1,799 results match your criteria NeuroRehabilitation [Journal]


The association between temporal measures of swallowing with penetration and aspiration in patients with dysphagia: A meta-analysis.

NeuroRehabilitation 2019 Feb 9. Epub 2019 Feb 9.

Department of Speech-Language Pathology, Rehabilitation Sciences Institute, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Toronto.

Introduction: Temporal features of swallowing physiology vary with age in healthy normals and have the potential to impact swallow safety and efficiency in patients with dysphagia. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess the relation between temporal features of swallowing with penetration, aspiration and residue in adult patients with dysphagia regardless of etiology.

Methods: Operational definitions of relevant terms were defined a priori. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-182553DOI Listing
February 2019
6 Reads

Effect of vestibular rehabilitation on recovery rate and functioning improvement in patients with chronic unilateral vestibular hypofunction and bilateral vestibular hypofunction.

NeuroRehabilitation 2019 Feb 7. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

Department of Otolaryngology, County General and Veterans Hospital Vukovar, Vukovar, Croatia.

Background: The minimal number of studies have documented the impact of Vestibular rehabilitation (VR) on the recovery rate of patients with Chronic Unilateral Vestibular Hypofunction (CUVH) and Bilateral Vestibular Hypofunction (BVH).

Objectives: The goal of the study was to show and compare the impact of vestibular rehabilitation (VR) in patients with CUVH and BVH.

Methods: We analysed the data of 30 patients with CUVH and 20 with BVH treated with VR. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-182524DOI Listing
February 2019

A study into the feasibility of using HRV variables to guide treatment in patients with paroxystic sympathetic hyperactivity in a neurointensive step-down unit.

NeuroRehabilitation 2019 Feb 4. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Department of Intensive Care and Neurointensive Stepdown Unit, Elective Surgery Centre, Silkeborg Regional Hospital, Denmark.

Background: Patients suffering brain injury may experience paroxystic sympathetic hyperactivity, presenting diagnostic and therapeutic challenges in neurointensive rehabilitation. The syndrome has been modelled as peripheral and central excitatory:inhibitory ratios of autonomous nervous activity. Another model represents the symptoms as oscillations of the two components of the autonomous nervous system. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-182557DOI Listing
February 2019

Neuroplastic and motor behavioral changes after intermanual transfer training of non-dominant hand: A prospective fMRI study.

NeuroRehabilitation 2019 Feb 4. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Sports Movement Institute & Technology (SMIT) Lab, Department of Physical Therapy, Yonsei University, Wonju, Republic of Korea.

Background: Intermanual transfer of learning is an important movement basis for a keyboard and instrument playing movement. However, the issue of where neural plastic mechanism occurs in the brain after intermanual transfer training remains both controversial and unresolved.

Objective: The aim of present study is to investigate the neuroplastic mechanism associated with the interlimb transfer learning from non-dominant hand to dominant hand. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-182550DOI Listing
February 2019

The influence of postural deformities on neck function and pain in patients with Parkinson's disease.

NeuroRehabilitation 2019 Feb 4. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Department of Systems Medicine, University of Roma "Tor Vergata", Rome, Italy.

Background: Trunk alignment is thought to contribute to neck function. However, this common assumption is not clear in patients with Parkinson's disease (PwPD) suffering from different postural deformities such as: Pisa syndrome (PS), Camptocormia & Antecollis (C&A).

Objectives: to investigate the effect of different postural deformities including PS and C&A on neck function and pain in patient (PwPD). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-182505DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

The effects of balance and gait function on quality of life of stroke patients.

Authors:
Jin Park Tae-Ho Kim

NeuroRehabilitation 2019 Feb 2. Epub 2019 Feb 2.

Department of Physical Therapy, College of Rehabilitation Science, Daegu University, Gyeongsan, Republic of Korea.

Background: Stroke patients have a lower quality of life than other people.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of balance and gait function of stroke patients on their quality of life.

Methods: Twenty-seven subjects participated in the experiment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-182467DOI Listing
February 2019

Which interventions are useful for managing muscle spasticity in individuals who sustained traumatic brain injury? - A Cochrane Review summary with commentary.

Authors:
Sara Laxe

NeuroRehabilitation 2019 Jan 30. Epub 2019 Jan 30.

Brain Injury Unit of Fundación Institut Guttmann, Institut Universitari de Neurorehabilitació adscrit a la UAB, Badalona, Barcelona, Spain.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-189003DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Correlation of falls in patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis with objective measures of balance, strength, and spasticity.

NeuroRehabilitation 2019 Jan 29. Epub 2019 Jan 29.

School of Physical Therapy, Texas Woman's University, Houston, TX, USA.

Background: Persons diagnosed with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) often demonstrate neurological deficits that predispose them to repeated falls and associated adverse consequences. Determining contributing factors to falls in this population is critical to improve safety and patient outcomes.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to correlate clinical measures of gait speed, balance, strength, spasticity, and a self-reported rating scale of function with fall incidence in individuals with ALS. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-182531DOI Listing
January 2019
4 Reads

A stimulus for eating. The use of neuromuscular transcutaneous electrical stimulation in patients affected by severe dysphagia after subacute stroke: A pilot randomized controlled trial.

NeuroRehabilitation 2019 Jan 29. Epub 2019 Jan 29.

Clinical Laboratory of Experimental Neurorehabilitation, I.R.C.C.S. Santa Lucia Foundation, Rome, Italy.

Background: Oropharyngeal dysphagia is a common problem in subacute stroke patients leading to aspiration pneumonia and malnutrition. Non-invasive neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) coupled with traditional therapy could be best treatment option for patients with post-stroke dysphagia, however results are still inconclusive and more studies are requested.

Objective: The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of laryngopharyngeal neuromuscular electrical stimulation on dysphagia caused by stroke. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-182526DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Immediate effects of a single treadmill session with additional ankle loading on gait in children with hemiparetic cerebral palsy.

NeuroRehabilitation 2019 Jan 29. Epub 2019 Jan 29.

Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, Brazil.

Background: Children with hemiparetic cerebral palsy are often characterized by reduced speed progression, shorter step length, and increased support base. These kinematic alterations result in inefficient gait.

Objective: To assess the immediate effects of treadmill training with additional lower limb loading on kinematic gait parameters in children with Cerebral Palsy (CP). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-182516DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Magnetoencephalographic evaluation for the myoelectric hand prosthesis with tacit learning system.

NeuroRehabilitation 2019 Jan 29. Epub 2019 Jan 29.

Department of Hand Surgery, Nagoya University School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan.

Background: The effect of tacit learning systems (TLSs) on brain plasticity are as of yet unknown. We developed a myoelectric hand prosthesis equipped with a TLS to auto-regulate forearm rotation in response to upper extremity movement patterns.

Objective: To evaluate the effects of tacit learning on the central nervous system during a prosthesis control exercise. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-182514DOI Listing
January 2019

A follow-up study on the long-term effects of rehabilitation in children with autism spectrum disorders.

NeuroRehabilitation 2019 Jan 29. Epub 2019 Jan 29.

Department of Child Healthcare, Wuxi Children's Hospital, Wuxi, Jiangsu, P.R. China.

Background: OBJECTIVE:This study aimed to investigate the effects of long-term rehabilitation and related factors affecting the recovery of autistic children.

Methods: A total of 137 autistic children were followed up for 3 years. They received two neuropsychological assessments at the first visit and 3 years after referral. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-182502DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

The utility of clinical criteria in patients with chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

NeuroRehabilitation 2018 ;43(4):431-441

Department of Neurology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

Background: Repetitive traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by Alzheimer-like changes in the brain. CTE has been defined through neuropathological findings among deceased athletes and others exposed to repetitive TBI, but to date there are no definitive clinical criteria for CTE.

Objective: To evaluate the utility of currently proposed clinical criteria for CTE and suggest improvements. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-182452DOI Listing
January 2018
22 Reads

Dysphagia in cerebral hypoxia.

NeuroRehabilitation 2018 ;43(4):387-393

Department of Neurology, Hochzirl Hospital, Zirl, Austria.

Introduction: Dysphagia is a frequent problem in various neurological disorders. However, knowledge on swallowing function in patients with cerebral hypoxia is sparse. The objective of this study is to report the development of swallowing function in a series of adolescent and young-adult patients with cerebral hypoxia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-182437DOI Listing
January 2018
10 Reads

Cognitive rehabilitation, self-management, psychotherapeutic and caregiver support interventions in progressive neurodegenerative conditions: A scoping review.

NeuroRehabilitation 2018 ;43(4):443-471

PenCLAHRC, University of Exeter Medical School, Exeter, UK.

Background: Despite its potentially significant impact, cognitive disability may be overlooked in a number of progressive neurodegenerative conditions, as other difficulties dominate the clinical picture.

Objective: We examined the extent, nature and range of the research evidence relating to cognitive rehabilitation, self-management, psychotherapeutic and caregiver support interventions in Parkinsonian disorders, multiple sclerosis (MS), frontotemporal dementias (FTD), motor neuron disease and Huntington's disease.

Methods: Scoping review based on searches of MEDLINE and CINAHL up to 15 March 2016. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-172353DOI Listing
January 2018
11 Reads

Immediate effect of kinesio taping on knee extensor torque of children with Cerebral Palsy: Three case reports.

NeuroRehabilitation 2018 ;43(4):519-523

Department of Physiotherapy, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos-SP, Brazil.

Background: Kinesiotaping (KT) has been commonly used in clinical setting. However, beneficial KT effects have not been proved yet.

Objective: We aimed to verify the effects of KT in knee extensor torque in children with CP. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-161921DOI Listing
January 2018
20 Reads

Energetic cost of walking and spasticity in persons with multiple sclerosis with moderate disability.

NeuroRehabilitation 2018 ;43(4):483-489

Department of Physical Therapy, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA.

Background: The energetic cost of walking (Cw) is elevated in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS). This may be explained by spasticity and spatiotemporal parameters of gait.

Objective: To examine the associations among Cw, spasticity of ankle plantarflexors, and spatiotemporal gait parameters in persons with MS who had moderate disability. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-182498DOI Listing
January 2018
5 Reads

Treadmill exercise training could attenuate the upregulation of Interleukin-1 beta and tumor necrosis factor alpha in the skeletal muscle of mouse model of chronic/progressive Parkinson disease.

NeuroRehabilitation 2018 ;43(4):501-507

Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan.

Background: Induction of Parkinson disease (PD) causes interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) upregulation in gastrocnemius skeletal muscles. Endurance exercise suppresses iNOS and HSP90 overexpression in PD skeletal muscle. The purpose of this study is to test the impact of treadmill exercise training on PD-associated IL-1β and TNF-α upregulation in the gastrocnemius muscle. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-182492DOI Listing
January 2018
5 Reads

The development and pilot evaluation of virtual reality balance scenarios in people with multiple sclerosis (MS): A feasibility study.

NeuroRehabilitation 2018 ;43(4):473-482

Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, Irbid, Jordan.

Background: Balance deficits are considered a risk factor for falls in MS patients. Therefore, developing innovative approaches such as virtual reality (VR) to improve balance in MS is required.

Objectives: The aims of this study were to develop and evaluate feasibility and acceptability of VR scenarios that target balance in MS using a pilot trial. Read More

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https://www.researchgate.net/publication/10971015_The_method
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-182471DOI Listing
January 2018
11 Reads

Dose-response relationship of transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation in healthy humans: A proof of concept study.

NeuroRehabilitation 2018 ;43(4):369-376

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA.

Background: Non-invasive transcranial direct current stimulation has been shown to modulate cortical excitability in various studies. Similarly, recent preliminary studies suggest that transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation (tsDCS) may engender a modulation effect on spinal and cortical neurons.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dose-response effects of tsDCS in healthy subjects and thereby lay groundwork for expanding treatment options for patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-182469DOI Listing
January 2018

Improving gait and lower-limb muscle strength in children with cerebral palsy following Selective Percutaneous Myofascial Lengthening and functional physiotherapy.

NeuroRehabilitation 2018 ;43(4):361-368

Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece.

Background: Selective Percutaneous Myofascial Lengthening (SPML) is an innovative minimally invasive surgical procedure, using micro incisions often combined with alcohol nerve block, for managing muscle contractures and stiffness in children with cerebral palsy (CP). There is lack of evidence of effects of a combined intervention of SPML and physiotherapy on gait function and muscle strength in CP.

Objective: This study investigated the change in gait function and muscle strength in children with CP who underwent gait laboratory assessment before and after SPML, combined with obturator nerve blocks, and 9-month post-surgical functional physiotherapy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-182468DOI Listing
January 2018
8 Reads

Cognitive functioning following traumatic brain injury: The first 5 years.

Authors:
Nigel V Marsh

NeuroRehabilitation 2018 ;43(4):377-386

Department of Psychology, Sunway University, No. 5 Jalan Universiti, Bandar Sunway, 47500 Selangor Darul Ehsan, Malaysia. Tel.: +60 3 7491 8622; Fax: +60 3 5635 8633; E-mail:

Objective: This study reports the results from a 5-year longitudinal investigation of the prevalence and severity of cognitive deficits following significant (i.e., ventilation required for > 24 hours) traumatic brain injury. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-182457DOI Listing
January 2018
7 Reads

Relationship between the rate of force development in knee extensor muscles and gait speed in patients with chronic stroke: A cross-sectional study.

NeuroRehabilitation 2018 ;43(4):425-430

Faculty of Rehabilitation, School of Health Sciences, Fujita Health University, Aichi, Japan.

Background: The relationship between peak torque of the knee extensor muscles and gait speed was previously investigated in patients with chronic stroke, but whether the rate of force development (RFD), another indicator of muscle strength, affected gait speed remained unknown.

Objective: To clarify the relationships between the RFD of the knee extensor muscles over multiple time intervals and gait speed in patients with chronic stroke.

Methods: Twenty chronic stroke patients participated in this study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-182455DOI Listing
January 2018

Do trunk exercises improve trunk and upper extremity performance, post stroke? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

NeuroRehabilitation 2018 ;43(4):395-412

University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.

Background: Post-stroke trunk control is reported to be associated with trunk performance and recovery of the upper limb, but the evidence for the influence of trunk exercise on both of these is unclear.

Objective: To evaluate the effect of trunk exercises on trunk performance post-stroke, and to determine if these exercises result in improved upper limb function.

Methods: A comprehensive search of the literature published between January 1990 and February 2017 was conducted using the following electronic databases; AMED, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsychInfo and SPORTDiscus. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-182446DOI Listing
January 2018

Initial severity of somatosensory impairment influences response to upper limb sensory retraining post-stroke.

NeuroRehabilitation 2018 ;43(4):413-423

Occupational Therapy, School of Allied Health, College of Science, Health, and Engineering, La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.

Background: Somatosensory loss occurs often following stroke. A proportional recovery model is proposed for spontaneous motor recovery, with implication for treatment planning. It is currently unknown if initial severity of sensory impairment influences stroke survivors' response to treatment to improve sensation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-182439DOI Listing
January 2018
2 Reads

Assessing the sensitivity and specificity of cognitive screening measures for people with Parkinson's disease.

NeuroRehabilitation 2018 ;43(4):491-500

School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, VIC, Australia.

Introduction: While cognitive impairment is a recognised feature of Parkinson's disease (PD), few studies have evaluated the validity of brief cognitive screening measures compared to a comprehensive neuropsychological assessment. This studies aim was to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Modified Mini-Mental State Examination and Dementia Rating Scale (DRS-2) to detect cognitive impairment in individuals with PD.

Method: Fifty-eight participants were administered the MMSE, 3MS, DRS-2 and a neuropsychological battery. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-182433DOI Listing
January 2018
12 Reads

Feasibility and outcome of an individualized Tai Chi program for improving balance and strength in the elderly: A pilot study.

NeuroRehabilitation 2018 ;43(4):509-518

Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.

Background: Traditional Tai Chi is too complex for most elderly individuals. There have been few reports regarding the development of simplified Tai Chi programs to suit the physical needs of elderly adults. However, these programs were not individualized according to the participants' balance control abilities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-162061DOI Listing
January 2018

Sleep and sleep disorders following traumatic brain injury: An introduction.

Authors:
David L Ripley

NeuroRehabilitation 2018 ;43(3):255-256

Brain Injury Medicine and Rehabilitation, Shirley Ryan Ability Lab, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-189001DOI Listing
January 2018
2 Reads

Objective measures of sleep and wakefulness in patients with moderate to severe brain injury on an inpatient rehabilitation unit. Pearls and pitfalls of actigraph monitoring.

NeuroRehabilitation 2018 ;43(3):277-285

Craig Hospital, Englewood, CO, USA.

Background: As awareness of disrupted sleep in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) increases so does interest in finding objective measures of sleep. As a result, many clinicians are turning to actigraphs to monitor sleep in patients with altered consciousness. Actigraphs are accelerometers which have been used in sleep research for over four decades. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-182537DOI Listing
January 2019
13 Reads

Sleep disorders in traumatic brain injury.

NeuroRehabilitation 2018 ;43(3):257-266

Department of Neurology Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.

Background: Sleep disorders play a significant role in the care of those with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI).

Objective: To provide a literature review on the interaction of sleep and circadian processes on those with TBI.

Methods: A literature review was conducted on PubMed using the following key words and their combination: "Sleep Apnea", "Traumatic Brain Injury", "Circadian", "Parasomnia", "Insomnia", "Hypersomnia", "Narcolepsy", and "Restless Legs". Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-182583DOI Listing
January 2019
10 Reads

Sleep after TBI: How the TBI Model Systems have advanced the field.

NeuroRehabilitation 2018 ;43(3):287-296

Background: Identification and management of comorbidities in TBI has become an increasing focus for optimizing TBI outcomes. Recent meta-analyses highlight sleep disturbance and sleep disorders following TBI (Mathias & Alvaro, 2012). Improving the recognition and treatment of sleep disorders in TBI should be a central focus of rehabilitation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-182538DOI Listing
January 2019
10 Reads

Pharmacological management of sleep after traumatic brain injury.

NeuroRehabilitation 2018 ;43(3):347-353

Sleep-wake disturbances (SWD) are prevalent in the traumatic brain injury (TBI) population and may exacerbate related neurobehavioral impairments. As such, it is important to recognize and treat SWD early to allow for optimal cognitive recovery following a TBI. A number of medications are currently available for treatment of SWD. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-182536DOI Listing
January 2019
9 Reads

Nonpharmacological management of sleep disturbances after traumatic brain injury.

NeuroRehabilitation 2018 ;43(3):355-360

JFK Medical Center-Johnson Rehabilitation Institute, Edison, NJ, USA.

Background: Sleep plays an integral role in several physiologic functions such as cognition and functional ability. Sleep disturbances are common after brain injury and can interfere with rehabilitation and recovery. There are several pathways by which sleep is initiated, and thus various ways to target common complaints as well. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-182535DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

Sleep disturbance and cognition in people with TBI.

Authors:
Eric B Larson

NeuroRehabilitation 2018 ;43(3):297-306

Marianjoy Rehabilitation Hospital, 26W171 Roosevelt Road, Wheaton, IL 60187, USA. Tel.: +1 630 909 8608; Fax: +1 630 909 6572; E-mail:

Background: Sleep disturbance plays a significant role in cognitive impairment following traumatic brain injury (TBI).

Objectives: To summarize recent findings that examine sleep disturbance and cognition in TBI.

Methods: Epidemiological information on sleep disorders in people with TBI is presented. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-182534DOI Listing
January 2019
13 Reads

Association of sleep with neurobehavioral impairments during inpatient rehabilitation after traumatic brain injury.

NeuroRehabilitation 2018 ;43(3):319-325

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine/Shirley Ryan AbilityLab, Chicago, IL, USA.

Background: Sleep disturbance is a common sequela after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Many of the impairments following TBI may be exacerbated by impaired sleep-wake cycle regulation.

Objectives: To investigate the relationship between total sleep time (TST), measured by wrist actigraphy and observational sleep logs, and neurobehavioral impairments during inpatient rehabilitation after TBI. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-182533DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Assessment of sleep after traumatic brain injury (TBI).

NeuroRehabilitation 2018 ;43(3):267-276

TIRR Memorial Hermann, Houston, TX, USA.

Background: Individuals who have sustained a TBI often present with complaints of disturbed sleep. Identifying sleep disorders in the TBI population has not been standardized. Much of the confusion may come from the heterogeneity of the research that has been conducted on sleep problems after traumatic brain injury. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-182485DOI Listing
January 2019
9 Reads

Sleep and fatigue after TBI.

NeuroRehabilitation 2018 ;43(3):307-317

Health Service Executive Ireland, Blanchardstown, Dublin, Ireland.

Background: Whilst post traumatic brain injury fatigue (PTBIF) and sleep disturbance are common sequelae following brain injury, underlying mechanisms, and the potential for targeted interventions remain unclear.

Objective: To present a review of recent studies exploring the epidemiology of PTBIF and sleep disturbance, the relationship and neuropsychological correlates of these issues, potential approaches to intervention, and implications for neurorehabilitation.

Methods: A review of relevant literature was undertaken, with a focus on PTBIF relating to sleep disturbance, the neuropsychological correlates of these issues and implications for neurorehabilitation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-182484DOI Listing
January 2019
14 Reads

The interplay between neuroendocrine and sleep alterations following traumatic brain injury.

NeuroRehabilitation 2018 ;43(3):327-345

Centre for Neuro Skills, Encino, CA, USA.

Background: Sleep and endocrine disruptions are prevalent after traumatic brain injury (TBI) and are likely to contribute to morbidity.

Objective: To describe the interaction between sleep and hormonal regulation following TBI and elucidate the impact that alterations of these systems have on cognitive responses during the posttraumatic chronic period.

Methods: Review of preclinical and clinical literature describing long-lasting endocrine dysregulation and sleep alterations following TBI. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-182483DOI Listing
January 2019
8 Reads

The Cochrane Corners in NeuroRehabilitation: A Cochrane Rehabilitation initiative.

NeuroRehabilitation 2018 ;43(2):111-112

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Istanbul Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-180003DOI Listing
January 2018
7 Reads

Mobility, balance and balance confidence - correlations with daily living of individuals with and without mild proprioception deficits post-stroke.

Authors:
Debbie Rand

NeuroRehabilitation 2018 ;43(2):219-226

Department of Occupational Therapy, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, PO 39040, Tel Aviv 6997801, Israel. Tel.: +972 3 640 6551; Fax: +972 3 6409933; E-mail:

Background: Proprioception deficits are common post-stroke and may lead to impaired standing balance and restricted mobility.

Objectives: To compare 1) mobility, balance, balance confidence (BC), independence in basic and instrumental activities of daily living (BADL and IADL) of individuals with and without mild proprioception deficits at the chronic stage post-stroke. In addition, 2) correlations between mobility, balance and BC to BADL and IADL will be assessed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-172398DOI Listing
November 2018

A non-task-oriented approach based on high-dose playful movement exploration for rehabilitation of the upper limb early after stroke: A proposal.

NeuroRehabilitation 2018 ;43(1):31-40

Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA.

Background: Stroke is one of the leading causes of disability in the world, with the upper limb being affected up to 80% of the time. Current rehabilitative therapies for the upper limb, primarily centered on task-oriented training, are ineffective at boosting recovery from motor impairment beyond what is expected from spontaneous biological recovery and instead promote compensatory strategies in order to perform specific activities of daily living.

Purpose: To give a critical overview of animal and clinical literature that support the idea that a non-task-oriented approach may be more fruitful for recovery from motor impairment, and to propose a novel therapeutic paradigm designed to bolster spontaneous biological recovery early after stroke. Read More

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http://www.medra.org/servlet/aliasResolver?alias=iospress&am
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-172411DOI Listing
October 2018
16 Reads

The use of robots in stroke rehabilitation: A narrative review.

NeuroRehabilitation 2018 ;43(1):99-110

Department of Rehabilitation and Regenerative Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.

Background: Stroke is among the leading causes of acquired disability in the United States, affecting nearly 800,000 Americans annually. The identification of more effective treatments for hemiparesis has been recognized as a top research priority. Intelligent, motor-driven devices for rehabilitation, or rehabilitation robotics, represent an exciting frontier with considerable potential to address these concerns. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-172408DOI Listing
October 2018
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Implementing biomarkers to predict motor recovery after stroke.

NeuroRehabilitation 2018 ;43(1):41-50

Department of Medicine, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.

Background: There is growing interest in using biomarkers to predict motor recovery and outcomes after stroke. The PREP2 algorithm combines clinical assessment with biomarkers in an algorithm, to predict upper limb functional outcomes for individual patients. To date, PREP2 is the first algorithm to be tested in clinical practice, and other biomarker-based algorithms are likely to follow. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-172395DOI Listing
October 2018
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Brain-machine interfaces for rehabilitation in stroke: A review.

NeuroRehabilitation 2018 ;43(1):77-97

Institute of Medical Psychology and Behavioral Neurobiology, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.

Background: Motor paralysis after stroke has devastating consequences for the patients, families and caregivers. Although therapies have improved in the recent years, traditional rehabilitation still fails in patients with severe paralysis. Brain-machine interfaces (BMI) have emerged as a promising tool to guide motor rehabilitation interventions as they can be applied to patients with no residual movement. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-172394DOI Listing
October 2018
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Moving stroke rehabilitation forward: The need to change research.

NeuroRehabilitation 2018 ;43(1):19-30

Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Amsterdam University Medical Center, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam Movement Sciences, The Netherlands.

Background: Stroke rehabilitation aims to reduce impairments and promote activity and participation among patients. A major challenge for stroke rehabilitation research is to develop interventions that can reduce patients' neurological impairments. Until now, there has been no breakthrough in this research field. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-172393DOI Listing
October 2018
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Increased physician and physical therapist communication is associated with earlier mobility and decreased length of stay in the cerebrovascular and trauma neuroscience population.

NeuroRehabilitation 2018 ;43(2):195-199

Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA.

Object: Recent efforts in neurocritical care have emphasized optimal timing and employment of rehabilitation services. However, there is sparse literature on the effect of team approaches to the intensive care patient. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of increased coordination between a physical therapist and an attending cerebrovascular neurosurgeon through daily multidisciplinary rounds. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-182444DOI Listing
November 2018

Vestibular rehabilitation training in patients with subacute stroke: A preliminary randomized controlled trial.

NeuroRehabilitation 2018 ;43(2):247-254

Clinical Laboratory of Experimental Neurorehabilitation, Fondazione Santa Lucia (Scientific Institute for Research and Health Care), Rome, Italy.

Background: Vestibular rehabilitation (VR) consists in a customized exercise program patient-centred that includes a combination of different exercise components with the aim to promote gaze stability, improve balance and gait, and facilitate somatosensory integration.

Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of customized vestibular rehabilitation training on gait stability of patients with subacute stroke.

Methods: Twenty-five inpatients (12 M, age: 64. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-182427DOI Listing
November 2018
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Reliability and validity of the Sway Balance mobile application for measurement of postural sway in people with Parkinson disease.

NeuroRehabilitation 2018 ;43(2):147-154

Krannert School of Physical Therapy, University of Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN, USA.

Background: The emergence of mobile technology allows the examination of balance through direct measures of postural sway in a cost-effective, convenient and portable fashion. However, there is insufficient evidence for use in populations with neurologic conditions.

Objectives: 1) To determine the test-retest reliability of the Sway Balance™ mobile application in measuring postural sway in individuals with Parkinson disease, 2) To examine the concurrent validity of Sway Balance™ with inertial measurement units and 3) To determine if Sway Balance™ scores can predict disease severity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-182424DOI Listing
November 2018
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Effects of water-based and land-based exercises on walking and balance functions of patients with hemiplegia.

NeuroRehabilitation 2018 ;43(2):237-246

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Afyon Kocatepe University Faculty of Medicine, Afyon, Turkey.

Background: After the stroke, a number of changes occur in the neuromuscular system functions.

Objective: To determine whether the water based exercise (WBE) program applied in combination with the land-based exercises (LBE) compared to LBE alone contributes to the stroke patients' motor functions, walking, balance functions and quality of life (QoL).

Methods: In total, 60 patients participated in this study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-182422DOI Listing
November 2018
12 Reads