63 results match your criteria Neurologic Effects of Caffeine


Nutritional Supplements for the Treatment and Prevention of Sports-Related Concussion-Evidence Still Lacking.

Curr Sports Med Rep 2017 Jul/Aug;16(4):247-255

1Division of Sports Medicine, Department of Family, Community & Preventative Medicine, Drexel University, College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19127; 2Connecticut Children's Medical Center, Elite Sports Medicine, Farmington, CT; and 3UBMD Department of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, SUNY Buffalo Buffalo, NY.

Concussions are common neurologic events that affect many athletes. Very little has been studied on the treatment of concussions with supplements and medications. The U. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/JSR.0000000000000387DOI Listing
March 2018
28 Reads

A pilot randomized trial of high-dose caffeine therapy in preterm infants.

Pediatr Res 2015 Aug 9;78(2):198-204. Epub 2015 Apr 9.

Department of Pediatric Newborn Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.

Background: Standard-dose caffeine improves white matter microstructural development assessed by diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We hypothesized that early high-dose caffeine would result in further improvement in white matter microstructural development.

Methods: Seventy-four preterm infants (≤30 wk gestational age) were randomly assigned to either a high (80 mg/kg i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/pr.2015.72DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4928641PMC
August 2015
7 Reads

Clinical and practical considerations in the pharmacologic management of narcolepsy.

Sleep Med 2015 Jan 16;16(1):9-18. Epub 2014 Oct 16.

National Reference Network for Narcolepsy, Sleep-Wake Disorders Center, Department of Neurology, Gui-de-Chauliac Hospital, CHU Montpellier, INSERM U1061, France.

Despite published treatment recommendations and the availability of approved and off-label pharmacologic therapies for narcolepsy, the clinical management of this incurable, chronic neurologic disorder remains challenging. While treatment is generally symptomatically driven, decisions regarding which drug(s) to use need to take into account a variety of factors that may affect adherence, efficacy, and tolerability. Type 1 narcolepsy (predominantly excessive daytime sleepiness with cataplexy) or type 2 narcolepsy (excessive daytime sleepiness without cataplexy) may drive treatment decisions, with consideration given either to a single drug that targets multiple symptoms or to multiple drugs that each treat a specific symptom. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sleep.2014.10.002DOI Listing
January 2015
3 Reads

Does an energy drink cause a transient ischemic attack?

Am J Emerg Med 2015 Jan 1;33(1):129.e5-6. Epub 2014 Jul 1.

Department of Emergency Medicine, Duzce University School of Medicine, Duzce, Turkey.

Energy drinks have become a popular beverage especially among young individuals. The growing literature sheds light on acute health problems associated with these products, although they have not yet been in existence long enough to build a solid, evidence-based appreciation of potential long-term effects. Perhaps the greatest concern about energy drinks is the amount of caffeine they contain, which generally far exceeds that in other beverages. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajem.2014.06.037DOI Listing
January 2015
18 Reads

[Health hazards of energy drinks--the situation in Israel and the world].

Harefuah 2014 Mar-Apr;153(3-4):176-9, 238

Since 1987, with the introduction of the first commercial energy drink in Europe, the level of sale of these drinks increased rapidly throughout the western world. These drinks are based on caffeine that is found in them ndependently, and in other ingredients. Other ingredients in these drinks potentiate the effects of caffeine. Read More

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May 2014
4 Reads

Activation of elements in HERV-W family by caffeine and aspirin.

Virus Genes 2013 Oct 28;47(2):219-27. Epub 2013 Jun 28.

Department of Medical Microbiology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, 185 Donghu Road, Wuhan, 430071, People's Republic of China.

Caffeine and aspirin have been suggested to be involved in neurologic diseases, such as schizophrenia, and previous data have revealed that abnormal expression of HERV-W elements may be an important factor in the etiopathogenesis of those diseases. In this article, we reported that caffeine and aspirin contributed to the expression of HERV-W env and gag in Human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR and quantitative Real-time PCR were used to detect the mRNA of HERV-W env and gag in cells exposed to caffeine or aspirin. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007/s11262-013-0939
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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11262-013-0939-6
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11262-013-0939-6DOI Listing
October 2013
5 Reads

In vitro muscle contracture investigations on the malignant hyperthermia like episodes in myotonia congenita.

Acta Anaesthesiol Scand 2013 Sep 3;57(8):1017-23. Epub 2013 May 3.

Department of Anaesthesiology, Ulm University, Ulm, Germany.

Background: A common form of congenital myotonia, myotonia congenita (MC), is caused by mutations in the skeletal muscle Cl(-) channel gene type 1 (CLCN1). Due to the reduced Cl(-) conductance of the mutated channels, the patients may develop generalized muscle rigidity and hypermetabolism during general anaesthesia. The clinical symptoms resemble malignant hyperthermia (MH), which may lead to mistreatment of the patient. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/aas.12126DOI Listing
September 2013
1 Read

Variant ataxia telangiectasia: clinical and molecular findings and evaluation of radiosensitive phenotypes in a patient and relatives.

Neuromolecular Med 2013 Sep 30;15(3):447-57. Epub 2013 Apr 30.

Center for Medical Genetics, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 9000, Ghent, Belgium.

Variant ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) may be an underdiagnosed entity. We correlate data from radiosensitivity and kinase assays with clinical and molecular data from a patient with variant A-T and relatives. The coding region of ATM was sequenced. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12017-013-8231-4DOI Listing
September 2013
16 Reads

International Society of Sports Nutrition position stand: energy drinks.

J Int Soc Sports Nutr 2013 Jan 3;10(1). Epub 2013 Jan 3.

Exercise & Sport Nutrition Lab, Department of Health & Kinesiology, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, TX, 77843-4243, USA.

Position Statement: The International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN) bases the following position stand on a critical analysis of the literature on the safety and efficacy of the use of energy drinks (ED) or energy shots (ES). The ISSN has concluded the following. 1. Read More

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http://bands.ua.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/ISSN-Position
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http://www.sportsnutritionsociety.org/CERTBrochures/cissnand
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http://www.jissn.com/content/10/1/1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1550-2783-10-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3538552PMC
January 2013
13 Reads

Stress, caffeine and ethanol trigger transient neurological dysfunction through shared mechanisms in a mouse calcium channelopathy.

Neurobiol Dis 2013 Feb 23;50:151-9. Epub 2012 Sep 23.

Department of Pharmacology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA.

Several episodic neurological disorders are caused by ion channel gene mutations. In patients, transient neurological dysfunction is often evoked by stress, caffeine and ethanol, but the mechanisms underlying these triggers are unclear because each has diverse and diffuse effects on the CNS. Attacks of motor dysfunction in the Ca(V)2. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S096999611200319
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nbd.2012.09.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3534906PMC
February 2013
4 Reads

The effects of environmental noise and infant position on cerebral oxygenation.

Adv Neonatal Care 2012 Oct;12 Suppl 5:S18-27

Duke University School of Nursing, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA.

Purpose: To assess how different infant positions and peak sound levels affected cerebral oxygen saturation over time.

Subjects: Twenty-four premature infants who were born less than 32 weeks' gestational age without congenital cardiac, neurologic, and gastrointestinal anomalies.

Design: Repeated-measures design with the first observation between 2 and 48 hours of life; once again between 49 and 96 hours of life; on day of life 7; and every 7 days thereafter until discharge home, transfer to another hospital, or 40 weeks postmenstrual age, whichever came first. Read More

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http://content.wkhealth.com/linkback/openurl?sid=WKPTLP:land
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0b013e31826853feDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3448929PMC
October 2012
3 Reads

Cheyne-Stokes respiration: hypoxia plus a deep breath that interrupts hypoxic drive, initiating cyclic breathing.

Med Hypotheses 2011 Nov 6;77(5):714-6. Epub 2011 Aug 6.

Pediatrics 326320, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA 98125, USA.

In the 19th Century, Cheyne and Stokes independently reported cycles of respiration in patients with heart failure, beginning with apnea, followed by a few breaths. However Cheyne-Stokes respiration (C-SR) can also occur in healthy individuals with sleep, and was demonstrated in 1908 with voluntary hyperventilation, followed by apnea that Haldane blamed on hypoxia, subsequently called post-hyperventilation apnea. Additional theories explaining C-SR did not appear until 1954, based on control theory, specifically a feed-back regulator controlling CO(2). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mehy.2011.07.023DOI Listing
November 2011
1 Read

Effect of Red Bull energy drink on cardiovascular and renal function.

Amino Acids 2010 Apr 4;38(4):1193-200. Epub 2009 Aug 4.

Department of Biology, Winona State University, Winona, MN 55987, USA.

Energy drink consumption has been anecdotally linked to the development of adverse cardiovascular effects in consumers, although clinical trials to support this link are lacking. The effects of Red Bull energy drink on cardiovascular and neurologic functions were examined in college-aged students enrolled at Winona State University. In a double-blind experiment where normal calorie and low calorie Red Bull were compared to normal and low calorie placebos, no changes in overall cardiovascular function nor blood glucose (mg/dL) were recorded in any participant (n = 68) throughout a 2-h test period. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00726-009-0330-zDOI Listing
April 2010
19 Reads

Low-frequency oscillations in the cerebellar cortex of the tottering mouse.

J Neurophysiol 2009 Jan 5;101(1):234-45. Epub 2008 Nov 5.

Department of Neuroscience, University of Minnesota, Lions Research Building, Room 421, 2001 Sixth Street S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA.

The tottering mouse is an autosomal recessive disorder involving a missense mutation in the gene encoding P/Q-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. The tottering mouse has a characteristic phenotype consisting of transient attacks of dystonia triggered by stress, caffeine, or ethanol. The neural events underlying these episodes of dystonia are unknown. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/jn.90829.2008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2637021PMC
January 2009
2 Reads

The effects of adenosine A2A receptor antagonists on haloperidol-induced movement disorders in primates.

Psychopharmacology (Berl) 2008 Oct 3;200(3):393-401. Epub 2008 Jul 3.

Department of Neurobiology, Schering-Plough Research Institute, 2015 Galloping Hill Road, Kenilworth, NJ 07033, USA.

Rationale: Adenosine and dopamine interact within the striatum to control striatopallidal output and globus pallidus GABA release. Manipulating striatal adenosine transmission via blockade of the A2A receptor subtype can compensate for the reduced dopamine activity within the striatum that underlies movement disorders such as antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal syndrome (EPS) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Preclinical studies in the rat have demonstrated that adenosine A2A receptor antagonists can attenuate behaviors reflecting reduced dopamine activity, such as haloperidol-induced catalepsy and hypoactivity. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007%2Fs00213-008-12
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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00213-008-1214-8
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00213-008-1214-8DOI Listing
October 2008
6 Reads

Diagnosing and managing migraine headache.

J Am Osteopath Assoc 2007 Nov;107(10 Suppl 6):ES10-6

University Headache Center, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-School of Osteopathic Medicine, 42 E Laurel Rd, University Doctors Pavilion, Ste 1700, Stratford, NJ 08084-1354, USA.

Headache is one of the chief complaints among patients visiting primary care physicians. Diagnosis begins with exclusion of secondary causes for headache. More than 90% of patients will have a primary-type headache, so diagnosis can often be completed without further testing. Read More

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November 2007
4 Reads

Development of spontaneous intracranial hypotension concurrent with grade IV mobilization of the cervical and thoracic spine: a case report.

Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2007 Nov;88(11):1472-3

Department of Physical Therapy, Chapman University, Orange, CA, USA.

Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) has been clinically defined as the development of severe orthostatic headaches caused by an acute cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak. Typically, intracranial hypotension occurs as a complication of lumbar puncture, but recent reports have identified cases caused by minor trauma. We report a case of SIH secondary to a dural tear caused by a cervical and thoracic spine mobilization. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2007.08.111DOI Listing
November 2007
2 Reads

Pathogenesis and pharmacology of epilepsy in the lithium-pilocarpine model.

Epilepsia 2007 ;48 Suppl 5:41-7

INSERM U 398, 405 and 666, Strasbourg, France.

To try to identify the critical structures during epileptogenesis, we used the lithium-pilocarpine model that reproduces most clinical and neuropathological features of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). We used imaging techniques as well as a disease modifying approach and pharmacological strategy. With [14C]-2-deoxyglucose autoradiography, we assessed changes in cerebral glucose utilization. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1528-1167.2007.01288.xDOI Listing
November 2007
7 Reads

Hypertensive retinopathy associated with use of the ephedra-free weight-loss herbal supplement Hydroxycut.

MedGenMed 2006 Sep 28;8(3):82. Epub 2006 Sep 28.

Department of Internal Medicine, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA.

The use of performance-enhancing and weight-loss supplements is prevalent in the United States, and over the past decade, there has been growing concern with regard to the safety and efficacy of these products. It is well documented that ephedra-based products are associated with adverse reactions, including serious cardiovascular and neurologic injuries. With new restrictions placed on such products, companies are now marketing caffeine-based ephedra-free herbal supplements. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1781262PMC
September 2006
10 Reads

Effects of caffeine on the freezing of gait in Parkinson's disease.

Mov Disord 2007 Apr;22(5):710-2

Department of Neurology, Sapporo Azabu Neurosurgical Hospital, Sapporo, Japan.

Caffeine is a nonselective competitive blockade of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors. In this report, we studied the efficacy of 100 mg of caffeine per day on the freezing of gait (FOG) for patients with Parkinson's disease. Different subtypes of FOG showed different therapeutic responses to caffeine. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mds.21208DOI Listing
April 2007
4 Reads

Excessive daytime sleepiness and subsequent development of Parkinson disease.

Neurology 2005 Nov;65(9):1442-6

Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA.

Objective: To determine if excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) can predate future Parkinson disease (PD).

Methods: EDS was assessed in 3,078 men aged 71 to 93 years in the Honolulu-Asia Aging Study from 1991 to 1993. All were free of prevalent PD and dementia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/01.wnl.0000183056.89590.0dDOI Listing
November 2005
1 Read

Potassium channel blockers inhibit the triggers of attacks in the calcium channel mouse mutant tottering.

J Neurosci 2005 Apr;25(16):4141-5

Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287, USA.

Humans with the disorder episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) and the tottering mouse mutant exhibit episodic attacks induced by emotional and chemical stress. Both the human and mouse disorders result from mutations in CACNA1A, the gene encoding the alpha(1)2.1 subunit of Ca(v)2. Read More

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http://www.jneurosci.org/content/25/16/4141.full.pdf
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http://www.jneurosci.org/cgi/doi/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0098-05.2
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0098-05.2005DOI Listing
April 2005
32 Reads

Post-trauma administration of caffeine plus ethanol reduces contusion volume and improves working memory in rats.

J Neurotrauma 2004 Nov;21(11):1573-83

Vivian L. Smith Center for Neurologic Research, Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, University of Texas Medical School, Houston, Texas 77225, USA.

It has been demonstrated that ethanol exerts dose-dependent effects, both beneficial and detrimental, on the outcome of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Recently, it has been reported that co-administration of caffeine (10 mg/kg) and a low amount of alcohol (0.65 g/kg; caffeinol) reduces cortical infarct volume up to 80%, and improves motor coordination, following a rodent model of reversible common carotid/middle cerebral artery occlusion. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/neu.2004.21.1573DOI Listing
November 2004
1 Read

Barbiturate withdrawal following Internet purchase of Fioricet.

Arch Neurol 2004 Jul;61(7):1111-2

Neurology Service, St Elizabeth's Medical Center, 736 Cambridge Street, Boston, MA 02135, USA.

Background: The Internet enables businesses to advertise their pharmaceutical products and services without medical supervision. The Internet also allows for the unsupervised purchase of medications that may have neurologic consequences.

Objective: To describe acute withdrawal delirium following the abrupt discontinuation of Fioricet. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/archneur.61.7.1111DOI Listing
July 2004
3 Reads

Backache, headache, and neurologic deficit after regional anesthesia.

Anesthesiol Clin North America 2003 Mar;21(1):71-86

Department of Anesthesiology, Baylor College of Medicine, 6550 Fannin, Smith Tower Suite 1003, Houston, TX 77030, USA.

Back pain, chemical backache, PDPH, and neurologic deficit all may be reported after regional anesthesia for childbirth. Back pain is common during pregnancy, but epidural analgesia during labor does not increase the incidence of long-term back pain. Chemical backache caused by 2-chloroprocaine is probably a result of hypocalcemic tetany of paraspinous muscles. Read More

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March 2003
5 Reads

Prolonged low-dose caffeine exposure protects against hippocampal damage but not against the occurrence of epilepsy in the lithium-pilocarpine model in the rat.

Epilepsia 2003 Apr;44(4):529-35

INSERM U398, Université Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg, France.

Purpose: Acute caffeine exposure has proconvulsant effects and worsens epileptic and ischemic neuronal damage. Surprisingly, prolonged caffeine exposure decreases the susceptibility to seizures and the extent of ischemic damage. We explored whether the exposure to a low long-term dose of caffeine could protect the brain from neuronal damage and epileptogenesis in the lithium-pilocarpine model of temporal lobe epilepsy. Read More

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April 2003
2 Reads

Triggers of paroxysmal dyskinesia in the calcium channel mouse mutant tottering.

Pharmacol Biochem Behav 2002 Oct;73(3):631-7

Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Meyer Room 6-181, 600 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA.

Mutations in ion channels, or channelopathies, often lead to neurological disorders in which normal behavior is interrupted by attacks of debilitating symptoms such as pain, weakness or abnormal motor control. Attacks are often precipitated by similar stimuli, including stress, caffeine, ethanol, exercise or fatigue. The tottering mouse inherits a mutation in P/Q-type calcium channels and reliably exhibits attacks of abnormal movements, or dyskinesia. Read More

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October 2002
1 Read

Does caffeine intake protect from Alzheimer's disease?

Eur J Neurol 2002 Jul;9(4):377-82

Dementia Clinics, Hospital of Santa Maria and Laboratory of Neurosciences, Faculty of Medicine of Lisbon, Portugal.

Caffeine is the most widely consumed behaviourally active substance in the western world. Neuroprotective effects of caffeine in low doses, chronically administered, have been shown in different experimental models. If caffeine intake could protect against neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD), then higher levels of caffeine consumption in normal subjects as compared with AD patients should be detectable in the presumably long period before diagnosis when insidious pathogenic changes are taking place. Read More

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July 2002
3 Reads

Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (Glut1DS): methylxanthines potentiate GLUT1 haploinsufficiency in vitro.

Pediatr Res 2001 Aug;50(2):254-60

Department of Neurology, Columbia University, 710 West 168th Street, New York, NY 10032, U.S.A.

Methylxanthines such as caffeine and theophylline are known to inhibit glucose transport. We have studied such inhibition in the glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (Glut1DS) by erythrocyte glucose transport assays. Data from four patients with individual mutations in the GLUT1 gene are discussed: patient 1 (hemizygosity), 3 (S66F), 15 (368Ins23), and 17 (R333W). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1203/00006450-200108000-00015DOI Listing
August 2001
1 Read

Influences of caffeine to nitric oxide production and zonisamide concentration in the brain of seizure-susceptible EL mice.

Psychiatry Clin Neurosci 2001 Aug;55(4):319-24

Department of Neuropsychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520, Japan.

To investigate changes of nitric oxide (NO) productions and zonisamide (ZNS) concentrations in the brain of seizure-susceptible EL mice given caffeine orally, mice were given caffeine (600 microg/mL) solution ad libitum as a drinking fluid for 1-3 weeks. Nitric oxide production in the brain was determined by measuring levels of nitrite plus nitrate (NOx). The brain NOx levels of mice treated with caffeine for 3 weeks were significantly higher than the control. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1046/j.1440-1819.2001.00870.x
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1440-1819.2001.00870.xDOI Listing
August 2001
2 Reads

Phase I trial of oral green tea extract in adult patients with solid tumors.

J Clin Oncol 2001 Mar;19(6):1830-8

Department of Thoracic/Head & Neck Medical Oncology, University of Texas, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA.

Purpose: This trial was designed to determine the maximum-tolerated dose, toxicity, and pharmacology of oral green tea extract (GTE) once daily or three times daily.

Patients And Methods: Cohorts of three or more adult cancer patients were administered oral GTE with water after meals one or three times daily for 4 weeks, to a maximum of 6 months, depending on disease response and patient tolerance. Pharmacokinetic analyses were encouraged but optional. Read More

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http://ascopubs.org/doi/10.1200/JCO.2001.19.6.1830
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1200/JCO.2001.19.6.1830DOI Listing
March 2001
2 Reads

Chemical kindling and seizure susceptibility in morphine dependent rats.

Eur Neuropsychopharmacol 2000 Dec;10(6):483-7

Neuroscience Research Center, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 76175-113, Kerman, Iran.

In the present study, we investigated whether and how chronic morphine administration changes seizure susceptibility in rats. The role of morphine-dependence on the seizure susceptibility has been evaluated with models of pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-kindling and acute convulsions induced by PTZ, N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA), picrotoxin and caffeine in adult male rats. The results showed that morphine-dependence increased seizure severity only at 1-4th PTZ injections in the kindling model. Read More

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December 2000
3 Reads

Current options in the management of apnea of prematurity.

Authors:
J Bhatia

Clin Pediatr (Phila) 2000 Jun;39(6):327-36

Section of Neonatology, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta 30912, USA.

Apnea of prematurity (AOP) is a common problem that affects premature infants and, to a lesser degree, term infants. Apnea of prematurity appears to be due to immaturity of the infant's neurologic and respiratory systems. Apnea of prematurity is a diagnosis of exclusion that can be made only when other possible infectious, cardiologic, physiologic, and metabolic causes of apnea have been ruled out. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/000992280003900602DOI Listing
June 2000
4 Reads

Relationship between large conductance calcium-activated potassium channel and bursting activity.

Brain Res 2000 Mar;860(1-2):21-8

Laboratory of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Josai University, 1-1, Keyakidai, Sakado, Japan.

To elucidate the role of the large conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (BK(Ca) channel) in the production of bursting activity, which is characteristic of convulsions, effects of iberiotoxin (IbTX), a selective blocker of the BK(Ca) channel, on bursting activity, induced by various procedures were examined using primary cultured neurons from the cerebral cortex of mice. IbTX completely inhibited bursting activity induced by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), caffeine, 1,4,5-inositol triphosphate (IP3) and direct forced increase of intracellular calcium. Inherent spontaneous bursting activity in the cerebral cortical neurons of the El mouse, which shows a high susceptibility to convulsions was also completely inhibited by IbTX. Read More

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March 2000
2 Reads

Anticonvulsant action of 2-chloroadenosine injected focally into the perirhinal cortex in amygdaloid kindled rats.

Epilepsy Res 1999 Oct;37(1):37-43

Department of Physiology, School of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modarres University, Tehran, Iran.

Possible anticonvulsant effects of 2-chloroadenosine injected focally into the perirhinal cortex of amygdala kindled rats were investigated over a 2 h period. Animals were microinfused (1 microl) with 2-chloroadenosine (2-CLA; 5, 10, 15, 25 and 100 nM) or artificial cerebrospinal fluid applied through a cannula located in the perirhinal cortex. At the doses employed, 2-CLA significantly reduced afterdischarge duration and stage 5 seizure duration. Read More

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October 1999
2 Reads

[Comparative study of the analgesic effect of Dikalm and Saridon in headaches of various causes].

Vojnosanit Pregl 1998 May-Jun;55(3):265-9

Headache, as a syndrome, represents large health and wider socio-economic problem in every community for its massive occurrence and frequent absence of therapeutic response to the administered analgesics. That is why the finding, and later production of the drug that would satisfy the criteria of analgesic, efficacious in the treatment of headache, without the entering in etiology of syndrome are presented as the imperative. In connection with that was set the aim of the investigation: to investigate comparative analgesic efficacity of new preparation--Dikalm compared to analgesic that was for a long time present in our pharmaceutic market--Saridon tablets in the patients with different neurologic diseases, where headache represents the leading symptom of their difficulties. Read More

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September 1998
5 Reads

The hypnic ("alarm clock") headache syndrome.

Cephalalgia 1998 Apr;18(3):152-6

Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.

Hypnic headache syndrome is a rare, sleep-related, benign headache disorder. We report 19 new cases (84% females) with follow-up data. The mean age at headache onset was 60. Read More

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http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1046/j.1468-2982.1998.180
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1468-2982.1998.1803152.xDOI Listing
April 1998
2 Reads

Intra-amygdala infusion of 2-chloroadenosine suppresses amygdala-kindled seizures.

Brain Res 1997 Nov;775(1-2):37-42

Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Shaheed Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, I.R. Iran.

The seizure-modulating effects of 2-chloroadenosine (2-CLA) infused directly into the amygdala were investigated. Different groups of amygdala-kindled rats were infused (1 microliter) with 2-CLA (0.25, 1, 10 and 25 nM), caffeine (200 microM and 2 mM), a combination of the two or artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) applied directly through a cannula located in the amygdala. Read More

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November 1997
3 Reads

Paroxysmal dystonic choreoathetosis linked to chromosome 2q: clinical analysis and proposed pathophysiology.

Neurology 1997 Jul;49(1):177-83

University of Michigan Department of Neurology, Ann Arbor, USA.

We describe clinical features of a large Polish-American kindred in which autosomal-dominant, paroxysmal dystonic choreoathetosis (PDC) was linked to a locus on chromosome 2q. Episodes of generalized dystonia and choreoathetosis involving the face and all extremities began in early childhood, lasted for 30 minutes to several hours, and occurred up to several times each week. There was no interruption of consciousness and EEGs were normal during the episodes. Read More

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Effect of intraperitoneal and intrahippocampal (CA1) 2-chloroadenosine in amygdaloid kindled rats.

Brain Res 1997 Mar;751(2):259-64

Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Shaheed-Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Effects of intraperitoneal and intrahippocampal 2-chloroadenosine and caffeine were examined in fully kindled amygdaloid rats. Intraperitoneal administration of 2-chloroadenosine (5 and 10 mg/kg) decreased afterdischarge duration, stage 5 seizure duration and prolonged time taken to reach stage 4 seizure. Only the 10 mg/kg dose induced a significant reduction in seizure stage. Read More

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March 1997
4 Reads

Caffeine and its effect on persons with mental disorders.

Authors:
D H Simmons

Arch Psychiatr Nurs 1996 Apr;10(2):116-22

School of Nursing, University of Louisville, KY 40202, USA.

Whereas caffeine is widely accepted for use in society, it can be physically and psychologically harmful, especially to those with a mental illness. The effects of caffeine on specific mental illnesses and the medications used to treat them will be discussed. A review of addiction to caffeine and withdrawal from caffeine will also be presented. Read More

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April 1996
4 Reads

Effects of prenatal exposure to alcohol plus caffeine in rats: pregnancy outcome and early offspring development.

Authors:
J H Hannigan

Alcohol Clin Exp Res 1995 Feb;19(1):238-46

Fetal Alcohol Research Center, C. S. Mott Center for Human Growth and Development, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201, USA.

The factors determining susceptibility to fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) are not fully understood. We used an animal model of alcohol-related birth defects to assess the coteratogenic potential of caffeine as a risk factor in FAS. Rats were exposed prenatally to alcohol (approximately 15 g/kg/day) with or without caffeine (approximately 84 mg/kg/day) from gestation days 6 through 20 via liquid diet. Read More

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February 1995
2 Reads

Current cannabis use and tardive dyskinesia.

Schizophr Res 1993 Dec;11(1):3-8

Department of Psychiatry, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ont., Canada.

The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between substance abuse and tardive dyskinesia (TD) in 51 chronic, neuroleptic-treated, community outpatients with a DSM-III-R diagnosis of schizophrenia. In the presence of a clinical researcher, subjects completed a questionnaire on past and current alcohol and drug use, and provided information pertaining to variables which have, in the past, been implicated in the development of TD: smoking habits, caffeine consumption, and current neuroleptic dose. Subjects were also administered the Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale (AIMS) in an interview format with either two or three trained raters present in the room. Read More

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December 1993
2 Reads

Caffeine self-administration and withdrawal: incidence, individual differences and interrelationships.

Drug Alcohol Depend 1993 May;32(3):239-46

University of Vermont, Department of Psychiatry, Burlington 05405.

In four prior studies, caffeine (100 mg) self-administration was assessed by greater self-administration of caffeinated coffee than decaffeinated coffee and caffeine withdrawal was assessed by placebo substitution using six double-blind tests in each subject. This paper collates data across these studies to examine the incidence and predictors of the occurrence of caffeine self-administration and withdrawal. Caffeine self-administration occurred in 31% of subjects when a consistency criterion was used (n = 41) and 27% when a statistical criterion was used. Read More

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May 1993
2 Reads

Coffee and alcohol intake as predictors of smoking cessation and tobacco withdrawal.

J Subst Abuse 1993 ;5(3):305-10

Department of Psychiatry, University of Vermont, Burlington 05401-1419.

In one study of 105 smokers who received physician advice plus placebo gum and in another study of 630 self-quitters, neither the presence or absence, nor amount of precessation alcohol, nor coffee intake, nor changes in alcohol or coffee intake postcessation, predicted relapse or most withdrawal symptoms. The one possible exception was that heavy caffeine and alcohol users reported a greater increase in hunger and craving postcessation; however, these effects were not consistent across measures, follow-ups, and studies. Our results are inconsistent with theories that caffeine intoxication from increased caffeine blood levels postsmoking cessation worsen tobacco withdrawal or that alcohol or caffeine use during initial abstinence from smoking increases relapse to smoking. Read More

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March 1994
3 Reads

Xeroderma pigmentosum variant with multisystem involvement.

Arch Dermatol 1992 Sep;128(9):1233-7

Division of Dermatology, Ohio State University, Columbus.

Background: Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a hereditary disorder characterized by recessive inheritance and elevated rates of skin carcinogenesis. There are seven complementation groups (A through G) for which the genetic defect results in a failure to repair DNA damage from UV light and sunlight; one group, the variant, fails to replicate UV-damaged DNA correctly. Patients in XP groups A, B, D, and G have associated neurologic problems, the most severe being known as the DeSanctis-Cacchione syndrome. Read More

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September 1992
6 Reads

Increased leakage of calcium ion from the sarcoplasmic reticulum of the mdx mouse.

J Neurol Sci 1992 Jul;110(1-2):160-4

Department of Neurology, Toranomon Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.

Using a single skinned muscle fiber, the function of the contractile system and the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) were analyzed in the skeletal muscle of the mdx mouse. Activation of the contractile system by calcium ion and the maximum force generation was normal. Ca2+ uptake of the SR was normal as well as regulation of the Ca-induced Ca release (CICR) by Ca2+. Read More

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July 1992
3 Reads

Grand mal seizure in a postpartum patient following intravenous infusion of caffeine sodium benzoate to treat persistent headache.

J Clin Anesth 1992 Jan-Feb;4(1):48-51

Department of Anesthesiology, University of Illinois-Chicago College of Medicine and Humana Hospital-Michael Reese, IL.

A 27-year-old parturient developed a severe headache after placement of a labor epidural catheter. A presumptive diagnosis of an occult postdural puncture headache (PDPH) was made, and the patient was treated with an intravenous (IV) infusion of 500 mg of caffeine sodium benzoate (CSB) to vasoconstrict dilated cerebral vessels. Shortly after the infusion was completed, the patient experienced a self-limited grand mal seizure, which recurred later during her hospitalization. Read More

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April 1992
3 Reads

Management of otolaryngic patients susceptible to malignant hyperthermia without dantrolene.

Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 1991 Nov;105(5):680-6

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Eastern Virginia Medical Center, Norfolk 23507.

Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is an adverse reaction most frequently associated with the administration of halogenated inhalational anesthetic agents and the depolarizing muscle relaxant succinylcholine. Characteristic findings are a hypermetabolic state accompanied by extreme hyperpyrexia, acidosis, rhabdomyolysis, and generalized muscle rigidity, often involving the masseter muscles. Dantrolene sodium, which was approved in 1979 by the FDA for use in the prevention of MH in high-risk patients, has neurologic and gastrointestinal side effects. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/019459989110500508DOI Listing
November 1991
1 Read