1,225 results match your criteria Neuroimaging Clinics of North America[Journal]


Hear and Now.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2019 Feb 22;29(1):xvii. Epub 2018 Oct 22.

Department of Radiology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School, 243 Charles Street, Boston, MA 02114, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nic.2018.10.001DOI Listing
February 2019
6 Reads

Update on Temporal Bone Imaging with Emphasis on Clinical and Surgical Perspectives.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2019 Feb 31;29(1):xv. Epub 2018 Oct 31.

Department of Radiology, Michigan State University, Michigan State University Health Team, 846 Service Road, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nic.2018.10.002DOI Listing
February 2019

Arterial Anomalies of the Middle Ear: A Pictorial Review with Clinical-Embryologic and Imaging Correlation.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2019 Feb;29(1):93-102

Department of Radiology, Columbia University Medical Center, 622 West 168th Street, PB-1-301, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address:

The differential diagnosis of a red and/or pulsatile retrotympanic mass includes aberrant internal carotid artery, persistent stapedial artery (PSA), glomus tympanicum, and dehiscent jugular bulb. By recognizing the features of aberrant internal carotid artery and PSA on high-resolution computed tomography, these entities can be assessed by the radiologist. PSA is further classified by type because each type demonstrates a unique set of imaging features in addition to features common to all types. Read More

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February 2019
6 Reads

Third Window Lesions.

Authors:
Mai-Lan Ho

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2019 Feb;29(1):57-92

Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street Southwest, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. Electronic address:

Third window abnormalities are bony defects of the inner ear that enable abnormal communication with the middle ear and/or cranial cavity. Vestibular symptoms include vertigo and nystagmus induced by loud noises or increases in pressure. Auditory symptoms involve "pseudo-conductive" hearing loss with a low-frequency air-bone gap at audiometry, resulting from decreased air and increased bone conduction. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nic.2018.09.005DOI Listing
February 2019
11 Reads

Imaging of Tinnitus.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2019 Feb 31;29(1):49-56. Epub 2018 Oct 31.

Department of Radiology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 243 Charles Street, Boston, MA 02114, USA. Electronic address:

Although not all patients with tinnitus require imaging, patients with tinnitus and asymmetric hearing loss, additional neurologic findings, or pulsatile tinnitus should be evaluated with an appropriately tailored imaging study. Choice of imaging study should be guided by type of hearing loss and additional physical examination findings, such as middle ear lesion, presence of carotid bruit, or pulsatile tinnitus extinguished by jugular compression. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nic.2018.09.006DOI Listing
February 2019
7 Reads

Otosclerosis and Dysplasias of the Temporal Bone.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2019 Feb 31;29(1):29-47. Epub 2018 Oct 31.

Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, 820 Harrison Avenue, FGH 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02118, USA; Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, 820 Harrison Avenue, FGH 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02118, USA; Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, 820 Harrison Avenue, FGH 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02118, USA. Electronic address:

Many bone dysplasias, some common and others rare, may involve the temporal bone causing conductive, sensorineural, or mixed hearing loss, vestibular dysfunction, or skull base foraminal narrowing, potentially affecting quality of life. Some conditions may affect only the temporal bone, whereas others may be more generalized, involving different regions of the body. High-resolution computed tomography may detect subtle osseous changes that can help define the type of dysplasia, and MR imaging can help define the degree of activity of lesions and potential associated complications. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nic.2018.09.004DOI Listing
February 2019
17 Reads

Advanced MR Imaging of the Temporal Bone.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2019 Feb 31;29(1):197-202. Epub 2018 Oct 31.

Department of Radiology, Columbia University Medical Center, 622 West 168th Street, Presbyterian Building, FL01, Room/Suite 0331, New York, NY 10032, USA.

Temporal bone pathologies are challenging to discern because of their small size and subtle contrast. MR imaging is one of the key modalities in evaluating otologic diseases. Current advancement in MR techniques provide multiparametric information for evaluation of these pathologies. Read More

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February 2019
6 Reads

Imaging of Ménière Disease.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2019 Feb;29(1):19-28

Department of Radiology, GZA Hospitals Antwerp, Oosterveldlaan 24, Wilrijk 2610, Belgium.

Visualization of the morphologic substrate of Ménière disease, the endolymphatic hydrops, can be performed using noncontrast or contrast-enhanced MR imaging techniques. Noncontrast MR imaging uses a heavily T2-weighted sequence; however, its reproducibility remains to be confirmed. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging techniques mainly use a 3-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequence after intratympanic gadolinium administration or after a 4-hour delayed intravenous gadolinium administration. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nic.2018.09.002DOI Listing
February 2019
10 Reads

Common Otologic Surgical Procedures: Clinical Decision-Making Pearls and the Role of Imaging.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2019 Feb 31;29(1):183-196. Epub 2018 Oct 31.

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Columbia University Medical Center, 180 Fort Washington Avenue, Harkness Pavilion, Room 864, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address:

Neuro-otologists rely on the expertise and judgment of a skilled neuroradiologist to identify radiographic abnormalities in the complicated regional anatomy of the temporal bone and middle and posterior fossa, and more importantly, to alert the surgeon to potential operative pitfalls. This article highlights some of the common otologic surgical procedures that stress this important dynamic. The surgical perspective on quick and effective clinical decision-making pearls to keep in mind during a thorough radiographic analysis of the ear and lateral skull base is presented. Read More

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February 2019
9 Reads

Management of Vestibular Schwannomas for the Radiologist.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2019 Feb 31;29(1):173-182. Epub 2018 Oct 31.

Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Vagelos College of Physicians & Surgeons, NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Irving Medical Center, 180 Fort Washington Avenue, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address:

Vestibular schwannomas are the most common tumor of the cerebellopontine angle. The history of their management has driven advances in imaging, lateral skull base surgery, as well as radiosurgery. With these advances, a shift has occurred from life-saving treatment for late-stage disease to quality of life focused management of smaller tumors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nic.2018.09.003DOI Listing
February 2019
10 Reads

Temporal Bone Tumors: An Imaging Update.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2019 Feb;29(1):145-172

Department of Radiology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School, 243 Charles Street, Boston, MA 02114, USA.

In their variety, temporal bone tumors mirror the complexity of the structure from which they arise. They include more familiar lesions, such as vestibular schwannomas and paragangliomas, and also rarer neoplasms, such as nonvestibular schwannomas, sarcomas, giant cell tumors, Schneiderian papillomas, and endolymphatic sac tumors. Diagnostic imaging is invaluable in evaluating such lesions because they are typically challenging to access surgically and monitor clinically. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nic.2018.09.007DOI Listing
February 2019
15 Reads

Imaging of Temporal Bone Trauma: A Clinicoradiologic Perspective.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2019 Feb 31;29(1):129-143. Epub 2018 Oct 31.

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York Presbyterian Hospital, 1305 York Avenue, 5th Floor, New York, NY 10021, USA.

Imaging plays an important role in the evaluation of temporal bone trauma. Certain imaging findings can significantly change patient management or change surgical approach. Precise knowledge of clinical or surgical management can guide the review of imaging to detect these key findings. Read More

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February 2019
11 Reads

Imaging Findings in Syndromes with Temporal Bone Abnormalities.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2019 Feb 29;29(1):117-128. Epub 2018 Oct 29.

Department of Radiology, University of Chicago, Pritzker School of Medicine, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637, USA. Electronic address:

There is a wide variety of congenital syndromes that can involve the temporal bone. Many of these have overlapping features due to common embryologic abnormalities, such as first and second branchial anomalies. Diagnostic imaging is often important in the workup of hearing deficits related to congenital syndromes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nic.2018.08.004DOI Listing
February 2019
13 Reads

Imaging of Pediatric Hearing Loss.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2019 Feb 31;29(1):103-115. Epub 2018 Oct 31.

Department of Radiology, Perelman School of Medicine at University of Pennsylvania, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, 34 Civic Center Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.

Temporal bone high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are valuable tools in the evaluation of pediatric hearing loss. Computed tomography is important in the evaluation of pediatric conductive hearing loss and is the imaging modality of choice for evaluation of osseous abnormalities. MR imaging is the modality of choice for evaluation of sensorineural hearing loss. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nic.2018.09.011DOI Listing
February 2019
10 Reads

Inflammation of the Temporal Bone.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2019 Feb 29;29(1):1-17. Epub 2018 Oct 29.

Department of Radiology, University Hospitals of Leicester, Leicester University, Infirmary Square, Leicester LE1 5WW, UK.

Temporal bone and ear structure inflammation is commonly due to infection. It can be associated with a variety of complications and postinflammatory sequelae. Where the ear is easily inspected, clinical evaluation suffices. Read More

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February 2019
11 Reads

Preface.

Authors:
Lotfi Hacein-Bey

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2018 11;28(4):xvii-xviii

Interventional Neuroradiology and Neuroradiology, Department of Medical Imaging, Sutter Health, Sacramento, CA 95815, USA; Radiology Department, University of California Davis School of Medicine, 4860 Y Street, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA. Electronic address:

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November 2018
6 Reads

Ischemic Stroke.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2018 11;28(4):xv

Department of Radiology, Michigan State University, Michigan State University Health Team, 846 Service Road, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA. Electronic address:

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November 2018

Health Care Organization for the Management of Stroke: The French Perspective.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2018 Nov;28(4):691-698

Interventional Neuroradiology and Neuroradiology, Department of Medical Imaging, Sutter Health, Sacramento, CA 95815, USA; Radiology Department, University of California Davis Medical School of Medicine, 4860 Y Street, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA.

Stroke, a major burden to society, can now be treated in increasingly larger numbers of patients. Intravenous thrombolysis and mechanical thrombectomy are both now standard of care with class I, level of evidence A. Various local, regional, and national challenges are present, preventing equality in access to care for many patients. Read More

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November 2018
9 Reads

Economic and Societal Aspects of Stroke Management.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2018 Nov;28(4):683-689

Department of Medical Imaging, Sutter Health, 1500 Expo Parkway, Sacramento, CA 95815, USA.

Stroke is a major health burden worldwide with attendant mortality, morbidity, and cost. In 2010, there were approximately 16.9 million strokes and an estimated 33 million stroke survivors worldwide. Read More

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November 2018
6 Reads

Reperfusion Changes After Stroke and Practical Approaches for Neuroprotection.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2018 Nov;28(4):663-682

Center for Unruptured Brain Aneurysms, Neurological Surgery PC, 1991 Marcus Avenue, Suite 108, Lake Success, NY 11042, USA; Hybernia Medical LLC, 626 RexCorp Plaza, Uniondale, NY 11556, USA.

Reperfusion is the first line of care in a growing number of eligible acute ischemic stroke patients. Early reperfusion with thrombolytic drugs and endovascular mechanical devices is associated with improved outcome and lower mortality rates compared with natural history. Reperfusion is not without risk, however, and may result in reperfusion injury, which manifests in hemorrhagic transformation, brain edema, infarct progression, and neurologic worsening. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nic.2018.06.008DOI Listing
November 2018

What to Look for on Post-stroke Neuroimaging.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2018 Nov 15;28(4):649-662. Epub 2018 Sep 15.

NeuroCritical Care Service, Neurosciences Intensive Care Unit, Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Henry Ford Hospital, K-11, 2799 West Grand Boulevard, Detroit, MI 48202, USA. Electronic address:

The most feared complication after acute ischemic stroke is symptomatic or asymptomatic hemorrhagic conversion. Neuroimaging and clinical criteria are used to predict development of hemorrhage. Seizures after acute ischemic stroke or stroke-like symptoms from seizures are not common but may lead to confusion in the peristroke period, especially if seizures are repetitive or evolve into status epilepticus, which could affect neuroimaging findings. Read More

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November 2018
9 Reads

Noninterventional Treatment Options for Stroke.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2018 Nov;28(4):639-648

Doris & Stanley Tananbaum Stroke Center, Neurological Institute of New York, Columbia University Medical Center, 710 West 168th Street, New York, NY 10032, USA.

Given the need for early restoration of blood flow and preservation of partially damaged brain cells after ischemic stroke, the noninterventional treatment of stroke relies heavily on the speedy recognition and classification of the clinical syndrome. Initiation of systemic thrombolysis with careful observation of contraindications within the 3.0 (4. Read More

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November 2018
1 Read

Neuro-Interventional Management of Acute Ischemic Stroke.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2018 Nov;28(4):625-638

Interventional Neuroradiology and Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Huntington Memorial Hospital, 100 West California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91105, USA.

Restoration of cerebral blood flow is the most important step in preventing irreversible damage to hypoperfused brain cells after ischemic stroke from large-vessel occlusion. For those patients who do not respond to (or are not eligible for) intravenous thrombolysis, endovascular therapy has become standard of care. A shift is currently taking place from rigid time windows for intervention (time is brain) to physiology-driven paradigms that rely heavily on neuroimaging. Read More

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November 2018
13 Reads

Clot Pathophysiology: Why Is It Clinically Important?

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2018 Nov 15;28(4):611-623. Epub 2018 Sep 15.

Laboratory for Thrombosis Research, KU Leuven Campus Kulak Kortrijk, E. Sabbelaan 53, 8500 Kortrijk, Belgium.

Cerebral ischemic stroke treatment may change significantly now that clots are actually physically removed from the patient using thrombectomy. This allows for an analysis of the content of the clots as well as the correlation of the imaging findings and the clot behavior and morphology. This article illustrates how the interaction of different clots varies in the clinical setting and how analysis of clot composition, as well as the search for new pharmacologic targets, can lead to a better understanding of the pathophysiology and therapy resistance, in turn providing possibilities for a better approach in the treatment. Read More

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November 2018
8 Reads

Oligemia, Penumbra, Infarction: Understanding Hypoperfusion with Neuroimaging.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2018 Nov;28(4):599-609

Department of Radiology, University of Washington, 1959 Northeast Pacific Street, Room NW011, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. Electronic address:

Despite recent progress in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke with multiple trials demonstrating improved clinical outcome associated with endovascular thrombectomy up to 24 hours after onset, there is potential opportunity for optimal patient selection and treatment algorithm to further improve treatment outcome. Current limitation is in part caused by inconsistency of imaging protocols and imaging-based definitions of oligemia, penumbra, and infarction core within the various hypoperfusion states. To truly maximize the impact of imaging in acute ischemic stroke, imaging definitions of hypoperfusion states need to be more consistent and validated to correctly reflect different severities of ischemic injury. Read More

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November 2018
11 Reads

Advanced Neuroimaging of Acute Ischemic Stroke: Penumbra and Collateral Assessment.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2018 Nov 15;28(4):585-597. Epub 2018 Sep 15.

Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroimaging and Neurointervention, Stanford Healthcare, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.

Acute ischemic stroke (AIS) occurs when there is a sudden loss in cerebral blood flow due to embolic or thromboembolic occlusion of a cerebral or cervical artery. Patients with AIS require emergent neuroimaging to guide treatment, which includes intravenous thrombolysis and endovascular mechanical thrombectomy (EMT). Recent advances in AIS treatment by EMT has been driven in part by advances in computed tomography (CT) and MR imaging neuroimaging evaluation of ischemic penumbra and pial collateral vessels. Read More

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November 2018
7 Reads

MR Imaging Selection of Acute Stroke Patients with Emergent Large Vessel Occlusions for Thrombectomy.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2018 Nov 15;28(4):573-584. Epub 2018 Sep 15.

Neuroradiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Gray 241 MGH, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114, USA. Electronic address:

Acute stroke caused by large vessel occlusions (LVOs) are common. The time window to treat is up to 24 hours, and the most important factor is the size of the ischemic core. If the core is small (<70-100 mL), the penumbra must be large; penumbral imaging is unnecessary. Read More

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November 2018

Computed Tomography, Computed Tomography Angiography, and Perfusion Computed Tomography Evaluation of Acute Ischemic Stroke.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2018 Nov 15;28(4):565-572. Epub 2018 Sep 15.

Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. Electronic address:

This review outlines the current role of the individual components of multimodal computed tomography (computed tomography, computed tomography angiography, and perfusion computed tomography) in the evaluation of patients with acute ischemic stroke. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nic.2018.06.002DOI Listing
November 2018

Telestroke.

Authors:
Nina J Solenski

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2018 Nov;28(4):551-563

Department of Neurology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, University of Virginia Health System, PO Box 800394, Hospital Drive, Charlottesville, VA 22908, USA. Electronic address:

Teleradiology, transfer of radiology images to a distant diagnostician, has existed for more than 50 years and is a fundamental element in telestroke programs. Teleradiology allows access to expertise for accurate and rapid interpretation of noncontrast CT (NCCT) scans to distinguish ischemic stroke from hemorrhagic stroke. No acute stroke thrombolytic or clot retrieval treatment decision can be made without it. Read More

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November 2018
4 Reads

Clinical Distinction of Cerebral Ischemia and Triaging of Patients in the Emergency Department: Mimics, Wake-ups, Late Strokes, and Chameleons.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2018 Nov;28(4):537-549

Department of Neurology, Loyola University Chicago, Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Medical Center, 2160 South First Avenue, Building 105, Room 2700, Maywood, IL 60153, USA.

Non-stroke conditions may present in ways suggestive of ischemic stroke (ie, stroke mimic). Alternatively, the clinical presentation of ischemic stroke can vary considerably and may appear similar to another condition (ie, stroke chameleon). Common and uncommon mimics and chameleons are presented with discussion of key considerations to improve diagnostic accuracy. Read More

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November 2018
6 Reads

Emergent Neuroimaging: A Patient-Focused Approach.

Authors:
Diego B Nunez

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2018 08;28(3):xvii

Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nic.2018.05.001DOI Listing
August 2018
3 Reads

Emergent Neuroimaging: A Patient-Focused Approach.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2018 08 8;28(3):xv. Epub 2018 Jun 8.

Department of Radiology, Michigan State University, Michigan State University Health Team, 846 Service Road, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nic.2018.05.002DOI Listing
August 2018
4 Reads

Radiation Dose Considerations in Emergent Neuroimaging.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2018 Aug;28(3):525-536

Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address:

Computed tomography is often the first-line diagnostic imaging modality in the evaluation of patients with neurologic emergencies. A patient-centered approach to radiation dose management in emergent neuroimaging thus revolves around the appropriate use of computed tomography, including clinical decision support for ordering providers, thoughtful protocol design, the use of available technological advances in computed tomography, and radiation exposure monitoring at a population level. A multifaceted approach can help to minimize radiation exposure to individual patients while preserving diagnostic quality imaging. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nic.2018.03.010DOI Listing
August 2018
5 Reads

The Imaging of Maxillofacial Trauma 2017.

Authors:
Mark P Bernstein

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2018 Aug 8;28(3):509-524. Epub 2018 Jun 8.

Department of Radiology, New York University Langone Health, Bellevue Hospital and Trauma Center, 550 First Avenue, New York, NY 10016, USA. Electronic address:

Maxillofacial injuries account for a large portion of emergency department visits and often result in surgical consultation. Although many of the principles of fracture detection and repair are basic, the evolution of technology and therapeutic strategies has led to improved patient outcomes. This article aims to provide a clinical review of imaging aspects involved in maxillofacial trauma and to delineate its relevance to patient management. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nic.2018.03.013DOI Listing
August 2018
5 Reads

Blunt Craniocervical Trauma: Does the Patient Have a Cerebral Vascular Injury?

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2018 Aug;28(3):495-507

Department of Radiology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Jackson Memorial Hospital, Ryder Trauma Center, University of Miami Hospital, 1611 Northwest 12th Avenue, WW-279, Miami, FL 33136, USA. Electronic address:

Blunt cerebrovascular injury involves injury to the carotid and/or vertebral arteries sustained via generalized multitrauma or directed blunt craniocervical trauma. Stroke remains the most consequential outcome. Timely diagnosis and initiation of treatment before the development of neurologic complications has a well-established role in decreasing morbidity and mortality. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nic.2018.03.011DOI Listing
August 2018
16 Reads

Current Challenges in the Use of Computed Tomography and MR Imaging in Suspected Cervical Spine Trauma.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2018 Aug 8;28(3):483-493. Epub 2018 Jun 8.

Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Yale University School of Medicine, 333 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT 06510, USA.

There is controversy regarding the optimal imaging strategy in adult blunt trauma patients for suspected cervical spine trauma. Some investigators recommend negative computed tomography (CT) alone to clear the cervical spine in adult blunt trauma patients, while others insist that MR imaging is necessary, especially among obtunded adult blunt trauma patients. CT is an excellent imaging modality for bony cervical spine injury; however, there is a nonzero rate of clinically significant cervical spine injuries missed on CT. Read More

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August 2018
5 Reads

Head and Neck Injuries: Special Considerations in the Elderly Patient.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2018 Aug 8;28(3):471-481. Epub 2018 Jun 8.

Emergency Radiology and Neuroradiology Divisions, Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

Traumatic injuries to the head and neck are common in the elderly, which is a rapidly growing sector of the American population. Most injuries result from low-energy falls and therefore might be at risk for delayed presentation and undertriage. Imaging, particularly with computed tomography, plays a vital role in the evaluation of traumatic head and neck injuries in geriatric patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nic.2018.03.008DOI Listing
August 2018
11 Reads

Neurologic Emergencies in Pediatric Patients Including Accidental and Nonaccidental Trauma.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2018 Aug;28(3):453-470

Department of Radiology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Jackson Memorial Hospital, 1611 Northwest 12th Avenue, Suite WW279, Miami, FL 33136, USA.

This article summarizes common neurologic emergencies presenting in pediatric patients. Imaging techniques and appearances of specific conditions are detailed, including pearls and pitfalls for each presentation. Specific attention is given to differential diagnoses that can serve as mimickers of pediatric neurologic emergencies. Read More

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August 2018
19 Reads

Imaging the Unconscious "Found Down" Patient in the Emergency Department.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2018 Aug 8;28(3):435-451. Epub 2018 Jun 8.

Department of Radiology, University of Ottawa, The Ottawa Hospital, Civic and General Campus, 1053 Carling Avenue, Ottawa, ON K1Y 4E9, Canada.

Unconsciousness may be due to severe brain damage or to potentially reversible causes. Noncontrast head computed tomography (CT) helps identify acute ischemic and hemorrhagic lesions as well as certain patterns of toxic encephalopathy. MR imaging plays an important role in the assessment of acutely encephalopathic patients who may show no significant abnormality on CT. Read More

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August 2018
5 Reads

Emergent Neuroimaging During Pregnancy and the Postpartum Period.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2018 Aug;28(3):419-433

Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Yale Diagnostic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, 20 York Street, PO Box 208042, New Haven, CT 06520-8042, USA. Electronic address:

Acute neurologic emergencies in pregnancy often require neuroimaging to guide diagnosis and treatment. Implementation of a patient-centered care model in radiology can alleviate a patient's stress, reinforce appropriate imaging workup, improve patient satisfaction, and lead to improved outcomes. The authors present the evaluation, differential diagnosis, and recommended imaging protocols for the three most common acute neurologic symptoms in pregnancy and the postpartum period: headache, seizure, and focal neurologic deficits. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nic.2018.03.005DOI Listing
August 2018
8 Reads

Emergent Neuroimaging in the Oncologic and Immunosuppressed Patient.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2018 Aug;28(3):397-417

Neuroradiology Division, Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

Neuroimaging in the emergency department increasingly involves patients at increased risk for acute neurologic complications from malignancy and immunosuppression, including patients with organ transplantation, diabetes mellitus, treatment of chronic disease, and HIV positivity. These patients are susceptible to the same infections and emergencies as immunocompetent patients, but may present differently with common illnesses and are susceptible to a variety of other diseases. This article reviews important patient risk factors, emergent central nervous system abnormalities, and their imaging findings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nic.2018.03.004DOI Listing
August 2018
8 Reads

Acute Neurologic Syndromes Beyond Stroke: The Role of Emergent MR Imaging.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2018 Aug 8;28(3):375-395. Epub 2018 Jun 8.

Department of Radiology, Boston University Medical Center, 820 Harrison Avenue, FGH Building, 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02118, USA. Electronic address:

MR imaging with diffusion-weighted imaging has been essential in the evaluation of acute stroke but is also crucial for the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up in patients with various nonischemic disorders, including infectious processes, trauma, toxic/metabolic disorders, and other abnormalities. This article reviews various disorders with diffusion abnormality that can be commonly seen in the emergency setting. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nic.2018.03.012DOI Listing
August 2018
22 Reads
1.290 Impact Factor

Approach to Imaging in Patients with Spontaneous Intracranial Hemorrhage.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2018 Aug 8;28(3):353-374. Epub 2018 Jun 8.

Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3808, Durham, NC 27710, USA.

Spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage is a commonly encountered neurologic emergency. Imaging plays important roles in both guiding the emergent stabilization of patients with ICH and in elucidating the etiology of the hemorrhage to prevent rebleeding. A thorough understanding of the factors that have an impact on immediate management, the causes of hemorrhage, and the strengths of various imaging techniques in addressing these 2 concerns is vital to crafting a patient-centered approach to this condition. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nic.2018.03.003DOI Listing
August 2018
13 Reads

The Patient with Thunderclap Headache.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2018 Aug 8;28(3):335-351. Epub 2018 Jun 8.

Department of Radiology, The Imaging Clinical Effectiveness and Outcomes Research, Northwell Health, NSUH, 300 Community Drive, Manhasset, NY 11030, USA.

Thunderclap headache is a common presentation in the emergency department and, although multiple causes have been described, subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is the primary concern and early diagnosis is critical. CT is highly sensitive if performed within 6 hours of onset. Patients with aneurysmal or perimesencephalic SAH should be evaluated with CT angiography. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nic.2018.03.002DOI Listing
August 2018
13 Reads

The Adult Patient with Acute Neurologic Deficit: An Update on Imaging Trends.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2018 Aug 8;28(3):319-334. Epub 2018 Jun 8.

Division of Emergency Radiology, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 55 Fruit Street, Blake SB Room 29A, Boston, MA 02114, USA.

Stroke is the clinical syndrome of abrupt onset of acute neurologic deficit owing to decreased oxygen delivery to the brain, resulting in ischemia or infarction. Approximately 87% of strokes are ischemic and 13% are hemorrhagic. Improved awareness of the neuroimaging findings highlighted in recent stroke clinical trials, as well as of their role in patient selection for novel treatment options-including "late window" (8-24 hours post-ictus!) intraarterial thrombectomy-has become increasingly important. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nic.2018.03.001DOI Listing
August 2018
9 Reads

State-of-the-Art Imaging of Salivary Glands Disorders.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2018 05;28(2):xiii

Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Mansoura University, Elgomheryia Street, Mansoura 35512, Egypt. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nic.2018.02.001DOI Listing
May 2018
2 Reads
1.290 Impact Factor

Imaging of Salivary Glands.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2018 05 21;28(2):xi. Epub 2018 Feb 21.

Department of Radiology, Michigan State University, Michigan State University Health Team, 846 Service Road, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nic.2018.02.002DOI Listing
May 2018
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State-of-the-Art Imaging of Salivary Gland Tumors.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2018 May;28(2):303-317

Department of Radiology, Michigan State University, Michigan State University Health Team, 846 Service Road, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA.

MR imaging is the modality of choice in evaluation of salivary gland tumors. Postcontrast MR imaging is adequate for exact localization and extension of salivary gland tumors and multiparametric of diffusion-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging helps in characterization of benign and malignant salivary gland tumors. Imaging is important for preoperative localization, characterization of salivary gland tumors and locoregional extension, perineural spread, and nodal and distant staging of malignant salivary gland tumors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nic.2018.01.009DOI Listing
May 2018
15 Reads
1.290 Impact Factor

Imaging of Minor Salivary Glands.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2018 May;28(2):295-302

Department of Radiology, Michigan State University, Michigan State University Health Team, 846 Service Road, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA.

Neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions may involve the minor salivary glands. Tumors of minor salivary glands are commonly seen in the oral cavity. Malignant tumors are more common than benign minor salivary gland tumors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nic.2018.01.008DOI Listing
May 2018
9 Reads
1.290 Impact Factor

Routine and Advanced Ultrasound of Major Salivary Glands.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2018 May;28(2):273-293

Department of Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Prince of Wales Hospital, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Ngan Shing Street, Sha Tin, Hong Kong.

Ultrasound is the preferred initial imaging modality in Europe and Asia for assessing the major salivary glands. In experienced hands, it is sensitive for a range of salivary pathologies, often diagnostic, and also a safe, cost-effective gatekeeper for further investigations as well as image-guided diagnostic biopsies and aspirations. This article reviews the scanning technique and normal sonographic anatomy of major salivary glands and overviews typical sonographic appearances of salivary pathologies, including infective and inflammatory conditions, sialolithiasis, and neoplasms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nic.2018.01.007DOI Listing
May 2018
5 Reads