3,868 results match your criteria Neuroscience and biobehavioral reviews[Journal]


Cannabis use and human retina: The path for the study of brain synaptic transmission dysfunctions in cannabis users.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 Feb 14. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Pôle Hospitalo-Universitaire de Psychiatrie d'Adultes du Grand Nancy, Centre Psychothérapique de Nancy, Laxou, France; INSERM U1114, Fédération de Médecine Translationnelle de Strasbourg, Département de Psychiatrie, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France.

Owing to the difficulty of obtaining direct access to the functioning brain, new approaches are needed for the indirect exploration of brain disorders in neuroscience research. Due to its embryonic origin, the retina is part of the central nervous system and is well suited to the investigation of neurological functions in psychiatric and addictive disorders. In this review, we focus on cannabis use, which is a crucial public health challenge, since cannabis is one of the most widely used addictive drugs in industrialized countries. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2018.12.001DOI Listing
February 2019

The Arc gene: Retroviral heritage in cognitive functions.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 Feb 14. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Laboratory for Neurobiology of Memory, P.K. Anokhin Research Institute of Normal Physiology, Baltiyskaya 8, Moscow, 125315, Russian Federation; Department of Neuroscience, National Research Center "Kurchatov Institute", Akademika Kurchatova pl. 1, Moscow, 123182, Russian Federation; Institute for Advanced Brain Studies, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory 1, Moscow, 119991, Russian Federation. Electronic address:

Stabilization of neuronal plastic changes is mediated by transient gene expression, including transcription of the activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated gene (Arc), also known as Arg 3.1. Arc is implicated in several types of synaptic plasticity, including synaptic scaling, long-term potentiation, and long-term depression. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2019.02.006DOI Listing
February 2019

Extrinsic and default mode networks in psychiatric conditions: Relationship to excitatory-inhibitory transmitter balance and early trauma.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 Feb 12. Epub 2019 Feb 12.

Department of Biological and Medical Psychology, University of Bergen, Bergen Norway; Division of Psychiatry, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway; Department of Radiology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.

Over the last three decades there has been an accumulation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) studies reporting that aberrant functional networks may underlie cognitive deficits and other symptoms across a range of psychiatric diagnoses. The use of pharmacological MRI and H-Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (H-MRS) has allowed researchers to investigate how changes in network dynamics are related to perturbed excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in individuals with psychiatric conditions. More recently, changes in functional network dynamics and excitatory/inhibitory (E/I) neurotransmission have been linked to early childhood trauma, a major antecedents for psychiatric illness in adulthood. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2019.02.004DOI Listing
February 2019

Motor Imagery in children with DCD: a systematic and meta-analytic review of hand-rotation task performance.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 Feb 9. Epub 2019 Feb 9.

Deakin University, Cognitive Neuroscience Unit, School of Psychology Geelong, Australia.

This is the first review to quantitatively summarise evidence evaluating MI functioning in children with DCD compared to controls, based on the hand rotation task (HRT). Specifically, MI performance was assessed using three different behavioural performance measures on the HRT (i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2019.02.002DOI Listing
February 2019

Non-invasive neurophysiological measures of learning: A meta-analysis.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 Feb 6;99:59-89. Epub 2019 Feb 6.

Department of Cognitive Science & Artificial Intelligence, Tilburg University, Dante Building, Room D 330, Warandelaan 2, 5037 AB Tilburg, The Netherlands.

In a meta-analysis of 113 experiments we examined neurophysiological outcomes of learning, and the relationship between neurophysiological and behavioral outcomes of learning. Findings showed neurophysiology yielding large effect sizes, with the majority of studies examining electroencephalography and eye-related outcome measures. Effect sizes on neurophysiological outcomes were smaller than effect sizes on behavioral outcomes, however. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2019.02.001DOI Listing
February 2019

Circadian modulation of human reward function: Is there an evidentiary signal in existing neuroimaging studies?

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 Feb 2. Epub 2019 Feb 2.

Centre for Mental Health, Swinburne University of Technology, PO Box 312 John St Hawthorn, VIC, 3122, Australia. Electronic address:

Reward functioning in animals is modulated by the circadian system, but such effects are poorly understood in the human case. The aim of this study was to address this deficit via a systematic review of human fMRI studies measuring one or more proxies for circadian function and a neural reward outcome. A narrative synthesis of 15 studies meeting inclusion criteria identified 13 studies that show a circadian impact on the human reward system, with four types of proxy (circadian system biology, downstream circadian rhythms, circadian challenge, and time of day) associated with neural reward activation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2019.01.025DOI Listing
February 2019
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Towards a neural model of infant cry perception.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 Jan 30;99:23-32. Epub 2019 Jan 30.

Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition / Leiden University Centre for Linguistics, Leiden University, Van Wijkplaats 2, r2.02b, 2311 BV Leiden, the Netherlands; Clinical Child & Family Studies, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Van der Boechorststraat 7, 1081 BT Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

Previous work suggests that infant cry perception is supported by an evolutionary old neural network consisting of the auditory system, the thalamocingulate circuit, the frontoinsular system, the reward pathway and the medial prefrontal cortex. Furthermore, gender and parenthood have been proposed to modulate processing of infant cries. The present meta-analysis (N = 350) confirmed involvement of the auditory system, the thalamocingulate circuit, the dorsal anterior insula, the pre-supplementary motor area and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex and the inferior frontal gyrus in infant cry perception, but not of the reward pathway. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S01497634183051
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2019.01.026DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Cerebral plasticity as the basis for upper limb recovery following brain damage.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 Jan 30;99:49-58. Epub 2019 Jan 30.

Department for Neurology, SRH Health Center, Bad Wimpfen, Germany.

Neural plasticity is the basis for an adaptation process of functional and structural characteristics of the nervous system in response to a changing environment. However, changes during training in healthy volunteers are only partially comparable to that observed in patients with circumscribed lesions. Pathologies can even be associated with maladaptive plasticity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2019.01.027DOI Listing
January 2019

Corrigendum to "Effect of acute hypoxia on cognition: A systematic review and meta-regression analysis" Neurosci. Biobehav. Rev. 74 (2017) 225-232.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 Jan 24. Epub 2019 Jan 24.

Department of Sport and Exercise Science, Faculty of Science, University of Portsmouth, Guildhall Walk, Portsmouth PO1 2ER, United Kingdom.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2019.01.017DOI Listing
January 2019

Peripersonal space (PPS) as a multisensory interface between the individual and the environment, defining the space of the self.

Authors:
Andrea Serino

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 Jan 24. Epub 2019 Jan 24.

MySpace Lab., Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University Hospital, Lausanne, Switzerland; Center for Neuroprosthetics, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland; MindMaze SA, Lausanne, Switzerland. Electronic address:

Our brain has developed a specific system to represent the space closely surrounding the body, termed peripersonal space (PPS). This space has a key functional role as it is where all physical interactions with objects in the environment occur. Here I describe how multisensory neurons in a specific fronto-parietal network map the PPS by integrating tactile stimuli on the body with visual or auditory information related to external objects specifically when they are close to the body. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2019.01.016DOI Listing
January 2019
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Cortical and subcortical contributions to context-control learning.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 Jan 24;99:33-41. Epub 2019 Jan 24.

Center for Cognitive Neuroscience and Department of Psychology & Neuroscience, Duke University, United States. Electronic address:

"Cognitive control" describes our ability to strategically bias information processing in line with internal goals. Traditionally, research has focused on delineating the sources of top-down biasing, implicating the lateral prefrontal cortex. The past two decades, however, have seen increasing interest in the regulation of control, that is, how learning processes guide the context-sensitive application of top-down biasing. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2019.01.019DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and task-related heart rate variability: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 Jan 24;99:11-22. Epub 2019 Jan 24.

Department of Neuroscience, Iuliu Haţieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy Cluj-Napoca, Romania.

Background: Research suggests that Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is associated with autonomic nervous system dysregulation, but the findings were mixed.

Method: We conducted a literature review and meta-analysis to quantify the effect of ADHD on vagally-mediated heart rate variability (HRV). PsycINFO, PubMed, Web of Science and Scopus, were searched for case-control or cohort studies reporting measures of vagally-mediated HRV, after a task demand, among individuals with ADHD relative to healthy subjects. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2019.01.022DOI Listing
January 2019
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Conflicting emergences. Weak vs. strong emergence for the modelling of brain function.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 Jan 23;99:3-10. Epub 2019 Jan 23.

Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, UK.

The concept of "emergence" has become commonplace in the modelling of complex systems, both natural and man-made; a functional property" emerges" from a system when it cannot be readily explained by the properties of the system's sub-units. A bewildering array of adaptive and sophisticated behaviours can be observed from large ensembles of elementary agents such as ant colonies, bird flocks or by the interactions of elementary material units such as molecules or weather elements. Ultimately, emergence has been adopted as the ontological support of a number of attempts to model brain function. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2019.01.023DOI Listing
January 2019
8 Reads

Perceptual phenomena in destructured sensory fields: Probing the brain's intrinsic functional architectures.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 Jan 19;98:265-286. Epub 2019 Jan 19.

Neuroscience Consulting & Solutions, Gutach i.Br., D-79261 Germany.

Destructured sensory fields, involving homogenous stimulation with little or no time-varying structure, provide a fertile ground for testing hypotheses about predictive coding in the human brain. Extended exposure to sensory patterns that deviate substantially from the statistics of natural environments can elicit a bewildering range of perceptual phenomena, up to and including vivid oneiric imagery. We illustrate how this large variety of perceptual effects can be understood as the experiential counterpart of auto-generated neuronal dynamics, unconstrained by parameters that tune the waking sensorium. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2019.01.014DOI Listing
January 2019
5 Reads
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The auditory cortex and the emotional valence of sounds.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 Jan 18;98:256-264. Epub 2019 Jan 18.

Rita Levi-Montalcini Department of Neuroscience, University of Turin, I-10125, Turin, Italy; National Institute of Neuroscience-Turin, I-10125, Turin, Italy. Electronic address:

How and where sensory stimuli, such as tones or lights, are linked to valence is an important unresolved question in the field of neuroscience. The auditory cortex is essential to analyse the identity and the behavioural importance of tones paired with emotional events. On the contrary, whether the auditory cortex may also encode information on the emotional-motivational valence of sounds is much more controversial. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2019.01.018DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

The reverse translation of a quantitative neuropsychiatric framework into preclinical studies: Focus on social interaction and behavior.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 Jan 16. Epub 2019 Jan 16.

Boehringer Ingelheim Pharma GmbH & Co. KG, CNS Diseases, Birkendorfer Straße 65, 88397, Biberach an der Riss, Germany. Electronic address:

Following the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) concept, major brain circuits are conserved in evolution and malfunctioning of a brain circuit will lead to specific behavioral symptoms. Reverse translation of patient-based findings from Alzheimer's disease (AD), schizophrenia (SZ) and major depression (MD) patients to preclinical models accordingly can be a starting point for developing a deeper understanding of the functional circuit biology and contribute to the validation of new hypotheses for therapeutic intervention in patients. In the context of the EU funded PRISM project, a preclinical test battery of tasks has been selected and aligned with the clinical test battery. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S01497634173091
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2018.07.018DOI Listing
January 2019
6 Reads

Spatial memory in Huntington's disease: A comparative review of human and animal data.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 Jan 15;98:194-207. Epub 2019 Jan 15.

Monash Institute of Cognitive and Clinical Neurosciences, School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, 18 Innovation Walk, Clayton, VIC, 3800, Australia.

To improve the translational predictability of treatment strategies for Huntington's disease (HD), sensitive and analogous cognitive outcomes are needed across HD animal models and humans. Spatial memory measures are promising candidates because they are based on 'visual' or 'non-verbal' cognition, and are commonly tested in both animals and humans. Here, we consider the suitability of spatial memory for strengthening translational links between animals and humans in HD research and clinical trials. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2019.01.015DOI Listing
January 2019
5 Reads

Roles of aging in sleep.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 Jan 12;98:177-184. Epub 2019 Jan 12.

Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330006, China. Electronic address:

With aging, various factors deteriorate the normal sleep process that is essential for the restoration of functional and physical performance. Due to aging-related diseases, life changes, or aging itself, disturbances in normal sleep cycles can profoundly affect healthy aging. To understand the interconnections between aging and the factors influencing sleep, with emerging evidence accumulated in recent years, this study elaborates on the roles of aging in sleep from four perspectives: cortical thinning, white matter degeneration, neurotransmitter dysregulation, and circadian disorganization. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2019.01.013DOI Listing
January 2019
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Corrigendum to "A qualitative and quantitative review of diffusion tensor imaging studies in reading and dyslexia" [Neurosci. Biobehav. Rev. 36 (2012), 1532-1552].

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 Jan 11. Epub 2019 Jan 11.

Parenting and Special Education Research Unit, KU Leuven, L. Vanderkelenstraat 32, 3000, Leuven, Belgium.

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S01497634183096
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2018.12.019DOI Listing
January 2019
4 Reads

Alcohol exposure during embryonic development: An opportunity to conduct systematic developmental time course analyses in zebrafish.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 Jan 11;98:185-193. Epub 2019 Jan 11.

Univeristy of Toronto, Department of Cell and Systems Biology, 3359 Mississauga Road, Mississauga, Ontario, L5L 1C6, Canada; University of Toronto Mississauga, Department of Psychology, 3359 Mississauga Road, Mississauga, Ontario, L5L 1C6, Canada. Electronic address:

Ethanol affects numerous neurobiological processes depending upon the developmental stage at which it reaches the vertebrate embryo. Exposure time dependency may explain the variable severity and manifestation of life-long symptoms observed in fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) patients. Characterization of behavioural deficits will help us understand developmental stage-dependency and its underlying biological mechanisms. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S01497634183069
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2019.01.012DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

The course and prognostic factors of cognitive outcomes after traumatic brain injury: a systematic review.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 Jan 11. Epub 2019 Jan 11.

Rehabilitation Sciences Institute, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Canada; Toronto Rehab-University Health Network, Ontario, Canada; Aquired Brain Injury Research Lab, University of Toronto, Canada. Electronic address:

Despite indications that TBI may be a precursor of cognitive decline and subsequent development of Alzheimer's disease, little is known about the time course of this relationship and the factors involved. This systematic review summarizes the evidence pertinent to this subject matter. All English language studies of longitudinal design, and works cited within them, found in six literature databases, were considered, and their quality assessed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2019.01.011DOI Listing
January 2019

Pair-bonding, fatherhood, and the role of testosterone: A meta-analytic review.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 Jan 9;98:221-233. Epub 2019 Jan 9.

Department of Psychology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USA; Department of Family Medicine and Public Health Sciences, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USA.

Males of many species must allocate limited energy budgets between mating and parenting effort. The Challenge Hypothesis provides a framework for understanding these life-history trade-offs via the disparate roles of testosterone (T) in aggression, sexual behavior, and parenting. It predicts that males pursuing mating opportunities have higher T than males pursuing paternal strategies, and in humans, many studies indeed report that men who are fathers and/or pair-bonded have lower T than childless and/or unpaired men. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2019.01.010DOI Listing
January 2019
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Disturbed redox homeostasis and oxidative stress: Potential players in the developmental regression in Rett syndrome.

Authors:
Michael Müller

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 Jan 9;98:154-163. Epub 2019 Jan 9.

Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Universitätsmedizin Göttingen, Germany; Center for Nanoscale Microscopy and Molecular Physiology of the Brain (CNMPB), Humboldtallee 23, D-37073 Göttingen, Germany; Zentrum Physiologie und Pathophysiologie, Institut für Neuro-und Sinnesphysiologie, Humboldtallee 23, D-37073 Göttingen, Germany. Electronic address:

Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder affecting mostly girls. A seemingly normal initial development is followed by developmental stagnation and regression, leading to severe mental impairment with autistic features, motor dysfunction, irregular breathing and epilepsy. Currently, a cure does not exist. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S01497634183069
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2018.12.009DOI Listing
January 2019
8 Reads

Functional imaging studies of Impulse Control Disorders in Parkinson's disease need a stronger neurocognitive footing.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 Jan 9;98:164-176. Epub 2019 Jan 9.

Université de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Lyon Neuroscience Research Center, INSERM, U 1028, CNRS, UMR 5292, Action Control and Related Disorders team, F-69000, Lyon, France. Electronic address:

Impulse control disorders (ICDs) in Parkinson's disease (PD) are associated with dopaminergic dysfunction and treatment, but have no satisfactory therapeutic solution. While studies assessing the neurofunctional bases of ICDs are important for advancing our understanding and management of ICDs, they remain sparse and inconsistent. Based on a systematic analysis of the neuroimaging literature, the present review pinpoints various abnormalities beyond the mesocorticolimbic circuit that supports reward processing, suggesting possible dysfunction at the sensorimotor, executive and affective levels. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2019.01.008DOI Listing
January 2019
6 Reads

Sensory Processing Sensitivity in the context of Environmental Sensitivity: A critical review and development of research agenda.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 Jan 9;98:287-305. Epub 2019 Jan 9.

Radboud University Medical Center, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Department of Cognitive Neuroscience, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.

Sensory Processing Sensitivity (SPS) is a common, heritable and evolutionarily conserved trait describing inter-individual differences in sensitivity to both negative and positive environments. Despite societal interest in SPS, scientific knowledge is lagging behind. Here, we critically discuss how SPS relates to other theories, how to measure SPS, whether SPS is a continuous vs categorical trait, its relation to other temperament and personality traits, the underlying aetiology and neurobiological mechanisms, and relations to both typical and atypical development, including mental and sensory disorders. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S01497634183062
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2019.01.009DOI Listing
January 2019
5 Reads

Why would Parkinson's disease lead to sudden changes in creativity, motivation, or style with visual art?: A review of case evidence and new, contextual, and genetic hypotheses.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 Jan 7. Epub 2019 Jan 7.

Faculty of Psychology, Department of Basic Psychological Research and Research Methods, University of Vienna, Liebiggasse 5, A-1010 Vienna, Austria. Electronic address:

Parkinson's disease (PD) is a devastating diagnosis with, however, potential for an extremely intriguing aesthetic component. Despite motor and cognitive deficits, an emerging collection of studies report a burst of visual artistic output and alterations in produced art in a subgroup of patients. This provides a unique window into the neurophysiological bases for why and how we might create and enjoy visual art, as well as into general brain function and the nature of PD or other neurodegenerative diseases. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2018.12.016DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

Chronobiology of limbic seizures: Potential mechanisms and prospects of chronotherapy for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 Jan 7;98:122-134. Epub 2019 Jan 7.

Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Department of Molecular and Cellular Medicine, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, USA; Research Service, Olin E. Teague Veterans' Medical Center, Central Texas Veterans Health Care System, Temple, Texas, USA. Electronic address:

Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy (mTLE) characterized by progressive development of complex partial seizures originating from the hippocampus is the most prevalent and refractory type of epilepsy. One of the remarkable features of mTLE is the rhythmic pattern of occurrence of spontaneous seizures, implying a dependence on the endogenous clock system for seizure threshold. Conversely, circadian rhythms are affected by epilepsy too. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2019.01.004DOI Listing
January 2019
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Overcoming avoidance in anxiety disorders: The contributions of Pavlovian and operant avoidance extinction methods.

Authors:
Simon Dymond

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 Jan 7;98:61-70. Epub 2019 Jan 7.

Experimental Psychopathology Lab, Department of Psychology, Swansea University, Singleton Campus, Swansea, SA2 8PP, United Kingdom; Department of Psychology, Reykjavík University, Menntavegur 1, Nauthólsvík, 101, Reykjavík, Iceland. Electronic address:

Avoidance is generally adaptive, yet excessive rates of avoidance can become maladaptive and lead to functional impairment and psychopathology. Laboratory-based treatment research has provided important insights about the acquisition, maintenance, and extinction of maladaptive avoidance. Despite this, laboratory research on avoidance learning and extinction in humans is relatively underdeveloped. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2019.01.007DOI Listing
January 2019
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Is there room for attentional impairments in binge drinking? A commentary on Carbia et al. (2018).

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 Jan 7;98:58-60. Epub 2019 Jan 7.

Laboratory for Experimental Psychopathology (LEP), Psychological Science Research Institute, Université catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium. Electronic address:

Binge drinking is an excessive pattern of alcohol use, highly prevalent in adolescents and young adults. Several studies have explored the cognitive impairments associated with binge drinking, and Carbia et al. (2018) recently proposed a systematic review of these impairments. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2019.01.006DOI Listing
January 2019
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From the microscope to the magnet: Disconnection in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 Jan 7;98:47-57. Epub 2019 Jan 7.

INSERM U955, Team 15 "Translational Psychiatry", Hôpitaux Universitaires Mondor, Créteil, France; Fondation Fondamental, Créteil, France; NeuroSpin Neuroimaging Center, UNIACT Lab, Psychiatry Team, CEA Saclay, France.

White matter (WM) abnormalities have implicated schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD) as disconnection syndromes, yet the extent to which these abnormalities are shared versus distinct remains unclear. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies yield a putative measure of WM integrity while neuropathological studies provide more specific microstructural information. We therefore systematically reviewed all neuropathological (n = 12) and DTI (n = 11) studies directly comparing patients with SZ and BD. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2019.01.005DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Neurochemical changes in the aging brain: A systematic review.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 Jan 6;98:306-319. Epub 2019 Jan 6.

Centre of Human Psychopharmacology, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria, Australia.

Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) holds promise for understanding neurochemical mechanisms associated with human cognitive aging in vivo. Recent advances in magnetic field strength and methods provide the opportunity to examine neurometabolites with greater accuracy and detail. The current review summarizes recent literature on age-associated neurometabolite changes as measured by proton MRS, and the associations with cognition in non-clinical populations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2019.01.003DOI Listing
January 2019
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Neurobiological mechanisms underlying the sleep-pain relationship in adolescence: A review.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 01;96:401-413

Department of Psychology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada; Alberta Children's Hospital Research Institute, Canada; Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Canada. Electronic address:

Adolescence characterizes a period of significant change in brain structure and function, causing the neural circuitry to be particularly susceptible to the environment and various other experiences. Chronic pain and sleep deprivation represent major health issues that plague adolescence. A bidirectional relationship exists between sleep and pain; however, emerging evidence suggests that sleep disturbances have a stronger influence on subsequent pain than vice versa. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2018.11.006DOI Listing
January 2019
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Do 'early' brain responses reveal word form prediction during language comprehension? A critical review.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 01;96:367-400

Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, the Netherlands; Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Nijmegen, the Netherlands. Electronic address:

Current theories of language comprehension posit that readers and listeners routinely try to predict the meaning but also the visual or sound form of upcoming words. Whereas most neuroimaging studies on word prediction focus on the N400 ERP or its magnetic equivalent, various studies claim that word form prediction manifests itself in 'early', pre-N400 brain responses (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2018.11.019DOI Listing
January 2019

A review of gaze entropy as a measure of visual scanning efficiency.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 01;96:353-366

Centre for Human Psychopharmacology, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Australia.

While the concept of entropy has been applied to gaze analysis, it is unclear what aspects of visual scanning it measures. In this review, we first outline gaze control as a complex system of spatial prediction. Second, we provide a brief introduction to the concept of entropy within the context of information theory as the foundation for gaze entropy measures; with a specific focus on equations for Shannon's entropy and conditional entropy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2018.12.007DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

The structural connectome in traumatic brain injury: A meta-analysis of graph metrics.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 Jan 4. Epub 2019 Jan 4.

School of Behavioural, Health and Human Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Australian Catholic University. 115 Victoria Parade, Melbourne, VIC, 3065, Australia. Electronic address:

IMMS, P., A. Clemente, M. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S01497634183067
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2019.01.002DOI Listing
January 2019
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Variation in fourteen brain structure volumes in schizophrenia: A comprehensive meta-analysis of 246 studies.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 Jan 4;98:85-94. Epub 2019 Jan 4.

Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, 4209 Sennott Square, 210 South Bouquet St., Pittsburgh PA 15260, USA; Department of Psychology and Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, 4207 Sennott Square, 210 South Bouquet St., Pittsburgh PA 15260, USA. Electronic address:

Despite hundreds of structural MRI studies documenting smaller brain volumes on average in schizophrenia compared to controls, little attention has been paid to group differences in the variability of brain volumes. Examination of variability may help interpret mean group differences in brain volumes and aid in better understanding the heterogeneity of schizophrenia. Variability in 246 MRI studies was meta-analyzed for 13 structures that have shown medium to large mean effect sizes (Cohen's d≥0. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S01497634183029
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2018.12.030DOI Listing
January 2019
5 Reads

Down syndrome: Neurobiological alterations and therapeutic targets.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 Jan 4;98:234-255. Epub 2019 Jan 4.

Applied Biotechnology Research Center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Down syndrome (DS) is a genetic disease that occurs due to an aneuploidy of human chromosome 21. Trisomy of chromosome 21 is a primary genetic cause of developmental abnormalities leading to cognitive and learning deficits. Impairments in GABAergic transmission, noradrenergic neuronal loss, anomalous glutamatergic transmission and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor signalling, mitochondrial dysfunction, increased oxidative stress and inflammation, differentially expressed microRNAs, increased expression of crucial chromosome 21 genes, and DNA hyper-methylation and hyperactive homocysteine trans-sulfuration pathway, are common incongruities that have been reported in DS and might contribute to cognitive impairment and intellectual disability. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S01497634183080
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2019.01.001DOI Listing
January 2019
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Progress in brain cannabinoid CB receptor research: From genes to behavior.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 Jan 3;98:208-220. Epub 2019 Jan 3.

Addiction Biology Unit, Molecular Targets and Medications Discovery Branch, National Institute on Drug Abuse, Intramural Research Program, Baltimore, MD, 21224, USA. Electronic address:

The type 2 cannabinoid receptor (CB2R) was initially regarded as a peripheral cannabinoid receptor. However, recent technological advances in gene detection, alongside the availability of transgenic mouse lines, indicate that CB2Rs are expressed in both neurons and glial cells in the brain under physiological and pathological conditions, and are involved in multiple functions at cellular and behavioral levels. Brain CB2Rs are inducible and neuroprotective via up-regulation in response to various insults, but display species differences in gene and receptor structures, CB2R expression, and receptor responses to various CB2R ligands. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S01497634183082
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2018.12.026DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

Brain activation during human defensive behaviour: A systematic review and preliminary meta-analysis.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 Jan 3;98:71-84. Epub 2019 Jan 3.

Department of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK; National Institute for Health Research, Biomedical Research Centre, South London & Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.

The neural underpinnings of defensive behaviour have implications for both basic research and clinical translation. This review systematically collates published research on neural response during simple avoidance of threat and approach-avoidance behaviour during goal-conflicting situations and presents an exploratory meta-analysis of available whole-brain data. Scopus, PsychInfo and Web of Science databases were searched for the period up to March 2018. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2018.12.028DOI Listing
January 2019

The link between maternal obesity and offspring neurobehavior: A systematic review of animal experiments.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 Jan 3;98:107-121. Epub 2019 Jan 3.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Amsterdam UMC, location AMC, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; Amsterdam Reproduction and Development Research Institute, Amsterdam UMC, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

Maternal obesity in pregnancy is associated with neurobehavioral problems in the offspring. Establishing causality has been challenging in existing human studies, due to confounding by genetic and postnatal environment. Animal experiments can improve our understanding of this association. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S01497634183052
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2018.12.023DOI Listing
January 2019
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The evolutionarily conserved role of melatonin in CNS disorders and behavioral regulation: translational lessons from zebrafish.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 Jan 3. Epub 2019 Jan 3.

Institute of Experimental Medicine, Almazov National Medical Research Centre, Ministry of Healthcare of Russian Federation, St. Petersburg, Russia; School of Pharmacy, Southwest University, Chongqing, China; Institute of Translational Biomedicine, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg, Russia; Laboratory of Translational Biopsychiatry, Research Institute of Physiology and Basic Medicine, Novosibirsk, Russia; Department of Neuroscience, Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk, Russia; Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg, Russia; Granov's Russian Scientific Research Center of Radiology and Surgical Technologies, Ministry of Healthcare of Russian Federation, Pesochny, Russia; Almazov National Medical Research Centre, Ministry of Healthcare of Russian Federation, St. Petersburg, Russia; ZENEREI Research Center, Slidell, LA, USA. Electronic address:

Melatonin is an important hormone regulating circadian rhythm, neuroprotection and neuroimmune processes. However, its exact physiological roles in brain mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we summarize the mounting evidence implicating melatonin in brain disorders and behavior, based on clinical and experimental studies in-vivo. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2018.12.025DOI Listing
January 2019

Neuroimaging of individual differences: A latent variable modeling perspective.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 Jan 3;98:29-46. Epub 2019 Jan 3.

Washington University in St. Louis, Psychological and Brain Sciences, St. Louis, Missouri, United States.

Neuroimaging data is being increasingly utilized to address questions of individual difference. When examined with task-related fMRI (t-fMRI), individual differences are typically investigated via correlations between the BOLD activation signal at every voxel and a particular behavioral measure. This can be problematic because: 1) correlational designs require evaluation of t-fMRI psychometric properties, yet these are not well understood; and 2) bivariate correlations are severely limited in modeling the complexities of brain-behavior relationships. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2018.12.022DOI Listing
January 2019

The midbrain periaqueductal gray as an integrative and interoceptive neural structure for breathing.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 Jan 3;98:135-144. Epub 2019 Jan 3.

Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.

The periaqueductal gray (PAG) plays a critical role in autonomic function and behavioural responses to threatening stimuli. Recent evidence has revealed the PAG's potential involvement in the perception of breathlessness, a highly threatening respiratory symptom. In this review, we outline the current evidence in animals and humans on the role of the PAG in respiratory control and in the perception of breathlessness. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2018.12.020DOI Listing
January 2019

Kinematic and kinetic gait analysis to evaluate functional recovery in thoracic spinal cord injured rats.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 Jan 3;98:18-28. Epub 2019 Jan 3.

Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro, UTAD, Quinta de Prados, 5000-801 Vila Real, Portugal; CECAV, Centre for Animal Sciences and Veterinary Studies, University of Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro, Quinta de Prados, 5000-801 Vila Real, Portugal. Electronic address:

The recovery of walking function following spinal cord injury (SCI) is of major importance to patients and clinicians. In experimental SCI studies, a rat model is widely used to assess walking function, following thoracic spinal cord lesion. In an effort to provide a resource which investigators can refer to when seeking the most appropriate functional assay, the authors have compiled and categorized the behavioral assessments used to measure the deficits and recovery of the gait in thoracic SCI rats. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2018.12.027DOI Listing
January 2019
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Social, Self, (Situational), and Affective Processes in Medial Prefrontal Cortex (MPFC): Causal, Multivariate, and Reverse Inference Evidence.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 Jan 2. Epub 2019 Jan 2.

UCLA Psychology Department, 1248 Franz Hall, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-1563, United States.

The medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) has been posited to serve a variety of social, affective, and cognitive functions. These conclusions have largely been driven by forward inference analyses (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2018.12.021DOI Listing
January 2019

The biological origins of rituals: An interdisciplinary perspective.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2019 Jan 2;98:95-106. Epub 2019 Jan 2.

Department of Department of Chemistry, Life Sciences and Environmental Sustainability, Unit of Behavioral Biology, University of Parma, Italy.

Ritual behavior is ubiquitous, marking animal motor patterns, normal and psychopathological behavior in human individuals as well as every human culture. Moreover, formal features of rituals appear to be highly conserved along phylogeny and characterized by a circular and spatio-temporal structure typical of habitual behavior with internal repetition of non-functional acts and redirection of attention to the "script" of the performance. A continuity, based on highly conserved cortico-striatal loops, can be traced from animal rituals to human individual and collective rituals with psychopathological compulsions at the crossing point. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2018.12.031DOI Listing
January 2019
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How stress and glucocorticoids timing-dependently affect extinction and relapse.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2018 Dec 27;98:145-153. Epub 2018 Dec 27.

Department of Cognitive Psychology, Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, Ruhr University Bochum, 44801 Bochum, Germany. Electronic address:

In recent years, various research groups aimed to augment extinction learning (the most important underlying mechanism of exposure therapy) using glucocorticoids (GCs), in particular the stress hormone cortisol. In this review, we introduce the STaR (Stress Timing affects Relapse) model, a theoretical model of the timing-dependent effects of stress/GCs treatment on extinction and relapse. In particular, we show that (1) pre-extinction stress/GCs promote memory consolidation in a context-independent manner, making extinction memory more resistant to relapse following context change. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2018.12.029DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read