2,653 results match your criteria Neurobiology of Learning and Memory [Journal]


Differential Effects of Unipolar versus Bipolar Depression on Episodic Memory Updating.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Apr 17. Epub 2019 Apr 17.

National Center for Biological Sciences, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Bangalore 560065, India; Centre for Brain Development and Repair, Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Bangalore 560065, India; Centre for Discovery Brain Sciences, Deanery of Biomedical Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Hugh Robson Building, 15 George Square, Edinburgh EH89XD, UK.

Episodic memories, when reactivated, can be modified or updated by new learning. Since such dynamic memory processes remain largely unexplored in psychiatric disorders, we examined the impact of depression on episodic memory updating. Unipolar and bipolar depression patients, and age/education matched controls, first learned a set of objects (List-1). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2019.04.008DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Broad domains of histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation are associated with transcriptional activation in CA1 neurons of the hippocampus during memory formation.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Apr 16;161:149-157. Epub 2019 Apr 16.

Vanderbilt Brain Institute, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA. Electronic address:

Transcriptional changes in the hippocampus are required for memory formation, and these changes are regulated by numerous post-translational modifications of chromatin-associated proteins. One of the epigenetic marks that has been implicated in memory formation is histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3), and this modification is found at the promoters of actively transcribed genes. The total levels of H3K4me3 are increased in the CA1 region of the hippocampus during memory formation, and genetic perturbation of the K4 methyltransferases and demethylases interferes with forming memories. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2019.04.009DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

The ELAV family of RNA-binding proteins in synaptic plasticity and long-term memory.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Apr 15;161:143-148. Epub 2019 Apr 15.

Center for Neural Science, New York University, New York, NY 10003, USA. Electronic address:

The mechanisms of de novo gene expression and translation of specific gene transcripts have long been known to support long-lasting changes in synaptic plasticity and behavioral long-term memory. In recent years, it has become increasingly apparent that gene expression is heavily regulated not only on the level of transcription, but also through post-transcriptional gene regulation, which governs the subcellular localization, stability, and likelihood of translation of mRNAs. Specific families of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) bind transcripts which contain AU-rich elements (AREs) within their 3' UTR and thereby govern their downstream fate. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2019.04.007DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Hippocampal Arc protein expression and conditioned fear.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Apr 13. Epub 2019 Apr 13.

Rutgers University.

Arc (Activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein) is an effector neuronal immediate-early gene (IEG) and has been closely linked to behaviorally-induced neuronal plasticity. The present studies examined the regionally-selective, dissociable patterns of Arc expression induced by Pavlovian trace fear conditioning, delay fear conditioning, and contextual fear conditioning as well as novel context exposure. This research was guided by anatomical studies identifying heterogeneity of connectivity across the transverse (CA1, CA3) and septo-temporal (dorsal vs. Read More

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April 2019
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Sleep preferentially enhances memory for a cognitive strategy but not the implicit motor skills used to acquire it.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Apr 12;161:135-142. Epub 2019 Apr 12.

School of Psychology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada; The Brain and Mind Institute, Western University, London, Canada; Sleep Unit, The Royal's Institute for Mental Health Research, Ottawa, Canada; University of Ottawa Brain and Mind Institute, Ottawa, Canada; Department of Psychology, Western University, London, Canada. Electronic address:

Sleep is known to be beneficial to the strengthening of two distinct forms of procedural memory: memory for novel, cognitively simple series of motor movements, and memory for novel, cognitively complex strategies required to solve problems. However, these two types of memory are intertwined, since learning a new cognitive procedural strategy occurs through practice, and thereby also requires the execution of a series of simple motor movements. As a result, it is unclear whether the benefit of sleep results from the enhancement of the cognitive strategy, or the motor skills required to execute the solution. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2019.04.005DOI Listing

The effect of transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation on fear generalization and subsequent fear extinction.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Apr 12. Epub 2019 Apr 12.

Institute of Psychology, Leiden University, Wassenaarseweg 52, 2333 AK Leiden, The Netherlands.

Fear overgeneralization is thought to be one of the cardinal processes underlying anxiety disorders, and a determinant of the onset, maintenance and recurrence of these disorders. Animal studies have shown that stimulating the vagus nerve (VNS) affects neuronal pathways implicated in pattern separation and completion, suggesting it may reduce the generalization of a fear memory to novel situations. In a one-day study, 58 healthy students were subjected to a fear conditioning, fear generalization, and fear extinction paradigm. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2019.04.006DOI Listing

Hippocampal functional organization: A microstructure of the place cell network encoding space.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Apr 6;161:122-134. Epub 2019 Apr 6.

The Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10065, USA.

A clue to hippocampal function has been the discovery of place cells, leading to the 'spatial map' theory. Although the firing attributes of place cells are well documented, little is known about the organization of the spatial map. Unit recording studies, thus far, have reported a low coherence between neighboring cells and geometric space, leading to the prevalent view that the spatial map is not topographically organized. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2019.03.010DOI Listing

Disrupting the hippocampal Piwi pathway enhances contextual fear memory in mice.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Apr 6. Epub 2019 Apr 6.

Cognitive Neuroepigenetics Laboratory, Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072, Australia. Electronic address:

The Piwi pathway is a conserved gene regulatory mechanism comprised of Piwi-like proteins and Piwi-interacting RNAs, which modulates gene expression via RNA interference and through interaction with epigenetic mechanisms. The mammalian Piwi pathway has been defined by its role in transposon control during spermatogenesis; however, despite an increasing number of studies demonstrating its expression in the nervous system, relatively little is known about its function in neurons or potential contribution to behavioural regulation. We have discovered that all three Piwi-like genes are expressed in the adult mouse brain, and that viral-mediated knockdown of the Piwi-like genes Piwil1 and Piwil2 in the dorsal hippocampus leads to enhanced contextual fear memory without affecting generalised anxiety. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2019.04.002DOI Listing

Female mice with apolipoprotein E4 domain interaction demonstrated impairments in spatial learning and memory performance and disruption of hippocampal cyto-architecture.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Apr 4;161:106-114. Epub 2019 Apr 4.

Department of Pathology, University Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS 39216, United States; Program in Neuroscience, University Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS 39216, United States; Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, University Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS 39216, United States; Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS 39216, United States; Memory Impairment and Neurodegenerative Dementia Center, University Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS 39216, United States. Electronic address:

We have previously reported cognitive impairments in both young and old mice, particularly in female mice expressing mouse Arg-61 apoE, with a point mutation to mimic the domain interaction feature of human apoE4, as compared to the wildtype mouse (C57BL/6J) apoE. In this study, we further evaluated water maze performance in the female Arg-61 mice at an additional time point and then investigated related hippocampal cyto-architecture in these young female Arg-61 apoE mice vs. the wildtype mice. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2019.03.012DOI Listing
April 2019
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Temporary inactivation of the medial prefrontal cortex impairs the formation, but not the retrieval of social odor recognition memory in rats.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Apr 3;161:115-121. Epub 2019 Apr 3.

Division of Behavioral Biology, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21224, United States.

The hippocampus, medial dorsal thalamus and the perirhinal and entorhinal cortices are essential for visual recognition memory whereas the neural substrates underlying olfactory recognition memories are less well characterized. In the present study we combined chemogenetic inactivation with a social odor recognition memory (SORM) task to test the hypothesis that the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is involved in recognition memory. We demonstrate that temporary chemogenetic inactivation of the mPFC prior to an encoding session impairs social odor recognition memory, whereas silencing the mPFC just prior to the recognition session was without effect. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2019.04.003DOI Listing
April 2019
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Aged rats with different performances at environmental enrichment onset display different modulation of habituation and aversive memory.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Apr 2;161:83-91. Epub 2019 Apr 2.

Center for Neurobiology of Aging, PST, IRCCS INRCA, Ancona, Italy; Section of Neuroscience and Cell Biology, Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy. Electronic address:

A wide agreement exists that environmental enrichment (EE) is most beneficial if introduced early in life, but numerous studies reported that also aged animals remain responsive. As age-related memory and cognition impairments are not uniform, an open question is whether EE might exert different effects in animals with different age-related deficits. A 12-week EE protocol was applied to late adult rats pretested for habituation and aversive memory. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2019.04.001DOI Listing
April 2019
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Neurobiological substrates of persistent working memory deficits and cocaine-seeking in the prelimbic cortex of rats with a history of extended access to cocaine self-administration.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Apr 1;161:92-105. Epub 2019 Apr 1.

Psychology Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA; Center for Addiction Research and Education (CARE) at University of Florida, USA. Electronic address:

Cocaine use disorder (CUD) is associated with prefrontal cortex dysfunction and cognitive deficits that may contribute to persistent relapse susceptibility. As the relationship between cognitive deficits, cortical abnormalities and drug seeking is poorly understood, development of relevant animal models is of high clinical importance. Here, we used an animal model to characterize working memory and reversal learning in rats with a history of extended access cocaine self-administration and prolonged abstinence. Read More

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April 2019
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A requirement for epigenetic modifications during noradrenergic stabilization of heterosynaptic LTP in the hippocampus.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Mar 28;161:72-82. Epub 2019 Mar 28.

Department of Physiology, University of Alberta School of Medicine, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2H7, Canada. Electronic address:

Beta-adrenergic receptor (b-AR) activation by noradrenaline (NA) enhances memory formation and long-term potentiation (LTP), a form of synaptic plasticity characterized by an activity-dependent increase in synaptic strength. LTP is believed to be a cellular mechanism for contextual learning and memory. In the mammalian hippocampus, LTP can be observed at multiple synaptic pathways after strong stimulation of a single synaptic pathway. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2019.03.008DOI Listing
March 2019
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The NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 fails to impair long-term recognition memory in mice when the state-dependency of memory is controlled.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Mar 19;161:57-62. Epub 2019 Mar 19.

Department of Psychology, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE, UK; Centre for Learning and Memory Processes, Durham University, Durham, UK. Electronic address:

NMDA receptor-dependent synaptic plasticity has been proposed to be important for encoding of memories. Consistent with this hypothesis, the non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801, has been found to impair performance on tests of memory. Interpretation of some of these findings has, however, been complicated by the fact that the drug-state of animals has differed during encoding and tests of memory. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2019.03.006DOI Listing
March 2019
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Pathway specific activation of ventral hippocampal cells projecting to the prelimbic cortex diminishes fear renewal.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Mar 18;161:63-71. Epub 2019 Mar 18.

Department of Biology, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78258, United States. Electronic address:

The ability to learn that a stimulus no longer signals danger is known as extinction. A major characteristic of extinction is that it is context-dependent, which means that fear reduction only occurs in the same context as extinction training. In other contexts, there is re-emergence of fear, known as contextual renewal. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2019.03.003DOI Listing
March 2019
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Effects of NMDA antagonist dizocilpine (MK-801) are modulated by the number of distractor stimuli in the rodent odor span task of working memory.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Mar 9;161:51-56. Epub 2019 Mar 9.

Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Wilmington, United States.

The rodent odor span task (OST) uses an incrementing non-matching to sample procedure in which a series of odors is presented and selection of the session-novel odor is reinforced. An OST is frequently used to test the effects of neurobiological variables on memory capacity as the number of odors to remember increases during the course of the session. In this regard, one important finding has been that NMDA receptor antagonists selectively impair OST performance at doses that spare accuracy on control tasks. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2019.03.004DOI Listing

Unexplored territory: Beneficial effects of novelty on memory.

Authors:
J Schomaker

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Mar 9;161:46-50. Epub 2019 Mar 9.

Section Health, Medical and Neuropsychology, Institute of Psychology, Leiden University, Leiden, the Netherlands. Electronic address:

Exploring novel environments enhances learning in animals. Due to differing traditions, research into the effects of spatial novelty on learning in humans is scarce. Recent developments of affordable and fMRI-compatible virtual reality (VR) and mobile EEG systems can help bridge the gap between the two literatures. Read More

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March 2019
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Estrous cycle stage gates sex differences in prefrontal muscarinic control of fear memory formation.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Mar 6;161:26-36. Epub 2019 Mar 6.

Department of Biomedical Sciences, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI 53233, USA. Electronic address:

The association of a sensory cue and an aversive footshock that are separated in time, as in trace fear conditioning, requires persistent activity in prelimbic cortex during the cue-shock interval. The activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors has been shown to facilitate persistent firing of cortical cells in response to brief stimulation, and muscarinic antagonists in the prefrontal cortex impair working memory. It is unknown, however, if the acquisition of associative trace fear conditioning is dependent on muscarinic signaling in the prefrontal cortex. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2019.03.001DOI Listing

Salubrinal offers neuroprotection through suppressing endoplasmic reticulum stress, autophagy and apoptosis in a mouse traumatic brain injury model.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Mar 6;161:12-25. Epub 2019 Mar 6.

Department of Forensic Medicine, Medical School of Soochow University, Suzhou 215123, China. Electronic address:

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a complex injury that can cause severe disabilities and even death. TBI can induce secondary injury cascades, including but not limited to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, apoptosis and autophagy. Although the investigators has previously shown that salubrinal, the selective phosphatase inhibitor of p-eIF2α, ameliorated neurologic deficits in murine TBI model, the neuroprotective mechanisms of salubrinal need further research to warrant the preclinical value. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2019.03.002DOI Listing
March 2019
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DREADD-mediated modulation of locus coeruleus inputs to mPFC improves strategy set-shifting.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Feb 22;161:1-11. Epub 2019 Feb 22.

Brain Health Institute, Rutgers University/Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences, 683 Hoes Lane West, Office 259A, Piscataway, NJ 08854, United States. Electronic address:

Appropriate modification of behavior in response to our dynamic environment is essential for adaptation and survival. This adaptability allows organisms to maximize the utility of behavior-related energy expenditure. Modern theories of locus coeruleus (LC) function implicate a pivotal role for the noradrenergic nucleus in mediating switches between focused behavior during periods of high utility (exploit) versus disengagement of behavior and exploration of other, more rewarding opportunities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2019.02.009DOI Listing
February 2019
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Home-cage hypoactivity in mouse genetic models of autism spectrum disorder.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Feb 20. Epub 2019 Feb 20.

Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, United States; Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Iowa Neuroscience Institute, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, United States. Electronic address:

Genome-wide association and whole exome sequencing studies from Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) patient populations have implicated numerous risk factor genes whose mutation or deletion results in significantly increased incidence of ASD. Behavioral studies of monogenic mutant mouse models of ASD-associated genes have been useful for identifying aberrant neural circuitry. However, behavioral results often differ from lab to lab, and studies incorporating both males and females are often not performed despite the significant sex-bias of ASD. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2019.02.010DOI Listing
February 2019
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The nuclear matrix protein Matr3 regulates processing of the synaptic microRNA-138-5p.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Mar 18;159:36-45. Epub 2019 Feb 18.

Institute of Physiological Chemistry, Philipps-University Marburg, Marburg, Germany. Electronic address:

microRNA-dependent post-transcriptional control represents an important gene-regulatory layer in post-mitotic neuronal development and synaptic plasticity. We recently identified the brain-enriched miR-138 as a negative regulator of dendritic spine morphogenesis in rat hippocampal neurons. A potential involvement of miR-138 in cognition is further supported by a recent GWAS study on memory performance in a cohort of aged (>60 years) individuals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2019.02.008DOI Listing

Arc reactivity in accumbens nucleus, amygdala and hippocampus differentiates cue over context responses during reactivation of opiate withdrawal memory.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Mar 13;159:24-35. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

Univ. Bordeaux, Institut de Neurosciences Cognitives et Intégratives d'Aquitaine, UMR 5287, F-33000 Bordeaux, France; CNRS, Institut de Neurosciences Cognitives et Intégratives d'Aquitaine, UMR 5287, F-33000 Bordeaux, France. Electronic address:

Opiate withdrawal induces an early aversive state which can be associated to contexts and/or cues, and re-exposure to either these contexts or cues may participate in craving and relapse. Nucleus accumbens (NAC), hippocampus (HPC) and basolateral amygdala (BLA) are crucial substrates for acute opiate withdrawal, and for withdrawal memory retrieval. Also HPC and BLA interacting with the NAC are suggested to respectively mediate the processing of context and cue representations of drug-related memories. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2019.02.007DOI Listing

Cerebellum and cognition: Does the rodent cerebellum participate in cognitive functions?

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Feb 13. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

Department of Psychological Science, University of Vermont, 2 Colchester Avenue, Burlington, VT 05405, USA. Electronic address:

There is a widespread, nearly complete consensus that the human and non-human primate cerebellum is engaged in non-motor, cognitive functions. This body of research has implicated the lateral portions of lobule VII (Crus I and Crus II) and the ventrolateral dentate nucleus. With rodents, however, it is not so clear. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2019.02.006DOI Listing
February 2019
6 Reads

After-effects of repetitive anodal transcranial direct current stimulation on learning and memory in a rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Feb 5;161:37-45. Epub 2019 Feb 5.

Bioengineering College of Chongqing University, Chongqing Engineering Research Center for Medical Electronics Technology, Chongqing 400030, China. Electronic address:

Repetitive anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in a rat model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been shown to have distinct neuroprotective effects. Moreover, the effects of anodal tDCS not only occur during the stimulation but also persist after the stimulation has ended (after-effects). Here, the duration of the after-effects induced by repetitive anodal tDCS was investigated based on our previous studies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2019.02.002DOI Listing
February 2019

Impaired cerebellar plasticity and eye-blink conditioning in calpain-1 knock-out mice.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Feb 5. Epub 2019 Feb 5.

Graduate College of Biomedical Sciences, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766, United States. Electronic address:

Calpain-1 and calpain-2 are involved in the regulation of several signaling pathways and neuronal functions in the brain. Our recent studies indicate that calpain-1 is required for hippocampal synaptic plasticity, including long-term depression (LTD) and long-term potentiation (LTP) in field CA1. However, little is known regarding the contributions of calpain-1 to cerebellar synaptic plasticity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2019.02.005DOI Listing
February 2019
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Effects of DNA methyltransferase inhibition on pattern separation performance in mice.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Mar 4;159:6-15. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, Maastricht University, Maastricht 6200 MD, the Netherlands. Electronic address:

Enhancement of synaptic plasticity through changes in neuronal gene expression is a prerequisite for improved cognitive performance. Moreover, several studies have shown that DNA methylation is able to affect the expression of (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2019.02.003DOI Listing
March 2019
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Performance of the trial-unique, delayed non-matching-to-location (TUNL) task depends on AMPA/Kainate, but not NMDA, ionotropic glutamate receptors in the rat posterior parietal cortex.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Mar 4;159:16-23. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Department of Anatomy, Physiology, and Pharmacology, University of Saskatchewan, 107 Wiggins Road, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5E5, Canada. Electronic address:

Working memory (WM), the capacity for short-term storage and manipulation of small quantities of information, depends on fronto-parietal circuits. However, the function of the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) in WM has gone relatively understudied in rodents. Recent evidence calls into question whether the PPC is necessary for all forms of WM. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2019.02.001DOI Listing
March 2019
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Epigenetics and memory: Emerging role of histone lysine methyltransferase G9a/GLP complex as bidirectional regulator of synaptic plasticity.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Mar 28;159:1-5. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Department of Physiology, 2 Medical Drive, MD9, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117593, Singapore; Neurobiology/Aging Programme, Life Sciences Institute, Centre for Life Sciences, 28 Medical Drive, Singapore 117456, Singapore. Electronic address:

Various epigenetic modifications, including histone lysine methylation, play an integral role in learning and memory. The importance of the histone lysine methyltransferase complex G9a/GLP and its associated histone H3 lysine K9 dimethylation in memory formation and cognition, has garnered the attention of researchers in the past decade. Recent studies feature G9a/GLP as the 'bidirectional regulator of synaptic plasticity', the neural correlate of memory. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2019.01.013DOI Listing
March 2019
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Mechanisms of sleep and circadian ontogeny through the lens of neurodevelopmental disorders.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Jan 19. Epub 2019 Jan 19.

Department of Neurology and F.M. Kirby Neurobiology Center, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, United States; Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, United States. Electronic address:

Sleep is a mysterious, developmentally regulated behavior fundamental for cognition in both adults and developing animals. A large number of studies offer a substantive body of evidence that demonstrates that the ontogeny of sleep architecture parallels brain development. Sleep deprivation impairs the consolidation of learned tasks into long-term memories and likely links sleep to the neural mechanisms underlying memory and its physiological roots in brain plasticity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2019.01.011DOI Listing
January 2019
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Stress-induced impairment in goal-directed instrumental behaviour is moderated by baseline working memory.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Feb 18;158:42-49. Epub 2019 Jan 18.

Faculty of Psychology and Neuroscience, Maastricht University, the Netherlands; Department of Medical and Clinical Psychology, Tilburg University, the Netherlands.

Acute stress has been found to impair goal-directed instrumental behaviour, a cognitively flexible behaviour that requires cognitive control. The current study aimed to investigate the role of individual differences in baseline and stress-induced changes in working memory (WM) on the shift to less goal-directed responding under stress. To this end, 112 healthy participants performed an instrumental learning task. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2019.01.010DOI Listing
February 2019
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Transient inactivation of the visual-associative nidopallium frontolaterale (NFL) impairs extinction learning and context encoding in pigeons.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Feb 18;158:50-59. Epub 2019 Jan 18.

Faculty for Psychology, Biopsychology, Institute for Cognitive Neuroscience, Ruhr University Bochum, Bochum, Germany.

Extinction learning is a fundamental learning process that enables organisms to continuously update knowledge about their ever-changing environment. When using visual cues as conditioned stimuli (CS), visual cortical areas of mammals are known to participate in extinction learning. The aim of the present study was to test whether similar processes can also be observed in birds. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2019.01.012DOI Listing
February 2019
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Glucocorticoid response to stress induction prior to learning is negatively related to subsequent motor memory consolidation.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Feb 10;158:32-41. Epub 2019 Jan 10.

KU Leuven, Department of Movement Sciences, Movement Control and Neuroplasticity Research Group, Leuven, Belgium; KU Leuven, Leuven Brain Institute, Leuven, Belgium. Electronic address:

Hippocampal activity during early motor sequence learning is critical to trigger subsequent sleep-related consolidation processes. Based on previous evidence that stress-induced cortisol release modulates hippocampal activity, the current study investigates whether exposure to stress prior to motor sequence learning influences the ensuing learning and overnight consolidation process. Seventy-four healthy young adults were exposed to a stressor (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2019.01.009DOI Listing
February 2019

Okadaic acid attenuates short-term and long-term synaptic plasticity of hippocampal dentate gyrus neurons in rats.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Feb 8;158:24-31. Epub 2019 Jan 8.

Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Ardabil University of Medical Sciences, Ardabil, Iran; Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697, USA. Electronic address:

Protein phosphorylation states have a pivotal role in regulation of synaptic plasticity and long-term modulation of synaptic transmission. Serine/threonine protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) and 2A (PP2A) have a critical effect on various regulatory mechanisms involved in synaptic plasticity, learning and memory. Okadaic acid (OKA), a potent inhibitor of PP1 and PP2A, reportedly leads to cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like pathology. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S10747427193000
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2019.01.007DOI Listing
February 2019
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Resistance, vulnerability and resilience: A review of the cognitive cerebellum in aging and neurodegenerative diseases.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Jan 7. Epub 2019 Jan 7.

University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, United States. Electronic address:

In the context of neurodegeneration and aging, the cerebellum is an enigma. Genetic markers of cellular aging in cerebellum accumulate more slowly than in the rest of the brain, and it generates unknown factors that may slow or even reverse neurodegenerative pathology in animal models of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Cerebellum shows increased activity in early AD and Parkinson's disease (PD), suggesting a compensatory function that may mitigate early symptoms of neurodegenerative pathophysiology. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2019.01.004DOI Listing
January 2019
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A role for N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) and mGluR3 in cognition.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Feb 7;158:9-13. Epub 2019 Jan 7.

Department of Biology, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, USA. Electronic address:

The peptide transmitter N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) and its receptor, the type 3 metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR3, GRM3), are prevalent and widely distributed in the mammalian nervous system. Drugs that inhibit the inactivation of synaptically released NAAG have procognitive activity in object recognition and other behavioral models. These inhibitors also reverse cognitive deficits in animal models of clinical disorders. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2019.01.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6397785PMC
February 2019
5 Reads

Post-encoding frontal theta activity predicts incidental memory in the reward context.

Authors:
Min Pu Rongjun Yu

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Feb 7;158:14-23. Epub 2019 Jan 7.

School of Psychology, Center for Studies of Psychological Application and Key Laboratory of Mental Health and Cognitive Science of Guangdong Province, South China Normal University, Guangzhou, China; Department of Psychology, National University of Singapore, Singapore. Electronic address:

Memories for daily events require that individuals integrate initial fragile traces of events over time. Recent evidence suggests that reward anticipation enhances memory performance and amplifies frontal theta activity for remembered items vs. forgotten items. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2019.01.008DOI Listing
February 2019
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No neuron is an island: Homeostatic plasticity and over-constraint in a neural circuit.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Jan 4. Epub 2019 Jan 4.

Center for Learning and Memory, and Department of Neuroscience, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, United States. Electronic address:

To support computation the activity of neurons must vary within a useful range, which highlights one potential value of homeostatic plasticity. The interconnectedness of the brain, however, introduces the possibility that combinations of homeostatic mechanisms can produce over-constraint in which not all set points can be satisfied. We use a simulation of the cerebellum to investigate the potential for such conflict and its consequences. Read More

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January 2019

Memory deficits in males and females long after subchronic immune challenge.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Feb 3;158:60-72. Epub 2019 Jan 3.

Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, United States. Electronic address:

Memory impairments and cognitive decline persist long after recovery from major illness or injury, and correlate with increased risk of later dementia. Here we developed a subchronic peripheral immune challenge model to examine delayed and persistent memory impairments in females and in males. We show that intermittent injections of either lipopolysaccharides or Poly I:C cause memory decline in both sexes that are evident eight weeks after the immune challenge. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2019.01.003DOI Listing
February 2019
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Misaligned core body temperature rhythms impact cognitive performance of hospital shift work nurses.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Jan 3. Epub 2019 Jan 3.

UAB School of Nursing, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA. Electronic address:

Circadian rhythms greatly influence 24-h variation in cognition in nearly all organisms, including humans. Circadian clock impairment and sleep disruption are detrimental to hippocampus-dependent memory and negatively influence the acquisition and recall of learned behaviors. The circadian clock can become out of sync with the environment during circadian misalignment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2019.01.002DOI Listing
January 2019
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Using acute stress to improve episodic memory: The critical role of contextual binding.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Feb 2;158:1-8. Epub 2019 Jan 2.

Department of Psychology, University of California, Davis, CA 95618, USA; Center for Mind and Brain, University of California, Davis, CA 95618, USA.

Previous research has shown that encountering a brief stressor shortly after learning can be beneficial for memory. Recent studies, however, have shown that post-encoding stress does not benefit all recently encoded memories, and an adequate theoretical account of these effects remains elusive. The current study tested a contextual binding account of post encoding stress by examining the effect of varying the context in which the stressor was experienced. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2019.01.001DOI Listing
February 2019
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Dorsal hippocampal damage disrupts the auditory context-dependent attenuation of taste neophobia in mice.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Jan 15;157:121-127. Epub 2018 Dec 15.

Department of Psychobiology, Institute of Neurosciences, Center for Biomedical Research (CIBM), University of Granada, Spain.

Rodents exhibit neophobia for novel tastes, demonstrated by an initial reluctance to drink novel-tasting, potentially-aversive solutions. Taste neophobia attenuates across days if the solution is not aversive, demonstrated by increased consumption as the solution becomes familiar. This attenuation of taste neophobia is context dependent, which has been demonstrated by maintained reluctance to drink the novel tasting solution if the subject has to drink it after being brought to a novel environment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2018.12.009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6389410PMC
January 2019

Coupling of autonomic and central events during sleep benefits declarative memory consolidation.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Jan 16;157:139-150. Epub 2018 Dec 16.

Department of Cognitive Sciences, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA. Electronic address:

While anatomical pathways between forebrain cognitive and brainstem autonomic nervous centers are well-defined, autonomic-central interactions during sleep and their contribution to waking performance are not understood. Here, we analyzed simultaneous central activity via electroencephalography (EEG) and autonomic heart beat-to-beat intervals (RR intervals) from electrocardiography (ECG) during wake and daytime sleep. We identified bursts of ECG activity that lasted 4-5 s and predominated in non-rapid-eye-movement sleep (NREM). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2018.12.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6425961PMC
January 2019

Effects of acute psychosocial stress on the neural correlates of episodic encoding: Item versus associative memory.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Jan 12;157:128-138. Epub 2018 Dec 12.

Saarland University, Germany.

Acute stress is known to modulate episodic memory, but little is known about the extent to, and the circumstances under, which stress affects encoding of item vs. inter-item associative information for words of different valences. Furthermore, the precise neuro-cognitive mechanisms underlying stress effects on episodic encoding in humans are largely unknown. Read More

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January 2019
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Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over parietal cortex improves associative memory.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Jan 13;157:114-120. Epub 2018 Dec 13.

Department of Neuroscience, Institute for Medical Research, University of Belgrade, Serbia.

Associative memory plays a key role in everyday functioning, but it declines with normal ageing as well as due to various pathological states and conditions, thus impairing quality of life. Associative memory enhancement via neurostimulation over frontal areas resulted in limited success, while posterior stimulation sites seemed to be more promising. We hypothesized that anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of parietal areas would lead to higher performance in associative memory due to high connectivity between posterior parietal cortex (PPC) and hippocampus. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2018.12.007DOI Listing
January 2019
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ADHD symptoms are associated with decreased activity of fast sleep spindles and poorer procedural overnight learning during adolescence.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Jan 12;157:106-113. Epub 2018 Dec 12.

Department of Psychology and Logopedics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki, Finland.

ADHD and its subclinical symptoms have been associated with both disturbed sleep and weakened overnight memory consolidation. As sleep spindle activity during NREM sleep plays a key role in both sleep maintenance and memory consolidation, we examined the association between subclinical ADHD symptoms and sleep spindle activity. Furthermore, we hypothesized that sleep spindle activity mediates the effect of ADHD symptoms on overnight learning outcome in a procedural memory task. Read More

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January 2019
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Higher sleep spindle activity is associated with fewer false memories in adolescent girls.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Jan 13;157:96-105. Epub 2018 Dec 13.

Department of Psychology and Logopedics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.

Background: Sleep facilitates the extraction of semantic regularities amongst newly encoded memories, which may also lead to increased false memories. We investigated sleep stage proportions and sleep spindles in the recollection of adolescents' false memories, and their potential sex-specific differences.

Methods: 196 adolescents (mean age 16. Read More

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January 2019
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Autophosphorylation of F-actin binding domain of CaMKIIβ is required for fear learning.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Jan 7;157:86-95. Epub 2018 Dec 7.

Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198, Japan; Department of Pharmacology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan; Brain and Body System Science Institute, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570, Japan; School of Life Science, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631, China. Electronic address:

CaMKII is a pivotal kinase that plays essential roles in synaptic plasticity. Apart from its signaling function, the structural function of CaMKII is becoming clear. CaMKII - F-actin interaction stabilizes actin cytoskeleton in a dendritic spine. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S10747427183027
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2018.12.003DOI Listing
January 2019
7 Reads

Genetic inactivation of hypoxia inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF-1α) in adult hippocampal progenitors impairs neurogenesis and pattern discrimination learning.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Jan 3;157:79-85. Epub 2018 Dec 3.

Department of Neurosciences, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM, United States. Electronic address:

HIF-1α is a hypoxia-inducible protein that regulates many cellular processes, including neural stem cell maintenance. Previous work demonstrated constitutive stabilization of HIF-1α in neural stem cells (NSCs) of the adult mouse subventricular zone (SVZ) and hippocampal subgranular zone (SGZ). Genetic inactivation of NSC-encoded HIF-1α in the adult SVZ results in gradual loss of NSCs, but whether HIF-1α is required for the maintenance of SGZ hippocampal progenitors and adult hippocampal neurogenesis has not been determined. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2018.12.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6389421PMC
January 2019
12 Reads

Enhancing effects of acute exposure to cannabis smoke on working memory performance.

Neurobiol Learn Mem 2019 Jan 3;157:151-162. Epub 2018 Dec 3.

Department of Psychiatry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA; Department of Neuroscience, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA; Center for Addiction Research and Education, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA; Department of Psychology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA. Electronic address:

Numerous preclinical studies show that acute cannabinoid administration impairs cognitive performance. Almost all of this research has employed cannabinoid injections, however, whereas smoking is the preferred route of cannabis administration in humans. The goal of these experiments was to systematically determine how acute exposure to cannabis smoke affects working memory performance in a rat model. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2018.12.001DOI Listing
January 2019
67 Reads