1,016 results match your criteria Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis


'Nephrogenic' systemic fibrosis is mediated by myeloid C-C chemokine receptor 2.

J Invest Dermatol 2019 Apr 9. Epub 2019 Apr 9.

Kidney Institute of New Mexico; University of New Mexico Health Science Center; New Mexico Veterans Administration Health Care System. Electronic address:

Gadolinium-based contrast agents are implicated in several pathologic abnormalities (long-term retention in vital organs such as the skin and brain) and are the cause of a sometimes fatal condition in patients, 'nephrogenic' systemic fibrosis (NSF). Bone marrow-derived fibrocytes and the monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP1) inflammatory pathway have been implicated as mediators of adverse effects induced by gadolinium-based contrast agents. Mechanistic studies are scant. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jid.2019.03.1145DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Update on Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agent-Enhanced Imaging in the Genitourinary System.

AJR Am J Roentgenol 2019 Apr 11:1-11. Epub 2019 Apr 11.

3 Department of Radiology, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.

Objective: The purpose of this article is to review gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA)-enhanced MRI applications in the genitourinary system.

Conclusion: Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is rare or nonexistent with standard dosing of group II GBCAs. Gadolinium retention, cost, and examination times are emerging considerations affecting GBCA use. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2214/AJR.19.21137DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

[Gadolinium deposition-"gadolinium deposition disease"].

Radiologe 2019 Apr 8. Epub 2019 Apr 8.

Klinik für Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Universitätsklinikum des Saarlandes, Kirrberger Str., Gebäude 50.1, 66421, Homburg/Saar, Deutschland.

Gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents have been routinely used worldwide in diagnostic MRI since 1988. All routinely applied contrast agents for clinical use were considered extremely safe with regard to tolerance, adverse effects and diagnostic efficacy and when used at Food and Drug Administration-approved doses. With the identification of Gd-associated disorders, namely nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and adverse reactions, and in the longer term Gd-retention in the brain, this view changed and led to the withdrawal or restriction of approval of linear Gd chelates in Europe. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00117-019-0522-9
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00117-019-0522-9DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Effect of gadolinium concentration on temperature change under magnetic field.

PLoS One 2019 4;14(4):e0214910. Epub 2019 Apr 4.

Nazarbayev University, Chemical and Materials Engineering, Astana, Kazakhstan.

Gadolinium based contrast agents (GBCAs) were found to play a role in nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in patients with and without renal impairment. Therefore, preserving the structural stability of GBCAs to reduce their propensity to liberate Gd3+ is of utmost importance. This study evaluates the effect of gadolinium concentration of GBCAs on solution temperature under magnetic fields. Read More

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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0214910PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6449068PMC
April 2019
1 Read

Practical administration of intravenous contrast media in children: screening, prophylaxis, administration and treatment of adverse reactions.

Pediatr Radiol 2019 Apr 29;49(4):433-447. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

Department of Radiology, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.

Administration of intravenous contrast media to children is a routine practice at many clinical imaging centers, that can involve special considerations. In this paper, we provide practical information to facilitate optimal performance and oversight of this task. We provide targeted screening questions that can help to identify high-risk pediatric patients for both iodine-based and gadolinium-based intravenous contrast media administration. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00247-018-4306-6DOI Listing

Renal Safety of Intravenous Gadolinium Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients Following Liver Transplantation.

Transplantation 2019 Feb 19. Epub 2019 Feb 19.

Emory University School of Medicine, Departments of Medicine.

Background: Intravenous contrast enhanced imaging is invaluable in diagnosing pathology following liver transplantation. Given the potential risk of contrast nephropathy associated with iodinated CT contrast, alternate contrast modalities need to be examined, especially in the setting of renal insufficiency. The purpose of this study was to examine the renal safety of MRI with gadolinium following liver transplantation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TP.0000000000002678DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Use and Safety of Gadolinium Based Contrast Agents in Pediatric MR Imaging.

Indian J Pediatr 2019 Feb 22. Epub 2019 Feb 22.

Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital For Sick Children and Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 1X8, Canada.

Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCA) used for MR imaging are a valuable imaging resource that has benefited patient management over last three decades and largely have a high safety profile. However, recently, adverse effects related to GBCA like nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) and asymptomatic gadolinium deposition in tissues including brain are concerning. While NSF has largely stopped occurring due to precautions and guidelines to not use GBCA in patients with poor renal function, the long term effects of gadolinium deposition, especially in brain, are not known at this stage. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s12098-019-02891-x
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12098-019-02891-xDOI Listing
February 2019
12 Reads

Renal Imaging: Core Curriculum 2019.

Am J Kidney Dis 2019 Apr 15;73(4):552-565. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA. Electronic address:

Renal imaging has become a fundamental part of clinical care for patients with kidney disease. Imaging strategies for the kidney have been evolving during the past hundred years and have been even more rapidly changing during the past couple of decades due to the development of modern computed tomographic techniques, magnetic resonance imaging, and more sophisticated ultrasonographic techniques, such as contrast-enhanced ultrasonography. Applying the correct radiologic study for the clinical situation maximizes the diagnostic accuracy of the imaging, and a judicious choice between techniques helps limit radiation dose and potential adverse events. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/j.ajkd.2018.12.029DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Reductive microenvironment responsive gadolinium-based polymers as potential safe MRI contrast agents.

Biomater Sci 2019 Feb 18. Epub 2019 Feb 18.

Huaxi MR Research Center (HMRRC), Department of Radiology, West China Hospital, and National Engineering Research Center for Biomaterials, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China.

Accumulation of nano-scale contrast agents in body tissues potentially induces adverse effects associated with free Gd(iii) ion release from the nano-scale system, such as nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and gadolinium deposition in the brain tissue. A novel formulation strategy was proposed herein for Gd-based macromolecular MRI contrast agents (Gd-mCAs), which may significantly reduce Gd(iii) retention but maintain sufficient imaging contrast. Biodegradable poly[N-(1,3-dihydroxypropyl)methacrylamide] copolymers (pDHPMA) were synthesized from N-(1,3-dihydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (DHPMA) as a monomer and enzyme-responsive short peptide (GFLG) as a chain transfer agent. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c8bm01103fDOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis in a Patient With Multiple Inflammatory Disorders.

Fed Pract 2018 Jun;35(6):40-43

is a Chief Resident in the University of California Department of Medicine in Los Angeles. is a Hospitalist, and is a Pulmonologist at West Los Angeles VAMC Medical Center in California.

The risk of developing nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in patients with end stage renal disease may increase with exposure to gadolinium-based contrast dyes during magnetic resonance imaging. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6368019PMC

Calciphylaxis and nephrogenic fibrosing dermopathy with pseudoxanthoma elasticum-like changes: Successful treatment with sodium thiosulfate.

J Dermatol 2019 Jan 21. Epub 2019 Jan 21.

Department of Dermatology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1346-8138.14780DOI Listing
January 2019
11 Reads

Exposure of Macrophages to Low-Dose Gadolinium-Based Contrast Medium: Impact on Oxidative Stress and Cytokines Production.

Contrast Media Mol Imaging 2018 2;2018:3535769. Epub 2018 Dec 2.

Department of Medical Imaging, Taipei Tzu Chi Hospital, Buddhist Tzu-Chi Medical Foundation, New Taipei City, Taiwan.

The toxicity of gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) has drawn a lot of attention. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), a lethal disease related to the use of GBCAs, is still not understood. Recently, gadolinium retention is found in brain tissues after repeated use of GBCAs in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Read More

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https://www.hindawi.com/journals/cmmi/2018/3535769/
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2018/3535769DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6305030PMC
December 2018
12 Reads

Gadolinium Deposition in the Brain: Current Updates.

Korean J Radiol 2019 Jan 27;20(1):134-147. Epub 2018 Dec 27.

Department of Radiology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) are commonly used for enhancement in MR imaging and have long been considered safe when administered at recommended doses. However, since the report that nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is linked to the use of GBCAs in subjects with severe renal diseases, accumulating evidence has suggested that GBCAs are not cleared entirely from our bodies; some GBCAs are deposited in our tissues, including the brain. GBCA deposition in the brain is mostly linked to the specific chelate structure of the GBCA: linear GBCAs were responsible for brain deposition in almost all reported studies. Read More

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https://synapse.koreamed.org/DOIx.php?id=10.3348/kjr.2018.03
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3348/kjr.2018.0356DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6315073PMC
January 2019
10 Reads

Quiescent-Interval Single-Shot Magnetic Resonance Angiography.

Diagnostics (Basel) 2018 Dec 18;8(4). Epub 2018 Dec 18.

Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Laboratory for Minimally Invasive Therapeutics, Mayo Clinic, Phoenix, Arizona 85054, USA.

Lower extremity peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a chronic, debilitating disease with a significant global burden. A number of diagnostic imaging techniques exist, including computed tomography angiography (CTA) and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CEMRA), to aid in PAD diagnosis and subsequent treatment planning. Due to concerns of renal toxicity or nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) for iodinated and gadolinium-based contrasts, respectively, a number of non-enhanced MRA (NEMRA) protocols are being increasingly used in PAD diagnosis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics8040084DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6315503PMC
December 2018

Gadolinium-based contrast agents: why nephrologists need to be concerned.

Curr Opin Nephrol Hypertens 2019 Mar;28(2):154-162

Kidney Institute of New Mexico.

Purpose Of Review: The hegemony of gadolinium-based contrast agent-induced adverse events stretches beyond those who have renal impairment. 'Nephrogenic' systemic fibrosis is a misnomer: gadolinium-based contrast agents are the known trigger for the disease; kidney impairment is a risk factor. Impaired (true) glomerular filtration may be one catalyst for gadolinium-based contrast agent-induced adverse events, but it is increasingly evident that the same cluster of symptoms occurs in patients with normal renal function. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00041552-900000000-9919
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MNH.0000000000000475DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6416778PMC
March 2019
13 Reads

Dermatologic manifestations in end stage renal disease.

Hemodial Int 2019 Jan 6;23(1):3-18. Epub 2018 Dec 6.

Department of Nephrology, Cleveland Clinic Akron General, Akron, Ohio, USA.

Skin manifestations are commonly seen in end stage renal disease (ESRD). Skin involvement in this population can be extensive and dramatically worsen quality of life. Close observation of the skin and nails of ESRD patients by clinicians allows for timely diagnosis and treatment, which ultimately improves quality of life and reduces mortality. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/hdi.12689DOI Listing
January 2019
7 Reads

The biological fate of gadolinium-based MRI contrast agents: a call to action for bioinorganic chemists.

Metallomics 2019 Feb;11(2):240-254

The Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, The Institute for Innovation in Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 149 Thirteenth Street, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA.

Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) are widely used with clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and 10 s of millions of doses of GBCAs are administered annually worldwide. GBCAs are hydrophilic, thermodynamically stable and kinetically inert gadolinium chelates. In clinical MRI, 5-10 millimoles of Gd ion is administered intravenously and the GBCA is rapidly eliminated intact primarily through the kidneys into the urine. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c8mt00302eDOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Evaluating the Patient with Reported Gadolinium-Associated Illness.

J Med Toxicol 2019 Jan 29;15(1):36-44. Epub 2018 Nov 29.

Department of Emergency Medicine, Hartford Hospital, 80 Seymour St, Room 139, Hartford, CT, 06103, USA.

Introduction: Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) have been increasingly used in clinical practice since their introduction in the 1980s. Recently, increased public attention has been given to patients who report new symptoms following GBCA exposure. This review details the current knowledge surrounding GBCAs, with a focus on the known and proposed disease states that may be associated with GBCAs. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s13181-018-0689-x
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13181-018-0689-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6314929PMC
January 2019
15 Reads

Gadolinium tissue deposition in the periodontal ligament of mice with reduced renal function exposed to Gd-based contrast agents.

Toxicol Lett 2019 Feb 23;301:157-167. Epub 2018 Nov 23.

Institute for Maternal and Child Health, IRCCS Burlo Garofolo, Trieste, Italy. Electronic address:

Gadolinium deposition in tissue is linked to nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF): a rare disorder occurring in patients with severe chronic kidney disease and associated with administration of Gd-based contrast agents (GBCAs) for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). It is suggested that the GBCAs prolonged permanence in blood in these patients may result in a Gd precipitation in peripheral or central organs, where it initiates a fibrotic process. In this study we investigated new sites of retention/precipitation of Gd in a mouse model of renal disease (5/6 nephrectomy) receiving two doses (closely after each other) of a linear GBCA. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S03784274183205
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.toxlet.2018.11.014DOI Listing
February 2019
15 Reads

Influence of excess ligand on Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis associated with nonionic, linear gadolinium-based contrast agents.

Magn Reson Imaging 2019 May 22;58:174-178. Epub 2018 Nov 22.

Department of Radiology, Hospital Garcia de Orta, EPE, Almada, Portugal.

Background: The molecular structure, charge, thermodynamic and kinetic stability are approximately the same for gadodiamide and gadoversetamide, the main substantive difference is that gadodiamide is manufactured with 5% free ligand to form Omniscan® and gadoversetamide with 10% free ligand to form OptiMARK®.

Purpose: To determine the relative risk of Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis (NSF) between gadodiamide (Omniscan®) and gadoversetamide (OptiMARK®) and to explore the potential contribution of the amount of excess ligand added to their commercial formulations.

Materials And Methods: In this retrospective observational study, the number of doses and NSF cases associated with these agents were calculated based on two different approaches: the number of doses was determined based on pharmaceutical companies' information, and the number of unconfounded NSF cases was obtained from the previously published literature based on a legal database. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mri.2018.11.015DOI Listing
May 2019
2.022 Impact Factor

LA-ICP-MS/MS improves limits of detection in elemental bioimaging of gadolinium deposition originating from MRI contrast agents in skin and brain tissues.

J Trace Elem Med Biol 2019 Jan 1;51:212-218. Epub 2018 Nov 1.

University of Münster, Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Corrensstr. 30, 48149, Münster, Germany. Electronic address:

A novel analytical method to detect the retention of gadolinium from contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in tissue samples of patients is presented. It is based on laser ablation - inductively coupled plasma - triple quadrupole - mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS/MS). Both Gd and P were monitored with a mass shift of +16, corresponding to mono-oxygenated species, as well as Zn, Ca, and Fe on-mass. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jtemb.2018.10.021DOI Listing
January 2019
17 Reads
2.491 Impact Factor

[Non-iodinated contrast media nephrotoxicity].

Nephrol Ther 2018 Nov 6;14(6):484-490. Epub 2018 Oct 6.

Service Icar, hôpital de la Pitié-Salpêtrière, 83, boulevard de l'Hôpital, 75013 Paris, France; Service de néphrologie, hôpital de la Pitié-Salpêtrière, 83, boulevard de l'Hôpital, 75013 Paris, France.

The development of interventional radiology techniques regularly exposes patients to the potential renal toxocity of iodinated contrast media. Faced with this risk of nephrotoxicity, gadolinium-based contrast agents have long been considered as a safe alternative to iodinated contrast media, especially in sensitive or at risk patients. However, these gadolinium-based contrast agents are not devoid of nephrotoxicity and present another risk, a complication related to renal failure, the nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S17697255183058
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nephro.2018.09.002DOI Listing
November 2018
3 Reads

Absence of potential gadolinium toxicity symptoms following 22,897 gadoteric acid (Dotarem®) examinations, including 3,209 performed on renally insufficient individuals.

Eur Radiol 2019 Apr 1;29(4):1922-1930. Epub 2018 Oct 1.

Division of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee, DD1 9SY, UK.

Objectives: Recent safety concerns regarding gadolinium-based contrast agents (GdCAs) concluded with the suspension of some agents from the European market, yet a clinical consequence remains unknown. We used electronic health records to investigate the incidence of potential toxicity to gadoteric acid (Dotarem®) within our local population, including those with renal insufficiency (RI).

Methods: Data for patients who underwent contrast-enhanced MRI were identified, stratified by renal function at time of scan and retrospectively followed using routinely collected health data. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00330-018-5737-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6420614PMC
April 2019
2 Reads

[Mimetics of systemic sclerosis].

Z Rheumatol 2019 Feb;78(1):14-23

Klinik für Rheumatologie und klinische Immunologie, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Lübeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538, Lübeck, Deutschland.

Background: Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is characterized by heterogeneous clinical symptoms. Peripheral skin fibrosis can be a common symptom. Nevertheless, a variety of diseases with different etiologies are associated with a thickening of the skin and make the initial diagnosis of systemic sclerosis more difficult. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00393-018-0538-yDOI Listing
February 2019
14 Reads

Post-marketing surveillance of gadobutrol for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in Japan.

Jpn J Radiol 2018 Nov 19;36(11):676-685. Epub 2018 Sep 19.

Radiology, Bayer AG, Müllerstraße 178, 13353, Berlin, Germany.

Purpose: To evaluate the safety of gadobutrol for magnetic resonance imaging in a prospective, non-interventional, post-marketing surveillance in Japan.

Materials And Methods: Gadobutrol was administered in accordance with Japanese prescribing information over a 2-year enrollment period, using a standardized questionnaire to collect information. The primary outcome was the incidence of adverse reactions (ARs) following gadobutrol injection. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11604-018-0778-4
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11604-018-0778-4DOI Listing
November 2018
23 Reads

Gadolinium Retention After Contrast-Enhanced MRI.

JAMA 2018 Nov;320(18):1853-1854

Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jama.2018.13362DOI Listing
November 2018
5 Reads
35.289 Impact Factor

Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis: in a child with primary hyperoxaluria.

Clin Exp Dermatol 2019 01 9;44(1):70-72. Epub 2018 Sep 9.

Department of Pathology, Health Science University Şişli Hamidiye Etfal Training and Research Hospital, Etfal sok. Şişli, Istanbul, 34100, Turkey.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ced.13730DOI Listing
January 2019

Roles of the TGF-β⁻VEGF-C Pathway in Fibrosis-Related Lymphangiogenesis.

Int J Mol Sci 2018 Aug 23;19(9). Epub 2018 Aug 23.

Department of Medicinal Biochemistry, School of Pharmacy, Aichi Gakuin University, Nagoya 464-8650, Japan.

Lymphatic vessels drain excess tissue fluids to maintain the interstitial environment. Lymphatic capillaries develop during the progression of tissue fibrosis in various clinical and pathological situations, such as chronic kidney disease, peritoneal injury during peritoneal dialysis, tissue inflammation, and tumor progression. The role of fibrosis-related lymphangiogenesis appears to vary based on organ specificity and etiology. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms19092487DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6163754PMC
August 2018
3 Reads

Dechelation (Transmetalation): Consequences and Safety Concerns With the Linear Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents, In View of Recent Health Care Rulings by the EMA (Europe), FDA (United States), and PMDA (Japan).

Authors:
Val M Runge

Invest Radiol 2018 10;53(10):571-578

From the Department of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, Inselspital, University Hospital, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.

The issue of dechelation (transmetallation) in vivo after administration of the linear gadolinium-based contrast agents, and potential safety concerns, is considered on the basis of an extensive, focused literature review. Early indications of potential problems included the high level of excess ligand used in the formulation of 2 agents (indeed the 2 least stable thermodynamically) and interference with laboratory tests when blood was drawn from patients relatively soon after administration of these same agents. The advent of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in the late 2000s raised additional major concerns. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/RLI.0000000000000507DOI Listing
October 2018
7 Reads

Gadolinium-based contrast agents in children.

Pediatr Radiol 2018 08 4;48(9):1188-1196. Epub 2018 Aug 4.

Nemours Children's Hospital, Nemours Children's Health System, University of Central Florida College of Medicine, Orlando, FL, USA.

Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) are widely used in medical imaging, with greater than 300 million doses administered since their introduction. The risk of adverse reactions is very low, and GBCAs were thought to be very safe until the discovery of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF). Since that time, gadolinium has been found to deposit throughout the body, including the brain, where it is visible on non-contrast T1-weighted MR images in people with normal renal function. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00247-018-4165-1DOI Listing
August 2018
2 Reads
1.651 Impact Factor

Gadolinium deposition and the potential for toxicological sequelae - A literature review of issues surrounding gadolinium-based contrast agents.

Br J Clin Pharmacol 2018 Nov 17;84(11):2522-2534. Epub 2018 Aug 17.

Clinical Toxicology, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust and Faculty of Life Sciences and Medicine, King's College London, London, UK.

Every year, approximately 30 million magnetic resonance imaging scans are enhanced with gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) worldwide. Although the development of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in patients with renal impairment is well-documented, over recent years it has become apparent that exposure to GBCAs can potentially result in gadolinium deposition within human bone and brain tissue even in the presence of normal renal function. This review will address some of the controversies surrounding the safety of GBCA administration based on evidence from in vivo experiments, animal studies and clinical studies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bcp.13718DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6177715PMC
November 2018
5 Reads

Gadobutrol: A Review in Contrast-Enhanced MRI and MRA.

Authors:
Lesley J Scott

Clin Drug Investig 2018 Aug;38(8):773-784

, Springer, Private Bag 65901, Mairangi Bay, Auckland, 0754, New Zealand.

Intravenous gadobutrol [Gadovist (EU); Gadavist (USA)] is a second-generation, extracellular non-ionic macrocyclic gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA) that is approved for use in paediatric (including term neonates) and adult patients undergoing diagnostic contrast-enhanced (CE) MRI for visualization of pathological lesions in all body regions or for CE MRA to evaluate perfusion and flow-related abnormalities. Its unique physicochemical profile, including its high thermostability and proton relaxation times, means that gadobutrol is formulated at twice the gadolinium ion concentration of other GBCAs, resulting in a narrower bolus and consequently, improved dynamic image enhancement. Based on >  20 years of experience in the clinical trial and real-world settings (>  50 million doses) and its low risk for developing nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), gadobutrol represents an effective and safe diagnostic GBCA for use in CE MRI and MRA to visualize pathological lesions and vascular perfusion and flow-related abnormalities in all body regions in a broad spectrum of patients, including term neonates and other paediatric patients, young and elderly adult patients, and those with moderate or severe renal or hepatic impairment or cardiovascular (CV) disease. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40261-018-0674-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6153968PMC
August 2018
14 Reads

Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents in Kidney Disease: A Comprehensive Review and Clinical Practice Guideline Issued by the Canadian Association of Radiologists.

Can J Kidney Health Dis 2018 12;5:2054358118778573. Epub 2018 Jun 12.

Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine and Kidney Research Centre, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

Purpose Of Review: Use of gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCA) in renal impairment is controversial, with physician and patient apprehension in acute kidney injury (AKI), chronic kidney disease (CKD), and dialysis because of concerns regarding nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF). The position that GBCA are absolutely contraindicated in AKI, category G4 and G5 CKD (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] < 30 mL/min/1.73 m), and dialysis-dependent patients is outdated and may limit access to clinically necessary contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2054358118778573DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6024496PMC
June 2018
3 Reads

Synthesis of a gadolinium based-macrocyclic MRI contrast agent for effective cancer diagnosis.

Authors:
Yohan Jeong Kun Na

Biomater Res 2018 13;22:17. Epub 2018 Jun 13.

Department of Biotechnology, The Catholic University of Korea, 43 Jibong-ro, Wonmi-gu, Bucheon-si, Gyeonggi do 420-743 South Korea.

Background: Gadolinium-based contrast agents are widely used as a contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging. Since gadolinium ions are toxic, many chelators are developed to bind gadolinium ions to prevent free gadolinium-associated disease. However, many reports indicated that linear chelator-based contrast agents are associated with nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) in patients with low kidney function. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40824-018-0127-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5998550PMC
June 2018
3 Reads

Biocompatible and Biodegradable Fe-Melanoidin Chelate as a Potentially Safe Contrast Agent for Liver MRI.

Bioconjug Chem 2018 07 28;29(7):2426-2435. Epub 2018 Jun 28.

Samsung Advanced Institute for Health Sciences & Technology (SAIHST) , Sungkyunkwan University , 81 Irwon-ro , Gangnam-gu, Seoul 06351 , Republic of Korea.

Currently, most MRI probes available for clinical use contain gadolinium, which is a high-risk paramagnetic metal that can cause severe side effects (e.g., nephrogenic systemic fibrosis). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.bioconjchem.8b00331DOI Listing
July 2018
15 Reads

Gadolinium-based contrast agents induce gadolinium deposits in cerebral vessel walls, while the neuropil is not affected: an autopsy study.

Acta Neuropathol 2018 Jul 10;136(1):127-138. Epub 2018 May 10.

Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, University of Münster, Corrensstraße 30, 48149, Münster, Germany.

Recent studies showed gadolinium depositions following serial administrations of gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) for magnetic resonance imaging examinations in various parts of the brain with the dentate nucleus (DN) being most affected. Even though no clinical correlates of the deposits are known yet, an intensive debate developed if this might be harmful. The aim of the current study was to specify the gadolinium distribution in brain tissue of patients who received serial injections of GBCAs in the low-µm range and to explore any potential pathological tissue changes caused by gadolinium deposits. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00401-018-1857-4
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00401-018-1857-4DOI Listing
July 2018
18 Reads
10.762 Impact Factor

Gadolinium-Induced Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis.

Methodist Debakey Cardiovasc J 2017 Jul-Sep;13(3):172-173

HOUSTON METHODIST HOSPITAL, HOUSTON, TEXAS.

The column in this issue is supplied by Anita H. Shah, M.D. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14797/mdcj-13-3-172DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5935203PMC
August 2018
1 Read

Sources, behaviour, and environmental and human health risks of high-technology rare earth elements as emerging contaminants.

Sci Total Environ 2018 Sep 27;636:299-313. Epub 2018 Apr 27.

Marine Biology Institute, Shantou University, Shantou, Guangdong Province, China 515063.

Recent studies show that high-technology rare earth elements (REEs) of anthropogenic origin occur in the environment including in aquatic systems, suggesting REEs are contaminants of emerging concern. However, compared to organic contaminants, there is a lack of comprehensive reviews on the anthropogenic sources, environmental behaviour, and public and ecological health risks of REEs. The current review aims to: (1) identify anthropogenic sources, transfer mechanisms, and environmental behaviour of REEs; (2) highlight the human and ecological health risks of REEs and propose mitigation measures; and (3) identify knowledge gaps and future research directions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.04.235DOI Listing
September 2018

Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents in Kidney Disease: Comprehensive Review and Clinical Practice Guideline Issued by the Canadian Association of Radiologists.

Can Assoc Radiol J 2018 May;69(2):136-150

Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine and Kidney Research Centre, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

Use of gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) in renal impairment is controversial, with physician and patient apprehension in acute kidney injury (AKI), chronic kidney disease (CKD), and dialysis because of concerns regarding nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF). The position that GBCAs are absolutely contraindicated in AKI, CKD stage 4 or 5 (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] <30 mL/min/1.73 m) and dialysis-dependent patients is outdated, and may limit access to clinically necessary contrast-enhanced MRI examinations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.carj.2017.11.002DOI Listing
May 2018
4 Reads

Methodological Aspects for Preclinical Evaluation of Gadolinium Presence in Brain Tissue: Critical Appraisal and Suggestions for Harmonization-A Joint Initiative.

Invest Radiol 2018 09;53(9):499-517

Bayer AG.

Gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents (GBCAs) are pharmaceuticals that have been approved for 30 years and used daily in millions of patients worldwide. Their clinical benefits are indisputable. Recently, unexpected long-term presence of Gd in the brain has been reported by numerous retrospective clinical studies and confirmed in preclinical models particularly after linear GBCA (L-GBCA) compared with macrocyclic GBCA (M-GBCA). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/RLI.0000000000000467DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6092104PMC
September 2018
23 Reads

10 Years of Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis: A Comprehensive Analysis of Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis Reports Received by a Pharmaceutical Company from 2006 to 2016.

Invest Radiol 2018 09;53(9):541-550

Bayer AG, Radiology, Whippany, NJ.

Objectives: The aim of this study was to critically assess the evaluation and categorization process for nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) based on reports received by Bayer from 2006 to 2016.

Materials And Methods: A total of 779 NSF reports received by Bayer globally from 2006 to 2016 were included in the analysis. Arlington Medical Resources provided gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA) market share. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/RLI.0000000000000462DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6092103PMC
September 2018
7 Reads

An assessment of exposure to rare earth elements among patients receiving long-term parenteral nutrition.

J Trace Elem Med Biol 2018 May 12;47:156-163. Epub 2018 Feb 12.

Laboratory of Inorganic and Nuclear Chemistry, Division of Environmental Health Sciences, Wadsworth, Center, New York State, Department of Health, Albany, NY, 12201-0509, United States; Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, The University at Albany, State University of New York, Albany, NY, 12201-0509, United States. Electronic address:

Patients receiving long-term parenteral nutrition (PN) are exposed to potentially toxic elements, which may accumulate in bone. Bone samples collected from seven PN patients (average = 14 years) and eighteen hip/knee samples were analyzed for Al as part of a previous investigation. Yttrium was serendipitously detected in the PN bone samples, leading to the present investigation of rare earth elements (REEs). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jtemb.2018.02.013DOI Listing
May 2018
7 Reads

Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agent-Related Toxicities.

CNS Drugs 2018 03;32(3):229-240

Neuroradiology Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Via di Grottarossa 1035, 00189, Rome, Italy.

In recent years, gadolinium-based contrast agents have been associated with different types of toxicity. In particular, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, a progressive sclerotic-myxedematous systemic disease of unknown etiology, is related to gadolinium-based contrast agent administration in patients with kidney dysfunction. More recently, evidence of magnetic resonance signal intensity changes on pre-contrast T1-weighted images after multiple gadolinium-based contrast agent administrations resulted in the hypothesis of gadolinium brain accumulation in patients with normal renal function, subsequently confirmed in pathological samples. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40263-018-0500-1DOI Listing
March 2018
43 Reads

Gadolinium as a new emerging contaminant of aquatic environments.

Environ Toxicol Chem 2018 06 19;37(6):1523-1534. Epub 2018 Apr 19.

Department of Environmental Toxicology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Medical University of Gdansk, Gdansk, Poland.

Since the 1980s, gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents (GBCAs) have been routinely used in magnetic resonance imaging as stable chelates of the Gd ion, without toxic effects. Generally, GBCAs are considered some of the safest contrast agents. However, it has been observed that they can accumulate in patient tissue, bone, and probably brain (causing nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in patients with kidney failure or insufficiency and disturbance of calcium homeostasis in the organism). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/etc.4116DOI Listing
June 2018
2 Reads

Is it safe to use gadolinium-based contrast agents in MRI?

Authors:
R Pullicino K Das

J R Coll Physicians Edinb 2017 Sep;47(3):243-246

R Pullicino, Neuroradiology Department, The Walton Centre NHS, Foundation Trust, Lower Lane, Liverpool L9 7LJ, UK. Email:

Gadolinium-based contrast agents have greatly expanded the capability of magnetic resonance imaging and have been used extensively in neuroradiology over the past 30 years. When initially developed they were thought to be relatively harmless; it was later discovered they are associated with nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and should be used with caution in certain patient groups, especially those with renal failure. Lately it has been found that the use of these contrast agents may result in deposition of gadolinium in the brain even in patients with an intact blood-brain barrier. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4997/JRCPE.2017.306DOI Listing
September 2017
2 Reads

Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Myocardium in Chronic Kidney Disease.

Kidney Blood Press Res 2018 8;43(1):134-142. Epub 2018 Feb 8.

1st Department of Pediatrics, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary.

Early stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) are often underdiagnosed, while their deleterious effects on the cardiovascular (CV) system are already at work. Thus, the assessment of early CV damage is of crucial importance in preventing major CV events. Myocardial fibrosis is one of the major consequences of progressive CKD, as it may lead to reentry arrhythmias and long-term myocardial dysfunction predisposing to sudden death and/or congestive heart failure. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000487367DOI Listing
September 2018
3 Reads

Skin changes after a magnetic resonance imaging scan.

Authors:
Barian Mohidin

BMJ 2018 02 8;360:k77. Epub 2018 Feb 8.

Royal Free Hospital, London, UK

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.k77DOI Listing
February 2018
2 Reads

Scleroderma with an update about clinico-pathological correlation.

G Ital Dermatol Venereol 2018 Apr 24;153(2):208-215. Epub 2018 Jan 24.

Department of Molecular Medicine, "Sapienza" University, Rome, Italy.

Scleroderma is divided into a systemic form called systemic sclerosis and a localized form also called morphea. According to 2013 ACR/EULAR Classification Criteria for Systemic Sclerosis, developed by the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR), skin thickening of the fingers extending proximal to the metacarpophalangeal joints is sufficient for a patient to be classified as having scleroderma. Histological examination is not included in the diagnostic criteria and is not routinely performed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.23736/S0392-0488.18.05922-9DOI Listing
April 2018
8 Reads

Science to Practice: Will Gadolinium Chelates Be Replaced by Iron Chelates in MR Imaging?

Radiology 2018 02;286(2):409-411

Stefanie Spielman Professor Department of Radiology Wright Center for Innovation in Biomedical Imaging The Ohio State University Biomedical Research Tower BR 720, 460 W 12th Ave Columbus, OH 43210.

Boehm-Sturm et al ( 1 ) pose a possible paradigm shift in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging: the substitution of iron chelates for gadolinium chelates as paramagnetic contrast agents. The advent of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis challenges the wide-spread perception that gadolinium is benign, and that all gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) are identical. Long-term gadolinium retention in patients with normal renal function is now a disturbing fact. Read More

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http://pubs.rsna.org/doi/10.1148/radiol.2017172305
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1148/radiol.2017172305DOI Listing
February 2018
5 Reads