25 results match your criteria NeoReviews [Journal]

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Diagnosis and Management of Patent Ductus Arteriosus.

Neoreviews 2018 Jul;19(7):e394-e402

Mildred T. Stahlman Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt and Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN.

Preterm infants are at increased risk for patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Prolonged exposure to PDA may be deleterious and has been associated with neonatal morbidity and mortality. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying regulation of postnatal ductus arteriosus closure are not fully understood, clinical experience and research trials have informed recent changes in PDA management strategies and refocused treatment strategies on smaller subsets of infants who require intervention. Read More

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Case 2: Beware of Lumps and Bumps after Cooling!

Neoreviews 2017 Jul;18(7):e441-e444

Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY.

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Case 1: A term infant with apnea and stiffening.

Neoreviews 2017 Nov;18(11):e665-e667

Division of Human Genetics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center.

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November 2017
10 Reads

Importance of Fetal Arrhythmias to the Neonatologist and Pediatrician.

Neoreviews 2016 Oct;17(10):e568-e578

Department of Pediatrics, Division of Cardiology, Children's Hospital of Wisconsin- Milwaukee and Fox Valley, 9000 W Wisconsin Avenue, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226, USA.

Sudden, unexplained death during the perinatal period remains a major, longstanding challenge. Recent advances in diagnostic techniques and genetic testing has provided evidence that a significant fraction of these deaths may result from lethal cardiac arrhythmias. In this paper, we review current methods of diagnosing arrhythmia in the fetus and strategies for management of life-threatening arrhythmia throughout the perinatal period, including transitional care at the time of delivery. Read More

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October 2016
6 Reads

Case 2: Early Neonatal Seizures.

Neoreviews 2015 Nov;16(11)

Department of Pediatrics, University at Buffalo, State University of New York and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Women and Children's Hospital of Buffalo, NY.

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November 2015
12 Reads

Noninvasive Ventilation in Premature Neonates.

Adv Neonatal Care 2016 Apr;16(2):91-8

University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia.

Background: The use of noninvasive ventilation is a constantly evolving treatment option for respiratory disease in the premature infant. The goals of these noninvasive ventilation techniques are to improve gas exchange in the premature infant's lungs and to minimize the need for intubation and invasive mechanical ventilation.

Purpose: The goals of this article are to consider various uses of nasal interfaces, discuss skin care and developmental positioning concerns faced by the bedside nurse, and discuss the medical management aimed to reduce morbidity and mortality. Read More

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April 2016
5 Reads

The Role of Biomarkers and Surrogate End Points in Drug Development for Neonatal Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

Neoreviews 2016 Feb;17(2):e87-e92

Office of Pediatric Therapeutics, US Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD.

Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare disease in newborns, infants, and children. It is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, but has limited treatment options. Except for inhaled nitric oxide, which is approved for persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN), no drug is approved for the treatment of newborns, infants, and children with PAH. Read More

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February 2016
13 Reads

Persistent Pulmonary Hypertension of the Newborn.

Neoreviews 2015 Dec;16(12):e680-e692

Department of Pediatrics, Brown University, Providence, RI.

Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) is often secondary to parenchymal lung disease (such as meconium aspiration syndrome) or lung hypoplasia (with congenital diaphragmatic hernia) but can also be idiopathic. PPHN is characterized by elevated pulmonary vascular resistance, resulting in right-to-left shunting of blood and hypoxemia. The diagnosis of PPHN is based on clinical evidence of labile hypoxemia often associated with differential cyanosis and confirmed by echocardiography. Read More

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December 2015
12 Reads
6 Citations

Case 1: Infant With Intrauterine Growth Restriction, Dehydration, and Weight Loss.

Neoreviews 2015 Dec;16(12):e708-e710

Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Santa Clara Valley Medical Center, San Jose, CA. ; Division of Pediatric Hospital Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA.

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December 2015
6 Reads

Case 1: Lactic Acidosis and Respiratory Distress in a 10-Day-Old Infant.

Neoreviews 2015 Jul;16(7):e431-e433

Division of Neonatal and Developmental Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA.

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July 2015
12 Reads

Epidemiology and Clinical Research Design, Part 2: Principles.

Neoreviews 2015;16(2):e94-e108

Department of Pediatrics, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY.

This is the third article covering core knowledge in scholarly activities for neonatal physicians. In this article, we discuss various principles of epidemiology and clinical research design. A basic knowledge of these principles is necessary for conducting clinical research and for proper interpretation of studies. Read More

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January 2015
8 Reads

Epidemiology and Clinical Research Design, Part 1: Study Types.

Neoreviews 2014 Dec;15(12):e558-e569

Department of Pediatrics, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY.

Selecting the best available preventive and therapeutic measures to avoid disability and death is an important goal for all health care practitioners. To achieve this goal, we need to perform studies that determine the value of these measures. In this article, we discuss the possible study designs that can be used for evaluating new approaches to prevention and treatment. Read More

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December 2014
8 Reads

Placental Microbiome and Its Role in Preterm Birth.

Neoreviews 2014 Dec;15(12):e537-e545

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO ; Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO.

Despite the well-known fact that the placenta has long-term effects on maternal and fetal health, the placenta remains a poorly understood and understudied organ. Not only is the placenta a site of exchange of nutrients and blood and gases between the fetal and maternal systems, but it also performs critical metabolic functions for supporting fetal development and maintaining maternal-fetal tolerance. It is also abundantly clear that impairment of placental function leads to severe pregnancy complications, including preterm birth (PTB), a significant cause of perinatal mortality and morbidity worldwide. Read More

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December 2014
6 Reads

Hypoxic ischemic brain injury: Potential therapeutic interventions for the future.

Neoreviews 2014 May;15(5):e177-e186

Department of Neurology, University of Chicago 900 East 57th Street Chicago IL 60637.

Perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury is a common problem with potentially devastating impact on neurodevelopmental outcomes. While therapeutic hypothermia, the first available treatment for this disease, reduces the risk of death or major neurodevelopmental disability, the risk of major neurologic morbidity following HI remains significant. Basic research has identified cellular mechanisms that mediate neuronal death. Read More

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May 2014
5 Reads

Principles of Use of Biostatistics in Research.

Neoreviews 2014 Apr;15(4):e133-e150

Department of Pediatrics, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY.

Collecting, analyzing, and interpreting data are essential components of biomedical research and require biostatistics. Doing various statistical tests has been made easy by sophisticated computer software. It is important for the investigator and the interpreting clinician to understand the basics of biostatistics for two reasons. Read More

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April 2014
14 Reads

Neonatal Cholestasis.

Neoreviews 2013 Feb;14(2)

Fellow in Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado School of Medicine, and Digestive Health Institute, Children's Hospital Colorado, CO.

Cholestatic jaundice is a common presenting feature of neonatal hepatobiliary and metabolic dysfunction. Any infant who remains jaundiced beyond age 2 to 3 weeks should have the serum bilirubin level fractionated into a conjugated (direct) and unconjugated (indirect) portion. Conjugated hyperbilirubinemia is never physiologic or normal. Read More

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February 2013
3 Reads

Neonatal Informatics: Transforming Neonatal Care Through Translational Bioinformatics.

Neoreviews 2012 May;13(5):e281-e284

Division of Neonatal and Developmental Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA.

The future of neonatal informatics will be driven by the availability of increasingly vast amounts of clinical and genetic data. The field of translational bioinformatics is concerned with linking and learning from these data and applying new findings to clinical care to transform the data into proactive, predictive, preventive, and participatory health. As a result of advances in translational informatics, the care of neonates will become more data driven, evidence based, and personalized. Read More

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May 2012
4 Reads

Innate Immunity in the Small Intestine of the Preterm Infant.

Neoreviews 2011 Sep;12(9):e517-e526

Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN.

The gastrointestinal tract comprises the largest surface area of the human body. This area is constantly exposed to myriad antigens as well as the large number of bacteria that coexist in the intestinal lumen. To protect against this exposure and help distinguish "self " from "foreign," the intestinal tract has evolved a sophisticated barrier defense system that includes both innate and adaptive immune systems. Read More

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September 2011
8 Reads

Neonatal Informatics: Optimizing Clinical Data Entry and Display.

Neoreviews 2012 Feb;13(2):81-85

Division of Neonatal and Developmental Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA.

Displaying the vast amount of clinical data that exist in electronic medical records without causing information overload or interfering with provider thought processes is a challenge. To support the transformation of data into information and knowledge, effective electronic displays must be flexible and guide physicians' thought processes. Applying research from cognitive science and human factors engineering offers promise in improving the electronic display of clinical information. Read More

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February 2012
13 Reads
2 Citations

Neonatal Informatics: Information Technology to Support Handoffs in Neonatal Care.

Neoreviews 2011 ;2011(12)

Division of Neonatal and Developmental Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, 94305.

Communication failures during physician handoffs represent a significant source of preventable adverse events. Computerized sign-out tools linked to hospital electronic medical record systems and customized for neonatal care can facilitate standardization of the handoff process and access to clinical information, thereby improving communication and reducing adverse events. It is important to note, however, that adoption of technological tools alone is not sufficient to remedy flawed communication processes. Read More

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January 2011
17 Reads

Neonatal Informatics: Computerized Physician Order Entry.

Neoreviews 2011 ;12:393-396

Division of Neonatal and Developmental Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA.

Computerized physician order entry (CPOE) is the feature of electronic medical record (EMR) implementation that arguably offers the greatest quality and patient safety benefits. The gains are potentially greater for critically ill neonates, but the effect of CPOE on quality and safety is dependent upon local implementation decisions. OBJECTIVES: After completing this article, readers should be able to: Define the basic aspects of CPOE and clinical decision support (CDS) systems. Read More

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January 2011
5 Reads

Neonatology and the Environment: Impact of Early Exposure to Airborne Environmental Toxicants on Infant and Child Neurodevelopment.

Neoreviews 2010 ;11:363-369

Heilbrunn Department of Population and Family Health, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, NY, NY.

Environmental contaminants pose a threat to infant neurodevelopment. In this current paper, we discuss evidence for the potentially harmful impact of fetal and early childhood exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), and organophosphorus (OP) insecticides. We focus on effects resulting from chronic and low-level exposure during the prenatal period and early childhood, when the brain is still undergoing rapid developmental changes. Read More

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January 2010
7 Reads

Pathophysiology of Anemia During the Neonatal Period, Including Anemia of Prematurity.

Authors:
John A Widness

Neoreviews 2008 Nov;9(11):e520

Department of Pediatrics, Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Ia.

This review summarizes the current thinking about the causes of anemia universally experienced by preterm infants in the early postnatal weeks. In addition to describing developmentally determined physiologic processes contributing to anemia of prematurity, this review discusses clinically important nonphysiologic contributors to anemia experienced by preterm infants during the neonatal period. Chief among these and an important contributor to the need for red blood cell transfusions is the heavy laboratory phlebotomy loss sustained shortly after birth, when neonatal cardiorespiratory illness is most severe. Read More

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November 2008
7 Reads

Treatment and Prevention of Neonatal Anemia.

Authors:
John A Widness

Neoreviews 2008 Nov;9(11):526-533

Department of Pediatrics, Carver College of Medicine, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Ia.

Because red blood cell (RBC) transfusion therapy remains the primary treatment of anemia encountered in early life, the basis for RBC transfusion in the treatment of symptomatic anemia is discussed in this review along with several important aspects of neonatal blood banking practices. Nontransfusion approaches to the prevention and treatment of neonatal anemia also are described. Finally, this review covers the controversy surrounding whether neonatal RBC transfusion therapy should be restrictive or liberal. Read More

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November 2008
7 Reads

Provoking thought and discussion

Authors:
Stevenson

Pediatr Rev 1999 Aug;20(8):e27

Coeditor, NeoReviews.

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