6,776 results match your criteria North Carolina Medical Journal [Journal]


MAHEC Distributes Opioid Awareness Flyer to 171 Schools Across Western North Carolina.

N C Med J 2019 Jan-Feb;80(1):63-65

Davidson impact fellow, Asheville, North Carolina

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.1.63DOI Listing
January 2019

Early Check: A North Carolina Research Partnership.

N C Med J 2019 Jan-Feb;80(1):59-61

director, Center for Newborn Screening, Ethics and Disability Studies, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina.

Newborn screening programs rely on understanding the benefits and harms of screening, but the rarity of conditions hampers generation of high-quality data. The Early Check study, a partnership between North Carolina nonprofit, academic, and state organizations, is filling this gap by screening for conditions not included in standard newborn screening. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.1.59DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

SCID: A Pediatric Emergency.

N C Med J 2019 Jan-Feb;80(1):55-56

J. Buren Sidbury professor of Pediatrics and professor of Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.1.55DOI Listing
January 2019

Lessons Learned from Newborn Screening in Pilot Studies.

N C Med J 2019 Jan-Feb;80(1):54-58

laboratory scientist, Center for Newborn Screening, Ethics, and Disability Studies, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina.

This commentary discusses the importance of conducting newborn screening pilot studies in North Carolina and the lessons learned from performing three pilots for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I), and X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.1.54DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

The Role of Technology in Newborn Screening.

N C Med J 2019 Jan-Feb;80(1):49-53

professor emeritus of pediatrics, Medical Genetics Division, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina

This commentary traces the expansion of newborn screening for inherited metabolic disorders during the past 55 years, from the first simple test for phenylketonuria to the current panel of over 35 conditions. Emphasis is placed on the role played by technology and the contributions made by researchers in North Carolina. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.1.49DOI Listing
January 2019

Recognizing 50 Years of Innovative Newborn Screening in North Carolina.

N C Med J 2019 Jan-Feb;80(1):45-48

laboratory improvement consultant, Newborn Screening Unit, North Carolina State Laboratory of Public Health, Raleigh, North Carolina.

Newborn screening is a critical, preventive health program for early identification of disorders in newborns. Early detection, diagnosis, and treatment of certain genetic or metabolic disorders can significantly reduce death, disease, and associated disabilities. North Carolina has been instrumental in the development of innovative technologies used in newborn screening programs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.1.45DOI Listing
January 2019

Newborn Screening Policy Decisions: Adding Conditions.

Authors:
Scott M Shone

N C Med J 2019 Jan-Feb;80(1):42-44

senior research public health analyst; laboratory services director, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina

Policy decisions about mandated newborn screening should be based on scientific evidence and incorporate expert opinion. At the national level, a systematic evidence review evaluates the benefit of screening for disorders that may be added to the Recommended Uniform Screening Panel, and ultimately considered by individual newborn screening programs. Recent changes in state laws, including in North Carolina, are intended to streamline the decision-making process for newborn screening policy changes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.1.42DOI Listing
January 2019

The Role of the Genetic Counselor in Newborn Screening.

Authors:
Gail Marcus

N C Med J 2019 Jan-Feb;80(1):39-40

state public health genetic counselor, Genetics and Newborn Screening Unit, North Carolina Division of Public Health, North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, Raleigh, North Carolina

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.1.39DOI Listing
January 2019

Newborn Screening Follow-up.

N C Med J 2019 Jan-Feb;80(1):37-41

cystic fibrosis newborn screening follow-up coordinator, North Carolina Division of Public Health, Raleigh, North Carolina.

Newborn screening identifies infants at increased risk for 50 metabolic conditions that are treatable with early detection. Follow-up links the laboratory result with physician action. Timeliness is essential to ensure affected babies receive treatment and enjoy a healthy and productive life. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.1.37DOI Listing
January 2019
5 Reads

What is Newborn Screening?

Authors:
Cynthia M Powell

N C Med J 2019 Jan-Feb;80(1):32-36

professor of Pediatrics and Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

Newborn screening is a system that provides early identification and treatment of infants with disorders prior to permanent disability or death. A successful newborn screening program requires skilled effort, understanding, and collaboration by many individuals, from those collecting the blood spots to the child's primary care provider and family. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.1.32DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

The Future of Newborn Screening: Why and How Partnerships Will Be Needed for Success.

N C Med J 2019 Jan-Feb;80(1):28-31

director, North Carolina State Laboratory of Public Health, Division of Public Health, North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, Raleigh, North Carolina.

Newborn screening in North Carolina has been highly successful, identifying newborns with health conditions for which time-sensitive treatments must be provided to reduce morbidity and mortality. This issue of the describes the history of newborn screening in the state, the nature of the system that must be in place for newborn screening to work as planned, and the leadership exemplified by North Carolina, both historically and now. Here we highlight some of the major challenges that newborn screening will almost surely face in the coming years. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.1.28DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Probability is Personal.

Authors:
Peter J Morris

N C Med J 2019 Jan-Feb;80(1):27

Editor in Chief.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.1.27DOI Listing
January 2019

Opinions and Practices of Lung Cancer Screening by Physician Specialty.

N C Med J 2019 Jan-Feb;80(1):19-26

professor, Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary Disease and Critical Care Medicine; Member, Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

In response to the National Lung Screening Trial, numerous professional organizations published guidelines recommending annual lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) for high-risk patients. Prior studies found that physician attitudes and knowledge about lung cancer screening directly impacts the number of screening exams ordered. In 2015, we surveyed 34 pulmonologists and 186 primary care providers (PCPs) to evaluate opinions and practices of lung cancer screening in a large academic medical center. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.1.19DOI Listing
January 2019

Predictors of 30-Day Return Following an Emergency Department Visit for Older Adults.

N C Med J 2019 Jan-Feb;80(1):12-18

professor, Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Older adults who are discharged following emergency department evaluation are at increased risk for functional decline and health care utilization, and are likely to benefit from close follow-up and additional care services. Understanding factors associated with a return emergency department visit within 30 days among older fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries discharged to the community may assist in identifying patients at greatest need for interventions. Predictors from Medicare data and public sources were evaluated in a retrospective data analysis of North and South Carolina residents (2011-2012) aged ≥ 65 years using Cox regression proportion hazards ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for time-to-30-day return events. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.1.12DOI Listing
January 2019

Public Awareness of HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis in Durham, North Carolina: Results of a Community Survey.

N C Med J 2019 Jan-Feb;80(1):7-11

associate professor, Division of Infectious Diseases, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina

Adoption of HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) remains limited among populations at greatest risk for HIV acquisition. This study aims to assess awareness of PrEP among individuals in Durham, North Carolina, which has one of the highest rates of HIV diagnoses in the state. In 2015-2016, we administered a survey including questions to assess PrEP awareness to individuals at multiple venues throughout Durham, North Carolina. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.80.1.7DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

The Rural Health Action Plan: An Update from the NCIOM.

N C Med J 2018 Nov-Dec;79(6):404-406

associate director, North Carolina Institute of Medicine, Morrisville, North Carolina.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.6.404DOI Listing
November 2018

Philanthropy Profile: Focus on Philanthropy: Empowering Rural Communities.

Authors:
Adam Linker

N C Med J 2018 Nov-Dec;79(6):402-403

program officer, Kate B. Reynolds Charitable Trust, Winston-Salem, North Carolina

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.6.402DOI Listing
November 2018

Running the Numbers: Health Insurance Coverage in North Carolina: The Rural-Urban Uninsured Gap.

N C Med J 2018 Nov-Dec;79(6):397-401

director, North Carolina Rural Health Research Program, Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, Chapel Hill, North Carolina; professor, Department of Health Policy and Management, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.6.397DOI Listing
November 2018
7 Reads

"What's Love Got to Do with It?"

N C Med J 2018 Nov-Dec;79(6):394-396

director, Hertford County Student Wellness Center, Roanoke Chowan Community Health Center, Murfreesboro, North Carolina.

Traditional rural lifestyles are often identified as contributors to poor health and disparities. A diverse group of unique partners in Hertford County, North Carolina, are focusing on key components of strengths through the Farm to School to Healthcare initiative as a way to long-lasting positive, overall health and happiness. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.6.394DOI Listing
November 2018

Collaboration: The Key to Early Childhood Success in Rural North Carolina.

N C Med J 2018 Nov-Dec;79(6):390-393

research and evaluation director, The North Carolina Partnership for Children, Raleigh, North Carolina.

Early childhood is a critical time of development. Differences in each child's health, education, and environment create observable developmental outcomes even before their first birthdays. Those who fall behind early often stay behind, and children in rural North Carolina face increased challenges. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.6.390DOI Listing
November 2018
9 Reads

Optimal Care for All: The Critical Need for Clinician Retention in Rural North Carolina.

N C Med J 2018 Nov-Dec;79(6):386-389

executive director, Eastern Area Health Education Center, Greenville, North Carolina; associate dean for Continuing Medical Education and associate professor of Pediatrics, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina.

Despite its increasing urbanization, North Carolina still has a large rural population that lacks optimal health care. While multiple programs have been successful in recruiting clinicians to rural communities, improving the retention of those clinicians will require the development and implementation of novel strategies along with the evaluation of their effectiveness. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.6.386DOI Listing
November 2018

Broadband: The Critical Infrastructure for Delivery of Today's Health Care.

Authors:
Amy Huffman

N C Med J 2018 Nov-Dec;79(6):383-384

research and policy specialist, The Broadband Infrastructure Office, North Carolina Department of Information Technology, Raleigh, North Carolina

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.6.383DOI Listing
November 2018

What's Economic Development Got to Do With It? The Economic Impact of Healthy Rural Communities.

Authors:
Patrick Woodie

N C Med J 2018 Nov-Dec;79(6):382-385

president, North Carolina Rural Center, Raleigh, North Carolina

Healthy people are vital to a community's ability to be economically competitive. Sustainable rural economic growth requires a healthy workforce supported by accessible and affordable local health systems. The issues facing rural health access are complex but there are tangible steps that can be taken to address them. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.6.382DOI Listing
November 2018
7 Reads

A Legislative View of Our Rural Health Care.

N C Med J 2018 Nov-Dec;79(6):375-376

former senator, North Carolina Senate, Raleigh, North Carolina.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.6.375DOI Listing
November 2018

A Rural Hospital Gets A Second Chance.

Authors:
Dana M Weston

N C Med J 2018 Nov-Dec;79(6):373-374

president and CEO, UNC Rockingham Health Care, Eden, North Carolina

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.6.373DOI Listing
November 2018

The Sufficiency of Health Care Professional Supply in Rural North Carolina.

Authors:
Mark Holmes

N C Med J 2018 Nov-Dec;79(6):372-377

director, North Carolina Rural Health Research Program, Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, Chapel Hill, North Carolina; professor, Department of Health Policy and Management, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

For most health professions, rural North Carolina has lower relative supply than urban parts of the state. Although there are plenty of innovative models addressing this disparity, a holistic approach is necessary if we want to effect real change. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.6.372DOI Listing
November 2018
7 Reads

Looking Back But Leaning Forward: New Opportunities and Challenges for North Carolina's Rural Communities.

N C Med J 2018 Nov-Dec;79(6):366-371

director, North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Rural Health, Raleigh, North Carolina.

Rural North Carolina is as diverse as it is beautiful. Each community, county, and region presents a unique set of challenges and opportunities in maintaining and improving the health of its people. Forty-five years ago, Jim Bernstein and other leaders in the state understood that in order to provide access to care and equalize the chances rural North Carolinians have to thrive, a focused approach was necessary. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.6.366DOI Listing
November 2018
6 Reads

Say It Ain't So-But Tellin' It Like It Is.

Authors:
Peter J Morris

N C Med J 2018 Nov-Dec;79(6):365

Editor in Chief.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.6.365DOI Listing
November 2018

Challenges Faced by Latino Caregivers in Transportation of Children with Medical Complexity.

N C Med J 2018 Nov-Dec;79(6):358-364

pediatric resident (PGY2), Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee.

Transportation challenges affect access to health care. Our objective was to describe transportation challenges faced by Latino children with medical complexity and identify strategies that could address these challenges. This is a qualitative study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.6.358DOI Listing
November 2018
9 Reads

Motor Vehicle Crash Case Definitions and How They Impact Injury Surveillance.

N C Med J 2018 Nov-Dec;79(6):351-357

research professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of injury in North Carolina. Motor vehicle crash injury surveillance that relies on hospital diagnostic codes alone may underestimate injury. Our objective was to describe how motor vehicle crash injury case definitions can impact results when using hospital data. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.6.351DOI Listing
November 2018
10 Reads

Tar Heel Footprints in Health Care: Jeff Spade.

N C Med J 2018 Nov-Dec;79(6):349-350

managing editor, North Carolina Medical Journal, North Carolina Institute of Medicine, Morrisville, North Carolina

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.6.349DOI Listing
November 2018

Naloxone-Prescribing Practices: A Missed Opportunity.

N C Med J 2018 Sep-Oct;79(5):343-344

assistant professor, Wake Forest Health Sciences, Department of Medicine, Section on Infectious Diseases, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.5.343DOI Listing
December 2018
5 Reads

Running the Numbers: Trends in Lead Poisoning Prevention Data for Children Aged < 6 Years in North Carolina.

N C Med J 2018 Sep-Oct;79(5):339-342

public health physician, North Carolina Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program, Children's Environmental Health, Environmental Health Section, Division of Public Health, NC Department of Health and Human Services, Raleigh, North Carolina.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.5.339DOI Listing
December 2018

Philanthropy Profile: Protecting North Carolina's Health by Investing in a Healthy Environment.

N C Med J 2018 Sep-Oct;79(5):337-338

director, Environmental Health Scholars Program; George Barth Geller Professor of Cancer Research; professor, Departments of of Surgery, Immunology, and Pathology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.5.337DOI Listing
December 2018

Clean Construction Practices at Hospitals Improve Public Health.

N C Med J 2018 Sep-Oct;79(5):334-336

former executive vice president and chief medical officer, Novant Health, Charlotte, North Carolina.

Diesel exhaust has been linked to numerous health issues, especially for people with respiratory and cardiovascular conditions. The Clean Construction Partnership encourages health systems to use low-emission construction equipment and reduce idling at their construction sites. Every dollar spent on reducing diesel pollution results in $13 in public health benefits [1]. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.5.334DOI Listing
December 2018

The Health Impacts of Environmental Policy: The North Carolina Clean Smokestacks Act.

N C Med J 2018 Sep-Oct;79(5):329-333

partner, Brooks, Pierce, McLendon, Humphrey & Leonard, LLP, Raleigh, North Carolina.

The North Carolina Clean Smokestacks Act and related policies led to substantial decreases of emitted air pollutants from coal-fired power plants. Improved air quality was associated with statewide improvements in respiratory, cardiovascular, and cerebrovascular health in North Carolina. The effectiveness of environmental policies can be monitored for impact on both environmental and health outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.5.329DOI Listing
December 2018

Connecting Environmental Justice and Community Health: Effects of Hog Production in North Carolina.

N C Med J 2018 Sep-Oct;79(5):324-328

epidemiologist, Division of Public Health, North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, Raleigh, North Carolina.

Environmental justice means equal access to a healthful environment for all. In North Carolina, many sources of pollution disproportionately affect low-income communities and communities of color. Clinicians who recognize effects of environmental injustices can improve patient care and community health. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.5.324DOI Listing
December 2018

Heat Exposure and Health Impacts in North Carolina.

N C Med J 2018 Sep-Oct;79(5):320-321

assistant professor, Department of Geography and Planning, Appalachian State University, Boone, North Carolina

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.5.320DOI Listing
December 2018

On the Front Lines of Climate Health Effects in North Carolina.

N C Med J 2018 Sep-Oct;79(5):318-323

health science policy analyst, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina.

Populations across the United States are vulnerable to- and experiencing health effects from-climate change, and North Carolina is no exception. Health professionals are vital when it comes to identifying and treating such impacts, as well as serving as trusted authorities in educating and protecting communities against climate health threats. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.5.318DOI Listing
December 2018

Emerging Contaminants and Environmental Health.

N C Med J 2018 Sep-Oct;79(5):315-316

director, Graduate Studies in Sustainability, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.5.315DOI Listing
December 2018

Safeguarding Children's Health: Time to Enact a Health-Based Standard and Comprehensive Testing, Mitigation, and Communication Protocol for Lead in Drinking Water.

N C Med J 2018 Sep-Oct;79(5):313-317

director, Analytical Sciences, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina.

Lead was a known toxin before the Roman Empire, yet exposure remains a public health concern today. Although there is no safe lead exposure level, a health-based drinking water standard has not been established. The Clean Water for Carolina Kids Study highlights the need for a health-based standard. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.5.313DOI Listing
December 2018

The Unexpected Health Effects of Air Pollution.

Authors:
David B Peden

N C Med J 2018 Sep-Oct;79(5):309-311

Andrews professor of pediatrics, senior associate dean for Translational Research, director, Center for Environmental Medicine, Asthma and Lung Biology, The School of Medicine, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.5.309DOI Listing
December 2018

Ambient Air Quality and Cardiovascular Health: Translation of Environmental Research for Public Health and Clinical Care.

N C Med J 2018 Sep-Oct;79(5):306-312

assistant director, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina.

Air pollution is intuitively associated with respiratory effects, but evidence has emerged over the past few decades that the cardiovascular effects of air pollution can be much more adverse and represent a greater public health burden. In this article, we present background on the sources, exposures, and health effects of air pollution and discuss the potential for intervention strategies in the health care system to help reduce individual and population exposure and the attendant risk from the cardiovascular effects of air pollution. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.5.306DOI Listing
December 2018

Health and the Environment in North Carolina.

N C Med J 2018 Sep-Oct;79(5):302-305

Andrews professor of pediatrics, senior associate dean for Translational Resarch, director, Center for Environmental Medicine, Asthma and Lung Biology, The School of Medicine, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Environmental impacts on health are usually discussed from a global perspective. However, this issue of the North Carolina Medical Journal focuses on studies of health outcomes in North Carolina caused by local air and water pollution. While some people are clearly at increased risk, environmental threats to health ultimately impact all of us. Read More

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http://www.ncmedicaljournal.com/lookup/doi/10.18043/ncm.79.5
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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.5.302DOI Listing
December 2018
5 Reads

Going (Way) Back to the Basics.

Authors:
Peter J Morris

N C Med J 2018 Sep-Oct;79(5):301

Editor in Chief.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.5.301DOI Listing
December 2018

The Impact of Coal-Powered Electrical Plants and Coal Ash Impoundments on the Health of Residential Communities.

N C Med J 2018 Sep-Oct;79(5):289-300

director, Environmental Health Scholars Program; George Barth Geller Professor of Cancer Research; professor, Departments of Surgery, Immunology, and Pathology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina.

In North Carolina, coal-burning power plants remain the major source of electrical production. Coal burning generates coal ash that is stored in landfills and slurry ponds that are often located near residential communities, signifying high potential for environmental contamination and increasing health risks. We reviewed the literature on potential health effects of coal-burning plants to summarize current knowledge on health risks. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.5.289DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Mortality and Health Outcomes in North Carolina Communities Located in Close Proximity to Hog Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations.

N C Med J 2018 Sep-Oct;79(5):278-288

director, Environmental Health Scholars Program; George Barth Geller Professor of Cancer Research; professor, Departments of Surgery, Immunology, and Pathology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina.

Life expectancy in southeastern North Carolina communities located in an area with multiple concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) after adjusting for socioeconomic factors remains low. We hypothesized that poor health outcomes in this region may be due to converging demographic, socioeconomic, behavioral, and access-to-care factors and are influenced by the presence of hog CAFOs. We studied mortality, hospital admissions, and emergency department (ED) usage for health conditions potentially associated with hog CAFOs-anemia, kidney disease, infectious diseases, and low birth weight (LBW)-in North Carolina communities located in zip codes with hog CAFOs (Study group 1), in zip codes with > 215hogs/km (Study group 2), and without hog CAFOs (Control group). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.5.278DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Climate Change and Public Health through the Lens of Rural, Eastern North Carolina.

N C Med J 2018 Sep-Oct;79(5):270-277

associate professor, Old Dominion University, Department of Political Science and Geography, Norfolk, Virginia.

Recognizing that health outcomes are associated with climate threats is important and requires increased attention by health care providers and policymakers. The primary goal of this report is to provide information related to the public health threats of climate change, while identifying climate-sensitive populations primarily in rural, Eastern North Carolina. Publicly available data was used to evaluate regional (eg, Eastern, Piedmont, and Western) and county level socio-vulnerability characteristics of population groups in North Carolina, including: percent of persons living in poverty, percent of non-white persons, percent of persons under 18 years living in poverty, percent of elderly people living in poverty, percent of persons with a disability, and number of primary care physicians. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.5.270DOI Listing
December 2018