 2018
7 Reads

"What's Love Got to Do with It?"

N C Med J 2018 Nov-Dec;79(6):394-396

director, Hertford County Student Wellness Center, Roanoke Chowan Community Health Center, Murfreesboro, North Carolina.

Traditional rural lifestyles are often identified as contributors to poor health and disparities. A diverse group of unique partners in Hertford County, North Carolina, are focusing on key components of strengths through the Farm to School to Healthcare initiative as a way to long-lasting positive, overall health and happiness. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.6.394DOI Listing
November 2018

Collaboration: The Key to Early Childhood Success in Rural North Carolina.

N C Med J 2018 Nov-Dec;79(6):390-393

research and evaluation director, The North Carolina Partnership for Children, Raleigh, North Carolina.

Early childhood is a critical time of development. Differences in each child's health, education, and environment create observable developmental outcomes even before their first birthdays. Those who fall behind early often stay behind, and children in rural North Carolina face increased challenges. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.6.390DOI Listing
November 2018
13 Reads

Optimal Care for All: The Critical Need for Clinician Retention in Rural North Carolina.

N C Med J 2018 Nov-Dec;79(6):386-389

executive director, Eastern Area Health Education Center, Greenville, North Carolina; associate dean for Continuing Medical Education and associate professor of Pediatrics, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina.

Despite its increasing urbanization, North Carolina still has a large rural population that lacks optimal health care. While multiple programs have been successful in recruiting clinicians to rural communities, improving the retention of those clinicians will require the development and implementation of novel strategies along with the evaluation of their effectiveness. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.6.386DOI Listing
November 2018

Broadband: The Critical Infrastructure for Delivery of Today's Health Care.

Authors:
Amy Huffman

N C Med J 2018 Nov-Dec;79(6):383-384

research and policy specialist, The Broadband Infrastructure Office, North Carolina Department of Information Technology, Raleigh, North Carolina

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.6.383DOI Listing
November 2018

What's Economic Development Got to Do With It? The Economic Impact of Healthy Rural Communities.

Authors:
Patrick Woodie

N C Med J 2018 Nov-Dec;79(6):382-385

president, North Carolina Rural Center, Raleigh, North Carolina

Healthy people are vital to a community's ability to be economically competitive. Sustainable rural economic growth requires a healthy workforce supported by accessible and affordable local health systems. The issues facing rural health access are complex but there are tangible steps that can be taken to address them. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.6.382DOI Listing
November 2018
9 Reads

A Legislative View of Our Rural Health Care.

N C Med J 2018 Nov-Dec;79(6):375-376

former senator, North Carolina Senate, Raleigh, North Carolina.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.6.375DOI Listing
November 2018

A Rural Hospital Gets A Second Chance.

Authors:
Dana M Weston

N C Med J 2018 Nov-Dec;79(6):373-374

president and CEO, UNC Rockingham Health Care, Eden, North Carolina

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.6.373DOI Listing
November 2018

The Sufficiency of Health Care Professional Supply in Rural North Carolina.

Authors:
Mark Holmes

N C Med J 2018 Nov-Dec;79(6):372-377

director, North Carolina Rural Health Research Program, Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, Chapel Hill, North Carolina; professor, Department of Health Policy and Management, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

For most health professions, rural North Carolina has lower relative supply than urban parts of the state. Although there are plenty of innovative models addressing this disparity, a holistic approach is necessary if we want to effect real change. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.6.372DOI Listing
November 2018
11 Reads

Looking Back But Leaning Forward: New Opportunities and Challenges for North Carolina's Rural Communities.

N C Med J 2018 Nov-Dec;79(6):366-371

director, North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Rural Health, Raleigh, North Carolina.

Rural North Carolina is as diverse as it is beautiful. Each community, county, and region presents a unique set of challenges and opportunities in maintaining and improving the health of its people. Forty-five years ago, Jim Bernstein and other leaders in the state understood that in order to provide access to care and equalize the chances rural North Carolinians have to thrive, a focused approach was necessary. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.6.366DOI Listing
November 2018
8 Reads

Say It Ain't So-But Tellin' It Like It Is.

Authors:
Peter J Morris

N C Med J 2018 Nov-Dec;79(6):365

Editor in Chief.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.6.365DOI Listing
November 2018

Challenges Faced by Latino Caregivers in Transportation of Children with Medical Complexity.

N C Med J 2018 Nov-Dec;79(6):358-364

pediatric resident (PGY2), Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee.

Transportation challenges affect access to health care. Our objective was to describe transportation challenges faced by Latino children with medical complexity and identify strategies that could address these challenges. This is a qualitative study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.6.358DOI Listing
November 2018
15 Reads

Motor Vehicle Crash Case Definitions and How They Impact Injury Surveillance.

N C Med J 2018 Nov-Dec;79(6):351-357

research professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of injury in North Carolina. Motor vehicle crash injury surveillance that relies on hospital diagnostic codes alone may underestimate injury. Our objective was to describe how motor vehicle crash injury case definitions can impact results when using hospital data. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.6.351DOI Listing
November 2018
15 Reads

Tar Heel Footprints in Health Care: Jeff Spade.

N C Med J 2018 Nov-Dec;79(6):349-350

managing editor, North Carolina Medical Journal, North Carolina Institute of Medicine, Morrisville, North Carolina

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.6.349DOI Listing
November 2018