95 results match your criteria Noncardiogenic Pulmonary Edema Imaging


The case report of capillary leakage syndrome secondary to malignant hypertension.

Medicine (Baltimore) 2018 Aug;97(34):e11913

Department of Nephrology, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.

Introduction: Capillary leak syndrome (CLS) is characterized by hypoproteinemia, diffused pitting edema, noncardiogenic pulmonary edema, and hypotension. By far, there are no related reports of CLS secondary to malignant hypertension (MHT). A 33-year-old male was admitted to our hospital with the diagnosis of CLS on the background of MHT. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000011913DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6113024PMC
August 2018
12 Reads
5.723 Impact Factor

Distribution of alveolar-interstitial syndrome in dogs and cats with respiratory distress as assessed by lung ultrasound versus thoracic radiographs.

J Vet Emerg Crit Care (San Antonio) 2018 Sep 3;28(5):415-428. Epub 2018 Aug 3.

Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC.

Objective: To assess distribution of alveolar-interstitial syndrome (AIS) detected by lung ultrasound (LUS) compared to thoracic radiographs (TXR).

Design: Prospective study.

Setting: University teaching hospital. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/vec.12750DOI Listing
September 2018
2 Reads

Salvage therapies for refractory hypoxemia in ARDS.

Respir Med 2018 08 3;141:150-158. Epub 2018 Jul 3.

Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, U C San Diego School of Medicine, USA. Electronic address:

Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is a condition of varied etiology characterized by the acute onset (within 1 week of the inciting event) of hypoxemia, reduced lung compliance, diffuse lung inflammation and bilateral opacities on chest imaging attributable to noncardiogenic (increased permeability) pulmonary edema. Although multi-organ failure is the most common cause of death in ARDS, an estimated 10-15% of the deaths in ARDS are caused due to refractory hypoxemia, i.e. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S09546111183022
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rmed.2018.06.030DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6186150PMC
August 2018
20 Reads

Point-of-care Lung Ultrasound.

Authors:
Makoto Sera

Masui 2017 May;66(5):493-502

The evaluation of the lung has usually been considered off-limits for ultrasound, because ultrasound energy is rapidly dissipated by air. Lung ultrasound is not useful for the evaluation of the pulmonary parenchyma and the pleural line. However ultrasound machines have become more portable, with decreased start-up time, while simultaneously providing improved image quality and ease of image acquisition. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
May 2017
6 Reads

Acute high-altitude sickness.

Eur Respir Rev 2017 Jan 31;26(143). Epub 2017 Jan 31.

Dept of Internal Medicine, University Clinic Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.

At any point 1-5 days following ascent to altitudes ≥2500 m, individuals are at risk of developing one of three forms of acute altitude illness: acute mountain sickness, a syndrome of nonspecific symptoms including headache, lassitude, dizziness and nausea; high-altitude cerebral oedema, a potentially fatal illness characterised by ataxia, decreased consciousness and characteristic changes on magnetic resonance imaging; and high-altitude pulmonary oedema, a noncardiogenic form of pulmonary oedema resulting from excessive hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction which can be fatal if not recognised and treated promptly. This review provides detailed information about each of these important clinical entities. After reviewing the clinical features, epidemiology and current understanding of the pathophysiology of each disorder, we describe the current pharmacological and nonpharmacological approaches to the prevention and treatment of these diseases. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1183/16000617.0096-2016DOI Listing
January 2017
9 Reads

RADIOGRAPHIC APPEARANCE OF PRESUMED NONCARDIOGENIC PULMONARY EDEMA AND CORRELATION WITH THE UNDERLYING CAUSE IN DOGS AND CATS.

Vet Radiol Ultrasound 2017 May 22;58(3):259-265. Epub 2016 Dec 22.

Department of Clinical Sciences, National Veterinary School of Alfort, University of Paris-Est, 94700, Maisons-Alfort, France.

Noncardiogenic pulmonary edema is an important cause of respiratory disease in dogs and cats but few reports describe its radiographic appearance. The purpose of this retrospective case series study was to describe radiographic findings in a large cohort of dogs and cats with presumed noncardiogenic pulmonary edema and to test associations among radiographic findings versus cause of edema. Medical records were retrieved for dogs and cats with presumed noncardiogenic edema based on history, radiographic findings, and outcome. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/vru.12468
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/vru.12468DOI Listing
May 2017
4 Reads

Suspected drug-induced infiltrative lung disease culminating in acute respiratory failure in a dog treated with cytarabine and prednisone.

J Vet Emerg Crit Care (San Antonio) 2016 Nov 8;26(6):844-850. Epub 2016 Apr 8.

Department of Emergency and Critical Care, Matthew J. Ryan Veterinary Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 19104.

Objective: To describe a case of suspected drug-induced infiltrative lung disease (ILD) and acute respiratory failure associated with the administration of cytarabine and prednisone in a dog requiring mechanical ventilation.

Case Summary: A 4.5-year-old, female spayed Yorkshire Terrier presented to the ICU with acute onset of respiratory distress following a 24-hour cytarabine infusion. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/vec.12470DOI Listing
November 2016
4 Reads

Severe Acute Cardiopulmonary Failure Related to Gadobutrol Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Reaction: Successful Resuscitation With Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

Mayo Clin Proc 2016 Mar 5;91(3):362-6. Epub 2016 Feb 5.

Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. Electronic address:

Nonanaphylactic noncardiogenic pulmonary edema leading to cardiorespiratory arrest related to the magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent gadobutrol has rarely been reported in the literature. Rarer is the association of hypokalemia with acidosis. We report 2 patients who had severe pulmonary edema associated with the use of gadobutrol contrast in the absence of other inciting agents or events. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mayocp.2015.12.010DOI Listing
March 2016
32 Reads

Pulmonary Edema Assessed by Ultrasound: Impact in Cardiology and Intensive Care Practice.

Echocardiography 2016 May 3;33(5):778-87. Epub 2016 Feb 3.

Cardiology Division, Hospital of the Government of the City of Buenos Aires "Dr. Cosme Argerich,", Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Pulmonary edema is a frequent condition found in adult patients hospitalized in cardiology wards and intensive care units. Ultrasonography is a diagnostic modality with a high sensitivity for the detection of extravascular lung water, visualized as B lines, and usually caused by cardiogenic or noncardiogenic pulmonary edema. This paper highlights a simple method for the assessment of patients with pulmonary edema, which allows for a differential diagnosis of its possible mechanism and contributes to therapeutic intervention guiding and monitoring. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/echo.13182
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/echo.13182DOI Listing
May 2016
5 Reads

Negative pressure pulmonary edema following choking on a cookie.

Pediatr Pulmonol 2016 Jul 19;51(7):E25-7. Epub 2016 Jan 19.

Pediatric Pulmonology Institute, Ruth Rappaport Children's Hospital, Rambam Health Care Campus, Haifa, Israel.

A 12-year-old boy developed severe acute respiratory distress during a school break requiring resuscitative measures. The episode started shortly after a short choking episode with a cookie. History, physical examination, laboratory results, chest X-ray, and clinical course supported the diagnosis of negative pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ppul.23385DOI Listing
July 2016
3 Reads

Magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent related pulmonary edema: a case report.

Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci 2012 Oct;16 Suppl 4:110-2

Department of Anesthesiology and Reanimation, Abant Izzet Baysal, University Medical School, Bolu, Turkey.

Gadobutrol is a contrast agent often used during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The agent has several side effects, some of which can be serious. It has extremely rare life-threatening systemic complications, which can lead to bronchospasm, hypersensitivity reactions and cardiovascular arrest. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
October 2012
3 Reads

Nonsurgical pneumoperitoneum in a dog secondary to blunt force trauma to the chest.

J Vet Emerg Crit Care (San Antonio) 2011 Oct 14;21(5):552-7. Epub 2011 Sep 14.

Angell Animal Medical Center, Emergency Critical Care Department, 350 South Huntington Ave., Jamaica Plain, MA 02130, USA.

Objective: To describe the medical management of pneumoperitoneum without surgical intervention in a dog that sustained blunt force trauma to the thorax. To review the mechanisms of how a thoracic injury (ie, extra-abdominal source) can lead to pneumoperitoneum.

Case Summary: A 4-month-old Shih Tzu puppy was attacked by a larger dog and sustained various injuries including a pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum, and a pneumoperitoneum. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-4431.2011.00671.xDOI Listing
October 2011
3 Reads

Three-view bedside ultrasound for the differentiation of acute respiratory distress syndrome from cardiogenic pulmonary edema.

Am J Emerg Med 2012 Sep 25;30(7):1324.e1-4. Epub 2011 Aug 25.

Department of Emergency Medicine, Alameda County Medical Center Highland, Oakland, CA 94602, USA.

Bedside ultrasound is being increasingly used by emergency physicians (EPs) for the differentiation of acute dyspnea in critically ill patients. Lung ultrasound is emerging as a highly sensitive tool in diagnosing alveolar interstitial edema with the presence of diffuse “B-lines” arising from the pleural line. However, when used independently, lung ultrasound is unable to differentiate between cardiogenic and noncardiogenic causes of pulmonary edema. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajem.2011.06.028DOI Listing
September 2012
6 Reads

An MR comparison study of cardiogenic and noncardiogenic pulmonary edema in animal models.

J Magn Reson Imaging 2011 Nov 18;34(5):1092-8. Epub 2011 Aug 18.

Biomedical MR Science Center, Shiga University of Medical Science, Shiga, Japan.

Purpose: To apply magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to differential diagnosis of cardiogenic pulmonary edema (CPE) and noncardiogenic pulmonary edema (NCPE).

Materials And Methods: In the CPE group, MR measurements were performed on 5 rats just before and 3 h after administration of 21 ± 2% body weight of normal saline. In the NCPE group, measurements were similarly performed on 5 animals just before and 48 h after 0. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmri.22730DOI Listing
November 2011
2 Reads

Dipyridamole-associated shock and pulmonary edema.

Ann Pharmacother 2011 Jul 13;45(7-8):e42. Epub 2011 Jun 13.

Bridgeport Hospital and Yale University School of Medicine, Bridgeport, CT, USA.

Objective: To report a case of fulminant shock and noncardiogenic pulmonary edema induced by intravenously administered dipyridamole.

Case Summary: A 73-year-old woman presented to the office of her cardiologist for dipyridamole myocardial scintigraphy. Several minutes after administration of intravenous dipyridamole 0. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1345/aph.1P734DOI Listing
July 2011
4 Reads

Prospective evaluation of drug-induced lung toxicity with high-resolution CT and transbronchial biopsy.

Radiol Med 2011 Mar 3;116(2):246-63. Epub 2010 Dec 3.

Area di Radiologia, IRST-Istituto Romagnolo Studio e cura dei Tumori, Meldola, Forlì, Italy.

Purpose: This study compared the results of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and cytohistology after transbronchial biopsy in the evaluation of drug-related interstitial lung disease (DR-ILD).

Materials And Methods: Patients with a clinical and imaging diagnosis of DR-ILD were prospectively included in a study protocol lasting 5 years. All patients were evaluated by bronchoscopy with transbronchial biopsy or bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) following an HRCT examination that raised a suspicion of DR-ILD. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11547-010-0608-yDOI Listing
March 2011
2 Reads

Noncardiogenic pulmonary edema in a cardiac surgery patient: never a welcome sight for the anesthesiologist.

J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth 2012 Feb 24;26(1):178-9. Epub 2010 Nov 24.

Department of Anesthesiology, Pharmacology, and Therapeutics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S10530770100042
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/j.jvca.2010.09.026DOI Listing
February 2012
3 Reads

Radiology corner. Case 45. Noncardiogenic pulmonary edema as a result of urosepsis.

Mil Med 2010 Mar;175(3):iii-iv

Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland 20814-4799, USA.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
March 2010
3 Reads

Acute lung injury after thoracic surgery.

J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth 2010 Aug 8;24(4):681-90. Epub 2010 Jan 8.

The Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA.

In this review, the authors discussed criteria for diagnosing ALI; incidence, etiology, preoperative risk factors, intraoperative management, risk-reduction strategies, treatment, and prognosis. The anesthesiologist needs to maintain an index of suspicion for ALI in the perioperative period of thoracic surgery, particularly after lung resection on the right side. Acute hypoxemia, imaging analysis for diffuse infiltrates, and detecting a noncardiogenic origin for pulmonary edema are important hallmarks of acute lung injury. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://pdfs.journals.lww.com/anesthesia-analgesia/2003/12000
Web Search
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S105307700900414
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/j.jvca.2009.10.032DOI Listing
August 2010
4 Reads

Brain natriuretic peptide levels in six basic underwater demolitions/SEAL recruits presenting with swimming induced pulmonary edema (SIPE).

J Spec Oper Med 2009 ;9(3):44-50

Loyola University Medical Center, Chicago, USA.

Swimming induced pulmonary edema (SIPE) is associated with both SCUBA diving and strenuous surface swimming; however, the majority of reported cases and clinically observed cases tend to occur during or after aggressive surface swimming. Capillary stress failure appears to be central to the pathophysiology of this disorder. Regional pulmonary capillaries are exposed to relatively high pressures secondary to increased vascular volume, elevation of pulmonary vascular resistance, and regional differences in perfusion secondary to forces of gravity and high cardiac output. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 2010
5 Reads

Acute paraplegia and pulmonary edema after benzathine penicillin injection.

Am J Emerg Med 2008 Feb;26(2):250.e1-5

Service d'Anesthésie-réanimation Centrale, CHU Ibn Rochd Casablanca Morocco 20200.

Accidental intra-arterial injection is a potentially devastating complication of the intragluteal injection of benzathine penicillin. A 35-year-old woman developed after intramuscular injection of benzathine penicillin G acute paraplegia and noncardiogenic pulmonary edema. Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation was initiated with furosemide and corticosteroids. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S073567570700294
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajem.2007.04.013DOI Listing
February 2008
4 Reads

A hitherto unreported pulmonary complication in an IV heroin user.

Chest 2008 Feb;133(2):549-51

Department of Internal Medicine, New York Methodist Hospital, Internal Medicine/Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, 506 6th St, Brooklyn, NY 11215, USA.

IV heroin use is associated with several well-described complications, including noncardiogenic pulmonary edema, aspiration pneumonitis, ARDS, pneumonia, lung abscess, septic pulmonary emboli, and atelectasis. Foreign-body granulomatosis may develop when drug users inject solutions containing crushed oral tablets in which talc is used as filler and can be complicated by pulmonary fibrosis. The effects are distinct from pulmonary edema, which may occur acutely with heroin injection. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1378/chest.07-0805DOI Listing
February 2008
6 Reads

Noncardiogenic pulmonary edema following accidental near-hanging.

Heart Lung 2007 Sep-Oct;36(5):364-6

Critical Care Unit of The Instituto Medico La Floresta, Caracas, DC, Venezuela.

A 79 year-old woman was admitted to our institution unconscious with pulmonary edema. She had been trapped by the neck in the electric sliding gate of her own home garage. A pulmonary artery catheter was inserted through the right internal jugular vein and her hemodynamic profile and chest x ray revealed a non cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S01479563060028
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hrtlng.2006.10.005DOI Listing
November 2007
8 Reads

Cytarabine-related lung infiltrates on high resolution computerized tomography: a possible complication with benign outcome in leukemic patients.

Haematologica 2007 Sep;92(9):e85-90

Department of Oncology and Hematology, Section of Hematology, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy.

Potentially fatal lung toxicity occurs in 12-20% of leukemic patients treated with cytarabine especially at intermediate to high doses, usually presenting as noncardiogenic pulmonary edema (NCPE). Anecdotally the association between cytarabine and the onset of bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) has been reported. We describe here three cases of patients affected by acute myeloid leukemia (AML) treated with chemotherapeutic regimens including high dose cytarabine, who developed early onset of fever, mild dyspnea, moderate hypoxemia on arterial blood gas analysis and lung infiltrates documented by high-resolution computerized tomography (HRCT), with a more indolent behaviour and a benign clinical outcome, compared with similar cases previously reported in the literature. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 2007
4 Reads

Noncardiogenic pulmonary edema associated with clopidogrel: a serious but unexpected side effect of clopidogrel.

Can J Cardiol 2007 May;23(6):478-80

Dr Siyami Ersek Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery Center, Istanbul, Turkey.

Clopidogrel has a favourable side effect profile, in which the most serious complications are related to bleeding diathesis. Drug reactions represent frequently encountered clinical problems that can also be life-threatening. In the present case, serious noncardiogenic pulmonary edema was observed as an idiosyncratic reaction after clopidogrel use. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2650669PMC
May 2007
7 Reads

De novo multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B with noncardiogenic pulmonary edema as the presenting symptom.

Endocr J 2006 Aug 10;53(4):523-9. Epub 2006 Jul 10.

Department of Medicine, Tokai University School of Medicine, Isehara, Kanagawa, Japan.

Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) type 2B is a rare hereditary disorder characterized by medullary thyroid carcinoma, pheochromocytoma, and neuroma. Early signs of MEN 2B are usually neuroma, gastrointestinal problems, and medullary thyroid carcinoma. Noncardiogenic pulmonary edema is rare as a presenting symptom. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
August 2006
4 Reads

Noncardiogenic pulmonary edema due to ibuprofen.

Respiration 2007 30;74(6):697. Epub 2005 Sep 30.

Department of Pulmonology, Municipal Hospital Dessau, Dessau, Germany.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://www.karger.com/Article/FullText/88693
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000088693DOI Listing
January 2008
4 Reads

Simple vs complex radionuclide methods of assessing capillary protein permeability for diagnosing acute respiratory distress syndrome.

J Crit Care 2005 Jun;20(2):162-71

Department of Intensive Care, Vrije Universiteit Medical Center, Institute for Cardiovascular Research at the Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Purpose: Using injection of gallium Ga 67 transferrin, technetium Tc 99m red cells, probes over the lungs, and blood samples, a pulmonary leak index (PLI) and pulmonary transcapillary escape rate (PTCER) for transferrin can be measured. This may help differentiating between cardiogenic pulmonary edema (CPE) and permeability (noncardiogenic) pulmonary edema of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The purpose of the study was to evaluate the relative importance of red cell labeling, blood sampling, and probe measurements in this assessment. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S088394410500023
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcrc.2004.12.002DOI Listing
June 2005
4 Reads

Noncardiogenic pulmonary edema as the first manifestation of pheochromocytoma: a case report.

Radiat Med 2005 Mar;23(2):133-8

Department of Radiology, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Ichihara Hospital, Chiba, Japan.

We report here a case of pheochromocytoma presenting with noncardiogenic pulmonary edema, which is an unusual first manifestation of pheochromocytoma. Chest radiograph showed diffuse consolitaion and ground-glass opacity on both lungs. Neither pleural effusion nor cardiomegaly was present. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
March 2005
4 Reads

Increased neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids from a patient with pulmonary edema associated with pheochromocytoma.

Intern Med 2004 Dec;43(12):1194-7

Department of Pulmonary Disease, Hokkaido Cancer Center, Sapporo.

Pulmonary edema, both cardiogenic and noncardiogenic, has been reported as a manifestation of pheochromocytoma. We report a patient with pheochromocytoma complicated by acute pulmonary edema that appeared clinically noncardiogenic. The patient had an uncomplicated course and rapid resolution of pulmonary edema. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
December 2004
4 Reads

Noncardiogenic pulmonary edema in low-dose oral methotrexate therapy.

Intern Med 2004 Sep;43(9):846-51

Department of Internal Medicine, Social Insurance Central General Hospital, Tokyo.

In the past two decades, low-dose methotrexate (MTX) has been widely used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). As adverse effects, various types of pulmonary toxicity have been reported with this therapy. We report a case of MTX-induced noncardiogenic pulmonary edema in a 35-year-old woman. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 2004
6 Reads

Pheochromocytoma-induced acute pulmonary edema and reversible catecholamine cardiomyopathy mimicking acute myocardial infarction.

Rev Port Cardiol 2004 Apr;23(4):561-8

División Cardiovascular, Servicios de Cardiología Intervencionista, Terapia Intensiva y Radiología, Centro Hospitalario la Concepción, Saltillo, México.

Acute noncardiogenic pulmonary edema and catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy as the first presentations of pheochromocytoma are uncommon events, but usually rapidly fatal. A 36-year-old man presented acute pulmonary edema in a setting of hypertensive emergency after arthroscopy, later developing catecholamine-induced cardiotoxicity mimicking an acute myocardial infarction, with elevation of cardiac damage markers, normal coronary arteries, and with full recovery from electrical abnormalities. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a right adrenal mass. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
April 2004
3 Reads

Noncardiogenic pulmonary edema induced by a molecular adsorbent recirculating system: case report.

J Artif Organs 2003 ;6(4):282-5

Liver Transplantation and Liver Surgery, Transplantation Division, Department of Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University, 1025 Walnut Street, Suite 605 College Building, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA.

Noncardiogenic pulmonary edema is a well-recognized manifestation of acute lung injury which has been related, among others, to blood or blood-product transfusion, intravenous contrast injection, air embolism, and drug ingestion. We describe two cases of noncardiogenic pulmonary edema after use of a molecular adsorbent recirculating system, a cell-free dialysis technique. Patients in this series presented at our institution to be evaluated for liver transplantation. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10047-003-0233-9
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10047-003-0233-9DOI Listing
February 2004
9 Reads

Detecting lung injury in patients with pulmonary edema.

Intensive Care Med 2002 Sep 19;28(9):1246-53. Epub 2002 Jul 19.

Department of Internal Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 S. Euclid Ave., St. Louis, MO 631110, USA.

Objective: Current entry rules for clinical trials of acute lung injury (ALI) depend on clinical criteria and arterial blood gas measurements. The objective of this study was to determine whether estimates of pulmonary vascular permeability could be used to more accurately identify patients with ALI for this purpose.

Design And Setting: Cross-sectional study in a university hosptial in a large metropolitan city. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00134-002-1414-3DOI Listing
September 2002
2 Reads

Acute respiratory distress syndrome.

Am Fam Physician 2002 May;65(9):1823-30

Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire, USA.

Acute respiratory distress syndrome is the clinical manifestation of severe, acute lung injury. It is characterized by the acute onset of diffuse, bilateral pulmonary infiltrates secondary to noncardiogenic pulmonary edema, refractory hypoxia, and decreased lung compliance. Acute respiratory distress syndrome occurs most frequently in the setting of sepsis, aspiration of gastric contents, trauma, or multiple transfusions. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
May 2002
4 Reads

Rapid presumptive diagnosis of hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome by peripheral blood smear review.

Am J Clin Pathol 2001 Nov;116(5):665-72

Department of Internal Medicine, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, USA.

Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) is a rare but frequently lethal acute zoonotic viral infection in rural North America. The rapidity of progression from febrile prodrome to cardiogenic shock and noncardiogenic pulmonary edema requiring intensive care creates high diagnostic urgency and a need for a rapid screening tool. In this retrospective cohort study, 2 pathologists scored blinded peripheral blood smears from 52 patients with HCPS and 128 seronegative patients referred for diagnosis of suspected hantavirus infection. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://academic.oup.com/ajcp/article-lookup/doi/10.1309/CNW
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1309/CNWF-DC72-QYMR-M8DADOI Listing
November 2001
3 Reads

Chemotherapy-induced noncardiogenic pulmonary edema related to gemcitabine plus docetaxel combination with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor support.

Respiration 2000 ;67(6):680-3

Department of Medical Oncology, Ioannina University Hospital, Ioannina, Greece.

Several cancer therapeutic agents have been associated with pulmonary toxicity. Herein, we describe the case of a 73-year-old woman with breast cancer metastatic to the liver, who developed noncardiogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) while on treatment with gemcitabine plus docetaxel combination with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) support. Gemcitabine, a deoxycytidine analogue, is reported to produce mild self-limiting and only occasionally severe pulmonary toxicity. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://www.karger.com/Article/FullText/56300
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000056300DOI Listing
April 2001
3 Reads

Hyponatremia, cerebral edema, and noncardiogenic pulmonary edema in marathon runners.

Ann Intern Med 2000 May;132(9):711-4

Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77024, USA.

Background: Noncardiogenic pulmonary edema is often associated with increased intracranial pressure and can be the initial manifestation of hyponatremic encephalopathy. Marathon runners tend to develop conditions that lead to hyponatremia.

Objective: To describe the development and treatment of noncardiogenic pulmonary edema in marathon runners that was associated with hyponatremic encephalopathy. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
May 2000
23 Reads

Effect of pulmonary edema on tracheal diameter.

Respiration 1999 Nov-Dec;66(6):522-7

The Center for Lung Research, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232, USA.

Background: Though it is well known that cardiogenic and noncardiogenic pulmonary edema can cause changes in lung mechanics, actual alterations in tracheal diameter have not been described.

Objective: To evaluate the effects of pulmonary edema induced by increased left atrial pressure (cardiogenic) and Perilla ketone (PK; noncardiogenic) on tracheal diameter in chronically instrumented awake sheep.

Methods: We investigated the effects of two mechanistically distinct types of pulmonary edema on tracheal diameter in chronically instrumented awake sheep. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000029429DOI Listing
June 2000
2 Reads

[Plain X-ray diagnosis of noncardiogenic edema].

Authors:
F Sakai

Nihon Igaku Hoshasen Gakkai Zasshi 1999 Jul;59(8):367-70

Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Tokyo Women's Medical University.

Noncardiogenic edema is pulmonary edema without increased precapillary blood pressure of the lung. The causes of noncardiogenic edema include decreased blood osmotic pressure, increased permeability of basement membrane, and disturbed lymphatic drainage. We describe the plain X-ray findings of noncardiogenic pulmonary edema as they correlate with the pathophysiology of pulmonary water influx from blood vessels into the extravascular space. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
July 1999
4 Reads

[Radiographic diagnosis of cardiogenic pulmonary edema].

Nihon Igaku Hoshasen Gakkai Zasshi 1999 May;59(6):223-30

Department of Radiology, Tokai University School of Medicine.

Development of pulmonary edema (increased extravascular lung water) is a common and sometimes life-threatening clinical problem in critical-care unit patients. There are three principal causes: cardiac failure, overhydration, and increased pulmonary capillary permeability. Among these, cardiogenic edema consists of left heart failure and overhydration. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
May 1999
3 Reads

Ehrlichiosis with severe pulmonary manifestations despite early treatment.

South Med J 1999 Mar;92(3):336-9

Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, USA.

It is generally thought that if patients with ehrlichiosis are treated promptly, life-threatening illness can be avoided. We report a patient who sought medical attention 1 day after the onset of symptoms, was immediately given doxycycline, and still had serious illness with generalized edema, pulmonary infiltrates, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and noncardiogenic pulmonary edema, while receiving replacement intravenous fluids. This case alerts physicians to the serious end of the disease spectrum that can occur even though patients are given prompt, appropriate drug treatment at the onset of illness. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
March 1999
3 Reads

Reperfusion edema after thromboendarterectomy: radiographic patterns of disease.

J Thorac Imaging 1998 Jul;13(3):178-83

Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 19104, USA.

In patients with chronic pulmonary embolism, pulmonary thromboendarterectomy may result in a unique form of noncardiogenic pulmonary edema termed reperfusion edema. This report reviews the authors' experience after pulmonary thromboendarterectomy with particular emphasis on the radiographic manifestations of reperfusion edema. The clinical and radiographic record of 25 patients who underwent pulmonary thromboendarterectomy at the University of Pennsylvania from 1985 through 1995 were reviewed. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
July 1998
3 Reads

A new view of pulmonary edema and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

J Thorac Imaging 1998 Jul;13(3):147-71

Department of Radiology, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque 87131-5336, USA.

The old division of lung edema into two categories--cardiogenic (hydrostatic) and noncardiogenic (increased permeability)--is no longer adequate. For instance, it fails to distinguish between the capillary leak caused by acute respiratory distress syndrome from that caused by interleukin-2 treatment. Further, it fails to account for the capillary leak ('stress-failure') that may accompany edema. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
July 1998
2 Reads

Pleural fluid characteristics in hantavirus pulmonary syndrome.

Chest 1997 Oct;112(4):1133-6

Department of Medicine, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque 87131-5271, USA.

Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS), is a rodent-borne, acute, often fulminant cardiorespiratory illness. Noncardiogenic pulmonary edema is prominent in HPS as is cardiac dysfunction. Pleural effusions are commonly noted in patients with HPS and have been thought to be exudative. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
October 1997
5 Reads

[Noncardiogenic pulmonary edema associated with hydrochlorothiazide use].

Rev Med Chil 1996 Jun;124(6):720-4

Departamento de Enfermedades Cardiovasculares, Escuela de Medicina, Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago de Chile.

A 54 years old female patient with a mitral valve prolapse and a rheumatoid arthritis treated with steroids was admitted with dyspnea and hypotension, that started 30 min after taking a pill containing enapril and hydrochlorothiazide. Hemodynamic monitoring with a Swan-Ganz catheter showed a pulmonary capillary pressure of 5 mm Hg, a systemic vascular resistance of 887 (dyn sec)/cm5 and a cardiac output of 10 l/min. The patient had a history of adverse reactions to thiazides and responded to volume replacement, dopamine and steroids. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
June 1996
6 Reads

Lung transplantation: indications, donor and recipient selection, and imaging of complications.

Radiographics 1996 Mar;16(2):355-67

Department of Radiology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver 80262, USA.

Lung transplantation has become a well-established treatment for end-stage pulmonary parenchymal and vascular disease. Careful selection of recipients and donors is important to decrease early graft failure, which is primarily due to rejection and bronchial dehiscence. Common complications include the reimplantation response, acute rejection, pleural effusion, lymphoproliferative disorders, bronchiolitis obliterans, infection, and airway stenosis or dehiscence. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1148/radiographics.16.2.8966293DOI Listing
March 1996
3 Reads

'Zamboni disease'. Pulmonary edema in an ice hockey player.

Authors:
W K Morgan

Arch Intern Med 1995 Dec 11-25;155(22):2479-80

University Hospital, London, Ontario.

A 17-year-old previously well ice hockey player experienced acute shortness of breath and cough productive of clear frothy sputum about 1.5 hours following an ice hockey match. Noncardiogenic pulmonary edema was found to develop as a result of the inhalation of the oxides of nitrogen. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 1996
2 Reads

Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome: clinical, diagnostic, and virologic aspects.

Semin Respir Infect 1995 Dec;10(4):259-269

Department of Medicine, University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque 87131-5271, USA.

Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome is an acute pneumonitis with a high mortality rate that is caused by a newly recognized hantavirus. Four Corners virus (also known as Muerto Canyon virus and Sin Nombre virus) is enzootic among deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus). Incidental transmission to humans can result in a disease characterized by rapidly progressive respiratory insufficiency, diffuse noncardiogenic pulmonary edema, vascular volume contraction with hemoconcentration, lactic acidosis, depressed cardiac output, and cardiac dysrhythmias preterminally. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
December 1995
3 Reads