8,777 results match your criteria Neuropsychologia [Journal]


Visual attention and neural oscillations in reading and dyslexia: are they possible targets for remediation?

Neuropsychologia 2019 Feb 19. Epub 2019 Feb 19.

Visual and Cognitive Neuroscience Unit, Department of Optometry & Vision Sciences and Melbourne Neuroscience Institute, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic 3010, Australia. Electronic address:

After decades of finding a range of cognitive functions both in visual and phonological domains that correlate with reading performance, there are in recent years attempts to solve the causation versus correlation dilemma in finding a core deficit in developmental dyslexia (DD). Thus, longitudinal studies that aim to predict reading difficulties from studies done in pre-reading years and reading-level matched studies that try to factor out the effect due to lack of reading in DD cohorts, have helped identify two possible candidates to be added to the classical phonological suspect. One is a deficit in visuo-spatial attention that underpins our ability to selectively attend to individual objects in a cluttered world, which is fundamental in being able to identify letters and words in a text such as the one you are reading now. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2019.02.009DOI Listing
February 2019

The "Semantic P600" in Second Language Processing: When Syntax Conflicts with Semantics.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Feb 18. Epub 2019 Feb 18.

Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Electronic address:

In sentences like "the mouse that chased the cat was hungry", the syntactically correct interpretation (the mouse chases the cat) is contradicted by semantic and pragmatic knowledge. Previous research has shown that L1 speakers sometimes base sentence interpretation on this type of knowledge (so-called "shallow" or "good-enough" processing). We made use of both behavioral and ERP measurements to investigate whether L2 learners differ from native speakers in the extent to which they engage in "shallow" syntactic processing. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2019.02.010DOI Listing
February 2019

Please be logical, I am in a bad mood: An electrophysiological study of mood effects on reasoning.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Feb 15;127:19-28. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Instituto Pluridisciplinar, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Spain. Electronic address:

Several behavioral studies have reported a detrimental effect of emotion on reasoning tasks, either when the content of the reasoning and/or the mood state of the individual are emotionally loaded. However, the neural mechanisms involved in this phenomena remain largely unexplored. In an event-related potentials (ERPs) study, we examined the consequences of an induced mood over the electrophysiological signals obtained while processing logical and illogical categorical conclusions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2019.02.008DOI Listing
February 2019

Distinct representations in occipito-temporal, parietal, and premotor cortex during action perception revealed by fMRI and computational modeling.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Feb 14. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Department of Cognitive Science, UC San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA; Neurosciences Program, UC San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA.

Visual processing of actions is supported by a network consisting of occipito-temporal, parietal, and premotor regions in the human brain, known as the Action Observation Network (AON). In the present study, we investigate what aspects of visually perceived actions are represented in this network using fMRI and computational modeling. Human subjects performed an action perception task during scanning. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2019.02.006DOI Listing
February 2019

Pupillary Responses and Reaction Times Index Different Cognitive Processes in a Combined Go/Switch Incidental Learning Task.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Feb 13. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

Program in Neurosciences and Mental Health, Hospital for Sick Children Research Institute, Toronto, Canada; Institute of Medical Sciences and Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. Electronic address:

In previous studies we have provided evidence that performance in speeded response tasks with infrequent target stimuli reflects both automatic and controlled cognitive processes, based on differences in reaction time (RT) and task-related brain responses (Cheyne, Ferrari et al. 2012, Isabella, Ferrari et al. 2015). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2019.02.007DOI Listing
February 2019

Slow segmentation of faces in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Feb 12;127:1-8. Epub 2019 Feb 12.

Dept. of Experimental Psychology, Helmholtz Institute, 3584 CS Utrecht, the Netherlands; Dept. of Developmental Psychology, Utrecht University, 3584 CS Utrecht, the Netherlands; Dept. of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Rudolf Magnus Institute of Neuroscience, University Medical Center, 3584 CX Utrecht, the Netherlands.

Atypical visual segmentation, affecting object perception, might contribute to face processing problems in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The current study investigated impairments in visual segmentation of faces in ASD. Thirty participants (ASD: 16; Control: 14) viewed texture-defined faces, houses, and homogeneous images, while electroencephalographic and behavioral responses were recorded. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2019.02.005DOI Listing
February 2019
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Learning from the past and expecting the future in Parkinsonism: Dopaminergic influence on predictions about the timing of future events.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Feb 11;127:9-18. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience and Movement Disorders, University College London, UK.

The prolonged reaction times seen in Parkinson's disease (PD) have been linked to a dopaminergic-dependent deficit in using prior information to prepare responses, but also have been explained by an altered temporal processing. However, an underlying cognitive mechanism linking dopamine, temporal processing and response preparation remains elusive. To address this, we studied PD patients, with or without medication, and age-matched healthy individuals using a variable foreperiod task requiring speeded responses to a visual stimulus occurring at variable onset-times, with block-wise changes in the temporal predictability of visual stimuli. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00283932183061
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2019.02.003DOI Listing
February 2019
4 Reads

Volumetric and surface characteristics of gray matter in adult dyslexia and dyscalculia.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Feb 7. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

School of Psychology and Centre for Brain Research, University of Auckland, New Zealand.

Dyslexia, dyscalculia and their comorbid manifestation are prevalent disorders associated with well-documented behavioral manifestations. However, attempts to relate these manifestations to abnormalities in brain structure have yielded mixed results, with no clear consistency across a range of measures. In this study, we used a unique design including adults with dyslexia, dyscalculia, both disorders and controls, to explore differences in gray matter characteristics across groups. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2019.02.002DOI Listing
February 2019

Haptic perception is altered in children with developmental coordination disorder.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Feb 7;127:29-34. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory of School of Kinesiology, University of Minnesota, USA.

Developmental coordination disorder (DCD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder affecting the motor system, but it may also present with signs of somatosensory dysfunction. This study examined whether haptic perception, which relies on somatosensory afferents, is impaired in children with DCD. Haptic sensitivity and acuity were systematically quantified in children with DCD and contrasted to the performance of typically developing (TD) children and young adults (each group N = 20). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2019.02.004DOI Listing
February 2019

Same words, different structures: An fMRI investigation of argument relations and the angular gyrus.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Mar 5;125:116-128. Epub 2019 Feb 5.

Department of Linguistics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA.

In fMRI, increased activation for combinatorial syntactic and semantic processing is typically observed in a set of left hemisphere brain areas: the angular gyrus (AG), the anterior temporal lobe (ATL), the posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS), and the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). Recent work has suggested that semantic combination is supported by the ATL and the AG, with a division of labor in which AG is involved in event concepts and ATL is involved in encoding conceptual features of entities and/or more general forms of semantic combination. The current fMRI study was designed to refine hypotheses about the angular gyrus processes in question. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2019.01.019DOI Listing
March 2019
3 Reads

tRNS boosts perceptual learning in peripheral vision.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Mar 2;125:129-136. Epub 2019 Feb 2.

Université de Toulouse-UPS, Centre de Recherche Cerveau et Cognition, Toulouse, France; Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Toulouse Cedex, France; UC Riverside, Riverside, CA, USA. Electronic address:

Visual crowding, the difficulty of recognizing elements when surrounded by similar items, is a widely studied perceptual phenomenon and a trademark characteristic of peripheral vision. Perceptual Learning (PL) has been shown to reduce crowding, although a large number of sessions is required to observe significant improvements. Recently, transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) has been successfully used to boost PL in low-level foveal tasks (e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2019.02.001DOI Listing

Boosting the effect of reward on cognitive control using TMS over the left IFJ.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Mar 2;125:109-115. Epub 2019 Feb 2.

Department of Neurology, University of Lübeck, D-23538 Lübeck, Germany.

Although an enhancing effect of reward on cognitive performance has been observed consistently, its neural underpinnings remain elusive. Recent evidence suggests that the inferior frontal junction (IFJ) may be a key player underlying such an enhancement by integrating motivational processes and cognitive control. However, its exact role and in particular a potential causality of IFJ activation is still unclear. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2019.01.016DOI Listing

Attentional modulation of neural responses to illusory shapes: Evidence from steady-state and evoked visual potentials.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Mar 31;125:70-80. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

The University of Queensland, Queensland Brain Institute, St Lucia, QLD 4072, Australia; The University of Queensland, School of Psychology, St Lucia, QLD 4072, Australia.

Our perception of illusory shapes, such as the classic Kanizsa triangle, is thought to reflect the visual system's capacity to fill in missing information associated with fragmented or partially occluded objects. Previous work has suggested that such 'modal' filling-in arises at relatively early stages of visual processing, prior to the allocation of focused attention, but few studies have examined whether attention influences neural responses to illusory shapes. Here we asked whether spatial attention affects neural activity evoked by illusory shapes by having participants focus on stimuli presented in one visual field (left or right), while ignoring those on the other side. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00283932193002
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2019.01.017DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Individual EEG alpha profiles are gender-dependent and indicate subjective experiences in Whole-Body Perceptual Deprivation.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Mar 31;125:81-92. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

Research Institute for Neuroscience, Education and Didactics, Patrizio Paoletti Foundation for Development and Communication, Assisi, Italy.

We use a unique environment of Whole Body Perceptual Deprivation (WBPD) to induce an altered state of consciousness (ASC) in our participants, and employ online EEG recording. We present individual EEG alpha profiles, and show how these data can be analyzed at the individual level. Our goal is to investigate to what degree subjective experience matches EEG alpha profile, and in particular, the various alpha hemispheric asymmetries observed in the frontal, parietal, and occipital lobes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2019.01.018DOI Listing

Editorial.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Feb;123:1-4

Washington University in Saint Louis, Saint Louis, MO, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2019.01.010DOI Listing
February 2019

Brain structure links trait hostile attribution bias and attitudes toward violence.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Mar 28;125:42-50. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Research Center of Psychology and Social Development, Southwest University, China; Key Laboratory of Cognition and Personality (SWU), China; Department of Psychology, Renmin University of China, China; Laboratory Department of Psychology, Renmin University of China, Beijing 100872, China. Electronic address:

The majority of research regarding hostile attribution bias focuses on its effect on aggression. However, little is known about the brain structure associated with trait hostile attribution bias and the mediating mechanism underlying this link. The current study uses voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to identify the brain regions related to individual differences in trait hostile attribution bias, measured by a Word Sentence Association Paradigm - Hostility in a sample of 176 undergraduate students. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2019.01.015DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

No direction specific costs in trans-saccadic memory.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Mar 26;125:23-29. Epub 2019 Jan 26.

Department of Experimental Psychology, Helmholtz Institute, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands.

Even though we frequently execute saccades, we perceive the external world as coherent and stable. An important mechanism of trans-saccadic perception is spatial remapping: the process of updating information across eye movements. Previous studies have indicated a right hemispheric dominance for spatial remapping, which has been proposed to translate into enhanced trans-saccadic memory for locations that are remapped into the right compared to the left hemisphere in healthy participants. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2019.01.014DOI Listing
March 2019
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Dyslexic individuals orient but do not sustain visual attention: Electrophysiological support from the lower and upper alpha bands.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Mar 24;125:30-41. Epub 2019 Jan 24.

Faculty of English, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań, Poland.

Individuals with developmental dyslexia have been characterized by problems with attentional orienting. In the current study, we specifically focused on possible changes in endogenous visual orienting that may be reflected in the electroencephalogram. A variant of the Posner cuing paradigm was employed with valid or invalid central cues that preceded target stimuli that were presented in the left or right visual field. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2019.01.013DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Event-related brain potentials to self-triggered tones: Impact of action type and impulsivity traits.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Mar 24;125:14-22. Epub 2019 Jan 24.

Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 75006 Paris, France; CNRS (Laboratoire Psychologie de la Perception, UMR 8242), 75006 Paris, France. Electronic address:

Human event-related potentials (ERPs) have previously been observed to be attenuated for self-triggered sounds and amplified for deviant auditory stimuli. These auditory ERP modulations have been proposed to reflect internal predictions about the sensory consequences of our actions and more generally about our sensory context. The present exploratory ERP study (1) compared the processing of self-triggered tones by either intention-based or stimulus-driven actions, and (2) studied the impact of impulsivity traits on the prediction of action-effects. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2019.01.012DOI Listing

Investigating links between habitual physical activity, cerebrovascular function, and cognitive control in healthy older adults.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Mar 23;125:62-69. Epub 2019 Jan 23.

Department of Psychology and Brain Health Research Centre, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand; Brain Research New Zealand, Auckland, New Zealand.

A growing body of evidence indicates regular physical activity benefits older adults' cognitive functioning, particularly when a high level of cognitive control is required. Recent research has pointed to improved cerebrovascular function as one mechanism through which such benefits might arise. This study built on previous research by investigating in 51 healthy older adults aged 60-72 years relationships between habitual physical activity, cerebrovascular function (indicated by resting cerebral blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery [n = 42], and its responsiveness to hypercapnia [n = 26] and hypocapnia [n = 25]), and cognitive control (inhibition and switching). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2019.01.011DOI Listing

Making sense of social interaction: Emotional coherence drives semantic integration as assessed by event-related potentials.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Mar 18;125:1-13. Epub 2019 Jan 18.

University of Applied Sciences, Potsdam, Germany.

We compared event-related potentials during sentence reading, using impression formation equations of a model of affective coherence, to investigate the role of affective content processing during meaning making. The model of Affect Control Theory (ACT; Heise, 1979, 2007) predicts and quantifies the degree to which social interactions deflect from prevailing social norms and values - based on the affective meanings of involved concepts. We tested whether this model can predict the amplitude of brain waves traditionally associated with semantic processing. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2019.01.002DOI Listing
March 2019
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Reading Shakespearean tropes in a foreign tongue: Age of L2 acquisition modulates neural responses to functional shifts.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Feb 18;124:79-86. Epub 2019 Jan 18.

Laboratory of Experimental Psychology and Neuroscience (LPEN), Institute of Cognitive and Translational Neuroscience (INCYT), INECO Foundation, Favaloro University, Buenos Aires, Argentina; National Scientific and Technical Research Council (CONICET), Buenos Aires, Argentina; Faculty of Education, National University of Cuyo (UNCuyo), Mendoza, Argentina. Electronic address:

Functional shifts (FSs) - morphosyntactically marked words evoking coherent but novel meanings - are ubiquitous in English and, specially, in Shakespearean literature. While their neural signatures have been explored in native speakers, no study has targeted foreign-language users, let alone comparing early and late bilinguals. Here, we administered a validated FS paradigm to subjects from both populations and evaluated time-frequency modulations evoked by FS and control sentences. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2019.01.007DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Auditory spatial attention modulates the unmasking effect of perceptual separation in a "cocktail party" environment.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Feb 16;124:108-116. Epub 2019 Jan 16.

Faculty of Education, East China Normal University, Shanghai, China; Key Laboratory of Speech and Hearing Science, East China Normal University, Shanghai, China.

The perceptual separation between a signal speech and a competing speech (masker), induced by the precedence effect, plays an important role in releasing the signal speech from the masker, especially in a reverberant environment. The perceptual-separation-induced unmasking effect has been suggested to involve multiple cognitive processes, such as selective attention. However, whether listeners' spatial attention modulate the perceptual-separation-induced unmasking effect is not clear. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2019.01.009DOI Listing
February 2019

Examining the neural correlates of within-category discrimination in face and non-face expert recognition.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Feb 17;124:44-54. Epub 2019 Jan 17.

Department of Psychology, University of Victoria, Canada. Electronic address:

While expert face discrimination develops naturally in humans, expert discrimination in non-face object categories, such as birds, cars and dogs, is acquired through years of experience and explicit practice. The current study used an implicit visual discrimination paradigm and electroencephalography (EEG) - Fast Periodic Visual Stimulation - to examine whether within-category discrimination of faces and non-face objects of expertise rely on shared mechanisms despite their distinct learning histories. Electroencephalogram was recorded while bird experts and bird novices viewed 60 s sequences of bird images or face images presented at a periodic rate of six images per second (i. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00283932193000
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2019.01.005DOI Listing
February 2019
7 Reads

Personality and EEG correlates of reactive social behavior.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Feb 14;124:98-107. Epub 2019 Jan 14.

Laboratory of Psychophysiology of Individual Differences, Institute of Physiology and Basic Medicine, Novosibirsk, Russia.

Reactive, as opposed to proactive, behavior during social interactions has been investigated in the study of aggression, but it is virtually unexplored in relation to other kinds of social behavior. Little is known about brain underpinning of these processes. In this study, we used a virtual interaction model to manipulate the emotional display of the interaction partner and to register actor's responses to these manipulations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2019.01.006DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Individual differences in intracortical inhibition during behavioural inhibition.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Feb 14;124:55-65. Epub 2019 Jan 14.

The University of Sydney, Australia.

The time required to abort an initiated response can be measured as the Stop Signal Reaction Time (SSRT). We determined whether GABAergic activity in the primary motor cortex (M1), measured using paired-pulse Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) was related to SSRT. GABAergic activity in M1 was assessed by measuring Short-Interval Intracortical Inhibition (SICI). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2019.01.008DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Praising or keeping silent on partner's ideas: Leading brainstorming in particular ways.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Feb 8;124:19-30. Epub 2019 Jan 8.

Shanghai Key Laboratory of Brain Functional Genomics, School of Psychology and Cognitive Science, East China Normal University, Shanghai, China. Electronic address:

This study aimed to investigate how different feedback affect group creative performance, and reveal the underlying interpersonal neural correlates using the functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS)-based hyperscanning technique. Participants solved one creativity task with two strangers in conditions with positive/negative/no feedback. Results revealed that performance in the negative condition was lower than in the other conditions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2019.01.004DOI Listing
February 2019

Neurobiological effects of transcranial direct current stimulation in younger adults, older adults and mild cognitive impairment.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Mar 6;125:51-61. Epub 2019 Jan 6.

Monash Alfred Psychiatry Research Centre, The Alfred and Monash University, Australia.

Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been investigated as a way to improve motor and cognitive functioning, with largely variable results. Currently, relatively little is known about the neurobiological effects, and possible drivers of variability, in either healthy or clinical populations. Therefore, this study aimed to characterise the neurobiological effects to tDCS in younger adults, older adults and adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and their relationship to cognitive performance. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00283932193000
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2019.01.003DOI Listing
March 2019
7 Reads

Perception of musical pitch in developmental prosopagnosia.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Feb 6;124:87-97. Epub 2019 Jan 6.

Human Vision and Eye Movement Laboratory, Departments of Medicine (Neurology), Ophthalmology and Visual Science, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.

Studies of developmental prosopagnosia have often shown that developmental prosopagnosia differentially affects human face processing over non-face object processing. However, little consideration has been given to whether this condition is associated with perceptual or sensorimotor impairments in other modalities. Comorbidities have played a role in theories of other developmental disorders such as dyslexia, but studies of developmental prosopagnosia have often focused on the nature of the visual recognition impairment despite evidence for widespread neural anomalies that might affect other sensorimotor systems. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00283932183078
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2018.12.022DOI Listing
February 2019
9 Reads

Turning down the heat: Neural mechanisms of cognitive control for inhibiting task-irrelevant emotional information during adolescence.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Mar 4;125:93-108. Epub 2019 Jan 4.

Department of Psychology, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL 61820, United States.

One major question in the cognitive neuroscience of cognitive control is whether prefrontal regions contribute to control by upregulating the processing of task-relevant material or by downregulating the processing of task-irrelevant material. Here we take a unique approach to addressing this question by using multi-voxel pattern analysis, which allowed us to determine the degree to which each of the task-relevant and task-irrelevant dimensions of a stimulus are being processed in posterior cortex on a trial-by-trial basis. In our study, adolescent participants performed an emotion word - emotional face Stroop task requiring them to determine the emotional valence (positive, negative) of a task-relevant word in the context of a task-irrelevant emotional face. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00283932183076
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2018.12.006DOI Listing
March 2019
5 Reads

Childhood socioeconomic status predicts cognitive outcomes across adulthood following traumatic brain injury.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Feb 3;124:1-8. Epub 2019 Jan 3.

Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, Think+Speak lab, Shirley Ryan AbilityLab, Chicago, IL, USA; Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.

Objective: To examine the association between childhood socioeconomic status (SES) and the level and rate of change in intelligence scores throughout adulthood following traumatic brain injury (TBI).

Methods: In this longitudinal study we tested 186 patients with TBI and 54 healthy controls from the Vietnam Head Injury Study. Childhood SES was determined for each participant based on parental educational attainment and occupational prestige. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2019.01.001DOI Listing
February 2019

Identifying task-general effects of stimulus familiarity in the parietal memory network.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Feb 2;124:31-43. Epub 2019 Jan 2.

Section on Cognitive Neuropsychology, Laboratory of Brain and Cognition, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, United States.

Studies of human memory have implicated a "parietal memory network" in the recognition of familiar stimuli. However, the automatic vs. top-down nature of information processing within this network is not yet understood. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00283932183046
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2018.12.023DOI Listing
February 2019
6 Reads

Inter-brain synchrony in mother-child dyads during cooperation: An fNIRS hyperscanning study.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Feb 27;124:117-124. Epub 2018 Dec 27.

Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Division of Brain Sciences, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, School of Medicine, Stanford University, 401 Quarry Road, Palo Alto, CA 94305, United States; Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, 1201 Welch Road, Palo Alto, CA 94305, United States.

Coordinated brain activity between individuals, or inter-brain synchrony, has been shown to increase during cooperation and correlate with cooperation success. However, few studies have examined parent-child inter-brain synchrony and whether it is associated with meaningful aspects of the parent-child relationship. Here, we measured inter-brain synchrony in the right prefrontal (PFC) and temporal cortices in mother-child dyads while they engaged in a cooperative and independent task. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00283932183035
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2018.12.021DOI Listing
February 2019
6 Reads

Understanding perirhinal contributions to perception and memory: Evidence through the lens of selective perirhinal damage.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Feb 27;124:9-18. Epub 2018 Dec 27.

Department of Psychology, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA; Nathan Kline Institute, Orangeburg, NY, USA. Electronic address:

Although a memory systems view of the medial temporal lobe (MTL) has been widely influential in understanding how memory processes are implemented, a large body of work across humans and animals has converged on the idea that the MTL can support various other decisions, beyond those involving memory. Specifically, recent work suggests that perception of and memory for visual representations may interact in order to support ongoing cognition. However, given considerations involving lesion profiles in neuropsychological investigations and the correlational nature of fMRI, the precise nature of representations supported by the MTL are not well understood in humans. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2018.12.020DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

What happens when nothing happens? An investigation of pauses as a compensatory mechanism in early Alzheimer's disease.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Feb 26;124:133-143. Epub 2018 Dec 26.

Octogone-Lordat Interdisciplinary Research Unit (EA 4156), University of Toulouse II-Jean Jaurès, Toulouse, France.

Lexical-semantic impairment is one of the earliest symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and is usually examined by single word processing tasks. During speech production, pauses are often investigated as a hallmark of a patient's lexical-semantic decline. In the current study, we put forward the hypothesis that pauses reflect different processes according to the type of discourse. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2018.12.018DOI Listing
February 2019

Similarities and differences in cerebellar grey matter volume and disrupted functional connectivity in idiopathic Parkinson's disease and multiple system atrophy.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Feb 24;124:125-132. Epub 2018 Dec 24.

The First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Department of Radiology, China. Electronic address:

Objective: This study investigated the potential differences in changes to cerebellar grey matter volume (GMV) and functional connectivity (FC) and the association between them, which might elucidate cerebellar function in multiple system atrophy (MSA) and idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD).

Methods: Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and three-dimensional T1 scans were obtained from 38 IPD, 62 MSA, and 59 healthy controls (HC). Seed-based connectivity analysis and voxel-based morphometry analysis were performed to assess the changes of cerebellar FC and GMV between the patient groups. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2018.12.019DOI Listing
February 2019
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The role of the motion cue in the dynamic gaze-cueing effect: A study of the lateralized ERPs.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Feb 21;124:151-160. Epub 2018 Dec 21.

Department of Psychology and Behavioral Sciences, Xixi Campus, Zhejiang University, No. 148, Tianmushan Road, Hangzhou 310028, China; School of Education, Yunnan Minzu University, Kunming, Yunnan, China.

When face was inverted, dynamic gaze cues could still effectively direct attention despite the disruption of configural face processing, but the static gaze cues could not. The present study investigated the role of the motion cue in the dynamic Gaze-Cueing Effect (GCE). With schematic and real faces, we employed the gaze-cueing paradigm to examine the differences among three kinds of cues (static gaze cue, dynamic gaze cue and motion cue) based on behavioral results and event-related potentials. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00283932183071
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2018.12.016DOI Listing
February 2019
5 Reads

Targeted memory reactivation during sleep to strengthen memory for arbitrary pairings.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Feb 21;124:144-150. Epub 2018 Dec 21.

Department of Psychology, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA.

A powerful way to investigate memory consolidation during sleep utilizes acoustic stimulation to reactivate memories. In multiple studies, Targeted Memory Reactivation (TMR) using sounds associated with prior learning improved later memory, as in recalling locations where objects previously appeared. In the present experiment, we examined whether a variant of the same technique could strengthen memory for the locations of pairs of objects. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2018.12.017DOI Listing
February 2019

Dissociable medial temporal pathways for encoding emotional item and context information.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Feb 19;124:66-78. Epub 2018 Dec 19.

Department of Psychology, University of California Davis, Davis, CA, United States; Center for Neuroscience, University of California Davis, Davis, CA, United States.

Emotional experiences are typically remembered with a greater sense of recollection than neutral experiences, but memory benefits for emotional items do not typically extend to their source contexts. Item and source memory have been attributed to different subregions of the medial temporal lobes (MTL), but it is unclear how emotional item recollection fits into existing models of MTL function and, in particular, what is the role of the hippocampus. To address these issues, we used high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine MTL contributions to successful emotional item and context encoding. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2018.12.015DOI Listing
February 2019

Experimentally induced limb-disownership in mixed reality.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Feb 18;124:161-170. Epub 2018 Dec 18.

Department of Psychology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.

The seemingly stable construct of our bodily self depends on the continued, successful integration of multisensory feedback about our body, rather than its purely physical composition. Accordingly, pathological disruption of such neural processing is linked to striking alterations of the bodily self, ranging from limb misidentification to disownership, and even the desire to amputate a healthy limb. While previous embodiment research has relied on experimental setups using supernumerary limbs in variants of the Rubber Hand Illusion, we here used Mixed Reality to directly manipulate the feeling of ownership for one's own, biological limb. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2018.12.014DOI Listing
February 2019

Exploring the role of motor and non-motor predictive mechanisms in sensory attenuation: Perceptual and neurophysiological findings.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Feb 18;124:216-225. Epub 2018 Dec 18.

Department of Psychology, Utrecht University, The Netherlands.

Sounds that result from our own actions are perceptually and neurophysiologically attenuated compared to sounds with an external origin. This sensory attenuation phenomenon is commonly attributed to prediction processes implicated in motor control. However, accumulating evidence suggests that attenuation effects can also result from prediction processes beyond the motor domain. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2018.12.007DOI Listing
February 2019

Self-perspective in episodic memory after parietal damage and in healthy ageing.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Feb 17;124:171-181. Epub 2018 Dec 17.

Psychology Division, Department of Life Sciences, Brunel University London, UB8 3PH, United Kingdom.

Although there is strong support from functional imaging studies for lateral parietal lobe involvement in episodic memory, patients with damage to these regions do not appear to suffer from severe deficits in this cognitive domain. As such there has been no definitive explanation of this area's precise involvement. Here, we hypothesised that parietal regions play a crucial role in episodic memory - specifically in recollecting details from an egocentric perspective. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2018.12.013DOI Listing
February 2019

Differential effects of learned associations with words and pseudowords on event-related brain potentials.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Feb 17;124:182-191. Epub 2018 Dec 17.

Affective Neuroscience and Psychophysiology Laboratory, University of Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany; Leibniz ScienceCampus Primate Cognition, Göttingen, Germany.

Associated stimulus valence affects neural responses at an early processing stage. However, in the field of written language processing, it is unclear whether semantics of a word or low-level visual features affect early neural processing advantages. The current study aimed to investigate the role of semantic content on reward and loss associations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2018.12.012DOI Listing
February 2019
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An active cognitive lifestyle as a potential neuroprotective factor in Huntington's disease.

Neuropsychologia 2019 01 26;122:116-124. Epub 2018 Oct 26.

Cognition and Brain Plasticity Unit, Neuroscience Program, IDIBELL (Institut d'Investigació Biomèdica de Bellvitge), L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address:

A cognitive stimulating lifestyle has been observed to confer cognitive benefits in multiple neurodegenerative diseases. However, the underlying neurobiological basis of this phenomenon remains unclear. Huntington's disease can provide a suitable model to study the effects and neural mechanisms of cognitive engagement in neurodegeneration. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2018.10.017DOI Listing
January 2019
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Now listen to this! Evidence from a cross-spliced experimental design contrasting pressuring and supportive communications.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Feb 15;124:192-201. Epub 2018 Dec 15.

University of Essex, United Kingdom.

Motivating communications are a frequent experience within daily life. Recently, it has been found that two types of motivations are spoken with distinct tones of voices: control (pressure) is spoken with a low pitched, loud tone of voice, fast speech rate, and harsh sounding voice quality; autonomy (support) is spoken with a higher pitched, quieter tone of voice and a slower speech rate. These two motivational tones of voice also differentially impact listeners' well-being. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2018.12.011DOI Listing
February 2019

Mental imagery and colour cues can prevent interference between motor tasks.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Feb 14;124:202-207. Epub 2018 Dec 14.

Department of Neurosciences and Movement Sciences, University of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland.

Motor interference can be observed when two motor tasks are learnt in subsequent order. The aim of the current study was to test two approaches potentially mitigating interference effects. The first approach used contextual colour cues requiring only little cognitive attention thus being assumed to be primarily implicit while the second, mental practice/rehearsal that demands much more active cognitive processing being considered explicit. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00283932183077
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2018.12.010DOI Listing
February 2019
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A neural substrate of early response capture during conflict tasks in sensory areas.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Feb 13;124:226-235. Epub 2018 Dec 13.

Integrative Model-based Cognitive Neuroscience Research Unit, University of Amsterdam, 1018 WS, The Netherlands.

Studies that aim to understand the neural correlates of response conflicts commonly probe frontal brain areas associated with controlled inhibition and decision processes. However, untimely fast conflict errors happen even before these top-down processes are engaged. The dual-route model proposes that during conflict tasks, as soon as the stimulus is presented, two early processes are immediately at play. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2018.12.009DOI Listing
February 2019
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Is ventromedial prefrontal cortex critical for behavior change without external reinforcement?

Neuropsychologia 2019 Feb 11;124:208-215. Epub 2018 Dec 11.

Department of Neurobiology, Faculty of Life Sciences and Sagol School of Neuroscience, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 6997801, Israel. Electronic address:

Cue-approach training (CAT) is a novel paradigm that has been shown to induce preference changes towards items without external reinforcements. In the task, the mere association of a neutral cue and a speeded button response has been shown to induce a behavioral choice preference change lasting for months. This paradigm includes several phases: after the training of individual items, behavior change is manifested in binary choices of items with similar initial values. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2018.12.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6372830PMC
February 2019
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Recover from the adversity: functional connectivity basis of psychological resilience.

Neuropsychologia 2019 01 4;122:20-27. Epub 2018 Dec 4.

Key Laboratory of Cognition and Personality (SWU), Ministry of Education, Chongqing, China; School of Psychology, Southwest University (SWU), Chongqing, China; Southwest University Branch, Collaborative Innovation Center of Assessment Toward Basic Education Quality, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China. Electronic address:

Psychological resilience refers to the ability that individuals can positively adapt and respond to stress and adversity. It is important for mental health and well-being. However, there was few study examined the functional connectivity basis of psychological resilience. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00283932183057
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2018.12.002DOI Listing
January 2019
16 Reads

The good, the bad, and the average: Characterizing the relationship between face and object processing across the face recognition spectrum.

Neuropsychologia 2019 Feb 4;124:274-284. Epub 2018 Dec 4.

Department of Psychology, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. Electronic address:

Face recognition skills vary considerably both in the normal population and in various clinical groups, and understanding the cognitive mechanisms contributing to this variability is important. In the present study, we investigate whether a group of good face recognizers (high performers; HPs) perform qualitatively differently from a control group on tests of face, object and word recognition, and also compare them to a group of developmental prosopagnosics (DPs). Through a series of experiments, we (i) examine whether HPs are better than control subjects in face and object recognition, (ii) investigate if any dissociations among face, object, and word processing tasks can be demonstrated in the HPs, and (iii) compare the performance of the HPs to a group of poor face recognizers namely a group of DPs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2018.11.016DOI Listing
February 2019