60 results match your criteria Nerve Block Superficial Peroneal


'SCALD-ED' Block: Superficial Cutaneous Anesthesia in a Lateral Leg Distribution within the Emergency Department - A Case Series.

J Emerg Med 2019 Jan 8. Epub 2019 Jan 8.

Department of Emergency Medicine, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, New Jersey.

Background: In the midst of a nationwide opioid epidemic, focus has been placed on identifying and utilizing safe, effective opioid-free analgesic alternatives. Lower-extremity peripheral nerve blockades are common and often involve both motor and sensory anesthesia, resulting in leg weakness and ambulatory difficulty. The aim of this case report is to describe an ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve block technique (superficial cutaneous anesthesia in a lateral (leg) distribution within the emergency department ['SCALD-ED' block]) that provides motor-sparing, purely sensory anesthesia after a superficial injury to the lateral leg in patients presenting to the emergency department. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jemermed.2018.12.005DOI Listing
January 2019
10 Reads

Identifying the emergence of the superficial peroneal nerve through deep fascia on ultrasound and by dissection: Implications for regional anesthesia in foot and ankle surgery.

Clin Anat 2019 Apr 7;32(3):390-395. Epub 2019 Jan 7.

School of Medicine, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, United Kingdom.

Regional anesthesia relies on a sound understanding of anatomy and the utility of ultrasound in identifying relevant structures. We assessed the ability to identify the point at which the superficial peroneal nerve (SPN) emerges through the deep fascia by ultrasound on 26 volunteers (mean age 27.85 years ± 13. Read More

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https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/ca.23323
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ca.23323DOI Listing
April 2019
16 Reads

Very Early Neurophysiological Study in Guillain-Barre Syndrome.

Eur Neurol 2018 22;80(1-2):100-105. Epub 2018 Oct 22.

Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an,

Purpose: The diagnosis of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) in the very early stage may be challenging. Our aim was to report the neurophysiological abnormalities in GBS within 4 days of clinical onset. We expected that GBS will be diagnosed by the assistance of neurophysiological study in the very early stage. Read More

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https://www.karger.com/Article/FullText/494261
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000494261DOI Listing
January 2019
18 Reads

Continuous Popliteal-Sciatic Blocks for Postoperative Analgesia: Traditional Proximal Catheter Insertion Superficial to the Paraneural Sheath Versus a New Distal Insertion Site Deep to the Paraneural Sheath.

Anesth Analg 2018 Aug 9. Epub 2018 Aug 9.

From the Department of Anesthesiology, University of California, San Diego, California.

We tested the hypothesis that during a continuous popliteal-sciatic nerve block, postoperative analgesia is improved with the catheter insertion point "deep" to the paraneural sheath immediately distal to the bifurcation between the tibial and common peroneal branches, compared with the traditional approach "superficial" to the paraneural sheath proximal to the bifurcation. The needle tip location was determined to be accurately located with a fluid bolus visualized with ultrasound; however, catheters were subsequently inserted without a similar fluid injection and visualization protocol (visualized air injection was permitted and usually implemented, but not required per protocol). The average pain (0-10 scale) the morning after surgery for subjects with a catheter inserted at the proximal subparaneural location (n = 31) was a median (interquartile) of 1. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1213/ANE.0000000000003693DOI Listing
August 2018
10 Reads

Ultrasound-guided therapeutic injections for neural pathology about the foot and ankle: a 4 year retrospective review.

Skeletal Radiol 2017 Jun 16;46(6):795-803. Epub 2017 Mar 16.

Center for Musculoskeletal Care, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.

Objective: To describe a 4-year clinical experience with ultrasound-guided therapeutic perineural injections of peripheral nerves about the foot and ankle.

Materials And Methods: Retrospective analysis of foot and ankle perineural injections performed between January 2012 and August 2016. Demographics, clinical indications, presence of structural pathology, immediate and interval pain relief, as well as complications were recorded. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00256-017-2624-7DOI Listing
June 2017
23 Reads

Defining local nerve blocks for feline distal pelvic limb surgery: a cadaveric study.

J Feline Med Surg 2017 Dec 10;19(12):1215-1223. Epub 2017 Feb 10.

5 Department of Molecular Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA.

Objectives Anatomical and methodological detail is lacking regarding local anesthetic peripheral nerve block techniques for distal pelvic limb surgery in cats. The aim of this study was to develop, describe and test nerve block methods based on cadaveric dissections and dye injections. Methods Ten pairs of feline pelvic limbs (n = 20) were dissected and the tibial nerve (T n. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1098612X17690652DOI Listing
December 2017
34 Reads

The benefits of ultrasound-guided continuous sensory nerve blockade in the setting of burn injury: a case report of bilateral continuous superficial peroneal nerve blockade in a patient with severe sleep apnea.

J Clin Anesth 2017 Feb 22;36:62-66. Epub 2016 Nov 22.

University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Mercy Hospital, 1400 Locust St, Pittsburgh, PA 15219.

The management of pain after burn injuries is a clinical challenge magnified in patients with significant comorbidities. Presently, burn pain is treated via a wide variety of modalities, including systemic pharmacotherapy and regional analgesia. Although the latter can provide effective pain control in patients with burn injuries, it is relatively underused. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jclinane.2016.10.002DOI Listing
February 2017
8 Reads

Dexmedetomidine Added to Local Anesthetic Mixture of Lidocaine and Ropivacaine Enhances Onset and Prolongs Duration of a Popliteal Approach to Sciatic Nerve Blockade.

Clin Ther 2017 Jan 10;39(1):89-97.e1. Epub 2016 Dec 10.

Department of Anaesthesiology, First Affiliated Hospital, Wenzhou Medical University, Zhejiang, China. Electronic address:

Purpose: A literature review of multiple clinical studies on mixing additives to improve pharmacologic limitation of local anesthetics during peripheral nerve blockade revealed inconsistency in success rates and various adverse effects. Animal research on dexmedetomidine as an adjuvant on the other hand has promising results, with evidence of minimum unwanted results. This randomized, double-blinded, contrastable observational study examined the efficacy of adding dexmedetomidine to a mixture of lidocaine plus ropivacaine during popliteal sciatic nerve blockade (PSNB). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clinthera.2016.11.011DOI Listing
January 2017
17 Reads

Continuous Peripheral Nerve Blocks: An Update of the Published Evidence and Comparison With Novel, Alternative Analgesic Modalities.

Authors:
Brian M Ilfeld

Anesth Analg 2017 01;124(1):308-335

From the Department of Anesthesiology, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California.

A continuous peripheral nerve block (CPNB) consists of a percutaneously inserted catheter with its tip adjacent to a target nerve/plexus through which local anesthetic may be administered, providing a prolonged block that may be titrated to the desired effect. In the decades after its first report in 1946, a plethora of data relating to CPNB was published, much of which was examined in a 2011 Anesthesia & Analgesia article. The current update is an evidence-based review of the CPNB literature published in the interim. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1213/ANE.0000000000001581DOI Listing
January 2017
12 Reads

Electrophysiologic features of fibular neuropathy in childhood and adolescence.

Muscle Nerve 2017 05 24;55(5):693-697. Epub 2017 Jan 24.

Department of Neurology, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Introduction: We studied patterns of nerve injury in pediatric common fibular (peroneal) neuropathy (CFN).

Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on data from 53 children with CFN at a pediatric electromyography laboratory.

Results: Conduction block at the fibular head was present in 35% of patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mus.25403DOI Listing
May 2017
7 Reads

A Randomized Controlled Trial Assessing the Effect of a Continuous Subcutaneous Infusion of Local Anesthetic Following Elective Surgery to the Great Toe.

Foot Ankle Spec 2017 Apr 20;10(2):116-124. Epub 2016 Sep 20.

Royal North Shore Hospital, Reserve Road, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia (BR, KK, TB, JW, KF, AW).

Local anesthetic use for wound infusions, single injection, and continuous nerve blocks for postoperative analgesia is well established. No study has investigated the effect of a continuous block of the saphenous and superficial peroneal nerves at the level of the ankle joint following first ray surgery. A double blind randomized controlled trial was designed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1938640016666923DOI Listing
April 2017
16 Reads

A prospective, randomized comparison between single- and multiple-injection techniques for ultrasound-guided subgluteal sciatic nerve block.

Anesth Analg 2014 Dec;119(6):1442-8

From the Department of Anesthesiology, Shimane University School of Medicine, Izumo City, Japan.

Background: It is believed that local anesthetic injected to obtain circumferential spread around nerves produces a more rapid onset and successful blockade after some ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blocks. However, evidence demonstrating this point is limited only to the popliteal sciatic nerve block, which is relatively easy to perform by via a high-frequency linear transducer. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that multiple injections of local anesthetic to make circumferential spread would improve the rate of sensory and motor blocks compared with a single-injection technique for ultrasound-guided subgluteal sciatic nerve block, which is considered a relatively difficult block conducted with a low-frequency, curved-array transducer. Read More

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http://pdfs.journals.lww.com/anesthesia-analgesia/2014/12000
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http://content.wkhealth.com/linkback/openurl?sid=WKPTLP:land
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1213/ANE.0000000000000462DOI Listing
December 2014
13 Reads

The sensate fibula osteocutaneous flap: neurosomal anatomy.

J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg 2013 Dec 30;66(12):1688-94. Epub 2013 Jul 30.

Harbor-UCLA Medical Center and the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, USA. Electronic address:

Background: Rapid return of oral sensation enhances quality of life following oromandibular reconstruction. For predictable reinnervation of flaps, a detailed knowledge of their nerve supply is required. This study was designed to investigate the cutaneous nerve supply of the fibula osteocutaneous flap. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bjps.2013.07.018DOI Listing
December 2013
22 Reads

Mechanism of the inhibitory effect of electroacupuncture on experimental arrhythmias.

J Acupunct Meridian Stud 2013 Apr 28;6(2):69-81. Epub 2012 Nov 28.

School of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697, USA.

Clinical observations reported that acupuncture can alleviate several kinds of arrhythmias. To explore its efficacy and mechanism, we have studied the electroacupuncture (EA) inhibition on experimental arrhythmias in rabbits since 1980s and analyzed its mechanism. These studies were mostly conducted in the Department of Physiology, Shanghai Medical University; recently the mechanism of acupuncture's effect on arrhythmias was analyzed in the School of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, which involves the following: (1)the inhibitory effect of EA on ventricular extrasystoles can be induced by hypothalamic defense area stimulation: a low-current and low-frequency stimulation of the median nerve underneath acupoints P 5 or deep peroneal nerve underneath S 36 can activate arcuate nucleus-ventral periaqueductal gray -nuclei raphe pathway and release endorphin, enkephaline, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), etc. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jams.2012.11.001DOI Listing
April 2013
5 Reads

Ultrasound-guided continuous superficial peroneal nerve block below the knee for the treatment of nerve injury.

Pain Pract 2013 Sep 13;13(7):572-5. Epub 2012 Dec 13.

Department of Anesthesiology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27157-1009, USA.

(CRPS) describes a constellation of symptoms including pain, trophic changes, hyperesthesia, allodynia, and dysregulation of local blood flow often following trauma. It is often confined to the extremities. Treatment of this disorder consists of a variety of modalities including systemic pharmacotherapy, local anesthetic injections or infusions, psychological nonpharmacotherapy, physical rehabilitation, and surgical intervention. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/papr.12021DOI Listing
September 2013
4 Reads

Ultrasound-guided ankle block for forefoot surgery: the contribution of the saphenous nerve.

Reg Anesth Pain Med 2012 Sep-Oct;37(5):554-7

Department of Anesthesiology, Hospital Clínic, Barcelona, Spain.

Background: Ankle blocks typically include the block of 5 nerves, the 4 branches that trace their origin back to the sciatic nerve plus the saphenous nerve (SaN). The sensory area of the SaN in the foot is variable. Based on our clinical experience, we decided to study the sensory distribution of the SaN in the foot and determine whether the block of this nerve is necessary as a component of an ultrasound-guided ankle block for bunion surgery. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/AAP.0b013e3182611483DOI Listing
June 2013
15 Reads

Ultrasound visualization of the superficial peroneal nerve in the mid-calf.

Authors:
Ki Jinn Chin

Anesthesiology 2013 Apr;118(4):956-65

Department of Anesthesia, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0b013e318266b7d2DOI Listing
April 2013
15 Reads

Neuropathic complications after 157 procedures of continuous popliteal nerve block for hallux valgus surgery. A retrospective study.

Orthop Traumatol Surg Res 2012 May 28;98(3):327-33. Epub 2012 Mar 28.

Neurology department, Desgenettes military teaching hospital, 69275 Lyon, France.

Background: Continuous peripheral nerve block (CPNB), in particular at the popliteal fossa, is widely used in orthopedic surgery, allowing good postoperative analgesia. Possible neuropathic complications, however, remain poorly known.

Objective: To review the characteristics of peripheral neuropathy (PN) after sciatic CPNB at the popliteal fossa, estimating prevalence, severity, evolution and possible risk factors, especially those relating to the procedure. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.otsr.2011.11.004DOI Listing
May 2012
10 Reads

Low-volume ultrasound-guided nerve block provides inferior postoperative analgesia compared to a higher-volume landmark technique.

Reg Anesth Pain Med 2011 Jul-Aug;36(4):393-8

Anesthesia Institute, PO Box 109199, Newmarket, Auckland, New Zealand.

Background And Objectives: Ultrasound guidance reduces the required local anesthetic volume for successful peripheral nerve blockade, but it is unclear whether this impacts postoperative analgesia. This prospective, randomized, observer-blinded study tested the hypothesis that a low-volume ultrasound-guided ankle block would provide similar analgesia after foot surgery compared with a conventional-volume surface landmark technique.

Methods: A total of 72 patients presenting for elective foot surgery under general anesthesia were randomized to receive a low-volume ultrasound-guided ankle block (n = 37; ropivacaine 0. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/AAP.0b013e31821e2fb7DOI Listing
July 2012
10 Reads

Anatomic localization of motor entry point of superficial peroneal nerve to peroneus longus and brevis muscles.

Clin Anat 2011 Mar 10;24(2):232-6. Epub 2010 Nov 10.

Department of Anatomy, Catholic Institute for Applied Anatomy, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea.

This study examined the anatomic location of the motor entry point (MEP) and branching point at the proximal and distal points of the tendon of the peroneal muscle by visual observation. Forty-three fresh legs of 25 adult bodies which had been donated to science were investigated in this study. The mean length of the reference line between the most proximal point of the head of the fibula (PHF) and the most distal point of the malleolus of the fibula (DMF) was 33. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ca.21076DOI Listing
March 2011
5 Reads

Anatomic variations of superficial peroneal nerve: clinical implications of a cadaver study.

Ital J Anat Embryol 2010 ;115(3):223-8

Department of Anatomy, Vydehi Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre, Whitefield, Bangalore, Karnataka, India

Superficial peroneal nerve and its branches are frequently at risk for iatrogenic damage. Although different studies on anatomical variations of superficial peroneal nerve are available in the medical literature, such reports are rare from India. Hence the present study was undertaken on Indian population. Read More

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March 2011
12 Reads

Ankle block implemented through two skin punctures.

Foot Ankle Int 2010 Jul;31(7):619-23

Motol University Hospital, 1st Orthopaedic Clinic, V Uvalu 84, Prague 5, 15006, Czech Republic.

Background: Recently, peripheral nerve blocks have increasingly been used in orthopedic surgery. The foot block is an alternative for anesthesia in cases of forefoot and midfoot operations. We propose a modification of the block technique due to potential difficulties concerning the tibial nerve. Read More

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http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.3113/FAI.2010.0619
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3113/FAI.2010.0619DOI Listing
July 2010
7 Reads

Ultrasound-guided superficial peroneal nerve block for foot surgery.

AJR Am J Roentgenol 2010 Jun;194(6):W538; author reply W542

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2214/AJR.09.3975DOI Listing
June 2010
2 Reads

Focal skeletal muscle uptake of 99mTechnetium-hydroxymethylene diphosphonate following peroneal nerve blocks in horses.

Vet Radiol Ultrasound 2010 May-Jun;51(3):338-43

Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-4475, USA.

We have observed focal skeletal muscle uptake of 99mTechnetium-hydroxymethylene diphosphonate (Tc-HDP), which could mimic a tibial lesion, in horses following peroneal nerve blocks. To characterize this observation further, 45 bone phase scintigrams were performed in 12 horses undergoing peroneal nerve blocks. Scans were performed before, and 1, 3, 7, and 14 days postblock. Read More

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June 2010
12 Reads

Sensory testing of distal sural and posterior tibial nerves provides early prediction of surgical anesthesia after single-injection infragluteal-parabiceps sciatic nerve block.

Anesth Analg 2010 Mar 10;110(3):951-7. Epub 2009 Dec 10.

Department of Anesthesiology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA.

Background: Surgical anesthesia for reconstructive ankle surgery requires sensory and motor block of all the terminal nerve distributions of the sciatic nerve. In this prospective observational study, we investigated the value of sensory and motor testing of the foot, after local anesthetic injection, for predicting complete sciatic nerve blockade and the duration of testing required for identifying incomplete anesthesia.

Methods: Sciatic nerve blocks (n = 180) using the infragluteal-parabiceps approach were performed in patients undergoing reconstructive ankle surgery. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1213/ANE.0b013e3181ca134bDOI Listing
March 2010
16 Reads

[Regional anaesthesia of the foot achieved from two cutaneous points of injection: an anatomical study].

Acta Chir Orthop Traumatol Cech 2009 Apr;76(2):104-9

Ortopedická klinika 1. LF UK a FN Motol, Praha.

PURPOSE OF THE STUDY Regional anaesthesia for the lower extremity distal to the ankle joint, knows as anaesthetic ankle block or foot block, involves a series of injections of local anaesthetic to block the peripheral nerves that supply innervation to the foot. Since the tibial nerve block is not always effective, the aim of this study was to design a modified technique of anaesthetic application. MATERIAL The study was carried out on 30 human cadavers provided by the Institute of Anatomy, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, and included data on a total of 60 lower extremities. Read More

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April 2009
10 Reads

The role of peripheral nerve surgery in the management of painful chronic wounds: indications and outcomes.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2008 Jul;122(1):193-7

Department of Plastic Surgery, Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC, USA.

Background: Patients with chronic wounds caused by healing problems often present with chronic pain at the site. Proper wound care with or without appropriate reconstruction usually addresses both the wound and its associated pain. However, wounds occasionally remain painful despite successful reconstruction, particularly when they are complicated by an underlying condition. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0b013e318177422cDOI Listing
July 2008
36 Reads

Ropivacaine and levobupivacaine for bilateral selective ankle block in patients undergoing hallux valgus repair.

Acta Anaesthesiol Scand 2008 Jul 12;52(6):841-4. Epub 2008 May 12.

Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Second Faculty of Medicine, Sant'Andrea Hospital, University of Rome La Sapienza, Rome, Italy.

Background: A selective ankle block, blocking the tibial, deep and superficial peroneal nerves, can be used successfully for great toe surgery. No comparative information is available on selective ankle block using ropivacaine and levobupivacaine.

Methods: We compared the onset time and success rate of a selective ankle block using low volumes (12 ml) of ropivacaine 10 mg/ml and levobupivacaine 7. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1399-6576.2008.01630.xDOI Listing
July 2008
3 Reads

The posterior approach to the sciatic nerve in the popliteal fossa: a comparison of single- versus double-injection technique.

Anesth Analg 2006 Dec;103(6):1571-3

Servei d'Anestèsia, Reanimació i Terapèutica del Dolor, Hospital Universitari de Girona Dr Josep Trueta, Carretera de França s/n. Girona, Spain.

We compared single-injection and double-injection of the sciatic nerve with nerve stimulation in the posterior popliteal approach using mepivacaine 1% in a prospective, randomized and single-blind study to evaluate effectiveness, delay of onset, and complications in patients undergoing foot and ankle surgery. In the single-injection group (Group S, n = 30), 25 mL of mepivacaine 1% was administered after eliciting foot inversion or plantar flexion. In the double-injection group (Group D, n = 30), 12. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1213/01.ane.0000242534.84131.c6DOI Listing
December 2006
28 Reads

Development and verification of saphenous, tibial and common peroneal nerve block techniques for analgesia below the thigh in the nonchondrodystrophoid dog.

Vet Anaesth Analg 2006 Jan;33(1):36-48

College of Veterinary Medicine, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA, USA.

Objective: To document simple and reliable local, infiltrating nerve blocks for the saphenous, tibial and common peroneal nerves in the dog.

Study Design: Laboratory technique development; in vivo blind, controlled, prospective study.

Animals: Twenty canine cadavers and 18 clinically normal, client-owned dogs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-2995.2005.00234.xDOI Listing
January 2006
15 Reads

The variations of the sensory branches of the superficial peroneal nerve course and its clinical importance.

Foot Ankle Int 2005 Nov;26(11):942-6

Medicine Faculty, Anatomy Department, 829 Sokak No:23/3, Bornova, IZMIR 35030, Turkey.

Background: Although the sensory branches of the superficial peroneal nerve (SPN) have different anatomical variations that are of clinical importance, little is known about their anatomic courses, branching patterns, or relationships to palpable osseous landmarks.(1,3) A detailed knowledge is necessary for surgical exposures about the foot and ankle, arthroscopic procedures, ankle block anesthesia, and SPN block for leg venography.

Methods: Thirty lower cadaver limbs were dissected to assess the anatomic properties and the variations of the sensory branches of the SPN. Read More

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http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/107110070502601108
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/107110070502601108DOI Listing
November 2005
3 Reads

Easily identifiable bony landmarks as an aid in targeted regional ankle blockade.

Clin Anat 2005 Oct;18(7):518-26

Department of Anatomy, Section of Clinical Anatomy, School of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.

Regional anesthesia around the ankle joint is well suited to a large number of surgical procedures of the foot. Previous studies have alluded to the variable nerve distribution of the foot, which may result in incomplete blocks. The aim of the study was to determine the position of the nerves in relation to the ankle joint to easily identifiable bony and prominent soft tissue landmarks to aid more accurate targeting of these nerves. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ca.20191DOI Listing
October 2005
36 Reads

Comparison of the different approaches to saphenous nerve block.

Anesthesiology 2005 Mar;102(3):633-8

Division of Pain Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine., Chicago, Illinois 60611, USA.

Background: The authors compared the efficacy of the different approaches to saphenous nerve block.

Methods: The following approaches to saphenous nerve block were compared in 10 volunteers: perifemoral, transsartorial, block at the medial femoral condyle, below-the-knee field block, and blockade at the level of the medial malleolus. Each volunteer underwent all five blocks, and the interval between blocks was 3-7 days. Read More

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March 2005
13 Reads

Painful foot neuromas after toe-to-thumb transfer.

J Hand Surg Am 2005 Jan;30(1):105-10

Department of Surgery and Orthopedic Surgery, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA.

Reconstruction of the thumb by transfer of a toe has evolved technically to the point that this complex procedure can result in a mobile, sensate, and aesthetically pleasing digit that contributes to an almost-normally functioning hand. Donor site deformity is well recognized, primarily as it relates to the appearance of the foot after transfer of the hallux to the thumb position and stiffness of the remaining portions of the big toe. The present report describes donor site disability related to painful neuromas of the superficial and deep peroneal nerves and the common plantar digital nerve to the first webspace. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S036350230400748
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhsa.2004.09.006DOI Listing
January 2005
6 Reads

Partial reversal of conduction slowing during repetitive stimulation of single sympathetic efferents in human skin.

Acta Physiol Scand 2004 Nov;182(3):305-11

Good Samaritan Hospital & Medical Center and Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland, OR, USA.

Aims: To describe and identify the function of a class of human C fibre with an unusual response to repetitive electrical stimulation. Other C fibres slow progressively at 2 Hz (type 1), reach a latency plateau (type 2) or hardly slow at all (type 3).

Methods: C fibres innervating hairy skin were recorded by microneurography in the superficial peroneal nerves of 19 healthy volunteers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-201X.2004.01357.xDOI Listing
November 2004
3 Reads

Ultrasound guidance for a lateral approach to the sciatic nerve in the popliteal fossa.

Anaesthesia 2004 Oct;59(10):1023-5

Department of Anaesthesia, Toronto Western Hospital, University of Toronto, 399 Bathurst Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5T 2S8, Canada.

Descriptions of the use of ultrasound for nerve location have focused on upper limb blocks. We present a case in which ultrasound imaging was used for a lateral approach to the sciatic nerve in the popliteal fossa. Ultrasound images taken proximal to the popliteal crease showed tibial and common peroneal nerves as round hyperechoic structures superficial and lateral to the tibial artery. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.1365-2044.2004.03872.x
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2044.2004.03872.xDOI Listing
October 2004
5 Reads

Regional anesthesia for office procedures: Part II. Extremity and inguinal area surgeries.

Authors:
Gohar A Salam

Am Fam Physician 2004 Feb;69(4):896-900

North Shore University Hospital at Manhasset, Manhasset, New York, USA.

The hand can be anesthetized effectively with blocks of the median, ulnar, or radial nerve. Each digit is supplied by four digital nerves, which can be blocked with injections on each side of the digit. Anterior or posterior ankle blocks can be used for regional anesthesia for the foot. Read More

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February 2004
5 Reads

Lateral approach to the sciatic nerve block in the popliteal fossa: correlation between evoked motor response and sensory block.

Reg Anesth Pain Med 2003 Sep-Oct;28(5):450-5

Department of Anesthesiology, Hospital Clínico Universitario de Santiago, Santiago de Compostela, Spain.

Background And Objectives: The purpose of this study was to identify which of two motor responses of the foot (plantar flexion versus dorsiflexion) best predicts complete sensory blockade of the sciatic nerve when is used for lateral popliteal sciatic nerve block.

Methods: Thirty American Society of Anesthesiologist physical status I or II patients scheduled for foot and ankle surgery under lateral popliteal sciatic nerve block were enrolled in the study. During each block, the needle was placed to evoke one of the following motor responses of the foot: plantar flexion or dorsiflexion. Read More

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http://pdfs.journals.lww.com/rapm/2003/09000/Lateral_Approac
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March 2004
21 Reads

Sciatic nerve blockade in the supine position: a novel approach.

Can J Anaesth 2003 Jan;50(1):52-6

Department of Anesthesiology, Erasmus Hospital, Free University of Brussels, Belgium.

Purpose: Sciatic nerve block is useful for surgery below the knee both intra- and postoperatively. Several techniques to insert a catheter at the knee level or higher have been described but need mobilization (lateral decubitus) of the patient. We describe novel landmarks, using a high lateral approach, to block the sciatic nerve without moving the patient. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF03020187DOI Listing
January 2003
5 Reads

Effect of clonidine on lidocaine clearance in vivo: a microdialysis study in humans.

Anesthesiology 2001 Dec;95(6):1371-6

Department of Anesthesiology, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, Washington 98111, USA.

Background: The addition of clonidine to local anesthetics has been shown to prolong both peripheral and central neuraxial local anesthetic blocks. Whether clonidine prolongs local anesthetic block by a pharmacokinetic effect or a pharmacodynamic effect is unclear. By directly measuring lidocaine tissue concentrations at the site of injection in the presence and absence of clonidine, this study was designed to address this question. Read More

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December 2001
5 Reads

Effect of epinephrine on lidocaine clearance in vivo: a microdialysis study in humans.

Anesthesiology 1999 Oct;91(4):962-8

Department of Anesthesiology, University of Washington, Seattle 98195, USA.

Background: Local anesthetic nerve block prolonged by epinephrine is thought to result from local vasoconstriction and consequent decreased local anesthetic clearance from the injection site. However, no study has yet confirmed this directly in humans by measuring tissue concentrations of local anesthetic over time. In addition, recent studies have shown that the alpha2-adrenergic receptor agonist, clonidine, also prolongs nerve block without altering local anesthetic clearance. Read More

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October 1999
2 Reads

Activity-dependent slowing of conduction differentiates functional subtypes of C fibres innervating human skin.

J Physiol 1999 Mar;515 ( Pt 3):799-811

Neuromuscular Unit, Good Samaritan Hospital & Medical Center, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland, OR, USA.

1. The effects of impulse activity on conduction in cutaneous C fibres have been examined in 46 microneurographic recordings from 11 normal subjects and 11 diabetic patients with normal nerve conduction. A tungsten microelectrode was inserted into a cutaneous nerve, usually the superficial peroneal close to the ankle, and intraneural microstimulation was used to identify an area of skin innervated. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2269177PMC
March 1999
4 Reads

Treatment of superficial and deep peroneal neuromas by resection and translocation of the nerves into the anterolateral compartment.

Foot Ankle Int 1998 May;19(5):300-3

Department of Neurosurgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

An approach to the treatment of dorsal foot pain of neuroma origin is described based upon principals demonstrated to be effective in the treatment of upper extremity dorsoradial neuromas: translocation of the appropriate nerves into a muscle environment away from the joint. In the lower extremity, this requires identification of the appropriate nerves by anesthetic block, resection of the dorsal foot neuroma(s), and translocation of the nerves into the muscles of the anterolateral compartment. This approach yielded excellent results in 9 of the 11 patients with a mean follow-up of 29 months. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/107110079801900506DOI Listing
May 1998
4 Reads

Severe motor-dominant neuropathy with IgM M-protein binding to the NeuAcalpha2-3Galbeta- moiety.

J Neurol Sci 1998 Jan;154(1):4-7

Department of Internal Medicine, Yodogawa Christian Hospital, Osaka, Japan.

We report the occurrence of a relapsing, severe predominantly motor neuropathy in a 75-year-old man with an IGM-K M-protein binding to gangliosides GM2, GM3, GM4, GD1a, GT1b and LM1. Motor nerve conduction velocities were slowed with conduction block. A superficial peroneal nerve biopsy specimen revealed segmental demyelination and remyelination. Read More

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January 1998
2 Reads

The nonpeptide NK-1 receptor antagonists LY303870 and LY306740 block the responses of spinal dorsal horn neurons to substance P and to peripheral noxious stimuli.

Neuroscience 1998 Apr;83(4):1251-60

Department of Physiology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

The effects of novel substance P (NK-1) receptor antagonists LY303870 and LY306740, as well as LY306155, the enantiomer of LY303870, were tested on the responses of nociceptive spinal dorsal horn neurons to iontophoretically applied substance P and to peripheral noxious stimuli. The peripheral stimuli included noxious thermal and pinch stimuli applied to the cutaneous receptive field in the hind paw and stimulation of the superficial peroneal nerve with a train of high-intensity electrical stimuli. Extracellular recordings were obtained using multi-barrel electrodes from L4-L7 segments of the spinal cord in cats anaesthetized with alpha-chloralose and spinalized at the L1 level. Read More

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April 1998
4 Reads

Correlation between evoked motor response of the sciatic nerve and sensory blockade.

Anesthesiology 1997 Sep;87(3):547-52

Department of Anesthesiology, Northwestern University Medical School and Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois, USA.

Background: Incomplete sensory blockade of the foot after sciatic nerve block in the popliteal fossa may be related to the motor response that was elicited when the block was performed. We investigated the appropriate motor response when a nerve stimulator is used in sciatic nerve block at the popliteal fossa.

Methods: Six volunteers classified as American Society of Anesthesiologists' physical status I underwent 24 sciatic nerve blocks. Read More

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September 1997
5 Reads

[Compression syndrome of the superficial fibular nerve. Case report].

Handchir Mikrochir Plast Chir 1997 May;29(3):124-6

Abteilung für Plastische und Wiederherstellungschirurgle, Ludwig Boltzmann Institut für Qualitätssicherung, Wien.

The case of a female patient complaining of dysaesthesia and paraesthesia on the dorsum of her right foot and digits which failed to respond to conservative treatment is presented. 10 cm above the lateral malleolus, a muscle bulge of 2 cm was detected. Hoffmann-Tinel's sign was positive at this site. Read More

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May 1997
2 Reads