9,618 results match your criteria Nature medicine[Journal]


Immunogenic neoantigens derived from gene fusions stimulate T cell responses.

Nat Med 2019 Apr 22. Epub 2019 Apr 22.

Human Oncology and Pathogenesis Program, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA.

Anti-tumor immunity is driven by self versus non-self discrimination. Many immunotherapeutic approaches to cancer have taken advantage of tumor neoantigens derived from somatic mutations. Here, we demonstrate that gene fusions are a source of immunogenic neoantigens that can mediate responses to immunotherapy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0434-2DOI Listing

A safe and potent anti-CD19 CAR T cell therapy.

Nat Med 2019 Apr 22. Epub 2019 Apr 22.

Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

Anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies can cause severe cytokine-release syndrome (CRS) and neurotoxicity, impeding their therapeutic application. Here we generated a new anti-CD19 CAR molecule (CD19-BBz(86)) derived from the CD19-BBz prototype bearing co-stimulatory 4-1BB and CD3ζ domains. We found that CD19-BBz(86) CAR T cells produced lower levels of cytokines, expressed higher levels of antiapoptotic molecules and proliferated more slowly than the prototype CD19-BBz CAR T cells, although they retained potent cytolytic activity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0421-7DOI Listing

Molecular profiling of cancer patients enables personalized combination therapy: the I-PREDICT study.

Nat Med 2019 Apr 22. Epub 2019 Apr 22.

Moores Cancer Center, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA.

Cancer treatments have evolved from indiscriminate cytotoxic agents to selective genome- and immune-targeted drugs that have transformed the outcomes of some malignancies. Tumor complexity and heterogeneity suggest that the 'precision medicine' paradigm of cancer therapy requires treatment to be personalized to the individual patient. To date, precision oncology trials have been based on molecular matching with predetermined monotherapies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0407-5DOI Listing

Genomic and transcriptomic profiling expands precision cancer medicine: the WINTHER trial.

Nat Med 2019 Apr 22. Epub 2019 Apr 22.

Worldwide Innovative Network (WIN) Association-WIN Consortium, Villejuif, France.

Precision medicine focuses on DNA abnormalities, but not all tumors have tractable genomic alterations. The WINTHER trial ( NCT01856296 ) navigated patients to therapy on the basis of fresh biopsy-derived DNA sequencing (arm A; 236 gene panel) or RNA expression (arm B; comparing tumor to normal). The clinical management committee (investigators from five countries) recommended therapies, prioritizing genomic matches; physicians determined the therapy given. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0424-4DOI Listing

Utility of ctDNA to support patient selection for early phase clinical trials: the TARGET study.

Nat Med 2019 Apr 22. Epub 2019 Apr 22.

Experimental Cancer Medicine Team, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK.

Next-generation sequencing (NGS) of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) supports blood-based genomic profiling but is not yet routinely implemented in the setting of a phase I trials clinic. TARGET is a molecular profiling program with the primary aim to match patients with a broad range of advanced cancers to early phase clinical trials on the basis of analysis of both somatic mutations and copy number alterations (CNA) across a 641 cancer-associated-gene panel in a single ctDNA assay. For the first 100 TARGET patients, ctDNA data showed good concordance with matched tumor and results were turned round within a clinically acceptable timeframe for Molecular Tumor Board (MTB) review. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0380-zDOI Listing

A signature of circulating inflammatory proteins and development of end-stage renal disease in diabetes.

Nat Med 2019 Apr 22. Epub 2019 Apr 22.

Research Division, Joslin Diabetes Center, Boston, MA, USA.

Chronic inflammation is postulated to be involved in the development of end-stage renal disease in diabetes, but which specific circulating inflammatory proteins contribute to this risk remain unknown. To study this, we examined 194 circulating inflammatory proteins in subjects from three independent cohorts with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. In each cohort, we identified an extremely robust kidney risk inflammatory signature (KRIS), consisting of 17 proteins enriched in tumor necrosis factor-receptor superfamily members, that was associated with a 10-year risk of end-stage renal disease. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0415-5DOI Listing

An organoid platform for ovarian cancer captures intra- and interpatient heterogeneity.

Nat Med 2019 Apr 22. Epub 2019 Apr 22.

Hubrecht Institute, Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences and UMC Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands.

Ovarian cancer (OC) is a heterogeneous disease usually diagnosed at a late stage. Experimental in vitro models that faithfully capture the hallmarks and tumor heterogeneity of OC are limited and hard to establish. We present a protocol that enables efficient derivation and long-term expansion of OC organoids. Read More

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http://www.nature.com/articles/s41591-019-0422-6
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0422-6DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

Systemic clinical tumor regressions and potentiation of PD1 blockade with in situ vaccination.

Nat Med 2019 Apr 8. Epub 2019 Apr 8.

Department of Hematology/Medical Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA.

Indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (iNHLs) are incurable with standard therapy and are poorly responsive to checkpoint blockade. Although lymphoma cells are efficiently killed by primed T cells, in vivo priming of anti-lymphoma T cells has been elusive. Here, we demonstrate that lymphoma cells can directly prime T cells, but in vivo immunity still requires cross-presentation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0410-xDOI Listing

A (delayed) history of the brain lymphatic system.

Nat Med 2019 Apr;25(4):538-540

University of Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0417-3DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Seasonal manifestations of sickle cell disease activity.

Nat Med 2019 Apr;25(4):536-537

Ruth L. and David S. Gottesman Institute for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Research and Departments of Medicine and of Cell Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0409-3DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Enlighten e-cigarettes.

Authors:

Nat Med 2019 Apr;25(4):531

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0431-5DOI Listing

Remote neonate monitoring.

Authors:
Hannah Stower

Nat Med 2019 Apr;25(4):541

Nature Medicine, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0429-zDOI Listing

Maternal infection linked to psychiatric disorders.

Authors:
Hannah Stower

Nat Med 2019 Apr;25(4):541

Nature Medicine, .

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http://www.nature.com/articles/s41591-019-0430-6
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0430-6DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

Lymph removal not tied to positive outcomes.

Authors:
Hannah Stower

Nat Med 2019 Apr;25(4):541

Nature Medicine, .

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http://www.nature.com/articles/s41591-019-0426-2
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0426-2DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

The breast milk microbiome.

Authors:
Hannah Stower

Nat Med 2019 Apr;25(4):541

Nature Medicine, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0427-1DOI Listing

Modeling kidney disease with organoids.

Authors:
Hannah Stower

Nat Med 2019 Apr;25(4):541

Nature Medicine, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0428-0DOI Listing

Charting a path from 'bench to bedside'.

Authors:
Lars Zender

Nat Med 2019 Apr;25(4):535

University Hospital Tubingen, Tubingen, Germany.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0394-6DOI Listing

Training the physician of the future.

Authors:
Colin Barras

Nat Med 2019 Apr;25(4):532-534

Colin Barras is a freelance science writer and editor, Michigan, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0354-1DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Author Correction: Patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells in cancer research and precision oncology.

Nat Med 2019 Apr 3. Epub 2019 Apr 3.

Department of Oncological Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, USA.

In the version of this article initially published, Table 1 had several errors. In the 'Immortalized cell lines column, the 'Expansion/Scalability' was listed as 'very high' and should have been 'unlimited'. In the 'Conditional reprogramming' column 'derivation time' was listed as '2-6 months' and should have been 'a few weeks', Expansion/Scalabilty was listed as 'Unknown' and should have been 'high', 'Amenability to high throughput' was listed as 'Unknown' and should have been 'moderate', 'Modeling early stage cancer and premalignancy' was listed as 'Unknown' and should have been 'Yes', 'Amenability to genetic manipulation' was listed as 'Unknown' and should have been 'possible', 'Autologous normal controls' was listed as 'Unknown' and should have been 'yes'. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0435-1DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Platelet GPIbα is a mediator and potential interventional target for NASH and subsequent liver cancer.

Nat Med 2019 Apr 1;25(4):641-655. Epub 2019 Apr 1.

Division of Chronic Inflammation and Cancer, German Cancer Research Center Heidelberg (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease ranges from steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), potentially progressing to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we show that platelet number, platelet activation and platelet aggregation are increased in NASH but not in steatosis or insulin resistance. Antiplatelet therapy (APT; aspirin/clopidogrel, ticagrelor) but not nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) treatment with sulindac prevented NASH and subsequent HCC development. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0379-5DOI Listing
April 2019
3 Reads

Metagenomic analysis of colorectal cancer datasets identifies cross-cohort microbial diagnostic signatures and a link with choline degradation.

Nat Med 2019 Apr 1;25(4):667-678. Epub 2019 Apr 1.

Department CIBIO, University of Trento, Trento, Italy.

Several studies have investigated links between the gut microbiome and colorectal cancer (CRC), but questions remain about the replicability of biomarkers across cohorts and populations. We performed a meta-analysis of five publicly available datasets and two new cohorts and validated the findings on two additional cohorts, considering in total 969 fecal metagenomes. Unlike microbiome shifts associated with gastrointestinal syndromes, the gut microbiome in CRC showed reproducibly higher richness than controls (P < 0. Read More

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http://www.nature.com/articles/s41591-019-0405-7
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0405-7DOI Listing
April 2019
12 Reads

Meta-analysis of fecal metagenomes reveals global microbial signatures that are specific for colorectal cancer.

Nat Med 2019 Apr 1;25(4):679-689. Epub 2019 Apr 1.

Structural and Computational Biology Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Heidelberg, Germany.

Association studies have linked microbiome alterations with many human diseases. However, they have not always reported consistent results, thereby necessitating cross-study comparisons. Here, a meta-analysis of eight geographically and technically diverse fecal shotgun metagenomic studies of colorectal cancer (CRC, n = 768), which was controlled for several confounders, identified a core set of 29 species significantly enriched in CRC metagenomes (false discovery rate (FDR) < 1 × 10). Read More

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http://www.nature.com/articles/s41591-019-0406-6
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0406-6DOI Listing
April 2019
17 Reads

Broadly neutralizing anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies in the clinic.

Nat Med 2019 Apr 1;25(4):547-553. Epub 2019 Apr 1.

Laboratory of Molecular Immunology, Rockefeller University, New York, NY, USA.

Combination anti-retroviral therapy (ART) has revolutionized the treatment and prevention of HIV-1 infection. Taken daily, ART prevents and suppresses the infection. However, ART interruption almost invariably leads to rebound viremia in infected individuals due to a long-lived latent reservoir of integrated proviruses. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0412-8DOI Listing
April 2019
8 Reads

A new approach for inflammatory bowel disease therapy.

Nat Med 2019 Apr;25(4):545-546

The Jill Roberts Institute for Research in Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0416-4DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Intracellular MLCK1 diversion reverses barrier loss to restore mucosal homeostasis.

Nat Med 2019 Apr 1;25(4):690-700. Epub 2019 Apr 1.

Department of Pathology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.

Epithelial barrier loss is a driver of intestinal and systemic diseases. Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) is a key effector of barrier dysfunction and a potential therapeutic target, but enzymatic inhibition has unacceptable toxicity. Here, we show that a unique domain within the MLCK splice variant MLCK1 directs perijunctional actomyosin ring (PAMR) recruitment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0393-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6461392PMC
April 2019
1 Read
27.363 Impact Factor

Publisher Correction: Spreading the search.

Authors:
Brianna Abbott

Nat Med 2019 Apr 1. Epub 2019 Apr 1.

Brianna Abbott is a science and health reporter based in New York and a former intern at Nature Medicine, New York, USA.

In the version of this article initially published, the affiliation of Dr. Sandra Geurts reads "Sandra Geurts, an epidemiologist at Radbound University in Nijmegen." Radbound University is her previous affiliation, and the sentence should have been, "Sandra Geurts, an epidemiologist at Maastricht University Medical Center+ in the Netherlands. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0438-yDOI Listing

A fresh look at adult neurogenesis.

Nat Med 2019 Apr;25(4):542-543

Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0408-4DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Divergent effects of lipids on stroke.

Nat Med 2019 Apr;25(4):543-544

Department of Neurology, Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0413-7DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Distinct phenotype of CD4 T cells driving celiac disease identified in multiple autoimmune conditions.

Nat Med 2019 Mar 25. Epub 2019 Mar 25.

Institute for Immunity, Transplantation and Infection, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA.

Combining HLA-DQ-gluten tetramers with mass cytometry and RNA sequencing analysis, we find that gluten-specific CD4 T cells in the blood and intestines of patients with celiac disease display a surprisingly rare phenotype. Cells with this phenotype are also elevated in patients with systemic sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus, suggesting a way to characterize CD4 T cells specific for disease-driving antigens in multiple autoimmune conditions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0403-9DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Highly efficient therapeutic gene editing of human hematopoietic stem cells.

Nat Med 2019 Mar 25. Epub 2019 Mar 25.

Division of Hematology/Oncology, Boston Children's Hospital , Boston, MA, USA.

Re-expression of the paralogous γ-globin genes (HBG1/2) could be a universal strategy to ameliorate the severe β-globin disorders sickle cell disease (SCD) and β-thalassemia by induction of fetal hemoglobin (HbF, αγ). Previously, we and others have shown that core sequences at the BCL11A erythroid enhancer are required for repression of HbF in adult-stage erythroid cells but are dispensable in non-erythroid cells. CRISPR-Cas9-mediated gene modification has demonstrated variable efficiency, specificity, and persistence in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0401-yDOI Listing
March 2019
3 Reads
27.363 Impact Factor

Immune signature drives leukemia escape and relapse after hematopoietic cell transplantation.

Nat Med 2019 Apr 25;25(4):603-611. Epub 2019 Mar 25.

Unit of Immunogenetics, Leukemia Genomics and Immunobiology, Division of Immunology, Transplantation and Infectious Disease, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano, Italy.

Transplantation of hematopoietic cells from a healthy individual (allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT)) demonstrates that adoptive immunotherapy can cure blood cancers: still, post-transplantation relapses remain frequent. To explain their drivers, we analyzed the genomic and gene expression profiles of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) blasts purified from patients at serial time-points during their disease history. We identified a transcriptional signature specific for post-transplantation relapses and highly enriched in immune-related processes, including T cell costimulation and antigen presentation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0400-zDOI Listing
April 2019
3 Reads

Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is abundant in neurologically healthy subjects and drops sharply in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

Nat Med 2019 Apr 25;25(4):554-560. Epub 2019 Mar 25.

Department of Molecular Neuropathology, Centro de Biología Molecular 'Severo Ochoa', CBMSO, CSIC-UAM, Madrid, Spain.

The hippocampus is one of the most affected areas in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Moreover, this structure hosts one of the most unique phenomena of the adult mammalian brain, namely, the addition of new neurons throughout life. This process, called adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN), confers an unparalleled degree of plasticity to the entire hippocampal circuitry. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0375-9DOI Listing

Author Correction: Adrenergic nerve degeneration in bone marrow drives aging of the hematopoietic stem cell niche.

Nat Med 2019 Apr;25(4):701

Ruth L. and David S. Gottesman Institute for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Research, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, NY, USA.

In the version of this article originally published, the key for Fig. 4c was incorrect. The symbols for 'Sham' and 'Den' were reversed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0425-3DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

The repertoire of maternal anti-viral antibodies in human newborns.

Nat Med 2019 Apr 18;25(4):591-596. Epub 2019 Mar 18.

Science for Life Laboratory, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

All circulating immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies in human newborns are of maternal origin and transferred across the placenta to provide passive immunity until newborn IgG production takes over 15 weeks after birth. However, maternal IgG can also negatively interfere with newborn vaccine responses. The concentration of IgG increases sharply during the third trimester of gestation and children delivered extremely preterm are believed to largely lack this passive immunity. Read More

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http://www.nature.com/articles/s41591-019-0392-8
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0392-8DOI Listing
April 2019
13 Reads
27.363 Impact Factor

Causal associations of blood lipids with risk of ischemic stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage in Chinese adults.

Nat Med 2019 Apr 11;25(4):569-574. Epub 2019 Mar 11.

Clinical Trial Service Unit and Epidemiological Studies Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.

Stroke is the second leading cause of death worldwide and accounts for >2 million deaths annually in China. Ischemic stroke (IS) and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) account for an equal number of deaths in China, despite a fourfold greater incidence of IS. Stroke incidence and ICH proportion are higher in China than in Western populations, despite having a lower mean low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) concentration. Read More

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http://www.nature.com/articles/s41591-019-0366-x
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0366-xDOI Listing
April 2019
34 Reads

Altered neuronal migratory trajectories in human cerebral organoids derived from individuals with neuronal heterotopia.

Nat Med 2019 Apr 11;25(4):561-568. Epub 2019 Mar 11.

Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Munich, Germany.

Malformations of the human cortex represent a major cause of disability. Mouse models with mutations in known causal genes only partially recapitulate the phenotypes and are therefore not unlimitedly suited for understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for these conditions. Here we study periventricular heterotopia (PH) by analyzing cerebral organoids derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) of patients with mutations in the cadherin receptor-ligand pair DCHS1 and FAT4 or from isogenic knockout (KO) lines. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0371-0DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Publisher Correction: Microbial network disturbances in relapsing refractory Crohn's disease.

Nat Med 2019 Apr;25(4):701

Maurice Müller Laboratories, Department for Biomedical Research, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.

Owing to an error during typesetting, a number of references were deleted from the Methods reference list. This altered all of the references in the Methods section and some of the references in Extended Data Fig. 5, making them inaccurate. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0411-9DOI Listing
April 2019
4 Reads

The microbiome, cancer, and cancer therapy.

Nat Med 2019 Mar 6;25(3):377-388. Epub 2019 Mar 6.

Department of Surgical Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA.

With the advent of next-generation sequencing, we have an unprecedented ability to study tumor and host genomes as well as those of the vast array of microorganisms that exist within living organisms. Evidence now suggests that these microbes may confer susceptibility to certain cancers and may also influence response to therapeutics. A prime example of this is seen with immunotherapy, for which gut microbes have been implicated in influencing therapeutic responses in preclinical models and patient cohorts. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0377-7DOI Listing

Dysregulation of a long noncoding RNA reduces leptin leading to a leptin-responsive form of obesity.

Nat Med 2019 Mar 6;25(3):507-516. Epub 2019 Mar 6.

Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY, USA.

Quantitative changes in leptin concentration lead to alterations in food intake and body weight, but the regulatory mechanisms that control leptin gene expression are poorly understood. Here we report that fat-specific and quantitative leptin expression is controlled by redundant cis elements and trans factors interacting with the proximal promoter together with a long noncoding RNA (lncOb). Diet-induced obese mice lacking lncOb show increased fat mass with reduced plasma leptin levels and lose weight after leptin treatment, whereas control mice do not. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0370-1DOI Listing
March 2019
3 Reads
27.363 Impact Factor

Genomic correlates of response to immune checkpoint blockade.

Nat Med 2019 Mar 6;25(3):389-402. Epub 2019 Mar 6.

Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA.

Despite impressive durable responses, immune checkpoint inhibitors do not provide a long-term benefit to the majority of patients with cancer. Understanding genomic correlates of response and resistance to checkpoint blockade may enhance benefits for patients with cancer by elucidating biomarkers for patient stratification and resistance mechanisms for therapeutic targeting. Here we review emerging genomic markers of checkpoint blockade response, including those related to neoantigens, antigen presentation, DNA repair, and oncogenic pathways. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0382-xDOI Listing

Targeting epigenetic modifications in cancer therapy: erasing the roadmap to cancer.

Nat Med 2019 Mar 6;25(3):403-418. Epub 2019 Mar 6.

Epigenetics Department, Oncology, GlaxoSmithKline, Collegeville, PA, USA.

Epigenetic dysregulation is a common feature of most cancers, often occurring directly through alteration of epigenetic machinery. Over the last several years, a new generation of drugs directed at epigenetic modulators have entered clinical development, and results from these trials are now being disclosed. Unlike first-generation epigenetic therapies, these new agents are selective, and many are targeted to proteins which are mutated or translocated in cancer. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0376-8DOI Listing
March 2019
3 Reads

A clinically meaningful metric of immune age derived from high-dimensional longitudinal monitoring.

Nat Med 2019 Mar 6;25(3):487-495. Epub 2019 Mar 6.

Faculty of Medicine, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel.

Immune responses generally decline with age. However, the dynamics of this process at the individual level have not been characterized, hindering quantification of an individual's immune age. Here, we use multiple 'omics' technologies to capture population- and individual-level changes in the human immune system of 135 healthy adult individuals of different ages sampled longitudinally over a nine-year period. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0381-yDOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Developmental origins and emerging therapeutic opportunities for childhood cancer.

Nat Med 2019 Mar 6;25(3):367-376. Epub 2019 Mar 6.

Department of Neurology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA.

Cancer is the leading disease-related cause of death in children in developed countries. Arising in the context of actively growing tissues, childhood cancers are fundamentally diseases of dysregulated development. Childhood cancers exhibit a lower overall mutational burden than adult cancers, and recent sequencing studies have revealed that the genomic events central to childhood oncogenesis include mutations resulting in broad epigenetic changes or translocations that result in fusion oncoproteins. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0383-9DOI Listing

Think globally about cancer.

Authors:

Nat Med 2019 Mar;25(3):351

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0402-xDOI Listing

Immunoprofiling comes of age.

Nat Med 2019 Mar;25(3):362-364

Broad Institute of Massachusetts Institute and Technology and Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0387-5DOI Listing

Molecular responses to immune checkpoint blockade in glioblastoma.

Nat Med 2019 Mar;25(3):359-361

Harvey Cushing Neuro-oncology Laboratories, Department of Neurosurgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0385-7DOI Listing

Direct-to-stomach delivery.

Authors:
Hannah Stower

Nat Med 2019 Mar;25(3):358

Nature Medicine, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0397-3DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Depression linked to the microbiome.

Authors:
Hannah Stower

Nat Med 2019 Mar;25(3):358

Nature Medicine, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0396-4DOI Listing