1,048 results match your criteria Neonatal Injuries in Child Abuse


The pathology and aetiology of subcortical clefts in infants.

Forensic Sci Int 2019 Mar 19;296:115-122. Epub 2019 Jan 19.

Department of Neuropathology and Ocular Pathology, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford University Hospital, Oxford, United Kingdom.

In infants, traumatic surface contusions of the brain are rare but subcortical clefts or cysts, variously labelled "contusional tears", "contusional clefts", "cortical tears" or "parenchymal lacerations" have been ascribed to trauma, and are even said to be characteristic of shaking and abuse. We describe the pathology of subcortical clefts or haemorrhages in seven infants. In none were the axonal swellings characteristic of traumatic axonal injury seen in relation to the clefts. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.forsciint.2019.01.011DOI Listing
March 2019
3 Reads

Skeletal Survey Yield in Young Children with Femur Fractures.

J Emerg Med 2018 Dec 30;55(6):758-763. Epub 2018 Oct 30.

Division of Emergency Medicine, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois.

Background: Fractures are common in children, and it can be difficult to distinguish unintentional injuries from child abuse.

Objective: We describe circumstances of injury, prevalence of suspicion for physical abuse, and use of imaging to identify additional occult fractures in young children with femur fractures.

Methods: We reviewed the medical records for children younger than 48 months old with femur fractures treated at a pediatric referral hospital (2011-2013). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jemermed.2018.09.041DOI Listing
December 2018
3 Reads

Epidemiology of subdural haemorrhage during infancy: A population-based register study.

PLoS One 2018 31;13(10):e0206340. Epub 2018 Oct 31.

Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Bergen and Department of Neurosurgery, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.

Objectives: To analyse subdural haemorrhage (SDH) during infancy in Sweden by incidence, SDH category, diagnostic distribution, age, co-morbidity, mortality, and maternal and perinatal risk factors; and its association with accidents and diagnosis of abuse.

Methods: A Swedish population-based register study comprising infants born between 1997 and 2014, 0-1 years of age, diagnosed with SDH-diagnoses according to the (International Classification of Diseases, 10th version (ICD10), retrieved from the National Patient Register and linked to the Medical Birth Register and the Death Cause Register. Outcome measures were: 1) Incidence and distribution, 2) co-morbidity, 3) fall accidents by SDH category, 4) risk factors for all SDHs in the two age groups, 0-6 and 7-365 days, and for ICD10 SDH subgroups: S06. Read More

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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0206340PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6209227PMC
April 2019
15 Reads

The added value of a second read by pediatric radiologists for outside skeletal surveys.

Pediatr Radiol 2019 02 26;49(2):203-209. Epub 2018 Oct 26.

Department of Pediatrics, Riley Hospital for Children, Section of Child Protection Programs, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA.

Background: Fractures are the second most common finding in non-accidental trauma after cutaneous signs. Interpreting skeletal surveys could be challenging as some fractures are subtle and due to anatomical variations that can mimic injuries.

Objective: To determine the effect of a second read by a pediatric radiologist of skeletal surveys for suspected non-accidental trauma initially read at referring hospitals by general radiologists. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00247-018-4276-8
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00247-018-4276-8DOI Listing
February 2019
14 Reads

Assessment of Maternal Knowledge and Confidence About Abusive Head Trauma and Coping With Infant Crying Before and After Infant Safety Education in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

J Perinat Neonatal Nurs 2018 Oct/Dec;32(4):373-381

Department of Pediatrics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee (Drs Rabbitt, Parker, and Yan and Ms Zhang); and Child Advocacy and Protection Services, Children's Hospital of Wisconsin, Milwaukee (Ms Bretl). Dr Parker is now at the Pediatric Residency Training Program at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Infants with a history of perinatal illness are at higher risk for abusive head trauma (AHT). Crying is a common trigger for physical abuse, and education on coping with infant crying is an important component of AHT prevention. This study assesses the effects of education in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) on mothers' knowledge about AHT and infant crying, self-efficacy in applying the education to infant cares and providing the education to others, and the quality of AHT and infant crying education after discharge. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00005237-201810000-0001
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JPN.0000000000000362DOI Listing
February 2019
5 Reads

Do we get the message through? Difficulties in the prevention of abusive head trauma.

Eur J Pediatr 2019 Feb 23;178(2):139-146. Epub 2018 Oct 23.

Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry/Psychotherapy, University of Ulm, Steinhövelstr. 5, 89075, Ulm, Germany.

Many programs aim to prevent abusive head trauma throughout the USA, Europe, and in many other regions of the world. Most of these programs inform mothers shortly after delivery about the dangers of abusive head trauma. Effectiveness of these programs usually is measured by the increase of knowledge on abusive head trauma. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00431-018-3273-0
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00431-018-3273-0DOI Listing
February 2019
13 Reads

Emergency Department Visits Owing to Intentional and Unintentional Traumatic Brain Injury among Infants in the United States: A Population-Based Assessment.

J Pediatr 2018 12 25;203:259-265.e1. Epub 2018 Sep 25.

Department of Emergency Medicine; Department of Pediatrics, Alpert Medical School of Brown University; Hassenfeld Child Health Innovation Institute, Brown School of Public Health; Injury Prevention Center, Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI.

Objective: To examine national trends of emergency department (ED) visits owing to traumatic brain injury (TBI) among infants (age <12 months), specifically in the context of intentional and unintentional mechanisms.

Study Design: National Electronic Injury Surveillance System-All Injury Program data documenting nonfatal ED visits from 2003 to 2012 were analyzed. TBI was defined as ED visits resulting in a diagnosis of concussion, or fracture, or internal injury of the head. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2018.08.023DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

The detection of significant fractures in suspected infant abuse.

J Forensic Leg Med 2018 Nov 5;60:9-14. Epub 2018 Sep 5.

Manchester Molecular Pathology Innovation Centre, 3rd floor Citylabs, Nelson Street, Manchester, M13 9NQ, United Kingdom. Electronic address:

Objective: Skeletal survey is a commonly used means of detecting fractures in infants, and is used as a screen in suspected cases of physical abuse. It is recognised that in live infants, a repeat survey some days after a suspected episode of injury will detect more fractures than one taken shortly after the suspected injury, indicating that the latter lacks sensitivity. In infants who die soon after a suspected episode of physical abuse, the managing clinicians do not have the option of a second survey; however there is the opportunity for the microscopic examination of bones removed at autopsy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jflm.2018.09.002DOI Listing
November 2018
9 Reads

Shaken Baby Syndrome: as a Controversy in Wrongful Conviction Cases.

Albany Law Rev 2018;81(3):1027-46

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September 2018

SDH and EDH in children up to 18 years of age-a clinical collective in the view of forensic considerations.

Int J Legal Med 2018 Nov 7;132(6):1719-1727. Epub 2018 Jul 7.

Institute of Legal Medicine, University Hospital of Cologne, Melatenguertel 60/62, 50823, Cologne, Germany.

Providing concise proof of child abuse relies heavily on clinical findings, such as certain patterns of injury or otherwise not plausibly explainable trauma. Subdural hemorrhaging has been identified as a common occurrence in abused children whereas epidural hemorrhaging is related to accidents. In order to explore this correlation, we retrospectively analyzed clinical data of children under 19 years of age diagnosed with either injury. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00414-018-1889-2DOI Listing
November 2018
20 Reads

Orofacial Injuries in Children and Adolescents (2009-2013): A 5-Year Study In Porto, Portugal.

Braz Dent J 2018 May-Jun;29(3):316-320

Dental School, Recife Campus, UPE - Universidade de Pernambuco, Recife, PE, Brazil.

The aim of this study was to verify the prevalence of acts of aggression to the head, face and neck towards victims of Physical Violence against Children and Adolescents (PVCA) who were examined at the National Institute of Legal Medicine and Forensic Sciences Delegation North (INMLCF-DN) in Porto, Portugal. A study was carried out on 2,148 complaints of physical aggression against children and adolescents (0 to less than 18 years old) occurred between 2009 and 2013 and which were retrieved from information about violence held on INMLCF-DN data files. Continuous variables were described and the association between them was verified by Chi-square or Fischer's Exact tests with 5% significance level. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/0103-6440201801830DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Consensus statement on abusive head trauma in infants and young children.

Pediatr Radiol 2018 08 23;48(8):1048-1065. Epub 2018 May 23.

Paediatric Musculoskeletal Imaging, Academic Unit of Child Health, Sheffield Children's NHS Foundation Trust, Western Bank, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK.

Abusive head trauma (AHT) is the leading cause of fatal head injuries in children younger than 2 years. A multidisciplinary team bases this diagnosis on history, physical examination, imaging and laboratory findings. Because the etiology of the injury is multifactorial (shaking, shaking and impact, impact, etc. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00247-018-4149-1DOI Listing
August 2018
64 Reads
1.651 Impact Factor

Krazy Glue in the ear: A case report of child abuse.

Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol 2018 Jun 3;109:112-114. Epub 2018 Apr 3.

Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery, BC Children's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. Electronic address:

Krazy Glue or cyanoacrylate glue is an acrylic resin that polymerizes in less than a minute when in contact with moisture or water. We present a case of a one month old referred to our tertiary pediatric otolaryngology clinic from an outside emergency department with a history of application of cyanoacrylate glue in the external ear canals. This report presents the management of this case along with the medical and legal outcomes surrounding this case of child abuse. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijporl.2018.03.039DOI Listing
June 2018
3 Reads

Infant abuse diagnosis associated with abusive head trauma criteria: incidence increase due to overdiagnosis?

Eur J Public Health 2018 08;28(4):641-646

Forensic Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.

Background: The hypothesis of this study is that the diagnosis of infant abuse is associated with criteria for shaken baby syndrome (SBS)/abusive head trauma (AHT), and that that changes in incidence of abuse diagnosis in infants may be due to increased awareness of SBS/AHT criteria.

Methods: This was a population-based register study. Setting: Register study using the Swedish Patient Register, Medical Birth Register, and Cause of Death Register. Read More

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https://academic.oup.com/eurpub/article/28/4/641/4974823
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/cky062DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6296307PMC
August 2018
7 Reads

Occult head injury is common in children with concern for physical abuse.

Pediatr Radiol 2018 08 13;48(8):1123-1129. Epub 2018 Apr 13.

University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, USA.

Background: Studies evaluating small patient cohorts have found a high, but variable, rate of occult head injury in children <2 years old with concern for physical abuse. The American College of Radiology (ACR) recommends clinicians have a low threshold to obtain neuroimaging in these patients.

Objectives: Our aim was to determine the prevalence of occult head injury in a large patient cohort with suspected physical abuse using similar selection criteria from previous studies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00247-018-4128-6DOI Listing
August 2018
4 Reads

Implications of non-accidental trauma on resource utilization and outcomes.

Pediatr Surg Int 2018 Jun 11;34(6):635-639. Epub 2018 Apr 11.

Division of Pediatric Surgery, Outpatient Care Center, Johns Hopkins All Children's Hospital, 601 5th Street South, Dept 70-6600, 3rd Floor, Saint Petersburg, FL, 33701, USA.

Purpose: The purpose was to compare the resource utilization and outcomes between patients with suspected (SUSP) and confirmed (CONF) non-accidental trauma (NAT).

Methods: The institutional trauma registry was reviewed for patients aged 0-18 years presenting from 2007 to 2012 with a diagnosis of suspicion for NAT. Patients with suspected and confirmed NAT were compared. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00383-018-4254-0DOI Listing
June 2018
2 Reads

Decreased risk adjusted 30-day mortality for hospital admitted injuries: a multi-centre longitudinal study.

Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med 2018 Apr 3;26(1):24. Epub 2018 Apr 3.

1Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linkoping University, Linkoping, Sweden.

Background: The interpretation of changes in injury-related mortality over time requires an understanding of changes in the incidence of the various types of injury, and adjustment for their severity. Our aim was to investigate changes over time in incidence of hospital admission for injuries caused by falls, traffic incidents, or assaults, and to assess the risk-adjusted short-term mortality for these patients.

Methods: All patients admitted to hospital with injuries caused by falls, traffic incidents, or assaults during the years 2001-11 in Sweden were identified from the nationwide population-based Patient Registry. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13049-018-0485-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5883358PMC

Racial and Ethnic Disparities and Bias in the Evaluation and Reporting of Abusive Head Trauma.

J Pediatr 2018 07 29;198:137-143.e1. Epub 2018 Mar 29.

Department of Pediatrics, University of Kansas School of Medicine, Wichita, KS.

Objective: To characterize racial and ethnic disparities in the evaluation and reporting of suspected abusive head trauma (AHT) across the 18 participating sites of the Pediatric Brain Injury Research Network (PediBIRN). We hypothesized that such disparities would be confirmed at multiple sites and occur more frequently in patients with a lower risk for AHT.

Study Design: Aggregate and site-specific analysis of the cross-sectional PediBIRN dataset, comparing AHT evaluation and reporting frequencies in subpopulations of white/non-Hispanic and minority race/ethnicity patients with lower vs higher risk for AHT. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2018.01.048DOI Listing
July 2018
2 Reads

Head imaging in suspected non accidental injury in the paediatric population. In the advent of volumetric CT imaging, has the skull X-ray become redundant?

Clin Radiol 2018 05 2;73(5):449-453. Epub 2018 Mar 2.

Alder Hey Children's NHS Foundation Trust, Eaton Road, Liverpool L12 2AP, UK.

Aim: To assess whether the inclusion of skull radiography, as part of the skeletal survey performed in suspected non-accidental injury (NAI), is still justified when volume computed tomography (CT) of the head has also been performed.

Materials And Methods: This was a retrospective study which included 94 patients aged between 24 days and 23 months who presented to the Emergency Department between August 2014 to July 2016 and had subsequent investigations for suspected NAI. Patients were identified from the local radiology systems (Carestream PACS and CRIS) using strict inclusion and exclusion criteria. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.crad.2017.11.027DOI Listing
May 2018
1 Read

Effectiveness of a Pediatric Abusive Head Trauma Prevention Program Among Spanish-Speaking Mothers.

Hisp Health Care Int 2018 03 20;16(1):5-10. Epub 2018 Feb 20.

1 Dell Children's Medical Center, Austin, TX, USA.

Introduction: This study aimed to evaluate participants' knowledge of and intent to share key messages of the Period of PURPLE Crying abusive head trauma prevention program among a majority Spanish-speaking population.

Methods: This study was a retrospective review of a postintervention survey administered in the perinatal unit of a community birthing hospital. Surveys were administered to mothers of newborns by perinatal nurses as part of routine process evaluation prior to hospital discharge between May 30, 2014, and May 15, 2015. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1540415318756859DOI Listing
March 2018
6 Reads

Injury and Mortality Among Children Identified as at High Risk of Maltreatment.

Pediatrics 2018 02;141(2)

Children's Data Network, Suzanne Dworak-Peck School of Social Work, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California; and.

Objectives: To determine if children identified by a predictive risk model as at "high risk" of maltreatment are also at elevated risk of injury and mortality in early childhood.

Methods: We built a model that predicted a child's risk of a substantiated finding of maltreatment by child protective services for children born in New Zealand in 2010. We assigned risk scores to the 2011 birth cohort, and flagged children as "very high risk" if they were in the top 10% of the score distribution for maltreatment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2017-2882DOI Listing
February 2018
8 Reads

A retrospective study of sexual offences in Zambia.

J Forensic Leg Med 2018 Feb 24;54:23-33. Epub 2017 Dec 24.

Division of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology, Department of Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, Anzio Road, Observatory, Cape Town, South Africa. Electronic address:

Zambia has recently reported high incidences of sexual abuse against women and children. Zambian law categorises sexual offences into rape, defilement, incest and others, with defilement constituting the majority of the reported cases (>89%). Between 2010 and 2012, convictions of defilement cases were achieved in only 13% of cases reported to the police. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jflm.2017.12.009DOI Listing
February 2018
3 Reads

Pediatric abusive head trauma in Taiwan: clinical characteristics and risk factors associated with mortality.

Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol 2018 May 4;256(5):997-1003. Epub 2018 Jan 4.

Department of Ophthalmology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, No. 5, Fu-Hsin Rd, Taoyuan, Taiwan, 33375.

Purpose: To report the clinical characteristics of abusive head trauma (AHT) in Taiwan and identify the risk factors associated with mortality of these patients.

Methods: Children with clinically diagnosed AHT from January 1, 2000, to October 31, 2015 were reviewed. The demographic data, clinical features, and associated retinal and radiologic findings were analyzed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00417-017-3863-yDOI Listing
May 2018
16 Reads

Comparison and optimization of imaging techniques in suspected physical abuse paediatric radiography.

Br J Radiol 2018 Feb 18;91(1083):20170650. Epub 2018 Jan 18.

2 Department of Medical Physics and Radiation Safety, Guy's and St Thomas' Hospitals NHS Trust , London , UK.

Objective: This study compares protocols in clinical use for paediatric suspected physical abuse (SPA) radiographic imaging across four National Health Service Trusts in the UK. The patient dose delivered from a SPA skeletal survey was compared between two sites using different imaging technology. Additionally, the technique in use for the abdomen anteroposterior (AP) radiographic projection was optimized at one of the participant sites. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1259/bjr.20170650DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5965489PMC
February 2018
6 Reads

Standardizing the Evaluation of Nonaccidental Trauma in a Large Pediatric Emergency Department.

Pediatrics 2018 01 6;141(1). Epub 2017 Dec 6.

Division of Emergency Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio.

Background And Objectives: Variability exists in the evaluation of nonaccidental trauma (NAT) in the pediatric emergency department because of misconceptions and individual bias of clinicians. Further maltreatment, injury, and death can ensue if these children are not evaluated appropriately. The implementation of guidelines for NAT evaluation has been successful in decreasing differences in care as influenced by race and ethnicity of the patient and their family. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2017-1994DOI Listing
January 2018
2 Reads

Abusive fracture incidence over three decades at a level 1 pediatric trauma center.

Child Abuse Negl 2018 02 29;76:364-371. Epub 2017 Nov 29.

Department of Pediatrics, Yale University School of Medicine, P.O. Box 208064, 333 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT, 06520-8064, USA.

Few studies have examined the incidence of abusive fractures in children. Only one study to date, from a single pediatric trauma center,has reported on the incidence of abusive fractures over time. That study showed a decrease in abusive fractures over a 24-year period. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chiabu.2017.11.008DOI Listing
February 2018
3 Reads

Cutaneous sign of abuse: Kids are not just little people.

Clin Dermatol 2017 Nov - Dec;35(6):504-511. Epub 2017 Aug 18.

Department of Pediatrics, University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Connecticut Children's Medical Center, Hartford, CT.

Skin injury is the most common form of child physical abuse. Although the pattern and visual appearance of skin injury and the treatment needed for the injury is similar in children and adults, characteristics of infant and childhood skin may complicate the diagnosis of injury. A good understanding of normal developmental presentation of accidental injury from infancy to adulthood, locations for injury that should trigger consideration of abuse, and cutaneous mimics of abuse across the lifespan are critical to the identification of suspected abuse. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2017.08.002DOI Listing
July 2018
6 Reads

Probabilistic description of infant head kinematics in abusive head trauma.

Comput Methods Biomech Biomed Engin 2017 Dec 21;20(16):1633-1642. Epub 2017 Nov 21.

a Auckland Bioengineering Institute, University of Auckland , Auckland , New Zealand.

Abusive head trauma (AHT) is a potentially fatal result of child abuse, but the mechanisms by which injury occur are often unclear. To investigate the contention that shaking alone can elicit the injuries observed, effective computational models are necessary. The aim of this study was to develop a probabilistic model describing infant head kinematics in AHT. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10255842.2017.1403593DOI Listing
December 2017
5 Reads

Skeletal surveys in young, injured children: A systematic review.

Child Abuse Negl 2018 02 15;76:237-249. Epub 2017 Nov 15.

Division of General Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, 3401 Civic Center Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA; PolicyLab, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, 2716 South Street, 10th floor, Philadelphia, PA, 19146, USA; Department of Pediatrics, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Blvd, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA; Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania, Colonial Penn Center, 3641 Locust Walk, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. Electronic address:

Skeletal surveys (SSs) have been identified as a key component of the evaluation for suspected abuse in young children, but variability in SS utilization has been reported. Thus, we aimed to describe the utilization patterns, yield, and risks of obtaining SS in young children through a systematic literature review. We searched PubMed/MEDLINE and CINAHL databases for articles published between 1990 and 2016 on SS. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chiabu.2017.11.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5771942PMC
February 2018
6 Reads

Injuries From Physical Abuse: National Survey of Children's Exposure to Violence I-III.

Am J Prev Med 2018 Jan 11;54(1):129-132. Epub 2017 Nov 11.

Crimes Against Children Research Center, Department of Sociology, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire.

Introduction: Official data sources do not provide researchers, practitioners, and policy makers with complete information on physical injury from child abuse. This analysis provides a national estimate of the percentage of children who were injured during their most recent incident of physical abuse.

Methods: Pooled data from three cross-sectional national telephone survey samples (N=13,052 children) included in the National Survey of Children's Exposure to Violence completed in 2008, 2011, and 2014 were used. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2017.08.031DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5878920PMC
January 2018
9 Reads

Child Fatalities in Dammam: A Call for Child Fatality Reviews in Arab Countries.

J Forensic Sci 2018 Jul 3;63(4):1171-1175. Epub 2017 Nov 3.

Center of Forensic and Legal Medicine, Ministry of health, Dammam, Eastern Province, P.O.Box 6668, Saudi Arabia 31176.

Identifying children's risk exposure is the first step toward mortality prevention. This retrospective study determined the causes of child fatalities in Dammam, Saudi Arabia. Death reports of children and adolescents from 1999 to 2015 (N = 157) were analyzed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1556-4029.13685DOI Listing
July 2018
2 Reads

A Retrospective Study of Cervical Spine MRI Findings in Children with Abusive Head Trauma.

Pediatr Neurosurg 2018 31;53(1):36-42. Epub 2017 Oct 31.

Division of Pediatric Neurosurgery, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.

Background/aims: Increasing attention has been given to the possible association of cervical spine (c-spine) injuries with abusive head trauma (AHT). The aims of this study were to describe c-spine MRI findings in hospitalized AHT patients.

Methods: This is a retrospective study of children under the age of 5 years with AHT admitted to hospital in 2004-2013. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000481511DOI Listing
July 2018
11 Reads

A systematic autopsy survey of human infant bridging veins.

Int J Legal Med 2018 Mar 26;132(2):449-461. Epub 2017 Oct 26.

East Midlands Forensic Pathology Unit, Robert Kilpatrick Building, Level 3 Leicester Royal Infirmary, University of Leicester, Leicester, LE2 7LX, UK.

In the first years of life, subdural haemorrhage (SDH) within the cranial cavity can occur through accidental and non-accidental mechanisms as well as from birth-related injury. This type of bleeding is the most common finding in victims of abusive head trauma (AHT). Historically, the most frequent cause of SDHs in infancy is suggested to be traumatic damage to bridging veins traversing from the brain to the dural membrane. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00414-017-1714-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5807502PMC
March 2018
4 Reads

Extensive retinal haemorrhages in a neonate.

Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed 2017 Nov 27;102(6):F557. Epub 2017 Sep 27.

Department of Neonatology, West Hertfordshire NHS Trust, Watford General Hospital, Watford, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/archdischild-2017-312966DOI Listing
November 2017
1 Read

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation-associated injuries in still-/newborns, infants and toddlers in a German forensic collective.

Forensic Sci Int 2017 Oct 12;279:235-240. Epub 2017 Sep 12.

University of Leipzig, Emergency Department, Leipzig, Germany.

Introduction: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) may lead to injuries. Forensic experts are sometimes confronted with claims that fatal injuries were caused by chest compressions during CPR rather than by assaults. We want to answer, how often CPR-associated injuries are present in younger children and if they may mimic injuries caused by abuse. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.forsciint.2017.09.007DOI Listing
October 2017
2 Reads

Measuring progress and projecting attainment on the basis of past trends of the health-related Sustainable Development Goals in 188 countries: an analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016.

Authors:

Lancet 2017 Sep 12;390(10100):1423-1459. Epub 2017 Sep 12.

Background: The UN's Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are grounded in the global ambition of "leaving no one behind". Understanding today's gains and gaps for the health-related SDGs is essential for decision makers as they aim to improve the health of populations. As part of the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2016 (GBD 2016), we measured 37 of the 50 health-related SDG indicators over the period 1990-2016 for 188 countries, and then on the basis of these past trends, we projected indicators to 2030. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(17)32336-XDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5603800PMC
September 2017
60 Reads
22 Citations
45.220 Impact Factor

Imaging and Diagnosis of Physical Child Abuse.

Radiol Technol 2017 Sep;89(1):45-65

Child abuse involves grave and disturbing acts of violence that can have lasting physical and emotional consequences for children and their families. The diagnosis of child abuse is emotionally difficult for those involved, and an error in judgment either way can have a detrimental effect on the health and safety of the child. Physicians rely on the skills of the imaging team to produce high-quality images that assist in differentiating inflicted injuries from accidental trauma. Read More

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September 2017
3 Reads

Abusive Injuries Are Worse Than Vehicular Injuries: Should We Refocus Prevention?

Pediatr Emerg Care 2018 Oct;34(10):723-728

The Safety Source-Injury Prevention, Children's Medical Center Dallas, Dallas, TX.

Objectives: The objective of this study was to compare the injury severity and outcome of motor vehicle and nonaccidental traumatic injuries and examine trends in mortality rates over time.

Methods: We reviewed data from 2005 to 2013 from a level 1 pediatric trauma center including demographics, injury severity, and outcomes. Primary outcomes of interest were mortality rates and hospital length of stay. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEC.0000000000001263DOI Listing
October 2018
33 Reads

Current review of prepubertal vaginal bleeding.

Curr Opin Obstet Gynecol 2017 Oct;29(5):322-327

aOSF Saint Francis Medical Center, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Peoria, IllinoisbMedstar Washington Hospital Center, Children's National Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia, USA.

Purpose Of Review: Prepubertal vaginal bleeding raises many concerns and evaluation and diagnosis may prove difficult for many providers. We aim to provide a comprehensive review and recent updates for those practitioners who care for these patients.

Recent Findings: Prompt management in the case of prepubertal vaginal bleeding is indicated, especially to rule out malignancy or abuse. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00001703-201710000-0000
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/GCO.0000000000000398DOI Listing
October 2017
33 Reads

[Current international recommendations for pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation: the European guidelines].

Emergencias 2017 07;29(4):266-281

Instituto Valenciano de Pediatría, Valencia, España.

Objectives: This summary of the European guidelines for pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) emphasizes the main changes and encourages health care professionals to keep their pediatric CPR knowledge and skills up to date. Basic and advanced pediatric CPR follow the same algorithm in the 2015 guidelines. The main changes affect the prevention of cardiac arrest and the use of fluids. Read More

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July 2017
23 Reads

Effect of the Earned Income Tax Credit on Hospital Admissions for Pediatric Abusive Head Trauma, 1995-2013.

Public Health Rep 2017 Jul/Aug;132(4):505-511. Epub 2017 Jun 13.

1 National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.

Objectives: Policies that increase household income, such as the earned income tax credit (EITC), have shown reductions on risk factors for child maltreatment (ie, poverty, maternal stress, depression), but evidence is lacking on whether the EITC actually reduces child maltreatment. We examined whether states' EITCs are associated with state rates of hospital admissions for abusive head trauma among children aged <2 years.

Methods: We conducted difference-in-difference analyses (ie, pre- and postdifferences in intervention vs control groups) of annual rates of states' hospital admissions attributed to abusive head trauma among children aged <2 years (ie, using aggregate data). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0033354917710905DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5507428PMC
July 2017
90 Reads

A Unique Type of Birth Trauma Mistaken for Abuse.

J Forensic Sci 2018 Mar 12;63(2):602-607. Epub 2017 Jun 12.

Department of Pathology, Western Michigan University Homer Stryker M.D. School of Medicine, 1000 Oakland Drive, Kalamazoo, MI.

Pediatric abusive head trauma is a challenging subject across many disciplines. Of particular importance is the identification of mimics of abuse, so cause and manner of death can be properly assigned. We present the case of suspected child abuse involving an infant who presented unresponsive to the hospital with hypoglycemia, hypothermia, and bilateral parietal fractures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1556-4029.13557DOI Listing
March 2018
23 Reads

The prevalence of psychiatric diagnoses and associated mortality in hospitalized US trauma patients.

J Surg Res 2017 06 23;213:171-176. Epub 2017 Feb 23.

Department of Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, California. Electronic address:

Background: We hypothesized that psychiatric diagnoses would be common in hospitalized trauma patients in the United States and when present, would be associated with worse outcomes.

Materials And Methods: The Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS, 2012) was used to determine national estimates for the number of patients admitted with an injury. Psychiatric diagnoses were identified using diagnosis codes according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jss.2017.02.014DOI Listing
June 2017
18 Reads

A Multidisciplinary Child Protection Team Improves the Care of Nonaccidental Trauma Patients.

Authors:
John M Draus

Am Surg 2017 May;83(5):477-481

We initiated a multidisciplinary Child Protection Team (CPT) as a subgroup of our pediatric multidisciplinary trauma peer review committee. Meetings are held monthly. Nonaccidental trauma (NAT) patients from the preceding month are reviewed. Read More

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May 2017
8 Reads

The association of nonaccidental trauma with historical factors, examination findings, and diagnostic testing during the initial trauma evaluation.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2017 06;82(6):1147-1157

From the Pediatric Surgery and Pediatric Trauma, Mary Bridge Children's Hospital & Health Center, Tacoma, WA (M.A.E.Jr.); Department of Pediatrics Emergency Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, CT (M.A., G.T.); Department of Surgery, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (K.F-O.); Department of Pediatrics, San Antonio Military Medical Center, Ft Sam Houston, TX; Uniformed Services University, Bethesda, MD (M.A.B.); Department of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Brown University, Providence, RI (S.J.D.); Department of Orthopaedics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (K.F.); Division of Pediatric Surgery, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (R.B.); Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (R.B.); Department of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (J.M.C.); and Institute of Primary Care Health, Cardiff University School of Medicine, Cardiff, Wales, UK (S.M.).

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000001441DOI Listing
June 2017
96 Reads

Radiologic head CT interpretation errors in pediatric abusive and non-abusive head trauma patients.

Pediatr Radiol 2017 Jul 11;47(8):942-951. Epub 2017 May 11.

Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Indiana University School of Medicine, 714 N. Senate Ave., Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA.

Background: Pediatric head trauma, including abusive head trauma, is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality.

Objective: The purpose of this research was to identify and evaluate radiologic interpretation errors of head CTs performed on abusive and non-abusive pediatric head trauma patients from a community setting referred for a secondary interpretation at a tertiary pediatric hospital.

Materials And Methods: A retrospective search identified 184 patients <5 years of age with head CT for known or potential head trauma who had a primary interpretation performed at a referring community hospital by a board-certified radiologist. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00247-017-3872-3DOI Listing
July 2017
13 Reads

ACR Appropriateness Criteria Suspected Physical Abuse-Child.

J Am Coll Radiol 2017 May;14(5S):S338-S349

Panel Chair, Emory University and Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, Georgia.

The youngest children, particularly in the first year of life, are the most vulnerable to physical abuse. Skeletal survey is the universal screening examination in children 24 months of age and younger. Fractures occur in over half of abused children. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacr.2017.01.036DOI Listing
May 2017
18 Reads

The importance of optic nerve sheath hemorrhage as a postmortem finding in cases of fatal abusive head trauma: A 13-year study in a tertiary hospital.

Forensic Sci Int 2017 Jul 19;276:5-11. Epub 2017 Apr 19.

Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand. Electronic address:

Fatal abusive head trauma is a major cause of death in children and toddlers who suffer from cruel physical abuse. Postmortem differentiation of fatal abusive head trauma from accidental head trauma can be a complicated process. This consecutive case series study aimed to determine the role of subdural optic nerve sheath hemorrhage (ONSH) in 70 autopsy cases of children ≤3 years old in making this differentiation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.forsciint.2017.04.008DOI Listing
July 2017
25 Reads

Failure and Fatigue Properties of Immature Human and Porcine Parasagittal Bridging Veins.

Ann Biomed Eng 2017 08 12;45(8):1877-1889. Epub 2017 Apr 12.

Department of Bioengineering, University of Pennsylvania, 240 Skirkanich Hall, 210 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA, 19104-6321, USA.

Tearing of the parasagittal bridging veins (BVs) is thought to be a source of extra-axial hemorrhage (EAH) associated with abusive traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) in children. However, the pediatric BV mechanical properties are unknown. We subjected porcine adult, porcine newborn, and human infant BVs to either a low rate pull to failure, a high rate pull to failure, or 30 s of cyclic loading followed by a pull to failure. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10439-017-1833-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5529232PMC
August 2017
3 Reads

Child Abuse and the Eye in an African Population.

Korean J Ophthalmol 2017 Apr 21;31(2):143-150. Epub 2017 Mar 21.

Department of Ophthalmology, LAUTECH Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, Nigeria.

Purpose: There is a paucity of data on child abuse and the eye in West Africa. Therefore, a need exists to determine the causes and circumstances surrounding these occurrences and their effects on the eye and vision in a pediatric population.

Methods: A 3-year study of consecutive cases of ocular features that presented to an eye clinic following a history suggestive of child abuse along with any associated eye injury was carried out. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3341/kjo.2017.31.2.143DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5368088PMC
April 2017
3 Reads