74 results match your criteria New Genetics and Society [Journal]


"I6 passages: on the reproduction of a human embryonic stem cell line from Israel to France".

New Genet Soc 2018 2;37(4):338-361. Epub 2018 Dec 2.

Institut National de la Santé Et de la Recherche Médicale U1251, Aix-Marseille University, Medical School La Timone, Marseille, France.

The first French clinical trial using human embryonic stem cells for regenerative purposes was launched in 2014, using the I6 stem cell line that was imported from Israel. From Israel to France, national reproductive policies and practices inform how basic scientists produce, manage and circulate cells across countries. Building on an interdisciplinary co-production involving two social scientists and a life scientist, this article suggests that biobanks cells from in vitro fertilization to stem cell science and from country to country by modifying their reproductive meaning. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636778.2018.1548269DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6319182PMC
December 2018

Identity, community and care in online accounts of hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome.

New Genet Soc 2018 2;37(2):117-136. Epub 2018 May 2.

Centre for Population Health Sciences, Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics, Medical School, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.

Sociological literature has explored how shifts in the point at which individuals may be designated as diseased impact upon experiences of ill health. Research has shown that experiences of being genetically "at risk" are shaped by and shape familial relations, coping strategies, and new forms of biosociality. Less is known about how living with genetic risk is negotiated in the everyday and over time, and the wider forms of identity, communities and care this involves. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636778.2018.1469974DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5964445PMC
May 2018
3 Reads

The UK's 100,000 Genomes Project: manifesting policymakers' expectations.

New Genet Soc 2017 6;36(4):336-353. Epub 2017 Sep 6.

Brighton and Sussex Medical School, University of Sussex, Falmer, UK.

The UK's 100,000 Genomes Project has the aim of sequencing 100,000 genomes from UK National Health Service (NHS) patients while concomitantly transforming clinical care such that whole genome sequencing becomes routine clinical practice in the UK. Policymakers claim that the project will revolutionize NHS care. We wished to explore the 100,000 Genomes Project, and in particular, the extent to which policymaker claims have helped or hindered the work of those associated with Genomics England - the company established by the Department of Health to deliver the project. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636778.2017.1370671DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5706982PMC
September 2017
8 Reads

Generations of interdisciplinarity in bioinformatics.

New Genet Soc 2016 Apr 23;35(2):186-209. Epub 2016 May 23.

School of Social Sciences, Cardiff University , Glamorgan Building, King Edward VII, Cardiff CF10 3WT , UK.

Bioinformatics, a specialism propelled into relevance by the Human Genome Project and the subsequent -omic turn in the life science, is an interdisciplinary field of research. Qualitative work on the disciplinary identities of bioinformaticians has revealed the tensions involved in work in this "borderland." As part of our ongoing work on the emergence of bioinformatics, between 2010 and 2011, we conducted a survey of United Kingdom-based academic bioinformaticians. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636778.2016.1184965DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4940887PMC
April 2016
23 Reads

Exploring the post-genomic world: differing explanatory and manipulatory functions of post-genomic sciences.

New Genet Soc 2016 Jan 25;35(1):49-68. Epub 2016 Feb 25.

Technoscience and Regulation Research Unit, Department of Pediatrics, Dalhousie University , Halifax , NS , Canada.

Richard Lewontin proposed that the ability of a scientific field to create a narrative for public understanding garners it social relevance. This article applies Lewontin's conceptual framework of the functions of science (manipulatory and explanatory) to compare and explain the current differences in perceived societal relevance of genetics/genomics and proteomics. We provide three examples to illustrate the social relevance and strong cultural narrative of genetics/genomics for which no counterpart exists for proteomics. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636778.2015.1133280DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4841027PMC
January 2016
2 Reads

Closure of a human tissue biobank: individual, institutional, and field expectations during cycles of promise and disappointment.

New Genet Soc 2015 Oct 26;34(4):417-436. Epub 2015 Nov 26.

Cesagene, School of Social Sciences, Cardiff University , Glamorgan Building, King Edward VII, Cardiff CF10 3WT , UK.

Biobanks are increasingly being established to act as mediators between patient-donors and researchers. In practice, some of these will close. This paper details the experiences of one such bank. Read More

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http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14636778.2015.11
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636778.2015.1107469DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4685593PMC
October 2015
4 Reads
1 Citation
0.860 Impact Factor

Epigenetic Determinism in Science and Society.

New Genet Soc 2015 Apr;34(2):177-195

University of Oxford.

The epigenetic "revolution" in science cuts across many disciplines, and it is now one of the fastest growing research areas in biology. Increasingly, claims are made that epigenetics research represents a move away from the genetic determinism that has been prominent both in biological research and in understandings of the impact of biology on society. We discuss to what extent an epigenetic framework actually supports these claims. Read More

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http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14636778.2015.10
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636778.2015.1033052DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4513352PMC
April 2015
5 Reads

How The Genome Got a Life Span.

New Genet Soc 2015 Apr;34(2):152-176

Institute for Society and Genetics And the Department of Sociology, University of California Los Angeles, Box 957221, 1320 Rolfe Hall, Los Angeles, CA 90095-7221 Telephone: 310-825-1517.

In the space of little more than a decade, ideas of the human genome have shifted significantly, with the emergence of the notion that the genome an individual changes with development, age, disease, environmental inputs, and time. This paper examines the emergence of the genome with a life span, one that experiences drift, instability and mutability, and a host of other temporal changes. We argue that developments in chromatin biology have provided the basis for this genomic embodiment of experience and exposure. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636778.2015.1034851DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4512745PMC
April 2015
3 Reads

Metaphors in search of a target: the curious case of epigenetics.

New Genet Soc 2015 Apr 12;34(2):196-218. Epub 2015 May 12.

School of Sociology and Social Policy, Institute for Science and Society, University of Nottingham , Nottingham , UK.

Carrying out research in genetics and genomics and communicating about them would not be possible without metaphors such as "information," "code," "letter" or "book." Genetic and genomic metaphors have remained relatively stable for a long time but are now beginning to shift in the context of synthetic biology and epigenetics. This article charts the emergence of metaphors in the context of epigenetics, first through collecting some examples of metaphors in scientific and popular writing and second through a systematic analysis of metaphors used in two UK broadsheets. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636778.2015.1034849DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4440632PMC
April 2015
5 Reads

Origin stories from a regional placenta tissue collection.

New Genet Soc 2015 Jan 4;34(1):25-51. Epub 2015 Feb 4.

Centre for Health and Clinical Research, Department of Health & Applied Social Sciences, University of the West of England , Bristol , UK.

Twenty-three years ago when women and their children were recruited to a longitudinal genetic epidemiological study during pregnancy, placentas were collected at birth. This paper explores the history of a regional placenta biobank and contemporary understandings of its value for the constitution of a research population. We draw on interviews with some of the mothers and those responsible for the establishment and curation of the placenta collection in order to explore the significance and meaning of the collection for them. Read More

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http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14636778.2014.999
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636778.2014.999153DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4337687PMC
January 2015
3 Reads

Genetics and Personal Responsibility for Health.

Authors:
David B Resnik

New Genet Soc 2014 Jun;33(2):113-125

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Box 12233, Mail Drop CU 03, Research Triangle Park, NC, 27709. .

Advances in genetic medicine may have implications for how we should think about personal responsibility for health, because they may show how it is possible to exert some control over risk factors that were previously thought as beyond the individual's control. Although we cannot control the genes that we are born with, we can often make decisions concerning genetic testing, disease prevention, and treatment. One might argue, therefore, that individuals should be treated as morally responsible for taking effective action in response to genetic risks factors, since genetically-based health risks are similar to other health risks. Read More

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http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14636778.2014.905
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636778.2014.905195DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4293629PMC
June 2014
9 Reads

Smoking at the workplace: Effects of genetic and environmental causal accounts on attitudes towards smoking employees and restrictive policies.

New Genet Soc 2014 Oct;33(4):400-412

Psychology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA.

People hold diverse beliefs regarding the etiologies of individual and group differences in behaviors which, in turn, might affect their attitudes and behaviors. It is important to establish how perceived etiologies for smoking might affect the effectiveness of policy initiatives and prevention efforts. The present study assessed whether exposure to genetic vs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636778.2014.951993DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4268242PMC
October 2014
10 Reads

International law, public health, and the meanings of pharmaceuticalization.

New Genet Soc 2014 Oct 18;33(4):434-449. Epub 2014 Sep 18.

Centre for Population Health Sciences, University of Edinburgh , Edinburgh , UK.

Recent social science scholarship has employed the term "pharmaceuticalization" in analyses of the production, circulation and use of drugs. In this paper, we seek to open up further discussion of the scope, limits and potential of this as an analytical device through consideration of the role of law and legal processes in directing pharmaceutical flows. To do so, we synthesize a range of empirical and conceptual work concerned with the relationships between access to medicines and intellectual property law. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636778.2014.951994DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4226322PMC
October 2014
5 Reads

Governing stem cell therapy in India: regulatory vacuum or jurisdictional ambiguity?

New Genet Soc 2014 Oct 29;33(4):413-433. Epub 2014 Oct 29.

Institute for Science and Society (ISS), School of Sociology and Social Policy, University of Nottingham , Nottingham , UK.

Stem cell treatments are being offered in Indian clinics although preclinical evidence of their efficacy and safety is lacking. This is attributed to a governance vacuum created by the lack of legally binding research guidelines. By contrast, this paper highlights jurisdictional ambiguities arising from trying to regulate stem cell therapy under the auspices of research guidelines when treatments are offered in a private market disconnected from clinical trials. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636778.2014.970269DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4226321PMC
October 2014
2 Reads

Autobiologies on YouTube: Narratives of Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing.

New Genet Soc 2014 Mar 7;33(1):60-78. Epub 2014 Mar 7.

Technology and Society Studies Department, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Despite a growing personal genomics market, little is known about how people engage with the possibilities offered by direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing. In order to help address this gap, this study deploys narrative analysis of YouTube videos posted by individuals who have purchased DTC genetic testing for disease. Genetic testing is said to be contributing to new states of illness, where individuals may become "patients-in-waiting. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636778.2014.884456DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3996527PMC
March 2014
46 Reads

Mapping the new molecular landscape: social dimensions of epigenetics.

New Genet Soc 2013 Dec 9;32(4):429-447. Epub 2013 Dec 9.

University of Edinburgh, Centre for Population Health Sciences, Old Medical School, Teviot Place, Edinburgh EH8 9AG, UK.

Epigenetics is the study of changes in gene expression caused by mechanisms other than changes in the DNA itself. The field is rapidly growing and being widely promoted, attracting attention in diverse arenas. These include those of the social sciences, where some researchers have been encouraged by the resonance between imaginaries of development within epigenetics and social theory. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636778.2013.861739DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3898699PMC
December 2013
6 Reads

On being a (modern) scientist: risks of public engagement in the UK interspecies embryo debate.

New Genet Soc 2012 Dec 22;31(4):408-423. Epub 2012 May 22.

Centre for Biomedicine & Society, Department of Sociology & Communications Brunel University, Kingston Lane, Uxbridge, Middlesex, UK.

In 2006, a small group of UK academic scientists made headlines when they proposed the creation of interspecies embryos - mixing human and animal genetic material. A public campaign was fought to mobilize support for the research. Drawing on interviews with the key scientists involved, this paper argues that engaging the public through communicating their ideas via the media can result in tensions between the necessity of, and inherent dangers in, scientists campaigning on controversial issues. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636778.2012.687138DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3534342PMC
December 2012
3 Reads
1 Citation
0.860 Impact Factor

Scientific institutions and effective governance: a case study of Chinese stem cell research.

Authors:
Joy Yueyue Zhang

New Genet Soc 2011 Jun;30(2):193-207

BIOS Centre, Sociology Department, London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK.

In terms of stem cell research, China appears both as a "powerhouse" armed with state-of-the-art facilities, internationally trained personnel and permissive regulation and as a "bit player," with its capability for conducting high quality research still in question. The gap between China's assiduous endeavors and the observed outcome is due to a number of factors. Based on interviews with 48 key stakeholders active in Chinese stem cell research, this article examines how the structure of scientific institutions has affected effective governance in China. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636778.2011.574372DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3797514PMC
June 2011
2 Reads

Informed Choice in Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing for Alzheimer and Other Diseases: Lessons from Two Cases.

Authors:
Donna A Messner

New Genet Soc 2011 ;30(1):59-72

Penn Center for the Integration of Genetic Technologies, Department of Medical Genetics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

Health-related direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing has been a controversial practice. Especially problematic is predictive testing for Alzheimer disease (AD), since the disease is incurable, prevention is inconclusive, and testing does not definitively predict an individual's future disease status. In this paper, I examine two contrasting cases of subjects who learn through genetic testing that they have an elevated risk of developing AD later in life. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636778.2011.552300DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3095442PMC
January 2011
3 Reads

Personal genomics and individual identities: motivations and moral imperatives of early users.

New Genet Soc 2010 Sep;29(3):261-290

Department of Bioethics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, US.

Since 2007, consumer genomics companies have marketed personal genome scanning services to assess users' genetic predispositions to a variety of complex diseases and traits. This study investigates early users' reasons for utilizing personal genome services, their evaluation of the technology, how they interpret the results, and how they incorporate the results into health-related decision-making. The analysis contextualizes early users' relationships to the technology, the knowledge generated by it, and how it mediates their relationship to their own health and to biomedicine more broadly. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636778.2010.507485DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2976061PMC
September 2010
4 Reads

"So, what is an embryo?" A comparative study of the views of those asked to donate embryos for hESC research in the UK and Switzerland.

New Genet Soc 2008 Jun 24;27(2):113-126. Epub 2008 Aug 24.

The moral status of the human embryo has gained much attention in debates over the acceptability, or otherwise, of human embryonic stem cell research. Far less attention has been paid to the suppliers of those embryos: people who have undergone IVF treatment to produce embryos to assist them to have a baby. It is sociologically and ethically important to understand their views and experiences of being asked to donate embryos for research if we are to fully understand the wider social and regulatory aspects of hESC science. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636770802077041DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3419546PMC
June 2008
4 Reads

States of uncertainty: governing the empire of biotechnology.

Authors:
Ian Forbes

New Genet Soc 2006 Apr;25(1):69-88

The biotechnological revolution presents states and governments with a set of challenges that they have difficulty meeting. Part of the problem is associated with common perceptions of the speed, volume and the radical uncertainty of the new developments. Globalisation is also implicated, especially in relation to the development of the knowledge economy and the role of multinational actors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636770600603501DOI Listing
April 2006
3 Reads

"Like editing bits of ourselves": geneticisation and human fate.

Authors:
Anne Scott

New Genet Soc 2006 Apr;25(1):109-24

School of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand.

Disquiet relating to the potential for knowing one's 'fate' emerged strongly in sixteen focus groups relating to genetic testing held in Aotearoa/New Zealand. This paper draws on the concept of 'life itself', rephrased here as 'capitalised genomics', to understand this reaction. A tension relating to the discourse of geneticisation, in which 'the gene' is held to carry essential identity, links to ancestors and people, and yet also to create fixed and innate characteristics, is described. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636770600603535DOI Listing
April 2006
9 Reads

"Be ready against cancer, now": direct-to-consumer advertising for genetic testing.

New Genet Soc 2006 Apr;25(1):89-107

Programmes de bioethique, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succursale Centre-Ville, Montreal (Quebec) Canada H3C 3J7.

A recent addition to the debate about the benefits and harms of direct-to-consumer (DTC) advertising of medicines and pharmaceuticals is a growing critique of DTC marketing and sale of genetic tests. Academic and policy literatures exploring this issue have, however, tended to focus on the sale of genetic tests, paying rather less attention to the particular implications of advertising. The globalization of broadcast media and ever increasing access to the Internet mean that public exposure to advertising for medical technologies is a reality that national regulatory bodies will be hard pressed to constrain. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636770600603527DOI Listing
April 2006
4 Reads

Genetics and prevention: a policy in the making.

New Genet Soc 2006 Apr;25(1):51-68

Department of Health Services, Institute of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Oster Farmagsgade 5, DK-1014 Copenhagen, Denmark.

This article explores the process through which the advances of genetic research are incorporated into public health care in Denmark. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork in cancer genetic counselling, the implementation of new medical advances is investigated by following the establishment of a policy on informing relatives at risk of hereditary cancer. This case material provides the occasion to examine how policies are shaped in a governmental process through which different actors seek to establish a common goal for a specific health practice. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636770600603485DOI Listing
April 2006
3 Reads

Locating tissue collections in tissue economies--deriving value from biomedical research.

Authors:
Aaro Tupasela

New Genet Soc 2006 Apr;25(1):33-49

Research Group for Comparative Sociology, Department of Sociology, PO Box 18 (Unioninkatu 18), 00014 University of Helsinki, Finland.

This paper examines diverging notions of value in the use of tissue sample collections and other information resources using a case study of hereditary colorectal cancer research in Finland. Recent science and technology policies that emphasize the production of commercial value derived from tissue sample collections are challenged by varying conceptions of value, as well as structural factors that relate to the combination of different public population information systems in the Finnish research system. Such challenges reflect a tension in the economic aspirations of the ideology of the knowledge society in relation to the goals of national health care policies, as well as the role of the state as a mediator of knowledge production and commercial development. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636770600603469DOI Listing
April 2006
1 Read

Knowledge and attitudes toward human cloning in Israel.

New Genet Soc 2006 Apr;25(1):21-31

Nursing Department, Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, PO Box 39040, Tel Aviv, 69978, Israel.

The success of mammal cloning in 1997 has brought the issue of human cloning into public discussion. Human cloning has several aspects and potential applications for use in both reproductive and non-reproductive matters. The aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge and attitudes toward human cloning in Israel. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636770600603360DOI Listing
April 2006
3 Reads

Cancer genetics and its "different faces of autonomy".

New Genet Soc 2006 Apr;25(1):1-19

Department of Science, Technology, Health and Policy Studies, University of Twente, BBT-STeHPS, PO Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede, The Netherlands.

In this article we discuss the development of a practice of screening, preventive treatment, and presymptomatic testing for individuals at risk of Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP), a specific hereditary predisposition for colon cancer. We describe this development as a process of co-evolution, showing how this practice has been gradually taking shape in a new network of actors, routines, rules, institutions and technologies. We further argue that, looking at the emergence and transformation of this practice, we can distinguish two different regimes: a regime of prevention and a regime of self-determination. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636770600603329DOI Listing
April 2006
5 Reads

Cloning humans, cloning literature: genetics and the imagination deficit.

Authors:
J Van Dijck

New Genet Soc 1999 ;18(1):9-22

Department of Arts and Culture, University of Maastricht, PO Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands.

After the birth of Dolly, media stories on cloning were replete with references to well-known science fiction plots. This essay criticizes the 'imagination deficit' of scientists and journalists, first by problematizing the uncritical adoption of attentuated science fiction plots in the media coverage of Dolly, and second, by proposing to look at more expansive science fiction novels that carefully examine issues such as uniqueness and identity in relation to the new genetics. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636779908656887DOI Listing
April 2007
5 Reads

What we know and what we don't about cloning and society.

Authors:
S Franklin

New Genet Soc 1999 ;18(1):111-20

Department of Sociology, Lancaster University, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636779908656893DOI Listing
April 2007
2 Reads

Science fiction/science fact: medical genetics in news stories.

New Genet Soc 2005 Dec;24(3):337-53

School of Sociology, Politics and Law, University of Plymouth, 8 Portland Villas, Drake Circus, Plymouth, Devon, PL4 8AA, UK.

News media coverage of biotechnology issues offers a rich source of fictional portrayals, with stories drawing strongly on popular imagery and metaphors in descriptions of the powers and dangers of biotechnology. This article examines how science fiction metaphors, imagery and motifs surface in British newspaper (broadsheet and tabloid) coverage of medical genetic issues, focusing on press reporting of two recent highly publicised news media events; namely, the Hashmi and Whitaker families' plights to use stem cells from a 'perfectly matched sibling' for the treatment of their diseased children. It is concerned in particular with the extent to which journalists' use of certain literary devices encourages preferred formulations of medical genetics, and thereby potentially shapes public deliberation about scientific developments and their consequences for society. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636770500350088DOI Listing
December 2005
2 Reads

A sequence of 'factishes': the media-metaphorical knowledge dynamics structuring the German press coverage of the human genome.

Authors:
Martin Doring

New Genet Soc 2005 Dec;24(3):317-36

IGBIS/University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham, NG9 2RD, UK.

This article deals with the cultural framing of the near sequencing of the human genome and its impact on the media coverage in Germany. It investigates in particular the way in which the weekly journal Die Zeit and the daily newspaper Frankfurter Rundschau reported this media event and its aftermath between June 2000 and June 2001. Both newspapers are quality papers that played an essential role in framing the human genome debate--alongside the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung--which became the most prominent genomic forum. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636770500349726DOI Listing
December 2005
2 Reads

Untying the Gordian knot of creation: metaphors for the Human Genome Project in Greek newspapers.

Authors:
Eleni Gogorosi

New Genet Soc 2005 Dec;24(3):299-315

Department of Linguistics and English Language, Bowland College, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YT, UK.

This article studies the metaphorical expressions used by newspapers to present the near completion of the Human Genome Project (HGP) to the Greek public in the year 2000. The analysis, based on cognitive metaphor theory, deals with the most frequent or captivating metaphors used to refer to the human genome, which give rise to both conventional and novel expressions. The majority of creative metaphorical expressions participate in the discourse of hope and promise propagated by the Greek media in an attempt to present the HGP and its outcome in a favorable light. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636770500349932DOI Listing
December 2005
3 Reads

From sequencing to annotating: extending the metaphor of the book of life from genetics to genomics.

Authors:
Iina Hellsten

New Genet Soc 2005 Dec;24(3):283-97

The Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, Networked Research and Digital Information, Joan Muyskenweg 25, 1090 HC Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

The article discusses how the metaphor of the Book of Life was extended over time to cover the life cycle of the Human Genome Project from genetics to genomics. In particular, the focus is on the role of extendable metaphors in the debate on the Human Genome Project in three European newspapers, popular scientific journals and scientific and scholarly articles from 1990 to 2002. In these different domains of use, various parts of the metaphor were highlighted. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636770500349890DOI Listing
December 2005
4 Reads

The Human Genome Project: an examination of its challenge to the technological imperative.

Authors:
Cheryl A Koski

New Genet Soc 2005 Dec;24(3):265-81

Department of Journalism and Media Studies, Science Journalism Program, University of South Florida, 140 Seventh Avenue South, FCT 204, St. Petersburg, FL 33701-5016, USA.

Increasingly scientists and governmental policymakers find themselves leaving their laboratories and office cubicles to share information and decision making with the general public. Contributing in large part to the development of science communication via the mass media has been the Human Genome Project (HGP). Examining the development of the HGP in the United States beginning with the early 1970s helps to establish why and how the general public has become a major player in science policy in the United States during the past quarter century, especially in regard to the ethical, legal, and social implications of research on human genetics. Read More

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December 2005
2 Reads

Genomics research in the UK--the social science agenda.

New Genet Soc 2005 ;24(2):239-52

ESRC Polaris House, North Star Avenue, Swindon SN2 1UJ, UK.

We sketch the development of UK genetics and genomics research, and emphasize the UK's key role in the international genetics and genomics research community. We highlight in particular the part played by the UK's Research Councils and other funders. With the move from genomics to post-genomics research, the field is diversifying, and interdisciplinarity becomes increasingly important, as traditional disciplinary boundaries become blurred, or break down, in the face of newly emerging sciences. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636770500184842DOI Listing
June 2006
2 Reads

Social science and a post-genomic future: alternative readings of genomic agency.

Authors:
Andrew Webster

New Genet Soc 2005 ;24(2):227-38

SATSU, Department of Sociology, University of York, York YO10 5DD, UK.

This paper explores competing discourses that envision different socio-technical landscapes opened up by the completion of the map of the human genome in 2003. It examines the ways in which the map, and it organising principle and very rationale--the gene as the sole or prime agent through which to understand the body and its disordering (as disease)--has been interpreted in quite distinct ways. It suggests how the sequences of a genomic map have post-genomic con-sequences that depend on a social rather than simply biological reading of genomic agency. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636770500184834DOI Listing
June 2006
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Governing genomics in the 21st century: between risk and uncertainty.

Authors:
Herbert Gottweis

New Genet Soc 2005 ;24(2):175-93

Department of Political Science, University of Vienna, Universitaetsstrasse 7, 1014 Vienna, Austria.

The paper reconstructs the governance of genomics by sketching the main features, modes of operation and tactics of the emerging genomics apparatus. Genomic governance in the 20th century is characterized by the simultaneous operation of a process of the stabilization of knowledge regimes, in particular via patenting. Furthermore, we observe a heterogenization and globalization of the actors and knowledge creating systems in genomics governance. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636770500184818DOI Listing
June 2006
2 Reads

For an ethics of promising, or: a few kind words about James Watson.

Authors:
Mike Fortun

New Genet Soc 2005 ;24(2):157-73

Department of Science and Technology Studies, Sage 5408, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, NY 12180, USA.

This essay questions some of the limits that both science studies and bioethics have assumed in their engagements with technoscience, and genomics in particular. It argues that these disciplines have privileged an "ethics of suspicion" regarding technoscience, and argues that this is ill-suited to promissory sciences such as genomics. The essay begins to develop elements of an "ethics of friendship" toward genomics, using examples from toxicogenomics and behavioral genetics, to suggest what an ethics of promising might involve. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636770500184792DOI Listing
June 2006
2 Reads

In the democracies of DNA: ontological uncertainty and political order in three states.

Authors:
Sheila Jasanoff

New Genet Soc 2005 ;24(2):139-55

Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA.

This paper compares the regulation of biotechnology in Britain, Germany and the United States and shows that systematic differences have developed around four issues: abortion, assisted reproduction, stem cells, and genetically modified crops and foods. Policy choices with respect to these issues reflect the capacity of each nation's regulatory institutions to deal with the scientific, social and ethical uncertainties around biotechnology. National regulatory frameworks constitute an apparatus of collective sense-making through which governments and publics interpret biotechnology's risks and promises. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636770500190864DOI Listing
June 2006
3 Reads

Regulating stem-cell research and human cloning in an Australian context: an exercise in protecting the status of the human subject.

Authors:
Olivia Harvey

New Genet Soc 2005 ;24(2):125-35

School of Sociology, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia 2052.

Over 12 months prior to the recent United Nations decision to defer a decision about what type of international treaty should be developed in the global stem-cell research and human cloning debate, the Federal Parliament of Australia passed two separate pieces of legislation relating to both these concerns. After a five-year long process of community consultation, media spectacle and parliamentary debate, reproductive cloning has been banned in Australia and only embryos considered to be excess to assisted reproductive technologies in existence on the 5th of April 2002 are currently valid research material. This paper argues that underpinning both pieces of legislation is a profound belief in the disruptive potential of all types of human cloning for the very nature and integrity of human species being. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636770500184776DOI Listing
June 2006
3 Reads

Contemplating choice: attitudes towards intervening in human reproduction in Sri Lanka.

New Genet Soc 2005 Apr;24(1):99-117

Department of Anthropology, 43 Old Elvet, University of Durham, DH1 3HN, UK.

To date, relatively little is known about the ethical, legal and social responses to recent advances in reproductive and genetic technology outside Europe and North America. This article reports on a survey carried out among doctors (n=278) and medical students (n=1256) in Sri Lanka to find out more about their responses to novel interventions in human reproduction such as In-Vitro Fertilization, Pre-Implantation Genetic Diagnosis and genetic engineering. In the first part of the paper comparisons are drawn between this survey and a survey carried out in 1985 which also considered issues surrounding amniocentesis and therapeutic termination. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636770500037859DOI Listing
April 2005
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'Genetics is not the issue': insurers on genetics and life insurance.

New Genet Soc 2005 Apr;24(1):79-98

Department of Health Care Studies, Section Health Ethics and Philosophy, University of Maastricht, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands.

This article offers an analysis of the way private insurers deal with the issue of genetics and insurance. Drawing on specific written insurance sources, a reconstruction is made of internal debates on genetics and insurance within the private insurance world in Europe and the United States. The article starts by analyzing the way insurers initially framed the issue of genetics. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636770500037834DOI Listing
April 2005
4 Reads

The Harvard case of Xu Xiping: exploitation of the people, scientific advance, or genetic theft?

New Genet Soc 2005 Apr;24(1):57-78

Amsterdam School of Social Science Research, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

A unique history and make-up of a population may make it an attractive research target for population geneticists and pharmaco-genomic investors. The promise of pharmaceutical profits and advances in medical knowledge attracted Harvard researchers and the company Millennium Pharmaceuticals to remote areas in Anhui Province, Central China, leading to international diplomatic disagreements about issues such as the ownership of genetic material and informed consent (IC). This article discusses the role of genomics and genetic sampling in China, the way it is related to population policies (the new eugenics), the national importance of genetic materials and the conflicts it led to between the Chinese government and Harvard University. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636770500037776DOI Listing
April 2005
3 Reads

Attitudes to biotechnology: estimating the opinions of a better-informed public.

New Genet Soc 2005 Apr;24(1):31-56

Department of Sociology, School of Human Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH, UK.

Public familiarity with basic scientific concepts and principles has been proposed as essential for effective democratic decision-making (Miller, 1998). Empirical research, however, finds that public 'scientific literacy' is generally low, falling well short of what normative criteria would consider 'acceptable.' This has prompted calls to better engage, educate and inform the public on scientific matters, with the additional, usually implicit assumption that a knowledgeable citizenry should express more supportive and favourable attitudes toward science. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636770500037693DOI Listing
April 2005
3 Reads

A sense of autonomy is preserved under Chinese reproductive policies.

New Genet Soc 2005 Apr;24(1):15-29

Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba Science City, Japan.

China has had a one-child family policy since 1979 and a National Family Planning Law since 2002. This paper presents analysis of comments from members of the general public and experts in China on the question of reproductive autonomy. The Chinese concept of 'Yousheng' (healthy birth) is more appropriate than eugenics as an expression of Chinese social policy and public attitudes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636770500037636DOI Listing
April 2005
3 Reads

Language and values in the human cloning debate: a web-based survey of scientists and Christian fundamentalist pastors.

New Genet Soc 2005 Apr;24(1):1-14

Departments of Biology and Communication, Portland State University, Portland, OR 97201, USA.

Over the last seven years, a major debate has arisen over whether human cloning should remain legal in the United States. Given that this may be the 'first real global and simultaneous news story on biotechnology' (Einsiedel et al., 2002, p. Read More

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http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14636770500037552
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636770500037552DOI Listing
April 2005
9 Reads

Genomic susceptibility-testing and pregnancy: something old, something new.

Authors:
Paula Saukko

New Genet Soc 2004 Dec;23(3):313-25

ISRC Centre for Genomics in Society (Egenis), University of Exeter, Amory Building, Exeter EX4 4RJ, UK.

This essay explores how testing for common and complex or genomic, as opposed to genetic, susceptibility to deep vein thrombosis both challenges and consolidates old social discourses on genes, gender and pregnancy. The nexus between genetics and reproduction usually crystallizes in the moral dilemma of selective termination. This essay examines online discussion among women with a genomic predisposition to deep vein thrombosis, which is associated with miscarriage and stillbirth. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1463677042000305075DOI Listing
December 2004
3 Reads

Genomic patenting and the utility requirement.

Authors:
Jane Calvert

New Genet Soc 2004 Dec;23(3):301-12

ESRC Centre for Genomics in Society (Egenis), University of Exeter, Amory Building, Exeter EX4 4RJ, UK.

This paper analyses the ways in which genomic knowledge is portrayed as useful knowledge in gene patenting in order to fulfil the 'utility'/'industrial applicability' requirement for patentability. It gives examples of utility claims in gene patents and asks whether genomics (as opposed to genetics) changes our ideas about what is useful and what can be patented. It puts forward a provisional classification of different types of utility and argues that merely identifying the physiological function of a gene diverges radically from our commonsense understanding of what it is for an invention to be useful. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1463677042000305066DOI Listing
December 2004
4 Reads