60 results match your criteria Nerve Block Dorsal Penile Neonatal


Field evaluation of the safety, acceptability, and feasibility of early infant male circumcision using the AccuCirc device.

PLoS One 2018 14;13(2):e0191501. Epub 2018 Feb 14.

Nyanza Reproductive Health Society, Kisumu, Kenya.

Background: As countries scale up adult voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) for HIV prevention, they are looking ahead to long term sustainable strategies, including introduction of early infant male circumcision (EIMC). Although a number of devices for EIMC are prequalified by the World Health Organization, evaluation of additional devices can provide policy-makers and clinicians the information required to make informed decisions. We undertook a field evaluation of the safety and acceptability of the AccuCirc device in Kisumu County, Kenya. Read More

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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0191501PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5812570PMC
March 2018
10 Reads

Combination Analgesia for Neonatal Circumcision: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Pediatrics 2017 Dec 17;140(6). Epub 2017 Nov 17.

Surgery, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Beirut, Lebanon

Objectives: There is no consensus on the most effective pain management for neonatal circumcision. We sought to compare different modalities.

Methods: This is a double-blinded randomized controlled trial comparing 3 combination analgesics used during circumcision (EMLA + sucrose; EMLA + sucrose + dorsal penile nerve block [DPNB]; EMLA + sucrose + ring block [RB]) with the traditional topical analgesic cream EMLA alone. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2017-1935DOI Listing
December 2017
9 Reads

Pediatric ambulatory anesthesia.

Anesthesiol Clin 2014 Jun 18;32(2):411-29. Epub 2014 Apr 18.

Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care, and Pain Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, GRB-415, Boston, MA 02114, USA.

Pediatric patients often undergo anesthesia for ambulatory procedures. This article discusses several common preoperative dilemmas, including whether to postpone anesthesia when a child has an upper respiratory infection, whether to test young women for pregnancy, which children require overnight admission for apnea monitoring, and the effectiveness of nonpharmacological techniques for reducing anxiety. Medication issues covered include the risks of anesthetic agents in children with undiagnosed weakness, the use of remifentanil for tracheal intubation, and perioperative dosing of rectal acetaminophen. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anclin.2014.02.002DOI Listing
June 2014
4 Reads

Comparison of eutectic mixture of local anesthetics cream with dorsal penile nerve block using lignocaine for circumcision in infants.

Pak J Med Sci 2013 Jan;29(1):27-30

Soofia Ahmed, Dept. of Paediatric Surgery, National Institute of Child Health, Rafiquee Shaheed Road, Karachi-75510, Pakistan.

Objective: Circumcision is a commonly performed surgical procedure but choice of anesthesia remained an issue of research and debate. This study was conducted to find out the effectiveness of the eutectic mixture of local anesthetic (EMLA) cream with dorsal penile nerve block (DPNB) using lignocaine, for reduction of pain during circumcision.

Methodology: This was comparative study carried out in Surgical Unit B of National Institute of Child Health Karachi, from May 2008 to October 2008. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12669/pjms.291.2944DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3809213PMC
January 2013
4 Reads

Regional anaesthesia in paediatric surgery: results of 2200 children.

J Pak Med Assoc 2011 Aug;61(8):782-6

Boztepe State Hospital of Ordu, Department of Anaesthesia and Reanimation, Pain, Ordu, Turkey.

Objectives: To evaluate paediatric regional anaesthesia applications in 2200 children at Diyarbakir Children's Hosptial, Turkey.

Methods: This is a cross-sectional study done from January 2005 and October 2009. Paediatric regional anaesthesia applications in 2200 children were retrospectively analysed and included in this study. Read More

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August 2011
3 Reads
0.403 Impact Factor

A review of systematic reviews on pain interventions in hospitalized infants.

Pain Res Manag 2008 Sep-Oct;13(5):413-20

The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids), Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Background: Hospitalized infants undergo multiple, repeated painful procedures. Despite continued efforts to prevent procedural pain and improve pain management, clinical guidelines and standards frequently do not reflect the highest quality evidence from systematic reviews.

Objective: To critically appraise all systematic reviews on the effectiveness of procedural pain interventions in hospitalized infants. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2799266PMC
March 2009
17 Reads

A video study of pain relief during newborn male circumcision.

J Perinatol 2006 Feb;26(2):106-10

Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, USA.

Objective: The purpose of this investigation was to compare the effectiveness of dorsal penile nerve block and topical lidocaine-prilocaine anesthesia techniques for pain relief during circumcision.

Methods: In total, 18 healthy term newborn males were divided based on anesthesia. The topical lidocaine-prilocaine group had six males undergoing circumcision and three males undergoing a sham procedure. Read More

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http://medicine.stonybrookmedicine.edu/system/files/7211413a
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http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/sj.jp.7211413
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.jp.7211413DOI Listing
February 2006
7 Reads

The use of non-nutritive sucking to decrease the physiologic pain response during neonatal circumcision: a randomized controlled trial.

Am J Obstet Gynecol 2005 Aug;193(2):537-42; discussion 542-3

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of North Carolina Hospitals, Chapel Hill, NC 27514, USA.

Objective: The purpose of this research was to study the effects on the physiologic pain response of the neonate during circumcision with the use of a gloved human finger.

Study Design: This was a randomized controlled trial analyzing the effect of non-nutritive sucking (NNS) on pain response during circumcision. Term neonates were randomized to 2 groups. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S000293780500490
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2005.03.060DOI Listing
August 2005
2 Reads

Lidocaine 4% cream compared with lidocaine 2.5% and prilocaine 2.5% or dorsal penile block for circumcision.

Am J Perinatol 2005 Jul;22(5):231-7

Department of Pharmacy Practice, The Eugene Applebaum College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences, Pediatric Pharmacology Research Unit, Children's Hospital of Michigan, Detroit, Michigan 48201, USA.

This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of lidocaine 4% cream (LMX4), compared with lidocaine 2.5% and prilocaine 2.5% (EMLA) or dorsal penile block (DPNB) for analgesia during circumcision. Read More

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http://www.thieme-connect.de/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-2005-871655
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-2005-871655DOI Listing
July 2005
13 Reads

Bupivacaine versus lidocaine analgesia for neonatal circumcision.

BMC Pediatr 2005 May 22;5(1):12. Epub 2005 May 22.

Department of Anesthesiology, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel.

Background: Analgesia for neonatal circumcision was recently advocated for every male infant, and its use is considered essential by the American Academy of Pediatrics. We compared the post-operative analgesic quality of bupivacaine to that of lidocaine for achieving dorsal penile nerve block (DPNB) when performing neonatal circumcision.

Methods: Data were obtained from 38 neonates following neonatal circumcision. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2431-5-12DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1164419PMC
May 2005
2 Reads

Pain relief for neonatal circumcision.

Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2004 Oct 18(4):CD004217. Epub 2004 Oct 18.

Child Health - Critical Care, Capital Health, Royal Alexandra Hospital, 10240 Kingsway, Room 5027-10 DTC, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, T5H 3V9.

Background: Circumcision is a painful procedure that many newborn males undergo in the first few days after birth. Interventions are available to reduce pain at circumcision; however, many newborns are circumcised without pain management.

Objectives: The objective of this review was to assess the effectiveness and safety of interventions for reducing pain at neonatal circumcision. Read More

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http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/103/1/196.full
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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/14651858.CD004217.pub2
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD004217.pub2DOI Listing
October 2004
5 Reads

Regional anesthesia for office procedures: Part II. Extremity and inguinal area surgeries.

Authors:
Gohar A Salam

Am Fam Physician 2004 Feb;69(4):896-900

North Shore University Hospital at Manhasset, Manhasset, New York, USA.

The hand can be anesthetized effectively with blocks of the median, ulnar, or radial nerve. Each digit is supplied by four digital nerves, which can be blocked with injections on each side of the digit. Anterior or posterior ankle blocks can be used for regional anesthesia for the foot. Read More

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February 2004
5 Reads

An evidence-based multidisciplinary protocol for neonatal circumcision pain management.

J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs 2002 Jul-Aug;31(4):403-10

Children's Hospital of Iowa, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City 52242-1009, USA.

Pain experienced in infancy may have effects later in life. Neonatal circumcision is a common painful procedure. In addition to dorsal penile nerve block, interventions that may have a role in minimizing pain and distress in neonatal circumcision include use of a sucrose pacifier, buffered lidocaine, small needles, acetaminophen, swaddling, and environmental modification. Read More

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September 2002
1 Read

Oral glucose solution for analgesia in infant circumcision.

Authors:
F C Kass J R Holman

J Fam Pract 2001 Sep;50(9):785-8

Headquarters Battalion, BAS, Camp Lejeune, CA, USA.

Objectives: Our objectives were to determine if a 50% dextrose solution would reduce the percentage of circumcision procedure time a neonate spent crying by 50% compared with water and whether it would be similar to a dorsal penile nerve block (DPNB).

Study Design: This was a randomized placebo-controlled blinded clinical trial.

Population: We included 71 patients who were recruited from the inpatient nursery of a military community hospital over a 5-month period. Read More

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September 2001
5 Reads

Gomco circumcision: When is it safe?

J Pediatr Surg 2001 Jul;36(7):1047-9

State University of New York HSC at Brooklyn, Brooklyn, NY, USA.

Background/purpose: The Gomco clamp is used most commonly for neonatal circumcisions in the United States with reported rates of complication as low as 0.2%. Often, however, circumcision is delayed beyond the neonatal period because of illness, parental concerns, or physician bias with patients presenting for elective circumcision in the first few years of life. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/jpsu.2001.24739DOI Listing
July 2001
3 Reads

Pain management for neonatal circumcision.

Authors:
A Taddio

Paediatr Drugs 2001 ;3(2):101-11

Department of Pharmacy, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Circumcision is the most common surgical procedure performed in the neonatal period in North America. If untreated, the pain of circumcision causes both short and long term changes in infant behaviours. The most widely studied pharmacological intervention for pain management during circumcision is dorsal penile nerve block (DPNB) by injected lidocaine (lignocaine). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2165/00128072-200103020-00003DOI Listing
May 2001
8 Reads

Combined analgesia and local anesthesia to minimize pain during circumcision.

Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 2000 Jun;154(6):620-3

Department of Pharmacy, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Background: Pain of circumcision is only partially relieved by single modalities, such as penile nerve block, lidocaine-prilocaine cream, and sucrose pacifiers.

Objective: To assess the effectiveness of a combination of interventions on the pain response of infants undergoing circumcision.

Methods: Cohort study. Read More

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June 2000
2 Reads

A randomized, placebo-controlled comparison of EMLA() and dorsal penile nerve block for pain relief during neonatal circumcision.

Prim Care Update Ob Gyns 1998 Jul;5(4):196

Rochester General Hospital, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, New York, Rochester, USA

Objective: To evaluate the relative efficacies of eutetic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA()) cream and dorsal penile nerve block (DPNB) for pain relief during neonatal circumcision.Methods: After parental informed consent, appropriate-for-gestational age, term, healthy newborns were randomized to receive either EMLA cream and placebo saline DPNB or placebo cream and 1% lidocaine DPNB. Placebo and EMLA cream were prepared by the pharmacy and applied by study nurses. Read More

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July 1998
2 Reads

Lidocaine-prilocaine cream for analgesia during circumcision in newborn boys.

Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2000 (2):CD000496

Paediatrics, Mount Sinai Hospital, 600 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. or

Background: Neonates routinely undergo tissue-damaging interventions as part of medical treatment. The skin is the site of noxious stimulation for many procedures, including circumcision. EMLA (eutectic mixture of local anesthetics) penetrates intact skin and has the potential to reduce pain associated with circumcision. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/14651858.CD000496
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD000496DOI Listing
July 2000
4 Reads

A randomized, controlled trial of a eutectic mixture of local anesthetic cream (lidocaine and prilocaine) versus penile nerve block for pain relief during circumcision.

Am J Obstet Gynecol 1999 Dec;181(6):1506-11

Department of Pediatrics, Rochester General Hospital, The University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, NY 14621, USA.

Objective: We set out to compare a eutectic mixture of local anesthetic cream (lidocaine and prilocaine) to dorsal penile nerve block with lidocaine for anesthesia during circumcision.

Study Design: In a double-blind study, term newborns were randomized to local anesthetic cream and sodium chloride solution dorsal penile nerve block (n = 31) or to placebo cream and lidocaine dorsal penile nerve block (n = 29). Pain was assessed by determination of heart rate, respiratory rate, and behavioral distress scoring. Read More

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December 1999
3 Reads

Dorsal penile nerve block vs topical placebo for circumcision in low-birth-weight neonates.

Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 1999 May;153(5):476-80

Department of Pediatrics, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA.

Objective: To investigate the efficacy and safety of dorsal penile nerve block (DPNB) and eutectic mixture of lidocaine (EMLA) for palliation of pain associated with circumcision in low-birth-weight infants.

Design: Randomized, blinded, controlled trial.

Setting: Intensive care nursery (step down unit) at Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC. Read More

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May 1999
31 Reads

Plain and buffered lidocaine for neonatal circumcision.

Obstet Gynecol 1999 Mar;93(3):350-2

Blodgett Memorial Medical Center, Grand Rapids, Michigan 49506, USA.

Objective: To determine if buffered lidocaine provided a more effective nerve block in a short time than plain lidocaine for neonatal circumcision.

Methods: One hundred ninety-four newborn males were studied in a randomized trial using two dorsal penile nerve block preparations for circumcision. Ninety-two received plain lidocaine, and 102 received buffered lidocaine. Read More

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March 1999
14 Reads

A comparison of the Mogen and Gomco clamps in combination with dorsal penile nerve block in minimizing the pain of neonatal circumcision.

Pediatrics 1999 Feb;103(2):E23

Department of Pediatrics, St Francis Hospital and Medical Center, Hartford, CT 06105, USA.

Objectives: 1) To compare the Mogen and Gomco clamps with regard to pain experienced during neonatal circumcision, and 2) to assess neonatal circumcision pain with and without dorsal penile nerve block (DPNB).

Design/methods: A randomized, controlled, nonblinded clinical trial; 48 healthy, full-term infants were randomized into one of the following four groups: Gomco vs Mogen with (+) or without (-) DPNB. DPNB+ infants were injected with 0. Read More

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February 1999
3 Reads

Infant physiological responses to noxious stimuli of circumcision with anesthesia and analgesia.

Pediatr Nurs 1998 Jul-Aug;24(4):385-9

Anesthesia Associates, Fargo, ND, USA.

Purpose: To compare the efficacy of dorsal penile nerve block (DPNB) and eutectic mixture of local anesthetic (EMLA) for attenuation of neonatal pain during circumcision.

Method: A total of 20 infants born at a United States upper Midwestern hospital were involved in the study. Measurements of blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, and oxygen saturation were obtained along with a Neonatal Infant Pain Scale (NIPS) grading at five separate intervals (baseline, restraint, incision, Gomco clamp application, and post circumcision) throughout the circumcision procedure. Read More

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December 1998
3 Reads

Circumcision practice patterns in the United States.

Pediatrics 1998 Jun;101(6):E5

Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, HealthPartners Medical Group, Minneapolis-St Paul, Minnesota, USA.

Objective: To determine 1) the performing of circumcision by medical specialty, gender, and years of practice; 2) the pattern of anesthetic use for this procedure; and 3) the reasons physicians cite for not using anesthesia.

Design: A total of 3066 questionnaires were received from a mailing to a representative sampling of physicians stratified by specialty and geographic location.

Results: Fifty-eight percent (1768) of the questionnaires were returned and interpretable from the following specialists: pediatricians (PEDs), 73% (n = 691); family practitioners (FPs), 52% (n = 464); and obstetricians (OBs), 51% (n = 623). Read More

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June 1998
2 Reads

Analgesia for neonatal circumcision: a randomized controlled trial of EMLA cream versus dorsal penile nerve block.

Pediatrics 1998 Apr;101(4):E5

Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14642, USA.

Objective: To compare the efficacy of the dorsal penile nerve block (DPNB) with a less invasive form of local anesthesia, eutectic mixture of local anesthetic (EMLA) cream, for reduction of pain during neonatal circumcision.

Design: Prospective, blinded, randomized, controlled trial.

Setting: Tertiary referral, neonatal intensive care nursery in a university teaching hospital. Read More

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April 1998
8 Reads

Neonatal circumcision. Randomized trial of a sucrose pacifier for pain control.

Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 1998 Mar;152(3):279-84

Department of Pediatrics, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Ill, USA.

Objective: To assess the effectiveness of oral sucrose via a nipple compared with no treatment and dorsal penile nerve block (DPNB) for alleviating pain in neonatal circumcision.

Design: Randomized control trial. Data analysis performed by investigators blinded to the 3 treatment groups. Read More

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March 1998
4 Reads

Comparison of ring block, dorsal penile nerve block, and topical anesthesia for neonatal circumcision: a randomized controlled trial.

JAMA 1997 Dec 24-31;278(24):2157-62

Faculty of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.

Context: Beliefs about the safety and effectiveness of current anesthetics have resulted in many newborns being circumcised without the benefit of anesthesia.

Objective: To compare ring block, dorsal penile nerve block, a topical eutectic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA), and topical placebo when used for neonatal circumcision. The placebo represented current practice, with no anesthetic for neonatal circumcision. Read More

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January 1998
16 Reads

Beyond dorsal penile nerve block: a more humane circumcision.

Pediatrics 1997 Aug;100(2):E3

Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Group Health, Inc., White Bear Lake, MN 55110, USA.

Objective: To explore techniques that can be utilized in addition to the dorsal penile nerve block (DPNB) to further reduce the neonate's stress and pain from routine circumcision, and thus make the procedure more humane.

Setting: Level 1 nursery at a community hospital.

Subjects: Eighty healthy, term, newborn male infants scheduled for routine neonatal circumcision. Read More

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August 1997
3 Reads

Circumcision anesthesia: a study of nursing implications for dorsal penile nerve block.

Authors:
M L Williamson

Pediatr Nurs 1997 Jan-Feb;23(1):59-63

Ellen Finley Earhart School of Nursing, Park College, Parkville, MO, USA.

Purpose: To compare responses to circumcision between a group of unanesthetized newborn males and a group having dorsal penile nerve block (DPNB).

Method: Thirty newborn males who met the selection criteria were randomly assigned to the treatment (n = 20) or control group (n = 10). Oxygen perfusion, blood pressure, respiratory rate, heart rate, and cardiac rhythm were measured before, during, and after circumcision. Read More

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May 1997
5 Reads

Local anesthesia for circumcision: which technique is most effective?

J Am Board Fam Pract 1997 Jan-Feb;10(1):13-9

University of Nevada School of Medicine, Reno, USA.

Background And Objectives: Circumcision is the most commonly performed surgical procedure in the United States, and it is painful. Several investigators have independently documented the reliability and safety of local anesthesia in eliminating the pain associated with circumcision. Investigations have not, however, been conducted to determine which technique is most effective in reducing the pain of the procedure. Read More

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April 1997
4 Reads

Comparison of newborn circumcision pain to calcaneal heel puncture pain: is newborn circumcision pain control clinically warranted?

Authors:
M E Holton

J Am Osteopath Assoc 1996 Jan;96(1):31-3

In newborns, elective male circumcision and calcaneal puncture for obtaining blood samples both cause pain. With elective male circumcision, dorsal penile nerve block (DPNB) is recommended for pain control, but no pain control is routinely recommended or used during calcaneal puncture. A prospective investigation was conducted to compare pain during elective circumcision (with and without DPNB) and calcaneal puncture to determine whether pain control should be used with the latter procedure. Read More

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January 1996
2 Reads

Prospective evaluation of complications of dorsal penile nerve block for neonatal circumcision.

Pediatrics 1995 May;95(5):705-8

Department of Pediatrics, Group Health, Inc., White Bear Lake, MN 55110, USA.

Objective: To evaluate the complications of the dorsal penile nerve block (DPNB) when used for routine neonatal circumcisions.

Methods: All male newborns born in a community hospital between November 1, 1989 and August 31, 1990, and circumcised after DPNB were evaluated. Questionnaires were completed at the time of hospital discharge and at a health supervision visit 2 weeks later. Read More

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May 1995
4 Reads

The safety of dorsal penile nerve block for neonatal circumcision.

J Fam Pract 1994 Sep;39(3):243-8

Department of Family Practice and Community Health, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis.

Background: Dorsal penile nerve block (DPNB) was first described for use in neonatal circumcision in 1978. Since then, many studies have documented its effectiveness in alleviating pain in newborns undergoing circumcision. In 1989, the American Academy of Pediatrics acknowledged that DPNB may relieve the pain and stress of circumcision but stopped short of endorsing its routine use in this procedure, citing lack of data on its safety. Read More

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September 1994
3 Reads

Changing attitudes and practices regarding local analgesia for newborn circumcision.

Authors:
C A Ryan N N Finer

Pediatrics 1994 Aug;94(2 Pt 1):230-3

Department of Newborn Medicine, Royal Alexandra Hospital, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.

Study Objective: To change physician attitudes and practices regarding the routine use of local and regional anesthesia for newborn circumcision.

Design: Interventional study, followed by an audit of physician practice over a 1-month period, 1 year following interventions.

Setting: The newborn nurseries of the Women's Pavilion, Royal Alexandra Hospital, Edmonton. Read More

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August 1994
3 Reads

Attitudes and practices regarding analgesia for newborn circumcision.

Pediatrics 1993 Oct;92(4):541-3

Department of Paediatrics, Children's Hospital of Western Ontario, London, Canada.

Study Objective: To determine attitudes regarding routine use of analgesia for newborn circumcision among primary care physicians in southwestern Ontario.

Design: Questionnaire survey conducted among all family physicians and pediatricians belonging to the London Academy of Medicine. The majority of pediatric primary care in this region is provided by family physicians. Read More

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October 1993
3 Reads

Dorsal penile root anesthesia for circumcision.

Authors:
J Goldenring

Clin Pediatr (Phila) 1993 Feb;32(2):127-8

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http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/000992289303200218
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/000992289303200218DOI Listing
February 1993
7 Reads

Dorsal penile nerve block in neonatal circumcision: chloroprocaine versus lidocaine.

Am J Perinatol 1992 May;9(3):214-8

Saint Francis Hospital, Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Dorsal penile nerve blocking (DPNB) has been used with success in decreasing neonatal stress during circumcision. This study was designed to confirm the effectiveness of lidocaine in DPNB and to demonstrate that chloroprocaine, a shorter acting anesthetic, is as effective in blocking circumcision stress as lidocaine, but, because of its shorter plasma elimination half-life and time of onset of action, is safer. Five groups of 15 neonates were matched for weight, age, and Apgar scores and randomly assigned to a control group, one lidocaine group and three chloroprocaine groups with 2-, 3- and 5-minute postinjection waiting periods. Read More

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http://www.thieme-connect.de/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-2007-999324
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-2007-999324DOI Listing
May 1992
3 Reads

Pain in neonatal circumcision.

Clin Pediatr (Phila) 1991 Jul;30(7):429-32

Department of Pediatrics, Kaiser Permanente Medical Center, Oakland, California 94611-5693.

Because newborn circumcision is a quick and safe surgical procedure, any method to relieve pain must be almost risk-free in order to be acceptable. General anesthesia and narcotic analgesia are not appropriate. Dorsal penile nerve block (DPNB) with lidocaine hydrochloride is probably the most effective and safest form of anesthesia for newborn circumcision currently available, but it can cause significant local and systemic reactions. Read More

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http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/000992289103000704
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/000992289103000704DOI Listing
July 1991
6 Reads

[Locoregional anesthesia in surgery with day hospitalization. Our experience with 240 cases].

Cir Pediatr 1991 Apr;4(2):88-90

Servicio de Cirurgía Pediátrica, Hospital Materno-Infantil Doce de Octubre, Madrid.

Locoregional anaesthesia has become an excellent complement of conventional general anaesthesia, because it results in efficient postoperative pain relief and is easy to carry out. We have performed two types of anaesthetic blockade: of peripheral nerve (dorsal nerve of the penis and abdominogenital nerve) and caudal block. Both have been employed in pediatric day surgery with good results in postoperative pain relief and with no complications. Read More

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April 1991
2 Reads

Dorsal penile nerve block for newborn circumcision.

Am Fam Physician 1991 Apr;43(4):1327-33

University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis.

Dorsal penile nerve block with lidocaine is safe and effective for reducing the pain associated with newborn circumcision. Administering the anesthesia adds little time or expense to the overall routine. Complications are minor, limited to local bleeding and hematoma formation. Read More

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April 1991
5 Reads

Dorsal penile nerve block.

J Am Board Fam Pract 1991 Jan-Feb;4(1):66-7

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March 1991
4 Reads

A complication associated with dorsal penile nerve block.

Authors:
R Berens S P Pontus

Reg Anesth 1990 Nov-Dec;15(6):309-10

Department of Anesthesiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Children's Hospital of Wisconsin, Milwaukee 53201.

A case describing a 2-day-old term male infant who received a dorsal penile nerve block (DNPB) prior to circumcision, inadvertently with 1:1000 epinephrine, is presented. The patient had a brief hemodynamic response followed by profound vasoconstriction and ischemia of the genitalia. A caudal catheter was inserted and a sympathetic block established in an attempt to antagonize the epinephrine-induced vasoconstriction. Read More

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April 1991
15 Reads

Dorsal penile nerve block.

Authors:
S I Lerman

J Am Board Fam Pract 1990 Oct-Dec;3(4):312-3

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January 1991
7 Reads

Local anesthesia for neonatal circumcisions: are family practice residents likely to use it?

Authors:
P Fontaine

Fam Med 1990 Sep-Oct;22(5):371-5

Department of Family Practice and Community Health, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis 55455.

Dorsal penile nerve block with lidocaine (DPNB) is a local anesthetic technique for neonatal circumcision which is both effective and consistent with ethical concerns for infant welfare. As such, it should be included in training programs that prepare residents to care for newborns. To assess the current level of DPNB use by residents in a family practice training program and to identify attitudes and other factors that relate to use, a survey was sent to 127 residents in the Department of Family Practice and Community Health, University of Minnesota. Read More

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December 1990
4 Reads

Effectiveness of 1% lidocaine dorsal penile nerve block in infant circumcision.

Am J Obstet Gynecol 1990 Sep;163(3):1074-8; discussion 1078-80

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston 29425.

A prospective, controlled, double-blinded investigation was conducted to evaluate whether infants undergoing circumcisions with 1% lidocaine dorsal penile nerve blocks experienced decreased stress as compared with those receiving saline solution injections or no injections. Stress was measured in terms of pulse rate and oxygen saturation on a pulse oximeter. A subjective grading scale was also developed to measure infant irritability. Read More

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September 1990
2 Reads

Dorsal penile nerve block during newborn circumcision: underutilization of a proven technique?

J Am Board Fam Pract 1990 Jul-Sep;3(3):171-4

Department of Family Medicine, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland 97201.

Newborn circumcision is the most common surgical procedure in the United States. The technique for local anesthesia, dorsal penile nerve block (DPNB), was first described in 1978. Although multiple subsequent studies have reported that DPNB can relieve pain and stress during a newborn's circumcision without any additional morbidity, many practitioners do not employ this technique. Read More

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September 1990
4 Reads

Anesthesia for neonatal circumcision: local anesthesia is better than dorsal penile nerve block.

Authors:
A L Masciello

Obstet Gynecol 1990 May;75(5):834-8

University of Florida Health Science Center, Jacksonville.

Several studies document the benefit of dorsal penile nerve block for neonatal circumcision, but the literature does not address the use of local anesthesia. A randomized, controlled, prospective study was conducted to compare the efficacy of dorsal penile nerve block versus local anesthesia. Thirty infants were randomly divided into three equal groups (N = 10): an unanesthetized control group, a group given dorsal penile nerve block, and a group given local anesthesia. Read More

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May 1990
31 Reads

Dorsal penile nerve block for circumcision.

Authors:
M R Mintz R Grillo

Clin Pediatr (Phila) 1989 Dec;28(12):590-1

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/000992288902801210DOI Listing
December 1989
3 Reads